Private Passions

Guests from all walks of life discuss their musical loves and hates.

Episodes

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Broadcast
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20081130

Michael Berkeley talks to actor Paul Rhys, whose choices include Bach's St Matthew Passion

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Michael Berkeley is joined by the painter Martin Fuller, whose work is currently enjoying a retrospective at the art gallery and museum in his home town of Leamington Spa.

His musical choices include songs by Duke Ellington, Oscar Brown and Charles Mingus, as well as a late Beethoven string quartet and an excerpt from Verdi's Requiem.

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Michael Berkeley is joined by the scholar, biographer and art historian FRANCEs Spalding, who has written extensively on members of the Bloomsbury Group.

Her latest book is a much-acclaimed biography of the wood engraver Gwen Raverat - a friend of Rupert Brooke and Lytton Strachy and the granddaughter of Charles Darwin.

Spalding's musical choices include church and educational music and works by Vivaldi, Glinka, Mussorgsky and Billie Holiday

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Michael Berkeley talks to writer and journalist Andro Linklater and plays his choice of music, including Josephine Baker, Marianne Faithfull, John Adams and Javanese gamelan music.

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Michael Berkeley's guest is American jazz pianist Fred Hersch.

His choice of music features Bach, Ravel, Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, Joni Mitchell and Earl Hines.

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Michael Berkeley is joined by art historian John Gage, an authority on the works of Turner and the author of two monumental studies of the role played by colour in art and culture.

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Michael Berkeley talks to the BBC's political editor Andrew Marr, whose choice of music includes Bach, Mozart, Shostakovich, Bob Dylan and Burt Bacharach.

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Michael Berkeley talks to agony aunt Irma Kurtz, whose musical choices include works by Tchaikovsky, Britten, Ravel, Janacek and Sondheim.

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Michael Berkeley's guest is Jude Kelly, artistic director of the West YORKshire Playhouse.

Her musical choices include Donizetti, John Cage, Haydn, Elgar and Joni Mitchell

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Michael Berkeley meets theatre director David McVicar, whose musical selection includes Handel, Mozart, Britten, Ravel and Nina Simone

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Michael Berkeley talks to author Hanif Kureishi, whose musical choices are almost all contemporary and include the Beatles, Steve Reich, Arvo Part, John Cage and Zakir Hussein.

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Michael Berkeley talks to Prof Sir Tom Blundell, whose wide-ranging musical tastes include pieces from INDIA, PAKISTAN and Senegal, Mozart, Bellini, Verdi and Billie Holiday

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Michael Berkeley talks to arts consultant Christopher Hunt, whose choice of music includes pieces by Handel, Bach, Mozart and Harrison Birtwistle.

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Michael Berkeley talks to former ENGLAND Test cricketer Tony Lewis, whose musical choices include Beethoven, Handel, Haydn and Schubert and a chorale by Karg-Elert.

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Michael Berkeley talks to poet Simon Armitage, whose musical choices include songs by Hugo Wolf, Nina Simone and Radiohead, and sacred music by Arvo Part, Durufle and Tavener.

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Michael Berkeley talks to writer Peter Parker, whose choices focus on music from the 1920s and 1930s, with pieces by Weill, Coward, Cole Porter, Krenek, Stravinsky and Britten.

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Michael Berkeley talks to writer, broadcaster and critic Clive James

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Michael Berkeley talks to poet Wendy Cope, whose musical choices include Tallis, Britten, Handel, Mozart, Beethoven and Judith Weir

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Michael Berkeley talks to novelist and playwright Nigel Williams, whose musical choices include Bach, Mozart, Muddy Waters and Orlando Gibbons.

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Michael Berkeley talks to historian Niall Ferguson, whose musical choices include Schubert, Beethoven, Wagner, Robert Burns and Cannonball Adderley.

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Michael Berkeley talks to playwright Arnold Wesker, whose choice of music includes Elgar, C P E Bach, Michael Nyman and Japanese composer Shikeiki Saegusa.

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Michael Berkeley talks to trumpeter Guy Barker, who chooses music by Miles Davis, Charles Mingus, Honegger and Martinu.

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Michael Berkeley is joined by the academic George Steiner, whose musical choices include works by Salamone Rossi, Gesualdo, Schubert, Poulenc, Edith Piaf and Hammerstein.

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Michael Berkeley talks to Dr Susan Wollenberg, whose musical choices reflect her interest in Viennese Baroque music, especially Schubert, C P E Bach and women composers.

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Michael Berkeley talks to war correspondent Robert Fox, whose choice of music includes Victoria, Vivaldi, Cimarosa, Mozart, George Butterworth and Leonard Cohen

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Michael Berkeley meets Nicholas de Jongh, chief theatre critic of the LONDON Evening Standard, whose choice of music includes Bach, Schubert, Mozart, Richard Strauss and Mahler.

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Michael Berkeley talks to actor and director Simon McBurney, who chooses music by Beethoven, Chopin, Cage and Schnittke and traditional music from around the world.

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Michael Berkeley talks to actor and director Philip Franks - Sgt Craddock in four series of Heartbeat - who chooses Purcell, Bach, Mozart, Shostakovich, John Adams and the Beatles.

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Michael Berkeley talks to writer Sue Townsend, whose musical choices include Bach, Tchaikovsky, Brahms, Edith Piaf, Jack Teagarden and Shandileer.

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Michael Berkeley talks to Nobel prize-winner Sir James Mirrlees, whose musical choices include Monteverdi, Goehr, Stravinsky, Schubert, Beethoven, Schoenberg and Stockhausen.

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Michael Berkeley talks to AUSTRALIAn novelist Tim Winton and introduces his choice of music.

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Michael Berkeley talks to Prof Steven Pinker, whose musical choices include Bach, Itzhak Perlman, Maurice Jarre, and songs by the Beatles, the Neville Brothers and Elvis Costello.

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Michael Berkeley talks to novelist Elizabeth Jane Howard, whose choice of music includes include Scarlatti, Bach, Mozart, Strauss and Brahms.

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Michael Berkeley talks to film and TV composer Stephen Warbeck, whose musical choices include Messiaen, Eisler, Britten, Bob Dylan, Keith Jarrett and the Pogues.

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Michael Berkeley talks to criminal psychologist Prof David Canter, whose choice of music ranges from Palestrina and Bach to Ligeti and the Beatles.

20030316

Michael Berkeley talks to Jon Lord, the classically-trained keyboard player of the rock group Deep Purple.

In 1969 Jon Lord made a pre-emptive strike for 'crossover' when his 'Concerto for Group and Orchestra' was performed at the Royal Albert Hall, conducted by Sir Malcolm Arnold.

Today he reveals some of the influences on his own music, including works by Stravinsky, Vaughan Williams, Bach, Bartok and The Beatles.

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Michael Berkeley's guest today is the distinguished South AFRICAn writer Andre Brink, who is Emeritus Professor of ENGLISH at the University of Cape Town.

Born into his country's exclusionary white culture, he repudiated its apartheid policies after studies in PARIS in the 1960s, and his many novels - including Looking On Darkness, Rumours Of Rain, The Rights Of Desire and The Other Side Of Silence - confront the painful realities and dilemmas of life in present-day South AFRICA.

He has also written plays, children's books and literary criticism.

His musical passions range from Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert and Chopin to a Croatian folk-song and a chanson by Francoise Hardy.

20030406

Today Michael Berkeley talks to the young British novelist Toby Litt, a graduate of Malcolm Bradbury's Creative Writing Course at the University of East Anglia, and author of Adventures In Capitalism, Corpsing, Deadkidsongs and, most recently, Exhibitionism.

His choice of music is eclectic, ranging from Bach, Saint-Saens, Mahler and Stravinsky to Bob Dylan, Nick Drake and the much-acclaimed young British composer Thomas Ades.

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Michael Berkeley's guest today is Peter Brookes, political cartoonist of The Times.

His great love is opera, and today he has chosen extracts from Mozart's Don Giovanni, Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin, Handel's Rinaldo, and Stravinsky's The Rake's Progress.

He is also passionate about chamber music, and movements from quartets by Janacek and Shostakovich feature among his choices.

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Today Michael Berkeley meets Matthew Parris, who recently published his memoir Chance Witness: An Outsider's Life In Politics.

A Conservative MP for seven years under the Thatcher government, Matthew Parris has since carved out a career as an entertaining parliamentary sketchwriter, travel writer and television broadcaster.

His choices today include folk music from AFRICA and the Ukraine, and an oratorio by Gounod, and operatic extracts by Rossini, Meyerbeer, and Smetana.

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Michael Berkeley's guest today is the scholar Stanley Wells, who is Emeritus Professor of Shakespeare Studies at the University of BIRMINGHAM, Chairman of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust at Stratford-upon-Avon, and Vice-Chairman of the Royal Shakespeare Theatre.

His latest book, Shakespeare for All Time, draws on a lifetime's experience of studying, teaching, editing and writing about the great playwright.

A Shakespearean theme runs through his musical choices, which include works by Schubert, Arne, Berlioz, Vaughan Williams and Britten.

20030503

Today Michael Berkeley meets the astrophysicist Malcolm Longair, Jacksonian Professor of Natural Philosophy at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge.

The new edition of his book, Theoretical Concepts in Physics, is a highly original approach to theoretical reasoning in physics, illuminating the subject from the perspective of research scientists.

Music is another of Malcolm Longair's passions, and in today's programme he brings insight and enthusiasm to bear on works by Handel, Wagner, John Adams, Messiaen and Oscar Peterson.

20030504

Michael Berkeley meets the astrophysicist Malcolm Longair, Jacksonian Professor of Natural Philosophy at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge.

The new edition of his book, Theoretical Concepts in Physics, is a highly original approach to theoretical reasoning in physics, illuminating the subject from the perspective of research scientists.

Music is another of Malcolm Longair's passions, and in today's programme he brings insight and enthusiasm to bear on works by Handel, Wagner, John Adams, Messiaen and Oscar Peterson.

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Michael Berkeley's guest today is Rick Moody, one of an up-and-coming generation of successful young American writers, whose 1994 novel, The Ice Storm, was turned by Ang Lee into a powerful film starring Kevin Kline and Sigourney Weaver.

His latest book, The Black Veil, is subtitled A Memoir With Digressions, and is based on his own experiences.

His musical passions range from Chopin, Tchaikovsky and Arvo Part to Meredith Monk, the Penguin Café Orchestra, and Frank Zappa.

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Michael Berkeley meets the explorer Benedict Allen, who seems equally at home in the Amazonian rainforest, the deserts of Mongolia or the frozen wastes of Siberia.

Last year his attempt to cross the Bering Straits with a dog team was filmed by the BBC, and he has published several accounts of his intrepid journeys, as well as editing The Faber Book of Explorations.

His musical choices include music from Cuba, Mongolia, West AFRICA and Papua New Guinea, as well as Bach, Elgar, Tchaikovsky and Richard Strauss.

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Michael Berkeley's guest this week is James Wood, who was Chief Literary Critic of The Guardian newspaper until 1995.

He now lives and works in the USA, where he is senior editor and literary critic for The New Republic, based in Washington DC.

He has also just published his own first novel, The Book Against God, in which music plays a significant role.

His choices today include vocal music by Byrd, Tallis, William Harris, Parry and the Beatles as well as piano works by Beethoven and Brahms.

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Michael Berkeley meets the award-winning Irish novelist and playwright John Banville, Chief Literary Critic and Associate Literary Editor of The Irish Times, whose novels include a trilogy based on the lives of Copernicus, Newton and Kepler, 'The Book of Evidence', 'Ghosts', 'Athena', 'The Untouchable' (inspired by the career of the Cambridge spy Anthony Blunt), and most recently, 'Shroud'.

His musical passions range from a traditional Irish melody played on the uileann pipes, and a piano piece by the contemporary Irish composer Gerald Barry, to works by Purcell, Britten, Shostakovich and Richard Strauss.

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Michael Berkeley's guest today is the actor Tim Pigott-Smith, who made his name as the sadistic colonial policeman Ronald Merrick in the TV adaptation of The Jewel In The Crown, and is currently starring as DI Vickers in The Vice.

When he is not playing loathsome policemen on TV, he often appears at the RSC and the National Theatre, in productions ranging from Shakespeare to Poliakoff, and has had various cameo film roles, including M in the Bond spoof Johnny ENGLISH.

His musical passions range from songs by Mahler, Georges Brassens and The Beatles to Bach's Goldberg Variations, a tango by Astor Piazzolla and Sibelius' Violin Concerto.

20030614

Today Michael Berkeley talks to Lynne Reid Banks, who began her career as an actress and journalist, then shot to fame in 1960 with the publication and subsequent filming of her first novel, The L-Shaped Room.

She went on to write over 30 more novels, plays, biographies, and children's books, a genre at which she excels.

The INDIAn In The Cupboard sold 5 million copies and was filmed in 1995, and she has just published her latest children's book, Alice By Accident.

She is particularly fond of the human voice, and her musical passions range from a Schubert song to American musicals, an aria from Menotti's opera The Consul, and traditional Navajo chant.

20030615

Today Michael Berkeley talks to Lynne Reid Banks, who began her career as an actress and journalist, then shot to fame in 1960 with the publication and subsequent filming of her first novel 'The L-Shaped Room'.

She went on to write over 30 more novels, plays, biographies, and children's books, a genre at which she excels.

'The INDIAn in the Cupboard' sold 5 million copies and was filmed in 1995, and she has just published her latest children's book, 'Alice by Accident'.

She is particularly fond of the human voice, and her musical passions range from a Schubert song to American musicals, an aria from Menottis opera 'The Consul', and traditional Navajo chant.

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Michael Berkeley's guest today is one of Britain's leading ARCHITECTs.

Sir Terry Farrell has completed high-profile buildings and masterplans in cities as diverse as EDINBURGH, Hong Kong, SEATTLE, Dubai, Lisbon, LONDON and Seoul.

His work in the UK has included Charing Cross Station, the MI6 headquarters building and Greenwich Pier in LONDON, the award-winning International Centre for Life in Newcastle, and The Deep, a marine science center in Hull.

His musical tastes range from Monteverdi, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, George Benjamin and The Beatles to traditional music from South America and his native IRELAND.

20030628

Michael Berkeleys guest this week is the internationally respected astrophysicist and Astronomer Royal, Sir Martin Rees, who heads the Institute of Astronomy at Cambridge University.

His books include Just Six Numbers and Our Cosmic Habitat, and he has just published Our Final Century, in which he concludes that the human race has only a 50% chance of surviving the 21st century.

His musical choices, however, are far from gloomy: they range from Haydn's Creation and a movement from Mahler's Resurrection Symphony to the incandescent Organ Solo and Intrada from Janacek's Glagolitic Mass.

20030629

Michael Berkeley's guest this week is the internationally respected astrophysicist and Astronomer Royal, Sir Martin Rees, who heads the Institute of Astronomy at Cambridge University.

His books include Just Six Numbers and Our Cosmic Habitat, and he has just published Our Final Century, in which he concludes that the human race has only a 50% chance of surviving the 21st century.

His musical choices, however, are far from gloomy: they range from Haydn's Creation and a movement from Mahler's Resurrection Symphony to the incandescent Organ Solo and Intrada from Janacek's Glagolitic Mass.

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Michael Berkeley talks to the novelist and translator Tim Parks, who was born in MANCHESTER but moved to Italy in 1981.

His work includes three non-fiction accounts of life there, most recently A Season With Verona, and 11 novels, of which, Europa, was shortlisted for the Booker Prize.

His latest novel, Judge Savage, was published earlier this year.

His musical passions range from Bach, Vivaldi, Mozart and Chopin to old ENGLISH folk songs and Paul Simon's The Boy in the Bubble.

20030713

Michael Berkeley's guest today is the guitarist and lutenist Julian Bream, who celebrates his 70th birthday this week.

Since the 1950s this much-loved performer has done more than any other to popularize the classical guitar and the Renaissance lute as mainstream concert instruments.

As well as exploring the existing repertoire for both instruments, Julian Bream has inspired many of the leading composers of our time to write new works for him, including Malcolm Arnold, Richard Rodney Bennett, Britten, Walton, Henze, Tippett, and Michael Berkeley's father Lennox.

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Today Michael Berkeley talks to the playwright and director Peter Gill, whose production Scenes From The Big Picture is currently running at the Cottesloe Theatre on LONDONs South Bank.

Peter Gill has directed many plays for the Royal Court, the Royal National Theatre and the RSC, and was the founder director of Riverside Studios.

He has also directed opera productions and plays for television.

His musical choices are wide-ranging, from a mass by Josquin and songs by Purcell and Schubert, to works by Stravinsky and Boulez.

20030720

Today Michael Berkeley talks to the playwright and director Peter Gill, whose production Scenes From The Big Picture is currently running at the Cottesloe Theatre on LONDON's South Bank.

Peter Gill has directed many plays for the Royal Court, the Royal National Theatre and the RSC, and was the founder director of Riverside Studios.

He has also directed opera productions and plays for television.

His musical choices are wide-ranging, from a mass by Josquin and songs by Purcell and Schubert to works by Stravinsky and Boulez.

20030727

Michael Berkeley's guest today is the writer Amanda Craig, whose novels include A Vicious Circle, In A Dark Wood, and the newly-published Love In Idleness, which draws inspiration from Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream.

Mendelssohn's enchanting overture to the play features among her musical choices, which also include Stravinsky's Firebird, an aria from Mozart's Marriage of Figaro', and the quartet from Beethoven's opera Fidelio, as well as songs by Noel Coward and Annie Lennox.

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"Michael Berkeley meets one of Britain's most exciting young actors, Adrian Lester, who has received rave reviews for his stunning Shakespearian performances, including Hamlet, directed by Peter Brook, and currently as Henry V at the Royal National Theatre.

He also starred in the film, Primary Colors, alongside John Travolta, and is looking forward to continuing his career both on stage and screen.

He began as a chorister at St Chad's in BIRMINGHAM, and music has played a major role in his career; he won Olivier awards for his performances in the Sondheim musicals, Sweeney Todd and Company.

His other musical passions include Aretha Franklin, Stevie Wonder, Cole Porter, and the Elgar Cello Concerto.

20030810

Michael Berkeley's guest is the writer Richard Francis, Professor of Creative Writing at Bath Spa University, and author of novels such as Taking Apart The Poco Poco, Fat Hen, and the recently-published Prospect Hill, as well as a biography of Ann Lee, founder of the American Shaker movement.

His eclectic musical passions include a 17th-century portrait of a battle by Biber, a Bach Prelude and Fugue, Beethoven's Waldstein Sonata, an improvisation by Charles Mingus, and John Adams's Shaker Loops.

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Today Michael Berkeley talks to the poet, journalist and librettist James Fenton, who has been Professor of Poetry at OXFORD University, a columnist for The Independent, foreign and political correspondent for several newspapers, theatre critic and gardening enthusiast.

His published volumes of poetry include Our Western Furniture, A German Requiem, Children In Exile and Out Of Danger, while his most recent publications include opera libretti, a collection of OXFORD Lectures entitled The Strength of Poetry, and A Garden From A Hundred Packs Of Seed.

His musical choices range widely from Bach's St Matthew Passion and dramatic works by Gluck and Wagner to a sonata by John Cage and a piece by the saxophonist John Harle.

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Michael Berkeley's guest today is the historian Orlando Figes, whose publications, including A People's Tragedy: The RUSSIAn Revolution 1891-1924 and Natasha's Dance: A Cultural History of RUSSIA, have specialized in different aspects of RUSSIAn, Soviet and Eastern European history.

These enthusiasms inform his musical choices today, which include works by Rachmaninov, Mussorgsky, Skryabin, and Shostakovich, as well as Bach and Schubert.

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Today Michael Berkeley meets the writer and arts journalist Judith Flanders, who won several major awards for her first book, A Circle Of Sisters, the biography of four Victorian sisters; and is just publishing her second, a study of day-to-day domestic life in The Victorian House.

Her musical choices range widely from baroque works by Monteverdi, Stradella, Corelli and Vivaldi to Stravinsky's ballet Apollo, Poulenc's Gloria and John Adams' Shaker Loops.

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Today Michael Berkeley meets the writer and arts journalist Judith Flanders, who won several major awards for her first book, A Circle Of Sisters, the biography of four Victorian sisters; and is just publishing her second, a study of day-to-day domestic life in The Victorian House.

Her musical choices range widely from baroque works by Monteverdi, Stradella, Corelli and Vivaldi to Stravinsky's ballet Apollo, Poulenc's Gloria and John Adams's Shaker Loops.

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Michael Berkeley's guest today is the writer and critic David Hughes, whose novels include The Imperial German Dinner Service, The Pork Butcher and recently The Lent Jewels, based on a Victorian family tragedy suffered by a former Bishop of CARLISLE, who later became Archbishop of Canterbury.

David Hughes has chosen a wide variety of music, from Bach, Ravel and Stravinsky to William Bolcom and Jake Thackray.

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Michael Berkeley talks to actress Zoe Wanamaker and plays her choice of music.

20031026

Michael Berkeley's guest today is the painter, sculptor and printmaker Allen Jones, who made his name with the rise of Pop Art in the 1960s, scandalizing the art world with sexually provocative paintings and sculptures such as Chair (1969).

His lithographs, issued in sets with titles such as Islands (1988) and Para Adultos (1984-5) are much sought-after.

His musical choices range widely from traditional Irish and Japanese music to Bach, Saint-Saens and Puccini.

20031102

Michael Berkeley talks to the journalist Mary Ann Sieghart, who is currently Assistant Editor of The Times newspaper, and a prolific columnist and feature writer.

She has presented and made guest appearances on many TV and radio programmes, including The Brains Trust, The Week In Westminster, Question Time and Newsnight.

Music, particularly singing, is one of her many private passions, and her choices today range from the Mozart and Brahms Requiems to Wagner's Die Meistersinger and songs by Richard Strauss, Hugh Masekela and Otis Redding.

20031109

Michael Berkeley's guest today is Adam Thirlwell, the 25 year-old Fellow of All Souls College, OXFORD who created a huge stir in literary circles this year with his first novel.

Politics, a multi-layered comedy of sexual etiquette, has been described as the most distinctive debut since Martin Amis's The Rachel Papers.

Adam Thirlwell draws on a wide range of cultural references, and his musical passions are equally eclectic, ranging from Mozart to John Adams and Jacques Brel.

20031116

Michael Berkeley talks to Clare Morrall, the BIRMINGHAM music teacher who caused a sensation when her first novel, Astonishing Splashes Of Colour, was shortlisted last month for the Booker Prize.

The novel reflects her interest in the dynamics of motherless family life and in synaesthesia - a condition in which emotions are seen as colours.

Her music choices include works by Handel, Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert.

20031214

Michael Berkeley's guest today is the actress Jill Balcon, who made her film debut in the classic Ealing Studios version of 'Nicholas Nickleby', and went on to marry the Poet Laureate Cecil Day-Lewis, model for Epstein, and appear in many other stage and screen productions including Derek Jarman's 'Edward II' and 'Wittgenstein'.

Last Friday she starred in Radio 4's play 'Deadheading the Roses', in which her son Daniel Day-Lewis played her lover.

A passionate music-lover, her choices include a Mozart piano concerto, songs by Faure, Schubert and Cole Porter, chamber music by Poulenc and Janacek, and a Villa Lobos guitar piece played by her great friend, Julian Bream.

20040104

Michael Berkeley meets the distinguished scientist Sir John Meurig Thomas, former Master of Peterhouse College, Cambridge, and Professor of Chemistry at the Davy Faraday Research Laboratory at the Royal Institution in LONDON.

His musical passions reflect both his Welsh background and a wide-ranging interest in music from other cultures as well as from the Western classical tradition.

20040111

Michael Berkeley's guest today is the young theatre director Rachel Kavanaugh, who has specialized in directing Shakespeare comedies, including The Merry Wives Of Windsor at the RSC in Stratford, and The Two Gentlemen Of Verona at Regent's Park in LONDON.

She has also directed a wide range of other productions, including The Wizard Of Oz, which is currently running at the BIRMINGHAM Repertory Theatre.

She would like to try her hand at opera, and her musical choices include extracts from Berlioz's Beatrice Et Benedict and Catalani's La Wally, as well as music by Handel, Ravel and Tchaikovsky.

20040118

Michael Berkeley's guest today is the writer John Julius Norwich, whose works include fascinating travel books, studies of the medieval Norman kingdom in Sicily, a three-volume history of the Byzantine Empire, 'A History of Venice', and two much-loved anthologies of 'Christmas Crackers'.

He is chairman of the Venice in Peril Fund, and his latest book, 'Paradise of Cities', concerns the many distinguished 19th-century émigrés who settled in Venice, from Byron and Wagner to Ruskin, Robert Browning and the painters Whistler and Sargent.

His musical choices range from the Viennese classics to Monteverdi, Rossini and Verdi.

20040125

Michael Berkeley meets one of Britain's most brilliant young scientists.

Marcus du Sautoy is professor of mathematics at the University of OXFORD, a research fellow at the Royal Society, and the author of many articles and books on mathematics, including The Music of the Primes.

He also plays the trumpet, and his musical choices include a brass fanfare by Britten, the opening of Janacek's stirring Sinfonietta, and the Prelude to Wagner's Parsifal, as well as pieces by Messiaen, Handel, Shostakovich and Richard Strauss.

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Michael Berkeley talks to the painter and writer Reg Gadney, who has enjoyed a highly versatile career.

Formerly Deputy Controller of the National Film Theatre and Pro-Rector of the Royal College of Art, he has lectured at OXFORD, Cambridge and Harvard, written many TV screenplays and adaptations including Minette Walters' The Sculptress, and written crime novels - most recently The Scholar of Extortion.

His musical passions range from the band of the Coldstream Guards, Louis Armstrong and the theme from Hitchcock's The Third Man, to Bach, Bellini and Britten.

20040404

Michael Berkeley's guest today is Richard Jones, whose often controversial but always stimulating theatre productions have included Wagner's Ring for the ROYAL OPERA HOUSE, where his new production of Shostakovich's Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk has just opened, A Midsummer Night's Dream for the RSC, and Berlioz's The Trojans for ENO.

His private musical passions include some surprises, from a Ligeti piano piece to The Laughing Policeman.

20040411

Michael Berkeley meets the TV celebrity Loyd Grossman, presenter of many TV series including Masterchef, The World on a Plate, and The History of British Sculpture.

He has a keen interest in museums and the historic environment, and has recently been advising the government on ways to improve NHS food.

His musical tastes range from Mozart and Beethoven to Gershwin and traditional music from many parts of the world.

20040418

Michael Berkeley's guest today is Jane Lapotaire, one of Britain's most versatile and intelligent actors.

A star of stage, film and TV, she has appeared in many celebrated productions at the National Theatre and the RSC, and received high praise for her roles as Katharine of Aragon in Henry VIII and Maria Callas in Masterclass.

Her memoir Time Out of Mind movingly documents her recent struggle to recover from a cerebral haemorrhage.

Her musical choices range widely from traditional Middle Eastern wedding songs to Piaf singing La foule, and instrumental music by Schubert, Sibelius and Vaughan Williams.

Michael Berkeley's guest today is Jane Lapotaire, one of Britain's most versatile and intelligent actors. A star of stage, film and TV, she has appeared in many celebrated productions at the National Theatre and the RSC, and received high praise for her roles as Katharine of Aragon in Henry VIII and Maria Callas in Masterclass.

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