Race For Equality

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Episodes

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01The Documentary2013071620130717 (WS)
20130721 (WS)

Wheelchair racer Tatyana McFadden says her victories off the track have defined her

Adopted from Russia by her American mother, the young Tatyana McFadden almost died. Sport made her strong, but in High School there was another fight. They wouldn't let her race on the track team. Aged 15, she took them to court, won her case and created a new law. In the first of two Paralympic documentaries for the BBC World Service, Paralympic Swimmer Kate Grey has spent a week with the McFaddens, giving her exclusive insight in to their lives.

Tatyana's sister Hannah, competed alongside her at London 2012 - and their mother Deborah helped write the Americans with Disabilities Act. Since the Paralympics, they've been helping the victims of the bombings at the Boston Marathon and raising awareness about the Russian ban on US adoption.

Next year, Tatyana will have the opportunity to show the country of her birth what she did with her 'second chance at life' when she competes at the Winter Paralympics in Sochi. It means taking up a new sport - cross country skiing - but the McFaddens relish a challenge. Kate hears from the McFaddens on the fights they’ve already won, and the causes they’re prepared to keep fighting for, and asks, post London 2012, what are the challenges still facing people with disabilities every day.

(Picture: Tatyanna (left) and Hannah (right) McFadden at the London 2012 Paralympics, Credit: Getty Images)

Kate Grey meets Paralympic wheelchair racers Tatyana and Hannah McFadden - but it's vic...

Kate Grey meets Paralympic wheelchair racers Tatyana and Hannah McFadden - but it's victories off the track that define them.

02 LASTThe Documentary2013073020130731 (WS)
20130804 (WS)

What impact has the London 2012 Paralympic Games had on disability sports in Ghana?

Ghana sent just four Paralympians to the 2012 Olympics, none of whom made it to the victory podium. After the difficulties they faced getting there, is still there still the will to work towards Rio 2016?

Powerlifter Charles Narh Teye told the BBC World Service during London 2012, that his parents had rejected the doctor's suggestion that they 'put me to sleep' with an injection at birth. His team-mate and Ghana’s flag-bearer, wheelchair racer Raphael Nkegbe Botsyo, said there were those back home who still believed 'a disabled person in the family must be a grandfather's curse'.

Paralympic athlete and gold medallist April Holmes travels to Ghana to meet the athletes and to find out if negative perceptions have changed since their performances in the British capital. April sees first-hand whether their achievements have had any impact on disability sport in the country, and asks if they have the desire and the backing to make it to Rio - and whether or not they will be part of a bigger team in 2016. She also asks Ghana’s minister for Youth and Sport and the Disabilities Commission what provisions are being made for the country’s Paralympic athletes.

(Picture: Ghanaian powerlifter Charles Narh Teye at London 2012, Credit: Getty Images)

What's the legacy of the London 2012 Paralympics for countries Ghana?

Ghana sent just four Paralympians to the British capital, none of whom made it to the victory podium. After the difficulties they faced getting there, April will be questioning whether there is still the will to work towards Rio 2016. Powerlifter, Charles Narh Teye, told the BBC World Service during London 2012 that his parents had rejected the doctor's suggestion that they “put me to sleep” with an injection at birth. His team-mate and Ghana’s flag-bearer, wheelchair Racer Raphael Nkegbe Botsyo, said there were those back home who still believed "a disabled person in the family must be a grandfather's curse".

April travels to Ghana to meet the athletes and to find out if that perception has changed since their performances in the British capital. April sees first-hand whether their achievements have had any impact on disability sport in the country, and asks if they have the desire and the backing to make it to Rio - and whether or not they will be part of a bigger team in 2016. She also asks Ghana’s Minister for Youth and Sport and the Disabilities Commission what provisions are being made for the country’s Paralympic athletes.

Picture: Ghanaian powerlifter Charles Narh Teye at London 2012, Credit: Getty Images