Proms Plus

Episodes

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Prom 64 Talk *20090903

Sara Mohr-pietsch, with conductor Vladimir Jurowski and pianist Tamara Stefanovich, discusses Prom 64, which includes multiple piano works by Mozart and Zimmerman.

Sara Mohr-pietsch discusses Prom 64, with its multiple piano works by Mozart and Zimmerman.

Prom 64 Talk *20090903

Sara Mohr-pietsch, with conductor Vladimir Jurowski and pianist Tamara Stefanovich, discusses Prom 64, which includes multiple piano works by Mozart and Zimmerman.

Sara Mohr-pietsch discusses Prom 64, with its multiple piano works by Mozart and Zimmerman.

Proms Intro: Bela Bartok20110721

Louise Fryer is joined by musicologist and author Malcolm Gillies and Hungarian poet and translator George Szirtes to explore the life and works of one of this Prom season's featured composers, Bela Bartok.

Louise Fryer and guests explore the life and works of Bela Bartok.

Proms Intro: Bela Bartok20110721

Louise Fryer is joined by musicologist and author Malcolm Gillies and Hungarian poet and translator George Szirtes to explore the life and works of one of this Prom season's featured composers, Bela Bartok.

Louise Fryer and guests explore the life and works of Bela Bartok.

Louise Fryer is joined by musicologist and author Malcolm Gillies and Hungarian poet and translator George Szirtes to explore the life and works of one of this Prom season's featured composers, Bela Bartok.

Louise Fryer and guests explore the life and works of Bela Bartok.

Proms Intro: William Tell20110716

Recorded in front of a live audience at the Royal College of Music, opera historian Benjamin Walton and Royal Opera House programme contributor Sarah Lenton join Petroc Trelawny to explore Rossini's William Tell, and the influence it had on the grand tradition of French opera.

Petroc Trelawny and guests explore Rossini's great opera William Tell.

Proms Intro: William Tell20110716

Recorded in front of a live audience at the Royal College of Music, opera historian Benjamin Walton and Royal Opera House programme contributor Sarah Lenton join Petroc Trelawny to explore Rossini's William Tell, and the influence it had on the grand tradition of French opera.

Petroc Trelawny and guests explore Rossini's great opera William Tell.

Recorded in front of a live audience at the Royal College of Music, opera historian Benjamin Walton and Royal Opera House programme contributor Sarah Lenton join Petroc Trelawny to explore Rossini's William Tell, and the influence it had on the grand tradition of French opera.

Petroc Trelawny and guests explore Rossini's great opera William Tell.

Proms Literary - The Literary Life of the Cello20110720

Instruments in Literature: the Cello.

How well do the great works of fiction portray instruments in their pages? Music critic and Professor of English, Peggy Reynolds is joined by a cellist from the BBC Symphony Orchestra to explore the cello's literary life across the ages - and to perform its literary incarnations.

Night Waves presenter Rana Mitter hosts this discussion recorded in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music.

The programme is part of Radio 3's Proms Plus Literary exploring some of the literary and cultural dimensions of this year's Proms concerts, in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music, right next door to the Albert Hall and just in advance of the concerts themselves.

Peggy Reynolds explores the cello in literature.

Proms Literary - The Literary Life Of The Cello20110720

Instruments in Literature: the Cello.

How well do the great works of fiction portray instruments in their pages? Music critic and Professor of English, Peggy Reynolds is joined by a cellist from the BBC Symphony Orchestra to explore the cello's literary life across the ages - and to perform its literary incarnations.

Night Waves presenter Rana Mitter hosts this discussion recorded in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music.

The programme is part of Radio 3's Proms Plus Literary exploring some of the literary and cultural dimensions of this year's Proms concerts, in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music, right next door to the Albert Hall and just in advance of the concerts themselves.

Peggy Reynolds explores the cello in literature.

Proms Literary - The Literary Life Of The Cello20110720

Instruments in Literature: the Cello.

How well do the great works of fiction portray instruments in their pages? Music critic and Professor of English, Peggy Reynolds is joined by a cellist from the BBC Symphony Orchestra to explore the cello's literary life across the ages - and to perform its literary incarnations.

Night Waves presenter Rana Mitter hosts this discussion recorded in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music.

The programme is part of Radio 3's Proms Plus Literary exploring some of the literary and cultural dimensions of this year's Proms concerts, in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music, right next door to the Albert Hall and just in advance of the concerts themselves.

Peggy Reynolds explores the cello in literature.

Proms Literary: French Classics20110718

From the romance of Proust to the existentialism of Camus, Kate Mosse, whose best selling 'Labyrinth' trilogy is set in France, and prize-winning writer and artist Edmund de Waal, author of 'The Hare with Amber Eyes', discuss the great French literary classics.

The programme is part of Radio 3's Proms Plus Literary exploring some of the literary and cultural dimensions of this year's Proms concerts, in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music, right next door to the Albert Hall and just in advance of the concerts themselves.

Night Waves presenter Matthew Sweet hosts this discussion on the French classics recorded in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music.

Writers Kate Mosse and Edmund de Waal discuss the great French literary classics.

Proms Literary: French Classics20110718

From the romance of Proust to the existentialism of Camus, Kate Mosse, whose best selling 'Labyrinth' trilogy is set in France, and prize-winning writer and artist Edmund de Waal, author of 'The Hare with Amber Eyes', discuss the great French literary classics.

The programme is part of Radio 3's Proms Plus Literary exploring some of the literary and cultural dimensions of this year's Proms concerts, in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music, right next door to the Albert Hall and just in advance of the concerts themselves.

Night Waves presenter Matthew Sweet hosts this discussion on the French classics recorded in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music.

Writers Kate Mosse and Edmund de Waal discuss the great French literary classics.

From the romance of Proust to the existentialism of Camus, Kate Mosse, whose best selling 'Labyrinth' trilogy is set in France, and prize-winning writer and artist Edmund de Waal, author of 'The Hare with Amber Eyes', discuss the great French literary classics.

The programme is part of Radio 3's Proms Plus Literary exploring some of the literary and cultural dimensions of this year's Proms concerts, in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music, right next door to the Albert Hall and just in advance of the concerts themselves.

Night Waves presenter Matthew Sweet hosts this discussion on the French classics recorded in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music.

Writers Kate Mosse and Edmund de Waal discuss the great French literary classics.

Agon *20090828

As part of a series celebrating Stravinsky's ballets, Louise Fryer is joined by composer Julian Anderson and Stravinsky biographer Stephen Walsh to discuss the composer's final example, Agon.

Louise Fryer discusses Stravinsky's final ballet, Agon.

Agon *20090828

As part of a series celebrating Stravinsky's ballets, Louise Fryer is joined by composer Julian Anderson and Stravinsky biographer Stephen Walsh to discuss the composer's final example, Agon.

Louise Fryer discusses Stravinsky's final ballet, Agon.

Gianandrea Noseda - Richard Wigley *20090806

Conductor Gianandrea Noseda and Richard Wigley, general manager of the BBC Philharmonic join Martin Handley to talk about their Italian-themed Prom.

Conductor Gianandrea Noseda talks to Martin Handley to talk about his Italian-themed Prom.

Gianandrea Noseda - Richard Wigley *20090806

Conductor Gianandrea Noseda and Richard Wigley, general manager of the BBC Philharmonic join Martin Handley to talk about their Italian-themed Prom.

Conductor Gianandrea Noseda talks to Martin Handley to talk about his Italian-themed Prom.

Handel's Samson *20090820

Catherine Bott is joined by conductor Harry Bicket and musicologist Dr Berta Joncas for an introduction to Handel's oratorio Samson.

Handel's Samson *20090820

Catherine Bott is joined by conductor Harry Bicket and musicologist Dr Berta Joncas for an introduction to Handel's oratorio Samson.

Literary Composers *20090823

Susan Hitch is joined by broadcaster the Rev Richard Coles and novelist Janice Galloway talk to about the diaries, poetry and letters of their favourite composers.

Richard Coles and Janice Galloway on the diaries and letters of their favourite composers.

Literary Composers *20090823

Susan Hitch is joined by broadcaster the Rev Richard Coles and novelist Janice Galloway talk to about the diaries, poetry and letters of their favourite composers.

Richard Coles and Janice Galloway on the diaries and letters of their favourite composers.

Middle-eastern Literature *20090822

Edward Stourton talks to Rana Mitter about how the literature of the Middle East has informed his understanding of the region - and selects his personal choice of readings.

Edward Stourton discusses how Middle East literature has helped him understand the region.

Middle-eastern Literature *20090822

Edward Stourton talks to Rana Mitter about how the literature of the Middle East has informed his understanding of the region - and selects his personal choice of readings.

Edward Stourton discusses how Middle East literature has helped him understand the region.

Partenope *20090719

Catherine Bott and the conductor of the 2009 Proms performance of Handel's opera Lars Ulrik Mortensen and Dr Suzanne Aspden from Oxford University discuss Handel's Partenope.

Catherine Bott, Lars Ulrik Mortensen and Dr Suzanne Aspden discuss Handel's Partenope.

Partenope *20090719

Catherine Bott and the conductor of the 2009 Proms performance of Handel's opera Lars Ulrik Mortensen and Dr Suzanne Aspden from Oxford University discuss Handel's Partenope.

Catherine Bott, Lars Ulrik Mortensen and Dr Suzanne Aspden discuss Handel's Partenope.

Proms Anniversary Composers *20090825

Sara Mohr-pietsch hosts a discussion at the Royal College of Music about Radio 3's four anniversary composers in 2009 - Purcell, Handel, Haydn and Mendelssohn - with members of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment.

Conductor Roger Norrington is joined by the OAE's principal oboist, Anthony Robson, and viola player Nicholas Logi.

Sara Mohr-pietsch discusses Radio 3's 2009 anniversary composers with members of the OAE.

Proms Anniversary Composers *20090825

Sara Mohr-pietsch hosts a discussion at the Royal College of Music about Radio 3's four anniversary composers in 2009 - Purcell, Handel, Haydn and Mendelssohn - with members of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment.

Conductor Roger Norrington is joined by the OAE's principal oboist, Anthony Robson, and viola player Nicholas Logi.

Sara Mohr-pietsch discusses Radio 3's 2009 anniversary composers with members of the OAE.

Proms Literary Festival - Fin-de-siecle Vienna *20090805

Proms Literary Festival

Susan Hitch presents a programme recorded in front of an audience in which writer and film-maker Dennis Marks, and professor of modern German literature Karen Leeder, explore the literary legacy of fin-de-siecle Vienna - the world that surrounded Gustav Mahler.

The Proms Literary Festival explores Gustav Mahler's fin-de-siecle Vienna.

Proms Literary Festival - Fin-de-siecle Vienna *20090805

Proms Literary Festival

Susan Hitch presents a programme recorded in front of an audience in which writer and film-maker Dennis Marks, and professor of modern German literature Karen Leeder, explore the literary legacy of fin-de-siecle Vienna - the world that surrounded Gustav Mahler.

The Proms Literary Festival explores Gustav Mahler's fin-de-siecle Vienna.

Proms Literary Festival - Gilbert And Sullivan *20090811

In a discussion recorded in front of an audience, Ian Mcmillan explores the power of the partnership between Gilbert and Sullivan with writer Ian Bradley, author of a complete annoted version of their works.

Ian Mcmillan explores the power of the partnership between Gilbert and Sullivan.

Proms Literary Festival - Gilbert And Sullivan *20090811

In a discussion recorded in front of an audience, Ian Mcmillan explores the power of the partnership between Gilbert and Sullivan with writer Ian Bradley, author of a complete annoted version of their works.

Ian Mcmillan explores the power of the partnership between Gilbert and Sullivan.

Proms Literary Festival - Mountain Writing *20090827

Proms Literary Festival

Stephen Venables, the first Briton to climb Everest without supplementary oxygen, and Chris Smith, mountaineering enthusiast as well as former Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, talk to Ian Mcmillan about their favourite mountain writing.

Stephen Venables and Lord Smith tell Ian Mcmillan about their favourite mountain writing.

Proms Literary Festival - Mountain Writing *20090827

Proms Literary Festival

Stephen Venables, the first Briton to climb Everest without supplementary oxygen, and Chris Smith, mountaineering enthusiast as well as former Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, talk to Ian Mcmillan about their favourite mountain writing.

Stephen Venables and Lord Smith tell Ian Mcmillan about their favourite mountain writing.

Proms Literary Festival - Samuel Johnson *20090812

In a programme recorded in front of a Proms audience, Ian Mcmillan is joined by Lynda Mugglestone of Pembroke College, Oxford, and journalist Matthew Parris to explore the myth and reality of Dr Samuel Johnson, and his continuing hold on the English language.

Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, published in 1755, held centre stage in defining and describing the English language for at least 150 years until the publication of the Oxford English Dictionary.

Personally unimposing - he was blind in one eye, deaf in one ear, and suffered from an assortment of physical tics which may have been Tourettes - Johnson rose from a modest background as the son of a bookseller in Uttoxeter to become one of the most quoted men of English letters.

His idiosyncratic dictionary is laden with his own personality, and he refers to words like lunch as 'as much food as one's hands can hold' and lexicographer as 'a writer of dictionaries; a harmless drudge that busies himself in tracing the original and detailing the signification of words'.

Ian Mcmillan and Lynda Mugglestone explore the myth and reality of Samuel Johnson

Proms Literary Festival - Samuel Johnson *20090812

In a programme recorded in front of a Proms audience, Ian Mcmillan is joined by Lynda Mugglestone of Pembroke College, Oxford, and journalist Matthew Parris to explore the myth and reality of Dr Samuel Johnson, and his continuing hold on the English language.

Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, published in 1755, held centre stage in defining and describing the English language for at least 150 years until the publication of the Oxford English Dictionary.

Personally unimposing - he was blind in one eye, deaf in one ear, and suffered from an assortment of physical tics which may have been Tourettes - Johnson rose from a modest background as the son of a bookseller in Uttoxeter to become one of the most quoted men of English letters.

His idiosyncratic dictionary is laden with his own personality, and he refers to words like lunch as 'as much food as one's hands can hold' and lexicographer as 'a writer of dictionaries; a harmless drudge that busies himself in tracing the original and detailing the signification of words'.

Ian Mcmillan and Lynda Mugglestone explore the myth and reality of Samuel Johnson

Proms Literary Festival - Sherlock Holmes20090907

Author AN Wilson and BBC TV producer Steven Moffat talk to Matthew Sweet about the enduring appeal of Sherlock Holmes and his love of Mendelssohn.

AN Wilson talks about the appeal of Sherlock Holmes and his love of Mendelssohn.

Proms Literary Festival - Sherlock Holmes20090907

Author AN Wilson and BBC TV producer Steven Moffat talk to Matthew Sweet about the enduring appeal of Sherlock Holmes and his love of Mendelssohn.

AN Wilson talks about the appeal of Sherlock Holmes and his love of Mendelssohn.

Proms Literary Festival - Tennyson *20090802

Proms Literary Festival

Former poet laureate Andrew Motion introduces a personal choice of poems by another poet Laureate, Alfred Tennyson.

Actress Fiona Shaw performs Andrew's choices, including excerpts from In Memoriam and The Lady of Shallot in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music.

Andrew also talks to Matthew Sweet about Tennyson, revealing him to be a much stranger poet than is generally believed - a troubled figured, rhapsodic in his poetry, both antiquated and modern.

In his life he was touched by great joy and tragedy, yet was always willing to grasp the great issues of the Victorian Age, of history, faith and evolution.

Andrew Motion introduces a personal choice of Tennyson's poems.

Readings are by Fiona Shaw

Proms Literary Festival - Tennyson *20090802

Proms Literary Festival

Former poet laureate Andrew Motion introduces a personal choice of poems by another poet Laureate, Alfred Tennyson.

Actress Fiona Shaw performs Andrew's choices, including excerpts from In Memoriam and The Lady of Shallot in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music.

Andrew also talks to Matthew Sweet about Tennyson, revealing him to be a much stranger poet than is generally believed - a troubled figured, rhapsodic in his poetry, both antiquated and modern.

In his life he was touched by great joy and tragedy, yet was always willing to grasp the great issues of the Victorian Age, of history, faith and evolution.

Andrew Motion introduces a personal choice of Tennyson's poems.

Readings are by Fiona Shaw

Proms Literary Festival: Great Bollywood Stories *20090816

In a discussion in front of an audience as part of the Proms Literary Festival 2009, Rana Mitter is joined by writer Jamila Gavin and theatre director Jatinder Verma to discuss the appeal of the stories at the heart of Bollywood cinema, how they have changed over the years and their impact on rival film industries.

Rana Mitter discusses the appeal of the stories at the heart of Bollywood cinema.

Proms Literary Festival: Great Bollywood Stories *20090816

In a discussion in front of an audience as part of the Proms Literary Festival 2009, Rana Mitter is joined by writer Jamila Gavin and theatre director Jatinder Verma to discuss the appeal of the stories at the heart of Bollywood cinema, how they have changed over the years and their impact on rival film industries.

Rana Mitter discusses the appeal of the stories at the heart of Bollywood cinema.

Proms Literary Festival: Ian Mcmillan On Don Quixote *20090911

Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quixote is one of fiction's best-loved characters and the hero of a book many consider a landmark of modern literature.

The knight has featured in artworks by Dore, Dali and Picasso, and has been the inspiration for music by Telemann, Mendelssohn and Richard Strauss.

Actor Andrew Sachs offers his own dramatic version of Quixote, spurred on by Ian Mcmillan and literary critic John Mullan's reflections on the character and his followers in the world of letters.

Actor Andrew Sachs presents his own dramatic version of Quixote.

Proms Literary Festival: Ian Mcmillan On Don Quixote *20090911

Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quixote is one of fiction's best-loved characters and the hero of a book many consider a landmark of modern literature.

The knight has featured in artworks by Dore, Dali and Picasso, and has been the inspiration for music by Telemann, Mendelssohn and Richard Strauss.

Actor Andrew Sachs offers his own dramatic version of Quixote, spurred on by Ian Mcmillan and literary critic John Mullan's reflections on the character and his followers in the world of letters.

Actor Andrew Sachs presents his own dramatic version of Quixote.

Proms Literary Festival: Music And Philosophy In Fin De Siecle Vienna *20090904

Susan Hitch invites philosophers Roger Scruton and AC Grayling to consider how iconoclastic thought found an echo in groundbreaking music in fin de siecle Vienna and how it resonates even today.

What did Mahler owe to his study of Nietzsche? Were there many musicians who knew of and were inspired by Freud's Interpretation of Dreams when it appeared in 1899? And how did Wittgenstein respond to the music of late 19th century Vienna? The Austrian capital was a place of challenge and iconoclasm during this period and the boundaries between concert hall and study were blurring as thinkers and musicians re-evaluated the nature of human experience.

Philosophers Roger Scruton and AC Grayling on intellectual life in fin de siecle Vienna.

Proms Literary Festival: Music And Philosophy In Fin De Siecle Vienna *20090904

Susan Hitch invites philosophers Roger Scruton and AC Grayling to consider how iconoclastic thought found an echo in groundbreaking music in fin de siecle Vienna and how it resonates even today.

What did Mahler owe to his study of Nietzsche? Were there many musicians who knew of and were inspired by Freud's Interpretation of Dreams when it appeared in 1899? And how did Wittgenstein respond to the music of late 19th century Vienna? The Austrian capital was a place of challenge and iconoclasm during this period and the boundaries between concert hall and study were blurring as thinkers and musicians re-evaluated the nature of human experience.

Philosophers Roger Scruton and AC Grayling on intellectual life in fin de siecle Vienna.

Proms Literary Festival: Victorian Villains *20090731

Proms Literary Festival

In a programme recorded in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music, Matthew Sweet introduces dramatic readings celebrating the infamous villains from Victorian fiction and is joined on stage by award-winning biographer Michael Holroyd and writer Elaine Showalter.

Matthew Sweet, Michael Holroyd and Elaine Showalter celebrate Victorian villains.

Proms Literary Festival: Victorian Villains *20090731

Proms Literary Festival

In a programme recorded in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music, Matthew Sweet introduces dramatic readings celebrating the infamous villains from Victorian fiction and is joined on stage by award-winning biographer Michael Holroyd and writer Elaine Showalter.

Matthew Sweet, Michael Holroyd and Elaine Showalter celebrate Victorian villains.

Rite Of Spring *20090813

Christopher Cook discusses Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring with director of the Royal Ballet Monica Mason and choreographer Millicent Hodson, who has reconstructed Nijinsky's original choreography for the celebrated ballet.

Christopher Cook discusses The Rite of Spring with Royal Ballet director Monica Mason

Rite Of Spring *20090813

Christopher Cook discusses Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring with director of the Royal Ballet Monica Mason and choreographer Millicent Hodson, who has reconstructed Nijinsky's original choreography for the celebrated ballet.

Christopher Cook discusses The Rite of Spring with Royal Ballet director Monica Mason

Schnittke And Shostakovich *20090824

Suzy Klein discusses Schnittke and Shostakovich with composer, writer and broadcaster Gerard Mcburney, and Russian music expert Dr Marina Frolova-Walker.

A discussion on Schnittke and Shostakovich with Gerard Mcburney and Marina Frolova-Walker.

Schnittke And Shostakovich *20090824

Suzy Klein discusses Schnittke and Shostakovich with composer, writer and broadcaster Gerard Mcburney, and Russian music expert Dr Marina Frolova-Walker.

A discussion on Schnittke and Shostakovich with Gerard Mcburney and Marina Frolova-Walker.

Shostakovich * *20090819

Andrew Mcgregor discusses Shostakovich with musicologist David Nice and lecturer Dr Philip Ross Bullock.

Andrew Mcgregor discusses Shostakovich with musicologist David Nice.

Shostakovich * *20090819

Andrew Mcgregor discusses Shostakovich with musicologist David Nice and lecturer Dr Philip Ross Bullock.

Andrew Mcgregor discusses Shostakovich with musicologist David Nice.

Sir Peter Maxwell Davies At 7520090908

Celebrating his 75th birthday year in 2009, Sir Peter Maxwell Davies reflects on his career both as a composer and conductor.

Hosted by Martin Handley.

Sir Peter Maxwell Davies reflects on his career both as a composer and conductor.

Sir Peter Maxwell Davies At 7520090908

Celebrating his 75th birthday year in 2009, Sir Peter Maxwell Davies reflects on his career both as a composer and conductor.

Hosted by Martin Handley.

Sir Peter Maxwell Davies reflects on his career both as a composer and conductor.

The Orpheus Myth * *20090815

In front of an audience at the Proms Literary Festival, Susan Hitch is joined by award-winning writer Philip Pullman to discuss the powerful legend of Orpheus, exploring the influence of myth as a subject for fiction.

The classical tale of Orpheus has influenced musicians and writers from Igor Stravinsky to John Milton to Nick Cave.

Orpheus, whose lyre and songs could charm even Hades, king of the underworld, journeys into the kingdom of the dead to plead for the release of his wife Eurydice.

Succeeding where all others have failed, he is offered a deal.

He can take his wife with him, but only if he makes his return journey without turning to look at her as she walks behind him back into the land of the living.

Where his heroism and charm have succeeded, his human flaw of curiosity proves his undoing.

Philip Pullman, author of His Dark Materials, on the powerful classical myth of Orpheus.

The Orpheus Myth * *20090815

In front of an audience at the Proms Literary Festival, Susan Hitch is joined by award-winning writer Philip Pullman to discuss the powerful legend of Orpheus, exploring the influence of myth as a subject for fiction.

The classical tale of Orpheus has influenced musicians and writers from Igor Stravinsky to John Milton to Nick Cave.

Orpheus, whose lyre and songs could charm even Hades, king of the underworld, journeys into the kingdom of the dead to plead for the release of his wife Eurydice.

Succeeding where all others have failed, he is offered a deal.

He can take his wife with him, but only if he makes his return journey without turning to look at her as she walks behind him back into the land of the living.

Where his heroism and charm have succeeded, his human flaw of curiosity proves his undoing.

Philip Pullman, author of His Dark Materials, on the powerful classical myth of Orpheus.

The Victorian Novel *20090804

Proms Literary Festival

As part of the festival's Victorian season, Matthew Sweet is joined by Roy Hattersley and Valentine Cunningham as they champion the Victorian novel in all its forms.

From the elegance of Jane Austen and the thrilling sensation novels of Wilkie Collins to the stately realism of George Eliot and the bleakness of Thomas Hardy, the Victorian novel is a treasure trove of literary riches.

Roy and Valentine argue that these should still be seen as pinnacles of English literature and their mix of character, social upheaval, storytelling, melodrama, malign fate and high style demonstrate a commitment to portray the whole of life that is as relevant today as it has ever been.

With Matthew Sweet.

Roy Hattersley and Valentine Cunningham champion the Victorian novel.

The Victorian Novel *20090804

Proms Literary Festival

As part of the festival's Victorian season, Matthew Sweet is joined by Roy Hattersley and Valentine Cunningham as they champion the Victorian novel in all its forms.

From the elegance of Jane Austen and the thrilling sensation novels of Wilkie Collins to the stately realism of George Eliot and the bleakness of Thomas Hardy, the Victorian novel is a treasure trove of literary riches.

Roy and Valentine argue that these should still be seen as pinnacles of English literature and their mix of character, social upheaval, storytelling, melodrama, malign fate and high style demonstrate a commitment to portray the whole of life that is as relevant today as it has ever been.

With Matthew Sweet.

Roy Hattersley and Valentine Cunningham champion the Victorian novel.

Xenakis *20090902

Martin Handley discusses Iannis Xenakis with the composer's friend and biographer Nouritza Matossian, and percussionist Colin Currie.

Martin Handley discusses Iannis Xenakis with Nouritza Matossian and Colin Currie.

Xenakis *20090902

Martin Handley discusses Iannis Xenakis with the composer's friend and biographer Nouritza Matossian, and percussionist Colin Currie.

Martin Handley discusses Iannis Xenakis with Nouritza Matossian and Colin Currie.

Proms Intro: The Mastersingers20100717

Louise Fryer discusses The Mastersingers of Nuremberg with Patrick Carnegy, author of Wagner and the Art of the Theatre, and Anthony Negus of WNO's music staff.

Louise Fryer discusses The Mastersingers with Patrick Carnegy and Anthony Negus of WNO.

Proms Intro: The Mastersingers20100717

Louise Fryer discusses The Mastersingers of Nuremberg with Patrick Carnegy, author of Wagner and the Art of the Theatre, and Anthony Negus of WNO's music staff.

Louise Fryer discusses The Mastersingers with Patrick Carnegy and Anthony Negus of WNO.

Literary: Humour In Literature20110813

Since Chaucer's Canterbury Tales 600 years ago, writers have been making us laugh - but what makes literary comic gold? Comedians Natalie Haynes and Steve Punt unveil and perform their favourite humorous writing from down the ages, from Aristophanes and Chaucer to Dorothy Parker and P.G.

Wodehouse.

Night Waves presenter Matthew Sweet hosts this discussion recorded in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music.

The programme is part of Radio 3's Proms Plus Literary exploring some of the literary and cultural dimensions of this year's Proms concerts, in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music, right next door to the Albert Hall and just in advance of the concerts themselves.

Comedians Natalie Haynes and Steve Punt talk about their favourite humorous writing.

Literary: Humour In Literature20110813

Since Chaucer's Canterbury Tales 600 years ago, writers have been making us laugh - but what makes literary comic gold? Comedians Natalie Haynes and Steve Punt unveil and perform their favourite humorous writing from down the ages, from Aristophanes and Chaucer to Dorothy Parker and P.G.

Wodehouse.

Night Waves presenter Matthew Sweet hosts this discussion recorded in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music.

The programme is part of Radio 3's Proms Plus Literary exploring some of the literary and cultural dimensions of this year's Proms concerts, in front of an audience at the Royal College of Music, right next door to the Albert Hall and just in advance of the concerts themselves.

Comedians Natalie Haynes and Steve Punt talk about their favourite humorous writing.

Musicians' Literary Passions: Tasmin Little20110903

Tasmin Little, creator of the groundbreaking Naked Violin project, completes our series of events in which musicians from this year's Proms season discuss their favourite works of fiction and poetry - accompanied by readings.

Presented by Anne McElvoy.

Violinist Tasmin Little discusses her literary passions with Anne McElvoy.

Barenboim And Beethoven20120720

Daniel Barenboim and Beethoven. Some sixty years after making his international debut, the great pianist and conductor talks to Proms Director Roger Wright about his abiding passion for the music of Beethoven.

Barenboim And Beethoven20120720

Daniel Barenboim and Beethoven. Some sixty years after making his international debut, the great pianist and conductor talks to Proms Director Roger Wright about his abiding passion for the music of Beethoven.

Berlioz's The Trojans20120722

Live from the Royal College of Music, London

Sara Mohr-Pietsch introduces Berlioz's Trojans with the help of musicians from tonight Prom. Together they unpick Berlioz's music and how he tells the story in his opera of war, love and a man on a mission.

Berlioz's The Trojans20120722

Live from the Royal College of Music, London

Sara Mohr-Pietsch introduces Berlioz's Trojans with the help of musicians from tonight Prom. Together they unpick Berlioz's music and how he tells the story in his opera of war, love and a man on a mission.

Debussy's Pelleas Et Melisande20120715

Louise Fryer explores the music and symbolism in Debussy's only completed opera, based on the popular late 19th century play by Maurice Maeterlinck. The subject of the opera is doomed and forbidden love set in a claustrophobic, dream-like atmosphere which perfectly suited the music of Debussy. Louise is joined by musicologist Professor Richard Langham Smith and poet and French literature specialist Professor Patrick McGuinness.

Debussy's Pelleas Et Melisande20120715

Louise Fryer explores the music and symbolism in Debussy's only completed opera, based on the popular late 19th century play by Maurice Maeterlinck. The subject of the opera is doomed and forbidden love set in a claustrophobic, dream-like atmosphere which perfectly suited the music of Debussy. Louise is joined by musicologist Professor Richard Langham Smith and poet and French literature specialist Professor Patrick McGuinness.

George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion20120714

A hundred years after it was written Professor Roy Foster and biographer Michael Holroyd discuss George Bernard Shaw's 'Pygmalion', the play which inspired 'My Fair Lady'. Shaw created the character of Eliza Doolittle for Mrs Patrick Campbell, She played the role in the first British production in 1914 with Herbert Beerbohm Tree as Henry Higgins. 'The reformer England needs today is an energetic phonetic enthusiast: that is why I have made such a one the hero of a popular play', wrote Shaw.

George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion20120714

A hundred years after it was written Professor Roy Foster and biographer Michael Holroyd discuss George Bernard Shaw's 'Pygmalion', the play which inspired 'My Fair Lady'. Shaw created the character of Eliza Doolittle for Mrs Patrick Campbell, She played the role in the first British production in 1914 with Herbert Beerbohm Tree as Henry Higgins. 'The reformer England needs today is an energetic phonetic enthusiast: that is why I have made such a one the hero of a popular play', wrote Shaw.

Juilliard School And Royal Academy Of Music20120716

Recorded earlier this evening in front of a live audience at the Royal College of Music.

Louise Fryer talks to Ara Guzelimian from New York's Juilliard School of Music and Jonathan Freeman-Attwood from London's Royal Academy of Music about their respective music colleges and the long-standing series of transatlantic collaborations between the two which tonight's Prom showcases.

Juilliard School And Royal Academy Of Music20120716

Recorded earlier this evening in front of a live audience at the Royal College of Music.

Louise Fryer talks to Ara Guzelimian from New York's Juilliard School of Music and Jonathan Freeman-Attwood from London's Royal Academy of Music about their respective music colleges and the long-standing series of transatlantic collaborations between the two which tonight's Prom showcases.

20080722

Martin Handley talks to Roger Norrington

20080722

Martin Handley talks to Roger Norrington

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Handel composed Belshazzar during a period when he was focusing on putting on English oratorios in London theatres.

Catherine Bott presents a discussion with critic, writer and broadcaster Roderick Swanston and theatre historian Sarah Lenton exploring why Handel had turned away from Italian opera at this time, examining the circumstances of the creation of Belshazzar and its dramatic content.

20080816

Handel composed Belshazzar during a period when he was focusing on putting on English oratorios in London theatres.

Catherine Bott presents a discussion with critic, writer and broadcaster Roderick Swanston and theatre historian Sarah Lenton exploring why Handel had turned away from Italian opera at this time, examining the circumstances of the creation of Belshazzar and its dramatic content.

Cambridge University At 800 *20090722

From the international renown of King's College Choir to the many graduates of the university's choral, music and organ scholar system, Cambridge continues to produce some of the best musicians, composers and conductors in the world.

Louise Fryer hosts a discussion with past and present Directors of Music at King's College - David Willcocks and Stephen Cleobury - alongside the university's professor of music - Nicholas Cook, and composer Ryan Wigglesworth.

Louise Fryer hosts a discussion to mark Cambridge University's 800th anniversary.

Cambridge University At 800 *20090722

From the international renown of King's College Choir to the many graduates of the university's choral, music and organ scholar system, Cambridge continues to produce some of the best musicians, composers and conductors in the world.

Louise Fryer hosts a discussion with past and present Directors of Music at King's College - David Willcocks and Stephen Cleobury - alongside the university's professor of music - Nicholas Cook, and composer Ryan Wigglesworth.

Louise Fryer hosts a discussion to mark Cambridge University's 800th anniversary.