Prophets, The [world Service]

Episodes

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01Heart And Soul2013120720131208 (WS)
20131209 (WS)

Clive Lawton travels to the Holy Land to tell the story of some of the prophets of the...

Clive Lawton travels to the Holy Land to tell the story of some of the prophets of the Bible.

01Heart and Soul20140419

01Heart and Soul20140419

01Heart and Soul20140419

01Heart And Soul2014041920140420 (WS)
20140421 (WS)
20140422 (WS)

Clive Lawton tells the story of two of the most famous of the Old Testament Prophets.

Clive Lawton tells the story of two of the most famous of the Old Testament Prophets. In the first of two parts he starts with Isaiah and the story of Jonah and the whale. Or should it be a fish? At one level Jonah is a knockabout tale of strange events, but at its core it is a story of universal assertions and values, surprising in its inclusivity and judgements. Jonah is a cantankerous character who doesn't seem to fit in with God's plans. And yet he is still called upon to be a prophet.

What, then, does the function involve? It certainly seems that being a prophet is no guarantee of insight or moral depth. How would we relate to such mythical figures if they were still around today and how relevant are their thoughts and ideas in a modern context?

Clive then profiles Isaiah, the supreme literary prophet or, possibly, prophets. There is a dispute about whether Isaiah is one, two or even three distinct personalities as his story covers several different epochs. His words reverberate around the world, not least as having been taken up so solidly by Christians as prophecies of the coming of Jesus as the Messiah.

Clive asks how would we relate to such mythical figures if they were still around today and how relevant are their thoughts and ideas in a modern context?

01Heart and Soul2014041920140420 (WS)

Clive Lawton tells the story of two of the most famous Old Testament prophets. In this first part, he starts with Isaiah and the story of Jonah and the whale - or should it be a fish? At one level Jonah's is a knockabout tale of strange events, but at its core it is a story of universal assertions and values, surprising in its inclusivity and judgements. Jonah is a cantankerous character who doesn't seem to fit in with God's plans. And yet he is still called upon to be a prophet.

Clive then profiles Isaiah, the supreme literary prophet - or should that be prophets? There is a dispute about whether Isaiah is one, two or even three distinct personalities, as his story covers several epochs. Clive asks how we would relate to these mythical figures if they were around today and how relevant their thoughts and ideas are in the modern world.

(Image: Getty)

01Heart and Soul2014041920140421 (WS)

Clive Lawton tells the story of two of the most famous Old Testament Prophets.

01Heart and Soul2014041920140422 (WS)

Clive Lawton tells the story of two of the most famous Old Testament Prophets.

02 LASTHeart And Soul2013121420131215 (WS)
20131216 (WS)

The stories of Prophets Miriam and Elijah.

In the second part of his exploration of four of the Prophets of the Old Testament, Clive Lawton tells the story of Elijah, a miracle-working, thundering wild-eyed and somewhat anti-social itinerant. Elijah is very much the prototype Old Testament prophet, and only one of two people in the Jewish Bible who, strangely, doesn't die.

As a result, he is thought to be almost still hovering around, ready to intervene when the right time comes. Jews open their doors to Elijah each Passover and pour him a cup of wine. He has a special seat at every circumcision and they sing of him at the end of every Sabbath.

Clive then tells the story of Miriam, the ‘Prophetess’. She is one of the few women in the Bible to be called a prophetess, though it's not entirely clear what that means. In some ways, she is an essential counterbalance to Moses who is always referred to by the Jews as the greatest of the prophets and the transmitter of the core of Jewish teaching and tradition, the Torah. However, without Miriam and her resourcefulness Moses would not have survived, and according to rabbinic tradition without Miriam, Moses would not even have been born.

02 LASTHeart and Soul20140426

02 LASTHeart and Soul20140426

02 LASTHeart and Soul20140426

In the second part of his exploration of four of the prophets of the Old Testament, Clive Lawton tells the story of Elijah, a miracle-working, thundering, wild-eyed and somewhat anti-social itinerant. Elijah is very much the prototype Old Testament prophet, and only one of two people in the Jewish Bible who, strangely, does not die.

As a result, he is thought to be almost still hovering around, ready to intervene when the right time comes. Jews open their doors to Elijah each Passover and pour him a cup of wine. He has a special seat at every circumcision and they sing of him at the end of every Sabbath.

Clive then tells the story of Miriam, the ‘prophetess’. She is one of the few women in the Bible to be called a prophetess, though it's not entirely clear what that means. In some ways, she is an essential counterbalance to Moses who is always referred to by the Jews as the greatest of the prophets and the transmitter of the core of Jewish teaching and tradition, the Torah. However, without Miriam and her resourcefulness Moses would not have survived, and according to rabbinic tradition without Miriam, Moses would not even have been born.

02 LASTHeart and Soul20140426

The story of Isaiah and Jonah, two of the most famous prophets of the Old Testament