Radio 2's Bob Marley Season

Episodes

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Bob Marley In Exile2011050920120726

Marcia Griffiths looks at Bob Marley's creative period of exile in London, when he recorded the unforgettable Exodus album.

Having made her name with the international 1970 hit Young Gifted and Black, Marcia went on to join the I-Threes, backing the Wailers on tour and on countless classic records. She brings a unique insight to the reggae star's relationship with the UK, which started with Marley's early 1970s visits to record and perform with the Wailers.

The documentary then focuses on 1977, when Marley responded to the shock of an attempt on his life by leaving Jamaica and making London his home for the whole of that memorable year.

In this richly creative, culturally crucial period for Marley, he lived at various London addresses, hanging out with fellow musicians and kindred spirits. He played his beloved football in Hyde Park and other green spaces across the capital; stood as a healing shaman in a city reeling from the 1976 Notting Hill Carnival riots; helped forge the lifelong bond between reggae and punk; and recorded the unforgettable Exodus album, predominantly at Island Records' Basing Street Studios in west London.

The programme features all-new interviews with the musicians, DJs, print and photo journalists and label people who knew, worked and played with Bob during those days; soundtracked by the great music he made and performed as an honorary Brit.

Contributors include reggae DJ David Rodigan; filmmaker, musician and 6 Music presenter Don Letts; former Island staffer John Knowles and music journalist John Shearlaw who share vivid memories of playing 5-a-side football with Bob.

Levi Roots speaks of the Bob he knew in London. And Vivien Goldman - Bob's press officer and confidante - explains why he came to the UK and how his stay influenced the sound of Exodus.

The documentary also examines why Marley eventually quit London to return to Jamaica, the legacy he left behind and what happened on subsequent visits to the UK, as his global status grew to that of a prophet.

Music includes much-loved Marley hits of the era as well as live tracks. The documentary first broadcast on Radio 2 in May 2011, to mark the 30th anniversary of Bob Marley's death. It is repeated ahead of a month-long season of programming on 6 Music to mark the 50th anniversary of Jamaican independence.

Marcia Griffiths explores reggae star Bob Marley's relationship with the UK.

The first of two Radio 2 documentaries marking the 30th anniversary of the death of Bob Marley, who succumbed to cancer on 11 May 1981, at the age of 36.

Bob Marley In Exile is presented by Marcia Griffiths, who made her name with the international 1970 hit Young Gifted and Black (with Bob Andy).

She went on to join the I-Threes, with Judy Mowatt and Marley's wife Rita, backing the Wailers on tour and on countless classic records for seven years, before embarking on a solo career.

Griffiths brings a unique insight to the story of the reggae star's relationship with the UK, which started with Marley's early 1970s visits to record and perform with the Wailers, forging a unique relationship with an ever-expanding British fan base.

In this richly creative, culturally crucial period for Marley, he lived at various London addresses, hanging out with fellow musicians and kindred spirits.

He played his beloved football in Hyde Park and other green spaces across the capital; stood as a healing shaman between rival cultures in a city reeling from the 1976 Notting Hill Carnival riots; helped forge the lifelong bond between reggae and punk, inspiring the Clash, the Slits, John Lydon and other new wavers; and recorded the unforgettable Exodus album, predominantly at Island Records' Basing Street Studios in west London.

Reggae DJ David Rodigan recalls seeing the Wailers in the humble environs of the Greyhound pub in Fulham Palace Road, during their first UK tour in 1973.

Filmmaker, musician and 6 Music presenter Don Letts talks about following Marley's entourage to their hotel after the famous Lyceum gig that helped break the UK in 1975, and hanging out with Bob when he lived near the King's Road.

Former Island staffer John Knowles and music journalist John Shearlaw share vivid memories of playing 5-a-side football with Bob, when the Wailers took on record labels, music papers and all comers.

And photographer Dennis Morris reveals how, as a teenager, he got Marley's picture onto the cover of Time Out magazine, and became one of the first to hear Redemption Song.

Levi Roots - now the entrepreneur behind Reggae Reggae Sauce but then part of the 1970s soundsystem that played upfront Wailers dub plates - speaks of the Bob he knew in London.

And Vivien Goldman - Bob's press officer and then friend and confidante - explains why he came to the UK and how his stay influenced the sound of Exodus.

Music includes much-loved Marley hits of the era as well as tracks from the live album recorded at the Lyceum; Exodus album cuts such as The Heathen; excerpts from Babylon By Bus (the live recording from the band's 1978 European tour); and the reggae-meets-new-wave anthem Punky Reggae Party.

Radio 2's Bob Marley Season continues on Wednesday at 10pm, with personal memories from friends and colleagues including Island Records' Chris Blackwell, in Knowing Bob Marley.

Knowing Bob Marley2011051120120521

To mark the anniversary of Bob Marley's death, five of his closest friends and colleagues share their personal experiences of the man they knew.

Knowing Bob Marley features intimate and revealing interviews that provide a revealing insight into the experiences that shaped the man who became the third world's first superstar.

Recorded exclusively for this programme Island Records founder Chris Blackwell, former girlfriend Esther Anderson, lawyer Diane Jobson, backing singer Marcia Griffith and Wailers guitarist Junior Marvin - all tell their story of the Bob Marley they knew best.

The programme reveals how the Jamaica he grew up in, with high unemployment, plus race and class divides, shaped him. We chart his musical rise from follower of trends such as the Rude Boy movement, to a reluctant leader of fellow musicians as he spread his reggae rhythm and message across the world.

Those close to Bob also reveal the circumstances of his death, which started with a toe injury during a game of football and resulted in his passing at the age of 36, just four years later.

Bob Marley was born in 1945 to a white father and black mother, at a time of racial division in Jamaica. Bob lacked parental guidance as he grew up in Nine Mile, a rural part of St Ann's before moving to the Trench Town suburb of Kingston in his early teens. In the 60s, he found music during a decade where opportunities were limited. With his friends Peter Tosh and Bunny Livingston, Bob created hype around Jamaica as The Wailers, and in 1973 were signed to Island Records as Bob Marley and The Wailers. Over the next eight years Bob became an international superstar before his untimely death on 11th May 1981.

To mark the 30th anniversary of Bob Marley's death, five of his closest friends and colleagues share personal experiences of the man they knew.

Paul Sexton presents new interviews that provide a real insight into the man who became the "third world's first superstar".

Island Records' founder Chris Blackwell; former girlfriend Esther Anderson; lawyer Diane Jobson; backing singer Marcia Griffith; and Wailers guitarist Junior Marvin; all talk about the Bob Marley they knew best.

Bob Marley was born in 1945 to a white father and black mother, at a time of racial division in Jamaica.

He grew up in Nine Mile, a rural part of St Ann's, before moving to the Trench Town suburb of Kingston in his early teens.

He found music in the 60s, playing with his friends Peter Tosh and Bunny Livingston, and in 1973 they were signed to Island Records as Bob Marley and The Wailers.

Over the next eight years Bob became an international superstar before his untimely death on 11 May 1981.

The programme reveals how the Jamaica he grew up in, with high unemployment and profound race and class divides, shaped him.

We chart his musical rise, from follower of trends such as the Rude Boy movement, to a reluctant leader of fellow musicians as he spread his reggae rhythm and message across the world.

Those close to Bob also reveal the circumstances of his death, which started with a toe injury during a game of football and lead to his death at the age of 36, just four years later.

Paul Sexton presents interviews with the reggae star's closest friends and colleagues.