Radio 2 Elvis Season

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
20100102
20100105
20100107
20100107

In a Memphis hotel room back in 1974, Suzi Quatro answered the phone, expecting another routine query about her tour or current hit, and heard a version of Elvis Presley's All Shook Up.

A huge Elvis fan, she was surprised, amazed and a little nervous to discover that the call was actually from the King himself, inviting her to visit him at his house, Graceland.

Suzi couldn't accept the invitation and she never went to Graceland..until now.

35 years after the event, Suzi travels to Memphis to make that long-delayed visit.

She explores her life-long obsession with Elvis, the connection she feels with him, and his influence on her career.

On the way to Graceland, and in an attempt to discover the man behind the image, Suzi visits Tupelo, Elvis' birthplace.

She meets some of his childhood friends who share some of their precious memories, including the reason why Elvis was hopeless at fishing and the moving story behind the final resting place of his still-born twin brother Jesse.

In Memphis itself, Suzi sees the council flat that was the Presley's first big city home, his school and the places where he made his first music, and meets the girl who Elvis walked home from school every day for four years.

Then it's on to Beale Street where Elvis found his musical direction, Sun Studios, where he made his first recordings, & Audobon Drive where he bought his first house.

Life long friend George Klein offers his own personal insight into the Presley psyche, before Suzi finally makes the long-delayed - and highly emotional - visit to Graceland itself.

Suzi travels to Memphis to explore her life-long fascination with Elvis Presley.

20100107

In a Memphis hotel room back in 1974, Suzi Quatro answered the phone, expecting another routine query about her tour or current hit, and heard a version of Elvis Presley's All Shook Up.

A huge Elvis fan, she was surprised, amazed and a little nervous to discover that the call was actually from the King himself, inviting her to visit him at his house, Graceland.

Suzi couldn't accept the invitation and she never went to Graceland..until now.

35 years after the event, Suzi travels to Memphis to make that long-delayed visit.

She explores her life-long obsession with Elvis, the connection she feels with him, and his influence on her career.

On the way to Graceland, and in an attempt to discover the man behind the image, Suzi visits Tupelo, Elvis' birthplace.

She meets some of his childhood friends who share some of their precious memories, including the reason why Elvis was hopeless at fishing and the moving story behind the final resting place of his still-born twin brother Jesse.

In Memphis itself, Suzi sees the council flat that was the Presley's first big city home, his school and the places where he made his first music, and meets the girl who Elvis walked home from school every day for four years.

Then it's on to Beale Street where Elvis found his musical direction, Sun Studios, where he made his first recordings, and Audobon Drive where he bought his first house.

Life long friend George Klein offers his own personal insight into the Presley psyche, before Suzi finally makes the long-delayed - and highly emotional - visit to Graceland itself.

Suzi travels to Memphis to explore her life-long fascination with Elvis Presley.

*20100102

Welcome to Las Vegas, where Elvis has not left the building.

Graceland may be home to his shrine but Elvis forged a lasting bond with the Las Vegas, thanks to a seven-year run between 1969 and 1976.

Rob Brydon, an Elvis fan, revisits this golden period in a remarkable career.

The 1969 Memphis Sessions at American Studios in Memphis re-established Presley as a musical force, returning him to the charts and producing some of his most acclaimed work.

Presley's manager, Col.

Tom Parker, was planning Presley's return to live concerts with a series of shows at the International Hotel in Las Vegas later that year.

Elvis assembled a new live band for his first Las Vegas concerts.

We hear about rehearsals in the summer of 1969, and the buoyant mood within the Presley camp, from lead guitarist James Burton and legendary Presley road manager Joe Esposito.

On July 31 1969, Elvis walked out on stage in front of a paying audience for the first time eight years.

The band, as we hear through live recordings, were superb.

Singers Myra Smith and Estelle Brown reveal what it was like performing on stage, night after night, with Elvis.

Things went well and Elvis went on to perform regular shows there for seven years - a total of 637 consecutive sold-out performances in front of 2.5 million people.

Presley completed his four week stint on 28 August 1969.

His fee for that initial season was in the region of 100 thousand dollars a week.

That month the Hilton took one and a half million dollars...and that figure doesn't even include takings from the casino!

When Presley returned in January 1970 for his winter season, he and his entourage made a considerable impact on life at the Hilton International Hotel, as we hear from valet Lonnie Pope and bell boy Dan Hakata.

When Elvis swept into town, he would set up in his hotel suite and establish a routine: karate, rehearsals with the band and then two shows a night - at 8 pm and midnight.

After the shows, he would retire to his 30th floor suite, sit at the piano and sing the gospel songs of his childhood.

But things did get pretty intense on the road and the FBI and Presley's personal body guards were on full alert following a death threat which claimed the King would be shot on stage.

Jerry Schilling, one of Presley's inner circle and Memphis Mafia, talks us through the events surrounding Presley's security.

Any programme exploring this period has to acknowledge Presley's use of prescription drugs and his escalating weight.

The Presley jump suits in white, blue and orange would become synonymous with Elvis in Vegas but the bespoke jumpsuits had to adjust to his expanding midriff.

Band members reveal how Elvis' personal problems affected life on stage and off.

That winter of 1976 was Presley's 15th season at the Las Vegas Hilton International Hotel and his last.

Grappling with his weight and personal problems, it was while preparing to play yet another series of concerts, the Presley heart gave up in the bathroom of Graceland on 16 August 1977.

Over thirty years later, Elvis remains an iconic figure and his presence can still be felt on the streets of Las Vegas, in the bars and in the showrooms.

It would be fair to say the King of Rock 'n' Roll changed the way we see the city.

It's not just the scores of Las Vegas Elvis impersonators, or the hundreds of images you see in the tacky gift shops and hotels.

The city's profile was shaped by him as he brought glitz and a new glamour.

And this month he is re-launched in a new Cirque De Soliel show, celebrating his life and music.

This new Vegas show confirms Elvis has not left the building and reconnects the King with the city.

Cirque production manager Michael Anderson and the Mayor of Las Vegas Oscar Goodman explore Presley's contribution to the city and legacy.

Rob Brydon explores the time Elvis spent in Las Vegas and his influence upon the city.

*20100102

Welcome to Las Vegas, where Elvis has not left the building.

Graceland may be home to his shrine but Elvis forged a lasting bond with the Las Vegas, thanks to a seven-year run between 1969 and 1976.

Rob Brydon, an Elvis fan, revisits this golden period in a remarkable career.

The 1969 Memphis Sessions at American Studios in Memphis re-established Presley as a musical force, returning him to the charts and producing some of his most acclaimed work.

Presley's manager, Col.

Tom Parker, was planning Presley's return to live concerts with a series of shows at the International Hotel in Las Vegas later that year.

Elvis assembled a new live band for his first Las Vegas concerts.

We hear about rehearsals in the summer of 1969, and the buoyant mood within the Presley camp, from lead guitarist James Burton and legendary Presley road manager Joe Esposito.

On July 31 1969, Elvis walked out on stage in front of a paying audience for the first time eight years.

The band, as we hear through live recordings, were superb.

Singers Myra Smith and Estelle Brown reveal what it was like performing on stage, night after night, with Elvis.

Things went well and Elvis went on to perform regular shows there for seven years - a total of 637 consecutive sold-out performances in front of 2.5 million people.

Presley completed his four week stint on 28 August 1969.

His fee for that initial season was in the region of 100 thousand dollars a week.

That month the Hilton took one and a half million dollars...and that figure doesn't even include takings from the casino!

When Presley returned in January 1970 for his winter season, he and his entourage made a considerable impact on life at the Hilton International Hotel, as we hear from valet Lonnie Pope and bell boy Dan Hakata.

When Elvis swept into town, he would set up in his hotel suite and establish a routine: karate, rehearsals with the band and then two shows a night - at 8 pm and midnight.

After the shows, he would retire to his 30th floor suite, sit at the piano and sing the gospel songs of his childhood.

But things did get pretty intense on the road and the FBI and Presley's personal body guards were on full alert following a death threat which claimed the King would be shot on stage.

Jerry Schilling, one of Presley's inner circle and Memphis Mafia, talks us through the events surrounding Presley's security.

Any programme exploring this period has to acknowledge Presley's use of prescription drugs and his escalating weight.

The Presley jump suits in white, blue and orange would become synonymous with Elvis in Vegas but the bespoke jumpsuits had to adjust to his expanding midriff.

Band members reveal how Elvis' personal problems affected life on stage and off.

That winter of 1976 was Presley's 15th season at the Las Vegas Hilton International Hotel and his last.

Grappling with his weight and personal problems, it was while preparing to play yet another series of concerts, the Presley heart gave up in the bathroom of Graceland on 16 August 1977.

Over thirty years later, Elvis remains an iconic figure and his presence can still be felt on the streets of Las Vegas, in the bars and in the showrooms.

It would be fair to say the King of Rock 'n' Roll changed the way we see the city.

It's not just the scores of Las Vegas Elvis impersonators, or the hundreds of images you see in the tacky gift shops and hotels.

The city's profile was shaped by him as he brought glitz and a new glamour.

And this month he is re-launched in a new Cirque De Soliel show, celebrating his life and music.

This new Vegas show confirms Elvis has not left the building and reconnects the King with the city.

Cirque production manager Michael Anderson and the Mayor of Las Vegas Oscar Goodman explore Presley's contribution to the city and legacy.

Rob Brydon explores the time Elvis spent in Las Vegas and his influence upon the city.

*20100105

Dear Mr.

President.

First, I would like to introduce myself.

I am Elvis Presley and admire you and have great respect for your office.

Martin Sheen looks at the King of Rock 'n' Roll's 1970 meeting with President Nixon.

In a storyline as fascinating as any created for President Bartlet's White House, he reveals how Elvis approached Nixon to offer his services to the United States Of America.

Elvis expressed a desire to be made a "Federal Agent at Large".

He wanted to communicate with, and report on, what he felt were harmful factions threatening America and he believed his star status would allow him a non-threatening entrance into the closed environment of these groups.

He arrived at the White House gate on the morning of December 21 with two bodyguards and some family photos and a commemorative World War II pistol intended as gifts for the President.

Contributors include President Nixon's aides, Egil "Bud" Krogh and Dwight Chapin, who were in the meeting with Elvis.

We'll also hear from Jerry Schilling, one of Elvis' inner circle, who was with him in the Oval Office.

He reveals why the meeting was so important to The King and how the relationship continued beyond the first meeting.

Martin Sheen tells the story of Elvis Presley's 1970 meeting with President Nixon."

*20100105

Dear Mr.

President.

First, I would like to introduce myself.

I am Elvis Presley and admire you and have great respect for your office.

Martin Sheen looks at the King of Rock 'n' Roll's 1970 meeting with President Nixon.

In a storyline as fascinating as any created for President Bartlet's White House, he reveals how Elvis approached Nixon to offer his services to the United States Of America.

Elvis expressed a desire to be made a Federal Agent at Large.

He wanted to communicate with, and report on, what he felt were harmful factions threatening America and he believed his star status would allow him a non-threatening entrance into the closed environment of these groups.

He arrived at the White House gate on the morning of December 21 with two bodyguards and some family photos and a commemorative World War II pistol intended as gifts for the President.

Contributors include President Nixon's aides, Egil Bud Krogh and Dwight Chapin, who were in the meeting with Elvis.

We'll also hear from Jerry Schilling, one of Elvis' inner circle, who was with him in the Oval Office.

He reveals why the meeting was so important to The King and how the relationship continued beyond the first meeting.

Martin Sheen tells the story of Elvis Presley's 1970 meeting with President Nixon.

Don't Start Me Talking...about Elvis
Don't Start Me Talking...about Elvis

Don't Start Me Talking...about Elvis20100101
Don't Start Me Talking...about Elvis20100101

Don't Start Me Talking...about Elvis20100101

Radio 2's Elvis Season continues with another chance to hear about The King, in the words of his fans.

This programme first broadcast in August 2007, as part of Radio 2's long-running oral history series, and offers an insight into the way Elvis impacted on everyday lives.

Don't Start Me Talking...about Elvis20100101

Radio 2's Elvis Season continues with another chance to hear about The King, in the words of his fans.

This programme first broadcast in August 2007, as part of Radio 2's long-running oral history series, and offers an insight into the way Elvis impacted on everyday lives.

Elvis And Dewey
Elvis And Dewey
Elvis And Dewey

Elvis and Dewey20091229
Elvis: Gospel According To The King
Elvis: Gospel According To The King
Elvis: Gospel According To The King

Elvis: Gospel According to The King20091226
Rob Brydon's World Of Elvis: The Las Vegas Years
Rob Brydon's World Of Elvis: The Las Vegas Years

Rob Brydon's World of Elvis: The Las Vegas Years20100102

Rob Brydon's World Of Elvis: The Las Vegas Years20100102

Welcome to Las Vegas, where Elvis has not left the building. Graceland may be home to his shrine but Elvis forged a lasting bond with the Las Vegas, thanks to a seven-year run between 1969 and 1976. Rob Brydon, an Elvis fan, revisits this golden period in a remarkable career.

The 1969 Memphis Sessions at American Studios in Memphis re-established Presley as a musical force, returning him to the charts and producing some of his most acclaimed work. Presley's manager, Col. Tom Parker, was planning Presley's return to live concerts with a series of shows at the International Hotel in Las Vegas later that year.

Elvis assembled a new live band for his first Las Vegas concerts. We hear about rehearsals in the summer of 1969, and the buoyant mood within the Presley camp, from lead guitarist James Burton and legendary Presley road manager Joe Esposito. On July 31 1969, Elvis walked out on stage in front of a paying audience for the first time eight years.

The band, as we hear through live recordings, were superb. Singers Myra Smith and Estelle Brown reveal what it was like performing on stage, night after night, with Elvis. Things went well and Elvis went on to perform regular shows there for seven years - a total of 637 consecutive sold-out performances in front of 2.5 million people.

Presley completed his four week stint on 28 August 1969. His fee for that initial season was in the region of 100 thousand dollars a week. That month the Hilton took one and a half million dollars...and that figure doesn't even include takings from the casino!

When Presley returned in January 1970 for his winter season, he and his entourage made a considerable impact on life at the Hilton International Hotel, as we hear from valet Lonnie Pope and bell boy Dan Hakata. When Elvis swept into town, he would set up in his hotel suite and establish a routine: karate, rehearsals with the band and then two shows a night - at 8 pm and midnight. After the shows, he would retire to his 30th floor suite, sit at the piano and sing the gospel songs of his childhood.

But things did get pretty intense on the road and the FBI and Presley's personal body guards were on full alert following a death threat which claimed the King would be shot on stage. Jerry Schilling, one of Presley's inner circle and Memphis Mafia, talks us through the events surrounding Presley's security.

Any programme exploring this period has to acknowledge Presley's use of prescription drugs and his escalating weight. The Presley jump suits in white, blue and orange would become synonymous with Elvis in Vegas but the bespoke jumpsuits had to adjust to his expanding midriff. Band members reveal how Elvis' personal problems affected life on stage and off.

That winter of 1976 was Presley's 15th season at the Las Vegas Hilton International Hotel and his last. Grappling with his weight and personal problems, it was while preparing to play yet another series of concerts, the Presley heart gave up in the bathroom of Graceland on 16 August 1977.

Over thirty years later, Elvis remains an iconic figure and his presence can still be felt on the streets of Las Vegas, in the bars and in the showrooms. It would be fair to say the King of Rock 'n' Roll changed the way we see the city. It's not just the scores of Las Vegas Elvis impersonators, or the hundreds of images you see in the tacky gift shops and hotels. The city's profile was shaped by him as he brought glitz and a new glamour.

And this month he is re-launched in a new Cirque De Soliel show, celebrating his life and music. This new Vegas show confirms Elvis has not left the building and reconnects the King with the city. Cirque production manager Michael Anderson and the Mayor of Las Vegas Oscar Goodman explore Presley's contribution to the city and legacy.

Rob Brydon's World of Elvis: The Las Vegas Years20100102

Welcome to Las Vegas, where Elvis has not left the building. Graceland may be home to his shrine but Elvis forged a lasting bond with the Las Vegas, thanks to a seven-year run between 1969 and 1976. Rob Brydon, an Elvis fan, revisits this golden period in a remarkable career.

The 1969 Memphis Sessions at American Studios in Memphis re-established Presley as a musical force, returning him to the charts and producing some of his most acclaimed work. Presley's manager, Col. Tom Parker, was planning Presley's return to live concerts with a series of shows at the International Hotel in Las Vegas later that year.

Elvis assembled a new live band for his first Las Vegas concerts. We hear about rehearsals in the summer of 1969, and the buoyant mood within the Presley camp, from lead guitarist James Burton and legendary Presley road manager Joe Esposito. On July 31 1969, Elvis walked out on stage in front of a paying audience for the first time eight years.

The band, as we hear through live recordings, were superb. Singers Myra Smith and Estelle Brown reveal what it was like performing on stage, night after night, with Elvis. Things went well and Elvis went on to perform regular shows there for seven years - a total of 637 consecutive sold-out performances in front of 2.5 million people.

Presley completed his four week stint on 28 August 1969. His fee for that initial season was in the region of 100 thousand dollars a week. That month the Hilton took one and a half million dollars...and that figure doesn't even include takings from the casino!

When Presley returned in January 1970 for his winter season, he and his entourage made a considerable impact on life at the Hilton International Hotel, as we hear from valet Lonnie Pope and bell boy Dan Hakata. When Elvis swept into town, he would set up in his hotel suite and establish a routine: karate, rehearsals with the band and then two shows a night - at 8 pm and midnight. After the shows, he would retire to his 30th floor suite, sit at the piano and sing the gospel songs of his childhood.

But things did get pretty intense on the road and the FBI and Presley's personal body guards were on full alert following a death threat which claimed the King would be shot on stage. Jerry Schilling, one of Presley's inner circle and Memphis Mafia, talks us through the events surrounding Presley's security.

Any programme exploring this period has to acknowledge Presley's use of prescription drugs and his escalating weight. The Presley jump suits in white, blue and orange would become synonymous with Elvis in Vegas but the bespoke jumpsuits had to adjust to his expanding midriff. Band members reveal how Elvis' personal problems affected life on stage and off.

That winter of 1976 was Presley's 15th season at the Las Vegas Hilton International Hotel and his last. Grappling with his weight and personal problems, it was while preparing to play yet another series of concerts, the Presley heart gave up in the bathroom of Graceland on 16 August 1977.

Over thirty years later, Elvis remains an iconic figure and his presence can still be felt on the streets of Las Vegas, in the bars and in the showrooms. It would be fair to say the King of Rock 'n' Roll changed the way we see the city. It's not just the scores of Las Vegas Elvis impersonators, or the hundreds of images you see in the tacky gift shops and hotels. The city's profile was shaped by him as he brought glitz and a new glamour.

And this month he is re-launched in a new Cirque De Soliel show, celebrating his life and music. This new Vegas show confirms Elvis has not left the building and reconnects the King with the city. Cirque production manager Michael Anderson and the Mayor of Las Vegas Oscar Goodman explore Presley's contribution to the city and legacy.

Suzi Quatro's Elvis
Suzi Quatro's Elvis

Suzi Quatro's Elvis20100107

Suzi Quatro's Elvis20100107

In a Memphis hotel room back in 1974, Suzi Quatro answered the phone, expecting another routine query about her tour or current hit, and heard a version of Elvis Presley's All Shook Up. A huge Elvis fan, she was surprised, amazed and a little nervous to discover that the call was actually from the King himself, inviting her to visit him at his house, Graceland.

Suzi couldn't accept the invitation and she never went to Graceland..until now. 35 years after the event, Suzi travels to Memphis to make that long-delayed visit. She explores her life-long obsession with Elvis, the connection she feels with him, and his influence on her career.

On the way to Graceland, and in an attempt to discover the man behind the image, Suzi visits Tupelo, Elvis' birthplace. She meets some of his childhood friends who share some of their precious memories, including the reason why Elvis was hopeless at fishing and the moving story behind the final resting place of his still-born twin brother Jesse.

In Memphis itself, Suzi sees the council flat that was the Presley's first big city home, his school and the places where he made his first music, and meets the girl who Elvis walked home from school every day for four years. Then it's on to Beale Street where Elvis found his musical direction, Sun Studios, where he made his first recordings, and Audobon Drive where he bought his first house.

Life long friend George Klein offers his own personal insight into the Presley psyche, before Suzi finally makes the long-delayed - and highly emotional - visit to Graceland itself.

Suzi Quatro's Elvis20100107

In a Memphis hotel room back in 1974, Suzi Quatro answered the phone, expecting another routine query about her tour or current hit, and heard a version of Elvis Presley's All Shook Up. A huge Elvis fan, she was surprised, amazed and a little nervous to discover that the call was actually from the King himself, inviting her to visit him at his house, Graceland.

Suzi couldn't accept the invitation and she never went to Graceland..until now. 35 years after the event, Suzi travels to Memphis to make that long-delayed visit. She explores her life-long obsession with Elvis, the connection she feels with him, and his influence on her career.

On the way to Graceland, and in an attempt to discover the man behind the image, Suzi visits Tupelo, Elvis' birthplace. She meets some of his childhood friends who share some of their precious memories, including the reason why Elvis was hopeless at fishing and the moving story behind the final resting place of his still-born twin brother Jesse.

In Memphis itself, Suzi sees the council flat that was the Presley's first big city home, his school and the places where he made his first music, and meets the girl who Elvis walked home from school every day for four years. Then it's on to Beale Street where Elvis found his musical direction, Sun Studios, where he made his first recordings, & Audobon Drive where he bought his first house.

Life long friend George Klein offers his own personal insight into the Presley psyche, before Suzi finally makes the long-delayed - and highly emotional - visit to Graceland itself.

When The King Met The President

When The King Met The President20100105

When The King Met The President20100105

Dear Mr. President. First, I would like to introduce myself. I am Elvis Presley and admire you and have great respect for your office."

Martin Sheen looks at the King of Rock 'n' Roll's 1970 meeting with President Nixon. In a storyline as fascinating as any created for President Bartlet's White House, he reveals how Elvis approached Nixon to offer his services to the United States Of America.

Elvis expressed a desire to be made a "Federal Agent at Large". He wanted to communicate with, and report on, what he felt were harmful factions threatening America and he believed his star status would allow him a non-threatening entrance into the closed environment of these groups. He arrived at the White House gate on the morning of December 21 with two bodyguards and some family photos and a commemorative World War II pistol intended as gifts for the President.

Contributors include President Nixon's aides, Egil "Bud" Krogh and Dwight Chapin, who were in the meeting with Elvis. We'll also hear from Jerry Schilling, one of Elvis' inner circle, who was with him in the Oval Office. He reveals why the meeting was so important to The King and how the relationship continued beyond the first meeting.

When The King Met The President20100105

Dear Mr. President. First, I would like to introduce myself. I am Elvis Presley and admire you and have great respect for your office.

Martin Sheen looks at the King of Rock 'n' Roll's 1970 meeting with President Nixon. In a storyline as fascinating as any created for President Bartlet's White House, he reveals how Elvis approached Nixon to offer his services to the United States Of America.

Elvis expressed a desire to be made a Federal Agent at Large. He wanted to communicate with, and report on, what he felt were harmful factions threatening America and he believed his star status would allow him a non-threatening entrance into the closed environment of these groups. He arrived at the White House gate on the morning of December 21 with two bodyguards and some family photos and a commemorative World War II pistol intended as gifts for the President.

Contributors include President Nixon's aides, Egil Bud Krogh and Dwight Chapin, who were in the meeting with Elvis. We'll also hear from Jerry Schilling, one of Elvis' inner circle, who was with him in the Oval Office. He reveals why the meeting was so important to The King and how the relationship continued beyond the first meeting.

01Elvis: Movie King Or Celluloid Sellout?

1Elvis: Movie King or Celluloid Sellout?20091228
01Elvis: The Brand

1Elvis: The Brand20100104
1The Elvis Trail20100108
02Elvis: Movie King Or Celluloid Sellout?

02Elvis: The Brand

02The Elvis Trail

2The Elvis Trail20100115
03The Elvis Trail
03The Elvis Trail
03The Elvis Trail

3The Elvis Trail20100122
04The Elvis Trail
04The Elvis Trail
04The Elvis Trail

4The Elvis Trail20100129
05The Elvis Trail

5The Elvis Trail20100205
05The Elvis Trail20100205

Michael Freedland continues his journey to mark the 75th anniversary of Elvis Presley's birth.

This week, he stops off in Nashville.

In Nashville, Michael visits the famous RCA Studio B where Presley recorded so many of his famous hits after he'd already hit the big time with Sam Phillips at Sun - tracks like Are you Lonesome Tonight? and It's Now Or Never.

At the studio Michael chats to Ray Walker of The Jordanaires (who sang backing vocals on many of Elvis' recordings); singer TG Sheppard; and former girlfriend, Ann Ellington Wagner.

Later on in Nashville, we hear from Million Dollar Quartet producer Cowboy Jack Clement; Ryman Auditorium marketing manager Brian Wagner; Grand Ol' Opry singer Carol Lee Cooper; bodyguard Sonny West; country singer and impersonator Ronnie McDowell.

Michael also takes a visit to the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Ernest Tubbs Record Store, where Elvis used to appear on the radio show, the Midnight Jamboree.

Michael Freedland continues his journey in Nashville, Tennessee.

05The Elvis Trail20100205

Michael Freedland continues his journey to mark the 75th anniversary of Elvis Presley's birth.

This week, he stops off in Nashville.

In Nashville, Michael visits the famous RCA Studio B where Presley recorded so many of his famous hits after he'd already hit the big time with Sam Phillips at Sun - tracks like Are you Lonesome Tonight? and It's Now Or Never.

At the studio Michael chats to Ray Walker of The Jordanaires (who sang backing vocals on many of Elvis' recordings); singer TG Sheppard; and former girlfriend, Ann Ellington Wagner.

Later on in Nashville, we hear from Million Dollar Quartet producer Cowboy Jack Clement; Ryman Auditorium marketing manager Brian Wagner; Grand Ol' Opry singer Carol Lee Cooper; bodyguard Sonny West; country singer and impersonator Ronnie McDowell.

Michael also takes a visit to the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Ernest Tubbs Record Store, where Elvis used to appear on the radio show, the Midnight Jamboree.

Michael Freedland continues his journey in Nashville, Tennessee.

06The Elvis Trail

06The Elvis Trail20100212
06The Elvis Trail20100212
06 LASTThe Elvis Trail20100212

Michael Freedland concludes his journey to mark the 75th anniversary of Elvis' birth.

This week he travels to Las Vegas, before driving through the Mojave desert to arrive in LA.

In Vegas, Michael takes a tour of the King's Ransom exhibit at the Imperial Palace Hotel, a museum run by Jimmy Velvet.

He talks to devoted fan, Vicky Sisler; fan club supremo Sue Land; one of Elvis' Memphis Mafia Joe Esposito, who actually met Elvis out in Germany when they were doing their national service; Linda Thompson's brother Sam, another Presley bodyguard; and jeweller Stuart Small, who has many tales to tell of Elvis' legendary generosity.

In LA, we explore Elvis' film career, talking to co-star Celeste Yarnall; screenwriter Michael Hoey; friend, impersonator and Mafia protege, Jimmy Angel; his hairdresser and spiritual companion, Larry Geller; and former girlfriend Linda Thompson, who speaks candidly of her time with Elvis.

Michael also spends an extraordinary evening in the home of one of Presley's songwriters, Don Robertson, who manages to play the piano despite a recent stroke.

What comes out of all these conversations? A truly rich and insightful picture of Elvis the man, and Elvis the singer.

A man with a fierce temper but a man with a tremendous respect for people, who Yes, Ma'amed and 'No, Sirred'; a lonely man with a thirst for friendship, companionship; a man who could spend all night on the dodgems but who had an insatiable spiritual desire to find out what his purpose on earth was; a great singer and superstar who yearned for the ordinary things in life; a man of huge generosity, who gave away millions of dollars worth of cars, houses and jewels to friends and often complete strangers; a shy man, a modest man, a man of simple tastes; the King of Rock 'n' Roll.

06 LASTThe Elvis Trail20100212

Michael Freedland concludes his journey to mark the 75th anniversary of Elvis' birth.

This week he travels to Las Vegas, before driving through the Mojave desert to arrive in LA.

In Vegas, Michael takes a tour of the King's Ransom exhibit at the Imperial Palace Hotel, a museum run by Jimmy Velvet.

He talks to devoted fan, Vicky Sisler; fan club supremo Sue Land; one of Elvis' Memphis Mafia Joe Esposito, who actually met Elvis out in Germany when they were doing their national service; Linda Thompson's brother Sam, another Presley bodyguard; and jeweller Stuart Small, who has many tales to tell of Elvis' legendary generosity.

In LA, we explore Elvis' film career, talking to co-star Celeste Yarnall; screenwriter Michael Hoey; friend, impersonator and Mafia protege, Jimmy Angel; his hairdresser and spiritual companion, Larry Geller; and former girlfriend Linda Thompson, who speaks candidly of her time with Elvis.

Michael also spends an extraordinary evening in the home of one of Presley's songwriters, Don Robertson, who manages to play the piano despite a recent stroke.

What comes out of all these conversations? A truly rich and insightful picture of Elvis the man, and Elvis the singer.

A man with a fierce temper but a man with a tremendous respect for people, who Yes, Ma'amed" and 'No, Sirred'; a lonely man with a thirst for friendship, companionship; a man who could spend all night on the dodgems but who had an insatiable spiritual desire to find out what his purpose on earth was; a great singer and superstar who yearned for the ordinary things in life; a man of huge generosity, who gave away millions of dollars worth of cars, houses and jewels to friends and often complete strangers; a shy man, a modest man, a man of simple tastes; the King of Rock 'n' Roll.

"

2 LASTElvis: Movie King or Celluloid Sellout?20091229
2 LASTElvis: The Brand20100105
6 LASTThe Elvis Trail20100212