Reading Between The Lines

Episodes

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01Easy as ABC?20120522

Michael Morpurgo explores how the seminal experience of learning to read has changed over the last 70 years.

In June 2012, all Year One children in English primary schools will sit a compulsory new Phonics Screening Check.

Meanwhile, authoritative studies show British ten year olds performing less well and expressing less enthusiasm for reading than many of their international peers.

Michael Morpurgo - hugely popular children's author, former Children's Laureate and passionate advocate for children's reading - explores how the experience of learning to read has changed since the 1944 Butler Education Act. Michael's starting point is a passionate interest in the subject, forged over decades as a father, grandfather, teacher and writer.

1. Easy as ABC?

In the first of two programmes, Michael finds out just what Systematic Synthetic Phonics are and why some, not least Nick Gibb, the Minister for Schools in the Coalition Government, are so keen on them - while others, in the educational establishment and the world of children's books, are less enthusiastic.

He talks to the Minister, and to phonics expert Ruth Miskin, and hears from writers Philip Pullman, Michael Rosen and Julia Donaldson. He visits a primary school in South London, rated 'Outstanding' by Ofsted, which has embraced the new system, and talks with pupils and teachers.

Ultimately, Michael Morpurgo tries to square the circle between getting children reading and getting them to love reading - not only because this is a widely recognised prerequisite for success in secondary education, but also because of the pleasure and fulfillment it brings children everywhere.

Producer : Beaty Rubens.

01Easy as ABC?2012052220120527

Michael Morpurgo explores how the seminal experience of learning to read has changed over the last 70 years.

In June 2012, all Year One children in English primary schools will sit a compulsory new Phonics Screening Check.

Meanwhile, authoritative studies show British ten year olds performing less well and expressing less enthusiasm for reading than many of their international peers.

Michael Morpurgo - hugely popular children's author, former Children's Laureate and passionate advocate for children's reading - explores how the experience of learning to read has changed since the 1944 Butler Education Act. Michael's starting point is a passionate interest in the subject, forged over decades as a father, grandfather, teacher and writer.

1. Easy as ABC?

In the first of two programmes, Michael finds out just what Systematic Synthetic Phonics are and why some, not least Nick Gibb, the Minister for Schools in the Coalition Government, are so keen on them - while others, in the educational establishment and the world of children's books, are less enthusiastic.

He talks to the Minister, and to phonics expert Ruth Miskin, and hears from writers Philip Pullman, Michael Rosen and Julia Donaldson. He visits a primary school in South London, rated 'Outstanding' by Ofsted, which has embraced the new system, and talks with pupils and teachers.

Ultimately, Michael Morpurgo tries to square the circle between getting children reading and getting them to love reading - not only because this is a widely recognised prerequisite for success in secondary education, but also because of the pleasure and fulfilment it brings children everywhere.

Producer : Beaty Rubens.

01Easy As Abc?2012052220120527

Michael Morpurgo explores how the seminal experience of learning to read has changed over the last 70 years.

In June 2012, all Year One children in English primary schools will sit a compulsory new "Phonics Screening Check".

Meanwhile, authoritative studies show British ten year olds performing less well and expressing less enthusiasm for reading than many of their international peers.

Michael Morpurgo - hugely popular children's author, former Children's Laureate and passionate advocate for children's reading - explores how the experience of learning to read has changed since the 1944 Butler Education Act. Michael's starting point is a passionate interest in the subject, forged over decades as a father, grandfather, teacher and writer.

1. Easy as ABC?

In the first of two programmes, Michael finds out just what Systematic Synthetic Phonics are and why some, not least Nick Gibb, the Minister for Schools in the Coalition Government, are so keen on them - while others, in the educational establishment and the world of children's books, are less enthusiastic.

He talks to the Minister, and to phonics expert Ruth Miskin, and hears from writers Philip Pullman, Michael Rosen and Julia Donaldson. He visits a primary school in South London, rated 'Outstanding' by Ofsted, which has embraced the new system, and talks with pupils and teachers.

Ultimately, Michael Morpurgo tries to square the circle between getting children reading and getting them to love reading - not only because this is a widely recognised prerequisite for success in secondary education, but also because of the pleasure and fulfilment it brings children everywhere.

Producer : Beaty Rubens.

Ultimately, Michael Morpurgo tries to square the circle between getting children reading and getting them to love reading - not only because this is a widely recognised prerequisite for success in secondary education, but also because of the pleasure and fulfillment it brings children everywhere.

01Easy As Abc?2012052220120527

Michael Morpurgo explores how the seminal experience of learning to read has changed over the last 70 years.

In June 2012, all Year One children in English primary schools will sit a compulsory new Phonics Screening Check.

Meanwhile, authoritative studies show British ten year olds performing less well and expressing less enthusiasm for reading than many of their international peers.

Michael Morpurgo - hugely popular children's author, former Children's Laureate and passionate advocate for children's reading - explores how the experience of learning to read has changed since the 1944 Butler Education Act. Michael's starting point is a passionate interest in the subject, forged over decades as a father, grandfather, teacher and writer.

1. Easy as ABC?

In the first of two programmes, Michael finds out just what Systematic Synthetic Phonics are and why some, not least Nick Gibb, the Minister for Schools in the Coalition Government, are so keen on them - while others, in the educational establishment and the world of children's books, are less enthusiastic.

He talks to the Minister, and to phonics expert Ruth Miskin, and hears from writers Philip Pullman, Michael Rosen and Julia Donaldson. He visits a primary school in South London, rated 'Outstanding' by Ofsted, which has embraced the new system, and talks with pupils and teachers.

Ultimately, Michael Morpurgo tries to square the circle between getting children reading and getting them to love reading - not only because this is a widely recognised prerequisite for success in secondary education, but also because of the pleasure and fulfilment it brings children everywhere.

Producer : Beaty Rubens.

Ultimately, Michael Morpurgo tries to square the circle between getting children reading and getting them to love reading - not only because this is a widely recognised prerequisite for success in secondary education, but also because of the pleasure and fulfillment it brings children everywhere.

02 LASTBeyond the Reading Wars20120529

Michael Morpurgo - former Children's Laureate, writer, father, grandfather and ardent advocate for children's reading - explores how the seminal experience of learning to read has changed over the last 70 years. It is a subject close to his heart and one which he approaches with his customary curiosity and passionate engagement.

In June 2012, all Year One children in English primary schools will sit a compulsory new 'Phonics Screening Check'.

Meanwhile, authoritative studies show British ten year olds performing less well and expressing less enthusiasm for reading than many of their international peers.

In the first programme, Michael tried to square the circle between getting children reading and getting them to love reading.

2.Beyond the Reading Wars

In this second programme, Michael Morpurgo explores how the contemporary debate has been informed by teaching methods of the recent past- and is, in some ways, a reaction to them.

He hears from the influential teacher and author, Margaret Meek, now in her eighties, about her belief in letting children learn to read from real books, and he challenges Julia Eccleshare, Children's Books Editor of The Guardian newspaper, on whether this method really worked for her own children.

He explores why learning to read has traditionally been a weather vane for wider classroom philosophies with the help of fellow children's author Michael Rosen.

Finally, he hears from the distinguished Cambridge neuroscientist, Usha Goswami, about how her research on dyslexia might help us understand what goes on in children's minds when they learn to read - and might even bring an end to the so-called 'Reading Wars'.

Producer : Beaty Rubens.

02 LASTBeyond the Reading Wars2012052920120529 (R4)

Michael Morpurgo - former Children's Laureate, writer, father, grandfather and ardent advocate for children's reading - explores how the seminal experience of learning to read has changed over the last 70 years. It is a subject close to his heart and one which he approaches with his customary curiosity and passionate engagement.

In June 2012, all Year One children in English primary schools will sit a compulsory new 'Phonics Screening Check'.

Meanwhile, authoritative studies show British ten year olds performing less well and expressing less enthusiasm for reading than many of their international peers.

In the first programme, Michael tried to square the circle between getting children reading and getting them to love reading.

2.Beyond the Reading Wars

In this second programme, Michael Morpurgo explores how the contemporary debate has been informed by teaching methods of the recent past- and is, in some ways, a reaction to them.

He hears from the influential teacher and author, Margaret Meek, now in her eighties, about her belief in letting children learn to read from real books, and he challenges Julia Eccleshare, Children's Books Editor of The Guardian newspaper, on whether this method really worked for her own children.

He explores why learning to read has traditionally been a weather vane for wider classroom philosophies with the help of fellow children's author Michael Rosen.

Finally, he hears from the distinguished Cambridge neuroscientist, Usha Goswami, about how her research on dyslexia might help us understand what goes on in children's minds when they learn to read - and might even bring an end to the so-called 'Reading Wars'.

Producer : Beaty Rubens.

02 LASTBeyond the Reading Wars2012052920120603

Michael Morpurgo - former Children's Laureate, writer, father, grandfather and ardent advocate for children's reading - explores how the seminal experience of learning to read has changed over the last 70 years. It is a subject close to his heart and one which he approaches with his customary curiosity and passionate engagement.

In June 2012, all Year One children in English primary schools will sit a compulsory new 'Phonics Screening Check'.

Meanwhile, authoritative studies show British ten year olds performing less well and expressing less enthusiasm for reading than many of their international peers.

In the first programme, Michael tried to square the circle between getting children reading and getting them to love reading.

2.Beyond the Reading Wars

In this second programme, Michael Morpurgo explores how the contemporary debate has been informed by teaching methods of the recent past- and is, in some ways, a reaction to them.

He hears from the influential teacher and author, Margaret Meek, now in her eighties, about her belief in letting children learn to read from real books, and he challenges Julia Eccleshare, Children's Books Editor of The Guardian newspaper, on whether this method really worked for her own children.

He explores why learning to read has traditionally been a weather vane for wider classroom philosophies with the help of fellow children's author Michael Rosen.

Finally, he hears from the distinguished Cambridge neuroscientist, Usha Goswami, about how her research on dyslexia might help us understand what goes on in children's minds when they learn to read - and might even bring an end to the so-called 'Reading Wars'.

Producer : Beaty Rubens.

02 LASTBeyond the Reading Wars2012052920120603
20120529 (R4)
20120603 (R4)

Michael Morpurgo - former Children's Laureate, writer, father, grandfather and ardent advocate for children's reading - explores how the seminal experience of learning to read has changed over the last 70 years. It is a subject close to his heart and one which he approaches with his customary curiosity and passionate engagement.

In June 2012, all Year One children in English primary schools will sit a compulsory new 'Phonics Screening Check'.

Meanwhile, authoritative studies show British ten year olds performing less well and expressing less enthusiasm for reading than many of their international peers.

In the first programme, Michael tried to square the circle between getting children reading and getting them to love reading.

2.Beyond the Reading Wars

In this second programme, Michael Morpurgo explores how the contemporary debate has been informed by teaching methods of the recent past- and is, in some ways, a reaction to them.

He hears from the influential teacher and author, Margaret Meek, now in her eighties, about her belief in letting children learn to read from real books, and he challenges Julia Eccleshare, Children's Books Editor of The Guardian newspaper, on whether this method really worked for her own children.

He explores why learning to read has traditionally been a weather vane for wider classroom philosophies with the help of fellow children's author Michael Rosen.

Finally, he hears from the distinguished Cambridge neuroscientist, Usha Goswami, about how her research on dyslexia might help us understand what goes on in children's minds when they learn to read - and might even bring an end to the so-called 'Reading Wars'.

Producer : Beaty Rubens.

02 LASTBeyond The Reading Wars2012052920120603
20120529 (R4)
20120603 (R4)

Michael Morpurgo - former Children's Laureate, writer, father, grandfather and ardent advocate for children's reading - explores how the seminal experience of learning to read has changed over the last 70 years. It is a subject close to his heart and one which he approaches with his customary curiosity and passionate engagement.

In June 2012, all Year One children in English primary schools will sit a compulsory new 'Phonics Screening Check'.

Meanwhile, authoritative studies show British ten year olds performing less well and expressing less enthusiasm for reading than many of their international peers.

In the first programme, Michael tried to square the circle between getting children reading and getting them to love reading.

2.Beyond the Reading Wars

In this second programme, Michael Morpurgo explores how the contemporary debate has been informed by teaching methods of the recent past- and is, in some ways, a reaction to them.

He hears from the influential teacher and author, Margaret Meek, now in her eighties, about her belief in letting children learn to read from real books, and he challenges Julia Eccleshare, Children's Books Editor of The Guardian newspaper, on whether this method really worked for her own children.

He explores why learning to read has traditionally been a weather vane for wider classroom philosophies with the help of fellow children's author Michael Rosen.

Finally, he hears from the distinguished Cambridge neuroscientist, Usha Goswami, about how her research on dyslexia might help us understand what goes on in children's minds when they learn to read - and might even bring an end to the so-called 'Reading Wars'.

Producer : Beaty Rubens.

Michael Morpurgo how the contemporary debate has been informed by past teaching methods.

02 LASTBeyond the Reading Wars2012052920120603
20120529 (R4)
20120603 (R4)

Michael Morpurgo how the contemporary debate has been informed by past teaching methods.