Prehistoric Manual

Mike Pitts, the editor of British Archaeology, presents a guide to ancient living mixing the insights of amateurs with the views of professional historians.

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
20040628

Mike Pitts, the editor of British Archaeology, presents a guide to ancient living mixing the insights of amateurs with the views of professional historians.

1/5. Changing Huts - round house style

Would our iron age ancestors have decorated their walls with painted patterns and why was pelican on the menu?

Contributors include the archaeologists John Coles and Stephen Minnit, and David Freeman and Ann Phipps, who spend 40 nights a year sleeping in a round house.

Then News.

20040629

Mike Pitts presents a guide to ancient living, mixing the insights of amateurs with the views of professional historians.

2/5. The first Cross Channel Ferry?

Mike Pitts visits the Dover Museum to see the best preserved prehistoric boat in Britain and talks to Joyce and Giff Gifford at their boatyard about what it might be like to sail.

Then News.

20040630

Mike Pitts, the editor of British Archaeology, presents a guide to ancient living mixing the insights of amateurs with the views of professional historians.

3/5. Chariots of Leather

At the International Museum of the Horse in Kentucky, America last summer a two wheeled wooden chariot with a suspension system made from woven leather was put through its paces. One of the passengers was Mike Pitts - who reports on this vehicle modelled from an image on a coin.

Then News.

20040701

4/5. Chopping and Changing

At Yarnton in Oxfordshire archaeologists have found what's thought to be the earliest loaf of bread in Britain. What does this tell us about how our landscape changed from forest to farmland? Mike Pitts learns how to make an axe and compares notes with the anthropologist Paul Sillitoe from Durham University, who's studied the use of stone axes on farming and forestry in Papua New Guinea.

Followed by News.

20040702

5/5. How to Kill a Woolly Mammoth

An excavation in Norfolk has revealed the best site for mammoth remains in Britain. The archaeologist Bill Boismier and the geologist Nigel Larkin discuss their findings and we also hear the views of the big game hunter Paul Roberts.

Presented by Mike Pitts, editor of British Archaeology.

Then News.

20060731

Mike Pitts, Editor of British Archaeology, presents a guide to ancient living.

1/5. Changing Huts, Round House Style

Would our Iron Age ancestors have decorated their walls with painted patterns and why was pelican on the menu?

Contributors include archaeologists John Coles and Stephen Minnit; and David Freeman and Ann Phipps, who spend 40 nights a year sleeping in a round house.

20060801

Mike Pitts, Editor of British Archaeology, presents a guide to ancient living.

2/5. The First Cross Channel Ferry

Mike visits the Dover Museum to see the best preserved prehistoric boat in Britain, and talks to Joyce and Giff Gifford at their boatyard about what it might be like to sail.

20060802

Mike Pitts, Editor of British Archaeology, presents a guide to ancient living.

3/5. Chariots of Leather

At the International Museum of the Horse in Kentucky, a two-wheeled wooden chariot with a suspension system made from woven leather went through its paces. One of the passengers was Mike, who reports on a vehicle modelled from an image on a coin.

20060803

Mike Pitts, Editor of British Archaeology, presents a guide to ancient living.

4/5. Chopping and Changing

At Yarnton in Oxfordshire, archaeologists have found what is thought to be the earliest loaf of bread in Britain. What does this tell us about how our landscape changed from forest to farmland? Mike learns how to make an axe, and compares notes with anthropologist Paul Sillitoe from Durham University, who's studied the use of stone axes on farming and forestry in Papua New Guinea.

Then News.

20060804

Mike Pitts, Editor of British Archaeology, presents a guide to ancient living.

5/5. How to Kill a Woolly Mammoth

An excavation in Norfolk has revealed the best site for mammoth remains in Britain. Archaeologist Bill Boismier and geologist Nigel Larkin discuss their findings, and Mike also canvasses the views of big game hunter Paul Roberts.

Then News.

01Changing Huts - Round House Style2004062820060731

Would our iron age ancestors have decorated their walls with painted patterns and why was pelican on the menu?

Contributors include the archaeologists John Coles and Stephen Minnit, and David Freeman and Ann Phipps, who spend 40 nights a year SLEEPing in a round house.

01Changing Huts - Round House Style2004062820060731

Would our iron age ancestors have decorated their walls with painted patterns and why was pelican on the menu?

Contributors include the archaeologists John Coles and Stephen Minnit, and David Freeman and Ann Phipps, who spend 40 nights a year SLEEPing in a round house.

02The First Cross Channel Ferry?2004062920060801

Mike Pitts visits the Dover Museum to see the best preserved prehistoric boat in Britain and talks to Joyce and Giff Gifford at their boatyard about what it might be like to sail.

03Chariots Of Leather2004063020060802

At the International Museum of the Horse in Kentucky, America last summer a two wheeled wooden chariot with a suspension system made from woven leather was put through its paces. One of the passengers was Mike Pitts - who reports on this vehicle modelled from an image on a coin.

03Chariots Of Leather2004063020060802

At the International Museum of the Horse in Kentucky, America last summer a two wheeled wooden chariot with a suspension system made from woven leather was put through its paces. One of the passengers was Mike Pitts - who reports on this vehicle modelled from an image on a coin.

04Chopping And Changing2004070120060803

At Yarnton in OXFORDshire archaeologists have found what's thought to be the earliest loaf of bread in Britain. What does this tell us about how our landscape changed from forest to farmland? Mike Pitts learns how to make an axe and compares notes with the anthropologist Paul Sillitoe from Durham University, who's studied the use of stone axes on farming and forestry in Papua New Guinea.

04Chopping And Changing2004070120060803

At Yarnton in OXFORDshire archaeologists have found what's thought to be the earliest loaf of bread in Britain. What does this tell us about how our landscape changed from forest to farmland? Mike Pitts learns how to make an axe and compares notes with the anthropologist Paul Sillitoe from Durham University, who's studied the use of stone axes on farming and forestry in Papua New Guinea.

05 LASTHow To Kill A Woolly Mammoth2004070220060804

An excavation in Norfolk has revealed the best site for mammoth remains in Britain. The archaeologist Bill Boismier and the geologist Nigel Larkin discuss their findings and we also hear the views of the big game hunter Paul Roberts.

Presented by Mike Pitts, editor of British Archaeology.

05 LASTHow To Kill A Woolly Mammoth2004070220060804

An excavation in Norfolk has revealed the best site for mammoth remains in Britain. The archaeologist Bill Boismier and the geologist Nigel Larkin discuss their findings and we also hear the views of the big game hunter Paul Roberts.

Presented by Mike Pitts, editor of British Archaeology.