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19990803

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848. After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt. Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

19990803

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848. After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt. Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

19990526

POSTSCRIPT

THE CENTURY OF SCIENCE

A radio programme

BBC Programme Number: 99QP0525

First broadcast on 1999-05-26

Recorded on 1999-05-23

Producer: DEBORAH COHEN

Notes: EX 73897

Next in series: THE CENTURY OF SCIENCE

Previous in series: THE CENTURY OF SCIENCE

See more POSTSCRIPT programmes (135)

Description

3/5. Professor John DURANT explores the scientific discoveries that have had a cultural impact & changed our way of looking at the world. 3: What Is

Subject Categories

science programmes (genre)

scientific research

life (biology)

Broadcast history

26 May 1999 21:25-21:45 (RADIO 3)

Contributors

John Durant

Deborah Cohen (Producer)

Stephen Critchlow (rdr)

John Smith (Speaker)

Chris Langton (Speaker)

Gerry Joyce (Speaker)

19990527

POSTSCRIPT

THE CENTURY OF SCIENCE

A radio programme

BBC Programme Number: 99QP0625

First broadcast on 1999-05-27

Recorded on 1999-05-25

Producer: R. PEASE

Next in series: THE CENTURY OF SCIENCE

Previous in series: THE CENTURY OF SCIENCE

See more POSTSCRIPT programmes (135)

Description

4/5. Professor John DURANT explores the scientific discoveries that have had

Subject Categories

science programmes (genre)

travel and exploration

Broadcast history

27 May 1999 21:25-21:45 (RADIO 3)

Contributors

John Durant

Roland Pease (Producer)

Stephen Critchlow (rdr)

Christopher Ondaatje (Speaker)

Owen Gingerich (Speaker)

Sara Wheeler (travel writer (spkr)) (Speaker)

20010523

Richard Foster investigates the cryptic pattern of precious marbles in front of the high altar in Westminster Abbey. Laid down in 1268 by Italian craftsmen for Henry III, the mosaic's hidden meaning integrates CHRISTIAN and pagan philosophies and refers to the end of the universe.

20010523

Richard Foster investigates the cryptic pattern of precious marbles in front of the high altar in Westminster Abbey. Laid down in 1268 by Italian craftsmen for Henry III, the mosaic's hidden meaning integrates CHRISTIAN and pagan philosophies and refers to the end of the universe.

A Poem For Ireland19980316

In the last of this week's readings by Irish poets, Tom Paulin presents a selection of new works.

Michael Longley reads new works: love poems, elegies remembering a small child and an Irish poet, memories of County Mayo, and a sequence of poems linked by two world wars.

On St Patrick's Day, Brendan Kennelly reads new poems in which he remembers two saints, two teachers and his 90-year-old grandmother.

In the week in which St Patrick's Day falls, five Irish poets read a selection of works.

Today Paula Meehan presents some of her own new work.

A Poem For Ireland19980316

In the last of this week's readings by Irish poets, Tom Paulin presents a selection of new works.

Michael Longley reads new works: love poems, elegies remembering a small child and an Irish poet, memories of County Mayo, and a sequence of poems linked by two world wars.

On St Patrick's Day, Brendan Kennelly reads new poems in which he remembers two saints, two teachers and his 90-year-old grandmother.

In the week in which St Patrick's Day falls, five Irish poets read a selection of works.

Today Paula Meehan presents some of her own new work.

A Poem For Ireland19980317

In the last of this week's readings by Irish poets, Tom Paulin presents a selection of new works.

Michael Longley reads new works: love poems, elegies remembering a small child and an Irish poet, memories of County Mayo, and a sequence of poems linked by two world wars.

On St Patrick's Day, Brendan Kennelly reads new poems in which he remembers two saints, two teachers and his 90-year-old grandmother.

In the week in which St Patrick's Day falls, five Irish poets read a selection of works.

Today Paula Meehan presents some of her own new work.

A Poem For Ireland19980317

In the last of this week's readings by Irish poets, Tom Paulin presents a selection of new works.

Michael Longley reads new works: love poems, elegies remembering a small child and an Irish poet, memories of County Mayo, and a sequence of poems linked by two world wars.

On St Patrick's Day, Brendan Kennelly reads new poems in which he remembers two saints, two teachers and his 90-year-old grandmother.

In the week in which St Patrick's Day falls, five Irish poets read a selection of works.

Today Paula Meehan presents some of her own new work.

A Poem For Ireland19980318

In the last of this week's readings by Irish poets, Tom Paulin presents a selection of new works.

Michael Longley reads new works: love poems, elegies remembering a small child and an Irish poet, memories of County Mayo, and a sequence of poems linked by two world wars.

On St Patrick's Day, Brendan Kennelly reads new poems in which he remembers two saints, two teachers and his 90-year-old grandmother.

In the week in which St Patrick's Day falls, five Irish poets read a selection of works.

Today Paula Meehan presents some of her own new work.

A Poem For Ireland19980318

In the last of this week's readings by Irish poets, Tom Paulin presents a selection of new works.

Michael Longley reads new works: love poems, elegies remembering a small child and an Irish poet, memories of County Mayo, and a sequence of poems linked by two world wars.

On St Patrick's Day, Brendan Kennelly reads new poems in which he remembers two saints, two teachers and his 90-year-old grandmother.

In the week in which St Patrick's Day falls, five Irish poets read a selection of works.

Today Paula Meehan presents some of her own new work.

A Poem For Ireland19980320

In the last of this week's readings by Irish poets, Tom Paulin presents a selection of new works.

Michael Longley reads new works: love poems, elegies remembering a small child and an Irish poet, memories of County Mayo, and a sequence of poems linked by two world wars.

On St Patrick's Day, Brendan Kennelly reads new poems in which he remembers two saints, two teachers and his 90-year-old grandmother.

In the week in which St Patrick's Day falls, five Irish poets read a selection of works.

Today Paula Meehan presents some of her own new work.

A Poem For Ireland19980320

In the last of this week's readings by Irish poets, Tom Paulin presents a selection of new works.

Michael Longley reads new works: love poems, elegies remembering a small child and an Irish poet, memories of County Mayo, and a sequence of poems linked by two world wars.

On St Patrick's Day, Brendan Kennelly reads new poems in which he remembers two saints, two teachers and his 90-year-old grandmother.

In the week in which St Patrick's Day falls, five Irish poets read a selection of works.

Today Paula Meehan presents some of her own new work.

Abscheulicher19990215

Each night this week, Peggy Reynolds unravels the dramatic, musical and emotional impact of a favourite operatic aria. Tonight, `Abscheulicher' from Beethoven's revolutionary rescue opera `Fidelio'. Mark Elder, Kathryn Harries, Graham Vick and Annabel Arden explore the composer's path to understanding humanity through his cross-dressed heroine in her moment of crisis.

Abscheulicher19990215

Each night this week, Peggy Reynolds unravels the dramatic, musical and emotional impact of a favourite operatic aria. Tonight, `Abscheulicher' from Beethoven's revolutionary rescue opera `Fidelio'. Mark Elder, Kathryn Harries, Graham Vick and Annabel Arden explore the composer's path to understanding humanity through his cross-dressed heroine in her moment of crisis.

Abstract Expressionist19980312

Brian Morton looks at five complex artistic partnerships in which the work is more than usually dependent on collaboration. Painter Jackson Pollock was not aware of being an `abstract expressionist', a category invented by the critic Clement Greenberg. Some would say, though, that Greenberg did not stop at describing Pollock's work but actually tried to influence it. In the fourth programme, Pollock biographer Deborah Solomon and art critic Richard Cork conduct a close examination of this collaboration.

Abstract Expressionist19980312

Brian Morton looks at five complex artistic partnerships in which the work is more than usually dependent on collaboration. Painter Jackson Pollock was not aware of being an `abstract expressionist', a category invented by the critic Clement Greenberg. Some would say, though, that Greenberg did not stop at describing Pollock's work but actually tried to influence it. In the fourth programme, Pollock biographer Deborah Solomon and art critic Richard Cork conduct a close examination of this collaboration.

All My Tomorrows1998030319980721

A five-part entertainment compiled by and starring Maureen Lipman, recreating monologues, sketches and songs originally written and performed by comedian Joyce Grenfell.

Featuring two songs with music composed by Richard Addinsell - `All my tomorrows' and `Picture Postcard' - and `Lally Tullet', a steamy tale of close relationships from a Virginian veranda.

All My Tomorrows1998030319980721

A five-part entertainment compiled by and starring Maureen Lipman, recreating monologues, sketches and songs originally written and performed by comedian Joyce Grenfell.

Featuring two songs with music composed by Richard Addinsell - `All my tomorrows' and `Picture Postcard' - and `Lally Tullet', a steamy tale of close relationships from a Virginian veranda.

Aria19990218

Peggy Reynolds unravels the dramatic, musical and emotional impact of a favourite operatic aria. Tonight, singers Thomas Allen, Robert Lloyd and Richard Van Allan and director Clare Venables follow Don Giovanni's passage to hell in the electrifying trio for basses at the end of Mozart's darkest opera.

Aria19990218

Peggy Reynolds unravels the dramatic, musical and emotional impact of a favourite operatic aria. Tonight, singers Thomas Allen, Robert Lloyd and Richard Van Allan and director Clare Venables follow Don Giovanni's passage to hell in the electrifying trio for basses at the end of Mozart's darkest opera.

At The Races19980406

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the final programme, racing experts talk about what really rides on the back of a horse - the hopes of those who bet to win and the broken dreams of those who lose. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. The fourth programme focuses on the jockey, and contributors include two of the most successful women jockeys, a trainer and a racing commentator. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the third programme, they focus on the trainer - an often mysterious figure who is at the heart of man's relationship with the horse. One of the guests is Kim Bailey, the leading National Hunt trainer. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the second programme, they compare their own trackside experiences with the works of writers and poets who have been inspired by the variety and beauty of Britain's racecourses and by race-day excitement. Reader Sir Peter O'Sullevan.

Fortunes big and small were set to be lost at the Grand National on Saturday. In five programmes this week, David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. Peter O'Sullevan reads from words by Shakespeare, Yeats and Larkin, among others. This first programme focuses on the beauty and majesty of the horse itself.

At The Races19980406

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the final programme, racing experts talk about what really rides on the back of a horse - the hopes of those who bet to win and the broken dreams of those who lose. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. The fourth programme focuses on the jockey, and contributors include two of the most successful women jockeys, a trainer and a racing commentator. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the third programme, they focus on the trainer - an often mysterious figure who is at the heart of man's relationship with the horse. One of the guests is Kim Bailey, the leading National Hunt trainer. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the second programme, they compare their own trackside experiences with the works of writers and poets who have been inspired by the variety and beauty of Britain's racecourses and by race-day excitement. Reader Sir Peter O'Sullevan.

Fortunes big and small were set to be lost at the Grand National on Saturday. In five programmes this week, David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. Peter O'Sullevan reads from words by Shakespeare, Yeats and Larkin, among others. This first programme focuses on the beauty and majesty of the horse itself.

At The Races19980407

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the final programme, racing experts talk about what really rides on the back of a horse - the hopes of those who bet to win and the broken dreams of those who lose. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. The fourth programme focuses on the jockey, and contributors include two of the most successful women jockeys, a trainer and a racing commentator. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the third programme, they focus on the trainer - an often mysterious figure who is at the heart of man's relationship with the horse. One of the guests is Kim Bailey, the leading National Hunt trainer. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the second programme, they compare their own trackside experiences with the works of writers and poets who have been inspired by the variety and beauty of Britain's racecourses and by race-day excitement. Reader Sir Peter O'Sullevan.

Fortunes big and small were set to be lost at the Grand National on Saturday. In five programmes this week, David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. Peter O'Sullevan reads from words by Shakespeare, Yeats and Larkin, among others. This first programme focuses on the beauty and majesty of the horse itself.

At The Races19980407

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the final programme, racing experts talk about what really rides on the back of a horse - the hopes of those who bet to win and the broken dreams of those who lose. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. The fourth programme focuses on the jockey, and contributors include two of the most successful women jockeys, a trainer and a racing commentator. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the third programme, they focus on the trainer - an often mysterious figure who is at the heart of man's relationship with the horse. One of the guests is Kim Bailey, the leading National Hunt trainer. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the second programme, they compare their own trackside experiences with the works of writers and poets who have been inspired by the variety and beauty of Britain's racecourses and by race-day excitement. Reader Sir Peter O'Sullevan.

Fortunes big and small were set to be lost at the Grand National on Saturday. In five programmes this week, David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. Peter O'Sullevan reads from words by Shakespeare, Yeats and Larkin, among others. This first programme focuses on the beauty and majesty of the horse itself.

At The Races19980408

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the final programme, racing experts talk about what really rides on the back of a horse - the hopes of those who bet to win and the broken dreams of those who lose. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. The fourth programme focuses on the jockey, and contributors include two of the most successful women jockeys, a trainer and a racing commentator. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the third programme, they focus on the trainer - an often mysterious figure who is at the heart of man's relationship with the horse. One of the guests is Kim Bailey, the leading National Hunt trainer. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the second programme, they compare their own trackside experiences with the works of writers and poets who have been inspired by the variety and beauty of Britain's racecourses and by race-day excitement. Reader Sir Peter O'Sullevan.

Fortunes big and small were set to be lost at the Grand National on Saturday. In five programmes this week, David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. Peter O'Sullevan reads from words by Shakespeare, Yeats and Larkin, among others. This first programme focuses on the beauty and majesty of the horse itself.

At The Races19980408

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the final programme, racing experts talk about what really rides on the back of a horse - the hopes of those who bet to win and the broken dreams of those who lose. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. The fourth programme focuses on the jockey, and contributors include two of the most successful women jockeys, a trainer and a racing commentator. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the third programme, they focus on the trainer - an often mysterious figure who is at the heart of man's relationship with the horse. One of the guests is Kim Bailey, the leading National Hunt trainer. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the second programme, they compare their own trackside experiences with the works of writers and poets who have been inspired by the variety and beauty of Britain's racecourses and by race-day excitement. Reader Sir Peter O'Sullevan.

Fortunes big and small were set to be lost at the Grand National on Saturday. In five programmes this week, David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. Peter O'Sullevan reads from words by Shakespeare, Yeats and Larkin, among others. This first programme focuses on the beauty and majesty of the horse itself.

At The Races19980409

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the final programme, racing experts talk about what really rides on the back of a horse - the hopes of those who bet to win and the broken dreams of those who lose. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. The fourth programme focuses on the jockey, and contributors include two of the most successful women jockeys, a trainer and a racing commentator. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the third programme, they focus on the trainer - an often mysterious figure who is at the heart of man's relationship with the horse. One of the guests is Kim Bailey, the leading National Hunt trainer. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the second programme, they compare their own trackside experiences with the works of writers and poets who have been inspired by the variety and beauty of Britain's racecourses and by race-day excitement. Reader Sir Peter O'Sullevan.

Fortunes big and small were set to be lost at the Grand National on Saturday. In five programmes this week, David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. Peter O'Sullevan reads from words by Shakespeare, Yeats and Larkin, among others. This first programme focuses on the beauty and majesty of the horse itself.

At The Races19980409

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the final programme, racing experts talk about what really rides on the back of a horse - the hopes of those who bet to win and the broken dreams of those who lose. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. The fourth programme focuses on the jockey, and contributors include two of the most successful women jockeys, a trainer and a racing commentator. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the third programme, they focus on the trainer - an often mysterious figure who is at the heart of man's relationship with the horse. One of the guests is Kim Bailey, the leading National Hunt trainer. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the second programme, they compare their own trackside experiences with the works of writers and poets who have been inspired by the variety and beauty of Britain's racecourses and by race-day excitement. Reader Sir Peter O'Sullevan.

Fortunes big and small were set to be lost at the Grand National on Saturday. In five programmes this week, David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. Peter O'Sullevan reads from words by Shakespeare, Yeats and Larkin, among others. This first programme focuses on the beauty and majesty of the horse itself.

At The Races19980410

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the final programme, racing experts talk about what really rides on the back of a horse - the hopes of those who bet to win and the broken dreams of those who lose. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. The fourth programme focuses on the jockey, and contributors include two of the most successful women jockeys, a trainer and a racing commentator. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the third programme, they focus on the trainer - an often mysterious figure who is at the heart of man's relationship with the horse. One of the guests is Kim Bailey, the leading National Hunt trainer. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the second programme, they compare their own trackside experiences with the works of writers and poets who have been inspired by the variety and beauty of Britain's racecourses and by race-day excitement. Reader Sir Peter O'Sullevan.

Fortunes big and small were set to be lost at the Grand National on Saturday. In five programmes this week, David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. Peter O'Sullevan reads from words by Shakespeare, Yeats and Larkin, among others. This first programme focuses on the beauty and majesty of the horse itself.

At The Races19980410

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the final programme, racing experts talk about what really rides on the back of a horse - the hopes of those who bet to win and the broken dreams of those who lose. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. The fourth programme focuses on the jockey, and contributors include two of the most successful women jockeys, a trainer and a racing commentator. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the third programme, they focus on the trainer - an often mysterious figure who is at the heart of man's relationship with the horse. One of the guests is Kim Bailey, the leading National Hunt trainer. Reader Peter O'Sullevan.

Five programmes this week in which David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. In the second programme, they compare their own trackside experiences with the works of writers and poets who have been inspired by the variety and beauty of Britain's racecourses and by race-day excitement. Reader Sir Peter O'Sullevan.

Fortunes big and small were set to be lost at the Grand National on Saturday. In five programmes this week, David Benedictus joins experts from the horse racing fraternity to explore how the strong passions invoked by the feats of legendary horses, their jockeys and their trainers connect with prose and poetry. Peter O'Sullevan reads from words by Shakespeare, Yeats and Larkin, among others. This first programme focuses on the beauty and majesty of the horse itself.

Between Moving Air And Moving Ocean19990503

In the last of their conversations, poet Thom Gunn talks to James Campbell about AIDS, the death of friends, ENGLAND, mass murderers and retirement, and he reads from recent published and unpublished work.

James Campbell continues his exploration of the impact and significance of poet Thom Gunn with poet Hugo Williams, editor and critic Karl Miller, critic Clive Wilmer, and Wendy Lesser, editor of the Threepenny Review, San Francisco.

Continuing his conversations and readings with James Campbell, poet Thom Gunn talks about his move to San Francisco in the 1950s, his relief at leaving ENGLAND behind, the liberating effect of discovering California in the 1960s, and the poetry this change of cultures produced.

In the second of five programmes exploring the work of poet Thom Gunn, Gunn reads from his early work and tells James Campbell about becoming a poet, his influences at Cambridge and the publication of his first book, written while he was still an undergraduate, which marked him out as a bold and exciting voice on the British poetry scene of the 1950s.

Poet Thom Gunn, now approaching 70, talks to writer James Campbell, with readings of his poetry. Gunn left ENGLAND for San Francisco forty-five years ago and has been there ever since. In the first of this week's five programmes, he talks about the development of his technique since he made his name with his first collections in the 1950s.

Between Moving Air And Moving Ocean19990503

In the last of their conversations, poet Thom Gunn talks to James Campbell about AIDS, the death of friends, ENGLAND, mass murderers and retirement, and he reads from recent published and unpublished work.

James Campbell continues his exploration of the impact and significance of poet Thom Gunn with poet Hugo Williams, editor and critic Karl Miller, critic Clive Wilmer, and Wendy Lesser, editor of the Threepenny Review, San Francisco.

Continuing his conversations and readings with James Campbell, poet Thom Gunn talks about his move to San Francisco in the 1950s, his relief at leaving ENGLAND behind, the liberating effect of discovering California in the 1960s, and the poetry this change of cultures produced.

In the second of five programmes exploring the work of poet Thom Gunn, Gunn reads from his early work and tells James Campbell about becoming a poet, his influences at Cambridge and the publication of his first book, written while he was still an undergraduate, which marked him out as a bold and exciting voice on the British poetry scene of the 1950s.

Poet Thom Gunn, now approaching 70, talks to writer James Campbell, with readings of his poetry. Gunn left ENGLAND for San Francisco forty-five years ago and has been there ever since. In the first of this week's five programmes, he talks about the development of his technique since he made his name with his first collections in the 1950s.

Between Moving Air And Moving Ocean19990504

In the last of their conversations, poet Thom Gunn talks to James Campbell about AIDS, the death of friends, ENGLAND, mass murderers and retirement, and he reads from recent published and unpublished work.

James Campbell continues his exploration of the impact and significance of poet Thom Gunn with poet Hugo Williams, editor and critic Karl Miller, critic Clive Wilmer, and Wendy Lesser, editor of the Threepenny Review, San Francisco.

Continuing his conversations and readings with James Campbell, poet Thom Gunn talks about his move to San Francisco in the 1950s, his relief at leaving ENGLAND behind, the liberating effect of discovering California in the 1960s, and the poetry this change of cultures produced.

In the second of five programmes exploring the work of poet Thom Gunn, Gunn reads from his early work and tells James Campbell about becoming a poet, his influences at Cambridge and the publication of his first book, written while he was still an undergraduate, which marked him out as a bold and exciting voice on the British poetry scene of the 1950s.

Poet Thom Gunn, now approaching 70, talks to writer James Campbell, with readings of his poetry. Gunn left ENGLAND for San Francisco forty-five years ago and has been there ever since. In the first of this week's five programmes, he talks about the development of his technique since he made his name with his first collections in the 1950s.

Between Moving Air And Moving Ocean19990504

In the last of their conversations, poet Thom Gunn talks to James Campbell about AIDS, the death of friends, ENGLAND, mass murderers and retirement, and he reads from recent published and unpublished work.

James Campbell continues his exploration of the impact and significance of poet Thom Gunn with poet Hugo Williams, editor and critic Karl Miller, critic Clive Wilmer, and Wendy Lesser, editor of the Threepenny Review, San Francisco.

Continuing his conversations and readings with James Campbell, poet Thom Gunn talks about his move to San Francisco in the 1950s, his relief at leaving ENGLAND behind, the liberating effect of discovering California in the 1960s, and the poetry this change of cultures produced.

In the second of five programmes exploring the work of poet Thom Gunn, Gunn reads from his early work and tells James Campbell about becoming a poet, his influences at Cambridge and the publication of his first book, written while he was still an undergraduate, which marked him out as a bold and exciting voice on the British poetry scene of the 1950s.

Poet Thom Gunn, now approaching 70, talks to writer James Campbell, with readings of his poetry. Gunn left ENGLAND for San Francisco forty-five years ago and has been there ever since. In the first of this week's five programmes, he talks about the development of his technique since he made his name with his first collections in the 1950s.

Between Moving Air And Moving Ocean19990505

In the last of their conversations, poet Thom Gunn talks to James Campbell about AIDS, the death of friends, ENGLAND, mass murderers and retirement, and he reads from recent published and unpublished work.

James Campbell continues his exploration of the impact and significance of poet Thom Gunn with poet Hugo Williams, editor and critic Karl Miller, critic Clive Wilmer, and Wendy Lesser, editor of the Threepenny Review, San Francisco.

Continuing his conversations and readings with James Campbell, poet Thom Gunn talks about his move to San Francisco in the 1950s, his relief at leaving ENGLAND behind, the liberating effect of discovering California in the 1960s, and the poetry this change of cultures produced.

In the second of five programmes exploring the work of poet Thom Gunn, Gunn reads from his early work and tells James Campbell about becoming a poet, his influences at Cambridge and the publication of his first book, written while he was still an undergraduate, which marked him out as a bold and exciting voice on the British poetry scene of the 1950s.

Poet Thom Gunn, now approaching 70, talks to writer James Campbell, with readings of his poetry. Gunn left ENGLAND for San Francisco forty-five years ago and has been there ever since. In the first of this week's five programmes, he talks about the development of his technique since he made his name with his first collections in the 1950s.

Between Moving Air And Moving Ocean19990505

In the last of their conversations, poet Thom Gunn talks to James Campbell about AIDS, the death of friends, ENGLAND, mass murderers and retirement, and he reads from recent published and unpublished work.

James Campbell continues his exploration of the impact and significance of poet Thom Gunn with poet Hugo Williams, editor and critic Karl Miller, critic Clive Wilmer, and Wendy Lesser, editor of the Threepenny Review, San Francisco.

Continuing his conversations and readings with James Campbell, poet Thom Gunn talks about his move to San Francisco in the 1950s, his relief at leaving ENGLAND behind, the liberating effect of discovering California in the 1960s, and the poetry this change of cultures produced.

In the second of five programmes exploring the work of poet Thom Gunn, Gunn reads from his early work and tells James Campbell about becoming a poet, his influences at Cambridge and the publication of his first book, written while he was still an undergraduate, which marked him out as a bold and exciting voice on the British poetry scene of the 1950s.

Poet Thom Gunn, now approaching 70, talks to writer James Campbell, with readings of his poetry. Gunn left ENGLAND for San Francisco forty-five years ago and has been there ever since. In the first of this week's five programmes, he talks about the development of his technique since he made his name with his first collections in the 1950s.

Between Moving Air And Moving Ocean19990506

In the last of their conversations, poet Thom Gunn talks to James Campbell about AIDS, the death of friends, ENGLAND, mass murderers and retirement, and he reads from recent published and unpublished work.

James Campbell continues his exploration of the impact and significance of poet Thom Gunn with poet Hugo Williams, editor and critic Karl Miller, critic Clive Wilmer, and Wendy Lesser, editor of the Threepenny Review, San Francisco.

Continuing his conversations and readings with James Campbell, poet Thom Gunn talks about his move to San Francisco in the 1950s, his relief at leaving ENGLAND behind, the liberating effect of discovering California in the 1960s, and the poetry this change of cultures produced.

In the second of five programmes exploring the work of poet Thom Gunn, Gunn reads from his early work and tells James Campbell about becoming a poet, his influences at Cambridge and the publication of his first book, written while he was still an undergraduate, which marked him out as a bold and exciting voice on the British poetry scene of the 1950s.

Poet Thom Gunn, now approaching 70, talks to writer James Campbell, with readings of his poetry. Gunn left ENGLAND for San Francisco forty-five years ago and has been there ever since. In the first of this week's five programmes, he talks about the development of his technique since he made his name with his first collections in the 1950s.

Between Moving Air And Moving Ocean19990506

In the last of their conversations, poet Thom Gunn talks to James Campbell about AIDS, the death of friends, ENGLAND, mass murderers and retirement, and he reads from recent published and unpublished work.

James Campbell continues his exploration of the impact and significance of poet Thom Gunn with poet Hugo Williams, editor and critic Karl Miller, critic Clive Wilmer, and Wendy Lesser, editor of the Threepenny Review, San Francisco.

Continuing his conversations and readings with James Campbell, poet Thom Gunn talks about his move to San Francisco in the 1950s, his relief at leaving ENGLAND behind, the liberating effect of discovering California in the 1960s, and the poetry this change of cultures produced.

In the second of five programmes exploring the work of poet Thom Gunn, Gunn reads from his early work and tells James Campbell about becoming a poet, his influences at Cambridge and the publication of his first book, written while he was still an undergraduate, which marked him out as a bold and exciting voice on the British poetry scene of the 1950s.

Poet Thom Gunn, now approaching 70, talks to writer James Campbell, with readings of his poetry. Gunn left ENGLAND for San Francisco forty-five years ago and has been there ever since. In the first of this week's five programmes, he talks about the development of his technique since he made his name with his first collections in the 1950s.

Between Moving Air And Moving Ocean19990507

In the last of their conversations, poet Thom Gunn talks to James Campbell about AIDS, the death of friends, ENGLAND, mass murderers and retirement, and he reads from recent published and unpublished work.

James Campbell continues his exploration of the impact and significance of poet Thom Gunn with poet Hugo Williams, editor and critic Karl Miller, critic Clive Wilmer, and Wendy Lesser, editor of the Threepenny Review, San Francisco.

Continuing his conversations and readings with James Campbell, poet Thom Gunn talks about his move to San Francisco in the 1950s, his relief at leaving ENGLAND behind, the liberating effect of discovering California in the 1960s, and the poetry this change of cultures produced.

In the second of five programmes exploring the work of poet Thom Gunn, Gunn reads from his early work and tells James Campbell about becoming a poet, his influences at Cambridge and the publication of his first book, written while he was still an undergraduate, which marked him out as a bold and exciting voice on the British poetry scene of the 1950s.

Poet Thom Gunn, now approaching 70, talks to writer James Campbell, with readings of his poetry. Gunn left ENGLAND for San Francisco forty-five years ago and has been there ever since. In the first of this week's five programmes, he talks about the development of his technique since he made his name with his first collections in the 1950s.

Between Moving Air And Moving Ocean19990507

In the last of their conversations, poet Thom Gunn talks to James Campbell about AIDS, the death of friends, ENGLAND, mass murderers and retirement, and he reads from recent published and unpublished work.

James Campbell continues his exploration of the impact and significance of poet Thom Gunn with poet Hugo Williams, editor and critic Karl Miller, critic Clive Wilmer, and Wendy Lesser, editor of the Threepenny Review, San Francisco.

Continuing his conversations and readings with James Campbell, poet Thom Gunn talks about his move to San Francisco in the 1950s, his relief at leaving ENGLAND behind, the liberating effect of discovering California in the 1960s, and the poetry this change of cultures produced.

In the second of five programmes exploring the work of poet Thom Gunn, Gunn reads from his early work and tells James Campbell about becoming a poet, his influences at Cambridge and the publication of his first book, written while he was still an undergraduate, which marked him out as a bold and exciting voice on the British poetry scene of the 1950s.

Poet Thom Gunn, now approaching 70, talks to writer James Campbell, with readings of his poetry. Gunn left ENGLAND for San Francisco forty-five years ago and has been there ever since. In the first of this week's five programmes, he talks about the development of his technique since he made his name with his first collections in the 1950s.

Boxing Clever19980413

The last of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is Adam Singer, chairman of Flextech, Britain's second largest cable and satellite programmer. Flextech have recently entered into a joint venture with BBC Worldwide.

The fourth of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is James Baker, head of programming at BSkyB.

The third of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is David Elstein, chief executive of Channel 5 and recently appointed visiting professor in broadcast media at OXFORD University.

The second of five conversations about the state of British television. BBC deputy director of programmes David Docherty talks about the future of public service broadcasting.

Five conversations about the state of British television. As broadcasting in Britain faces up to a period of unprecedented change, Christopher Cook talks to ITV director of programmes David Liddiment about how his network intends to rebuild its mass audience and adapt to a multichannel digital future.

Boxing Clever19980413

The last of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is Adam Singer, chairman of Flextech, Britain's second largest cable and satellite programmer. Flextech have recently entered into a joint venture with BBC Worldwide.

The fourth of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is James Baker, head of programming at BSkyB.

The third of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is David Elstein, chief executive of Channel 5 and recently appointed visiting professor in broadcast media at OXFORD University.

The second of five conversations about the state of British television. BBC deputy director of programmes David Docherty talks about the future of public service broadcasting.

Five conversations about the state of British television. As broadcasting in Britain faces up to a period of unprecedented change, Christopher Cook talks to ITV director of programmes David Liddiment about how his network intends to rebuild its mass audience and adapt to a multichannel digital future.

Boxing Clever19980414

The last of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is Adam Singer, chairman of Flextech, Britain's second largest cable and satellite programmer. Flextech have recently entered into a joint venture with BBC Worldwide.

The fourth of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is James Baker, head of programming at BSkyB.

The third of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is David Elstein, chief executive of Channel 5 and recently appointed visiting professor in broadcast media at OXFORD University.

The second of five conversations about the state of British television. BBC deputy director of programmes David Docherty talks about the future of public service broadcasting.

Five conversations about the state of British television. As broadcasting in Britain faces up to a period of unprecedented change, Christopher Cook talks to ITV director of programmes David Liddiment about how his network intends to rebuild its mass audience and adapt to a multichannel digital future.

Boxing Clever19980414

The last of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is Adam Singer, chairman of Flextech, Britain's second largest cable and satellite programmer. Flextech have recently entered into a joint venture with BBC Worldwide.

The fourth of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is James Baker, head of programming at BSkyB.

The third of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is David Elstein, chief executive of Channel 5 and recently appointed visiting professor in broadcast media at OXFORD University.

The second of five conversations about the state of British television. BBC deputy director of programmes David Docherty talks about the future of public service broadcasting.

Five conversations about the state of British television. As broadcasting in Britain faces up to a period of unprecedented change, Christopher Cook talks to ITV director of programmes David Liddiment about how his network intends to rebuild its mass audience and adapt to a multichannel digital future.

Boxing Clever19980415

The last of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is Adam Singer, chairman of Flextech, Britain's second largest cable and satellite programmer. Flextech have recently entered into a joint venture with BBC Worldwide.

The fourth of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is James Baker, head of programming at BSkyB.

The third of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is David Elstein, chief executive of Channel 5 and recently appointed visiting professor in broadcast media at OXFORD University.

The second of five conversations about the state of British television. BBC deputy director of programmes David Docherty talks about the future of public service broadcasting.

Five conversations about the state of British television. As broadcasting in Britain faces up to a period of unprecedented change, Christopher Cook talks to ITV director of programmes David Liddiment about how his network intends to rebuild its mass audience and adapt to a multichannel digital future.

Boxing Clever19980415

The last of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is Adam Singer, chairman of Flextech, Britain's second largest cable and satellite programmer. Flextech have recently entered into a joint venture with BBC Worldwide.

The fourth of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is James Baker, head of programming at BSkyB.

The third of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is David Elstein, chief executive of Channel 5 and recently appointed visiting professor in broadcast media at OXFORD University.

The second of five conversations about the state of British television. BBC deputy director of programmes David Docherty talks about the future of public service broadcasting.

Five conversations about the state of British television. As broadcasting in Britain faces up to a period of unprecedented change, Christopher Cook talks to ITV director of programmes David Liddiment about how his network intends to rebuild its mass audience and adapt to a multichannel digital future.

Boxing Clever19980416

The last of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is Adam Singer, chairman of Flextech, Britain's second largest cable and satellite programmer. Flextech have recently entered into a joint venture with BBC Worldwide.

The fourth of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is James Baker, head of programming at BSkyB.

The third of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is David Elstein, chief executive of Channel 5 and recently appointed visiting professor in broadcast media at OXFORD University.

The second of five conversations about the state of British television. BBC deputy director of programmes David Docherty talks about the future of public service broadcasting.

Five conversations about the state of British television. As broadcasting in Britain faces up to a period of unprecedented change, Christopher Cook talks to ITV director of programmes David Liddiment about how his network intends to rebuild its mass audience and adapt to a multichannel digital future.

Boxing Clever19980416

The last of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is Adam Singer, chairman of Flextech, Britain's second largest cable and satellite programmer. Flextech have recently entered into a joint venture with BBC Worldwide.

The fourth of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is James Baker, head of programming at BSkyB.

The third of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is David Elstein, chief executive of Channel 5 and recently appointed visiting professor in broadcast media at OXFORD University.

The second of five conversations about the state of British television. BBC deputy director of programmes David Docherty talks about the future of public service broadcasting.

Five conversations about the state of British television. As broadcasting in Britain faces up to a period of unprecedented change, Christopher Cook talks to ITV director of programmes David Liddiment about how his network intends to rebuild its mass audience and adapt to a multichannel digital future.

Boxing Clever19980417

The last of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is Adam Singer, chairman of Flextech, Britain's second largest cable and satellite programmer. Flextech have recently entered into a joint venture with BBC Worldwide.

The fourth of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is James Baker, head of programming at BSkyB.

The third of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is David Elstein, chief executive of Channel 5 and recently appointed visiting professor in broadcast media at OXFORD University.

The second of five conversations about the state of British television. BBC deputy director of programmes David Docherty talks about the future of public service broadcasting.

Five conversations about the state of British television. As broadcasting in Britain faces up to a period of unprecedented change, Christopher Cook talks to ITV director of programmes David Liddiment about how his network intends to rebuild its mass audience and adapt to a multichannel digital future.

Boxing Clever19980417

The last of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is Adam Singer, chairman of Flextech, Britain's second largest cable and satellite programmer. Flextech have recently entered into a joint venture with BBC Worldwide.

The fourth of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is James Baker, head of programming at BSkyB.

The third of five conversations about the state of British television. Today's guest is David Elstein, chief executive of Channel 5 and recently appointed visiting professor in broadcast media at OXFORD University.

The second of five conversations about the state of British television. BBC deputy director of programmes David Docherty talks about the future of public service broadcasting.

Five conversations about the state of British television. As broadcasting in Britain faces up to a period of unprecedented change, Christopher Cook talks to ITV director of programmes David Liddiment about how his network intends to rebuild its mass audience and adapt to a multichannel digital future.

Brimful Of Asha19990730

Mark Tully visits the home of Bombay's legendary film singer Asha Bhosle, best known in the UK through last year's tribute by Cornershop, `Brimful of Asha'. She is still singing at 65.

Brimful Of Asha19990730

Mark Tully visits the home of Bombay's legendary film singer Asha Bhosle, best known in the UK through last year's tribute by Cornershop, `Brimful of Asha'. She is still singing at 65.

Christ In The House Of His Parents19990816

Five writers reflect on their selection of images inspired by CHRISTIANity and explore how deeply those images resonate in contemporary culture. Today, writer and broadcaster Rana Kabbani discuss Millais's `Christ in the House of His Parents'.

Christ In The House Of His Parents19990816

Five writers reflect on their selection of images inspired by CHRISTIANity and explore how deeply those images resonate in contemporary culture. Today, writer and broadcaster Rana Kabbani discuss Millais's `Christ in the House of His Parents'.

Christ On The Cross19990819

Five writers reflect on their selection of images inspired by CHRISTIANity and explore how deeply those images resonate in contemporary culture. Today, novelist A L Kennedy talks about Cranach's `Christ on the Cross'.

Christ On The Cross19990819

Five writers reflect on their selection of images inspired by CHRISTIANity and explore how deeply those images resonate in contemporary culture. Today, novelist A L Kennedy talks about Cranach's `Christ on the Cross'.

Christmas Day19971222
Christmas Day19971222

Paul Durcan reads the final part of his book-length poem. Back home from CHRISTMAS at Frank's flat, Paul's thoughts range across his life.

Lunch over, Paul and Frank continue their conversation. Paul Durcan continues reading his book-length poem that sets out a funny, poignant and often irreverent vision of CHRISTMAS.

Paul and Frank settle down to lunch. Paul Durcan continues reading his book-length poem that sets out a funny, poignant and often irreverent vision of CHRISTMAS.

Paul and Frank continue their funny, melancholic and often subversive CHRISTMAS afternoon conversation. Paul Durcan continues reading his book-length poem that sets out a funny, sweetly sad and often irreverent vision of CHRISTMAS.

Accustomed to loneliness, Paul takes up Frank's unexpected invitation for a curiously homely, decidedly male CHRISTMAS lunch. Over five programmes this week, Paul Durcan reads his book-length poem that sets out a funny, poignant and often irreverent vision of CHRISTMAS.

Christmas Day19971223
Christmas Day19971223
Christmas Day19971224
Christmas Day19971224
Christmas Day19971225
Christmas Day19971225
Christmas Day19971226
Christmas Day19971226
Confession Of The Seven Deadly Sins19990629

Ken Smith introduces and reads his version of the `Confession of the Seven Deadly Sins' from William Langland's visionary allegorical poem `Piers Plowman', which satirised church and state and contributed to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381.

Confession Of The Seven Deadly Sins19990629

Ken Smith introduces and reads his version of the `Confession of the Seven Deadly Sins' from William Langland's visionary allegorical poem `Piers Plowman', which satirised church and state and contributed to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381.

Conversations With Writers19981020

In the fourth of five interviews with international writers, Hermione Lee talks to INDIAn novelist Anita Desai about the craft of writing and the themes she has developed throughout her many books.

In the second of five interviews with international writers, Hermione Lee talks to the internationally acclaimed South AFRICAn writer Nadine Gordimer about the craft of writing and the themes she has pursued in her novels.

Conversations With Writers19981020

In the fourth of five interviews with international writers, Hermione Lee talks to INDIAn novelist Anita Desai about the craft of writing and the themes she has developed throughout her many books.

In the second of five interviews with international writers, Hermione Lee talks to the internationally acclaimed South AFRICAn writer Nadine Gordimer about the craft of writing and the themes she has pursued in her novels.

Conversations With Writers19981022

In the fourth of five interviews with international writers, Hermione Lee talks to INDIAn novelist Anita Desai about the craft of writing and the themes she has developed throughout her many books.

In the second of five interviews with international writers, Hermione Lee talks to the internationally acclaimed South AFRICAn writer Nadine Gordimer about the craft of writing and the themes she has pursued in her novels.

Conversations With Writers19981022

In the fourth of five interviews with international writers, Hermione Lee talks to INDIAn novelist Anita Desai about the craft of writing and the themes she has developed throughout her many books.

In the second of five interviews with international writers, Hermione Lee talks to the internationally acclaimed South AFRICAn writer Nadine Gordimer about the craft of writing and the themes she has pursued in her novels.

Counterwise1998030219980720

A five-part entertainment compiled by and starring Maureen Lipman, recreating monologues, sketches and songs originally written and performed by comedian Joyce Grenfell. Featuring `Counterwise', in which an enthusiastic store assistant encounters the pitfalls of applying sales psychology; and `Opera Interval', during which an opera lover attempts to follow the plot of `Mildura' as it progresses from the SLEEPy village of Pola, with its royalist fisherfolk, to the cloisters of St Geminiano.

Counterwise1998030219980720

A five-part entertainment compiled by and starring Maureen Lipman, recreating monologues, sketches and songs originally written and performed by comedian Joyce Grenfell. Featuring `Counterwise', in which an enthusiastic store assistant encounters the pitfalls of applying sales psychology; and `Opera Interval', during which an opera lover attempts to follow the plot of `Mildura' as it progresses from the SLEEPy village of Pola, with its royalist fisherfolk, to the cloisters of St Geminiano.

Dite Alla Giovine19990216

Peggy Reynolds unravels the dramatic, musical and emotional impact of a favourite operatic aria. Tonight, the seductive duet `Dite alla Giovine' from Verdi's `La traviata', in which the dying courtesan Violetta writhes in agony as her lover's father Germont persuades her to sacrifice everything. With Josephine Barstow, Alan Opie, Jonathan Miller, Annabel Arden and Mark Elder

Dite Alla Giovine19990216

Peggy Reynolds unravels the dramatic, musical and emotional impact of a favourite operatic aria. Tonight, the seductive duet `Dite alla Giovine' from Verdi's `La traviata', in which the dying courtesan Violetta writhes in agony as her lover's father Germont persuades her to sacrifice everything. With Josephine Barstow, Alan Opie, Jonathan Miller, Annabel Arden and Mark Elder

Dubh19980319

Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill reads new works in ENGLISH and Irish, including `Dubh', a poem inspired by the fall of Shrebrenice.

Dubh19980319

Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill reads new works in ENGLISH and Irish, including `Dubh', a poem inspired by the fall of Shrebrenice.

Elegy19980501

Michael Schmidt introduces poems that say goodbye - to a murdered king, an only son, a sister, a parent and a friend - and one facing up to the poet's own death. With poems by Stephen Crane, Frank O'Hara, Philip Larkin and Emily Dickinson. Readers Melissa Sinden and Russell Dixon.

Elegy19980501

Michael Schmidt introduces poems that say goodbye - to a murdered king, an only son, a sister, a parent and a friend - and one facing up to the poet's own death. With poems by Stephen Crane, Frank O'Hara, Philip Larkin and Emily Dickinson. Readers Melissa Sinden and Russell Dixon.

Ellington/strayhorn19980311

Brian Morton looks at five complex artistic partnerships in which the work is more than usually dependent on collaboration. The shared credit `Ellington/Strayhorn' appears on some of the greatest jazz of the century. In the third programme, Strayhorn biographer David Hajdu and saxophonist Tommy Smith discuss that unique partnership.

Ellington/strayhorn19980311

Brian Morton looks at five complex artistic partnerships in which the work is more than usually dependent on collaboration. The shared credit `Ellington/Strayhorn' appears on some of the greatest jazz of the century. In the third programme, Strayhorn biographer David Hajdu and saxophonist Tommy Smith discuss that unique partnership.

England, England19981019

In the first of five interviews with international writers, Hermione Lee talks to novelist Julian Barnes about the craft of writing and the themes he has pursued through his books, including the most recent - `England, England', nominated for the Booker Prize.

Goodbye Cruel World19980428

`Goodbye Cruel World'. Michael Schmidt introduces poems of farewell, including Raleigh, Nashe, Donne and Herbert. Readers Melissa Sinden and Russell Dixon.

Goodbye Cruel World19980428

`Goodbye Cruel World'. Michael Schmidt introduces poems of farewell, including Raleigh, Nashe, Donne and Herbert. Readers Melissa Sinden and Russell Dixon.

In Full Flight19990820

Five writers reflect on their selection of images inspired by CHRISTIANity and explore how deeply those images resonate in contemporary culture. Today, broadcaster and journalist Richard Coles talks about Braque's `In Full Flight'.

In Full Flight19990820

Five writers reflect on their selection of images inspired by CHRISTIANity and explore how deeply those images resonate in contemporary culture. Today, broadcaster and journalist Richard Coles talks about Braque's `In Full Flight'.

In Questa Reggia19990219

Peggy Reynolds unravels the dramatic, musical and emotional impact of a favourite operatic aria. Francesca Zambello, Dame Gwyneth Jones, Jane Eaglen and Dennis O'Neill explore `In questa reggia' from Puccini's opera `Turandot', in which the Turandot reveals the atrocities suffered by her ancestor which led her to execute an endless stream of suitors.

In Questa Reggia19990219

Peggy Reynolds unravels the dramatic, musical and emotional impact of a favourite operatic aria. Francesca Zambello, Dame Gwyneth Jones, Jane Eaglen and Dennis O'Neill explore `In questa reggia' from Puccini's opera `Turandot', in which the Turandot reveals the atrocities suffered by her ancestor which led her to execute an endless stream of suitors.

Kama Sutra19990729

Mark Tully meets Shubha Mudgal, a classical singer known outside INDIA as the musician in the film `Kama Sutra'. She is currently reaching new audiences through a successful pop album.

Kama Sutra19990729

Mark Tully meets Shubha Mudgal, a classical singer known outside INDIA as the musician in the film `Kama Sutra'. She is currently reaching new audiences through a successful pop album.

Lawrence Of Arabia19980309

All artists are collaborative to some extent. This week, Brian Morton examines five complex artistic partnerships in which the work is more than usually dependent on collaboration. In the first programme, he profiles David Lean and Freddie Young, the duo responsible for the screen classics `Lawrence of Arabia', `Doctor Zhivago' and `Ryan's Daughter'.

Lawrence Of Arabia19980309

All artists are collaborative to some extent. This week, Brian Morton examines five complex artistic partnerships in which the work is more than usually dependent on collaboration. In the first programme, he profiles David Lean and Freddie Young, the duo responsible for the screen classics `Lawrence of Arabia', `Doctor Zhivago' and `Ryan's Daughter'.

Malo19990217

Peggy Reynolds unravels the dramatic, musical and emotional impact of a favourite operatic aria. Tonight, `Malo' from Britten's 'The Turn of the Screw', his operatic version of the Henry James ghost story. Discussing the aria are actor and once boy soprano David Hemmings, singers Joan Rodgers, directors Jonathan Miller and David Leveaux and conductor Wasfi Kani.

Malo19990217

Peggy Reynolds unravels the dramatic, musical and emotional impact of a favourite operatic aria. Tonight, `Malo' from Britten's 'The Turn of the Screw', his operatic version of the Henry James ghost story. Discussing the aria are actor and once boy soprano David Hemmings, singers Joan Rodgers, directors Jonathan Miller and David Leveaux and conductor Wasfi Kani.

New York, New York19971022

The third of four readings by Ian Gibson from his new biography of Salvador Dali. `New YORK, New YORK'. In the 30s and 40s, Dali was the most famous modern painter in America. And in 1937, when he set sail with his wife for New YORK for the first time, they had every intention of taking the city by storm.

New York, New York19971022

The third of four readings by Ian Gibson from his new biography of Salvador Dali. `New YORK, New YORK'. In the 30s and 40s, Dali was the most famous modern painter in America. And in 1937, when he set sail with his wife for New YORK for the first time, they had every intention of taking the city by storm.

Notes From India19990726

Mark Tully visits the home of Mehmoud Mirza, one of INDIA's leading sitar players.

The second of five programmes in which Mark Tully meets five leading INDIAn musicians for conversation and music-making. Tonight he visits the Delhi home of Wasifuddin Dagar, a leading singer of drupad, the most ancient form of INDIAn music.

Mark Tully seeks to get to the heart of the long and rich tradition of INDIAn classical music through conversation and music-making with leading INDIAn musicians. In the first of five programmes, he visits the Bombay home of santoor player Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma.

Notes From India19990726

Mark Tully visits the home of Mehmoud Mirza, one of INDIA's leading sitar players.

The second of five programmes in which Mark Tully meets five leading INDIAn musicians for conversation and music-making. Tonight he visits the Delhi home of Wasifuddin Dagar, a leading singer of drupad, the most ancient form of INDIAn music.

Mark Tully seeks to get to the heart of the long and rich tradition of INDIAn classical music through conversation and music-making with leading INDIAn musicians. In the first of five programmes, he visits the Bombay home of santoor player Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma.

Notes From India19990727

Mark Tully visits the home of Mehmoud Mirza, one of INDIA's leading sitar players.

The second of five programmes in which Mark Tully meets five leading INDIAn musicians for conversation and music-making. Tonight he visits the Delhi home of Wasifuddin Dagar, a leading singer of drupad, the most ancient form of INDIAn music.

Mark Tully seeks to get to the heart of the long and rich tradition of INDIAn classical music through conversation and music-making with leading INDIAn musicians. In the first of five programmes, he visits the Bombay home of santoor player Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma.

Notes From India19990727

Mark Tully visits the home of Mehmoud Mirza, one of INDIA's leading sitar players.

The second of five programmes in which Mark Tully meets five leading INDIAn musicians for conversation and music-making. Tonight he visits the Delhi home of Wasifuddin Dagar, a leading singer of drupad, the most ancient form of INDIAn music.

Mark Tully seeks to get to the heart of the long and rich tradition of INDIAn classical music through conversation and music-making with leading INDIAn musicians. In the first of five programmes, he visits the Bombay home of santoor player Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma.

Oscar And Lucinda19981021

In the third of five interviews with international writers, Hermione Lee talks to Booker Prize-winning AUSTRALIAn author Peter Carey about the craft of writing and the themes he has pursued through books including `Oscar and Lucinda' and the latest, `Jack Maggs'.

Oscar And Lucinda19981021

In the third of five interviews with international writers, Hermione Lee talks to Booker Prize-winning AUSTRALIAn author Peter Carey about the craft of writing and the themes he has pursued through books including `Oscar and Lucinda' and the latest, `Jack Maggs'.

Out Of A Book19990614

Neil Corcoran introduces the first of five readings from the work of the Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer. Fiona Shaw reads `Out of a Book' and `The Roving Eye' - two essays reflecting on childhood reading and how a writer discovers her subject.

Out Of A Book19990614

Neil Corcoran introduces the first of five readings from the work of the Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer. Fiona Shaw reads `Out of a Book' and `The Roving Eye' - two essays reflecting on childhood reading and how a writer discovers her subject.

Piers Plowman19990628

David Cnstantine intorduces and reads his version of Piers Plowman's meeting with Hope and Charity from William Langland's visionary allegorical poem `Piers Plowman', which satirised church and state and contributed to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381.

Kevin Jackson introduces four new translations of William Langland's visionary allegorical poem `Piers Plowman', which are presented by the translators in subsequent programmes this week. Langland's poem satirised church and state and contributed to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381.

Piers Plowman19990628

David Cnstantine intorduces and reads his version of Piers Plowman's meeting with Hope and Charity from William Langland's visionary allegorical poem `Piers Plowman', which satirised church and state and contributed to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381.

Kevin Jackson introduces four new translations of William Langland's visionary allegorical poem `Piers Plowman', which are presented by the translators in subsequent programmes this week. Langland's poem satirised church and state and contributed to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381.

Piers Plowman19990702

David Cnstantine intorduces and reads his version of Piers Plowman's meeting with Hope and Charity from William Langland's visionary allegorical poem `Piers Plowman', which satirised church and state and contributed to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381.

Kevin Jackson introduces four new translations of William Langland's visionary allegorical poem `Piers Plowman', which are presented by the translators in subsequent programmes this week. Langland's poem satirised church and state and contributed to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381.

Piers Plowman19990702

David Cnstantine intorduces and reads his version of Piers Plowman's meeting with Hope and Charity from William Langland's visionary allegorical poem `Piers Plowman', which satirised church and state and contributed to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381.

Kevin Jackson introduces four new translations of William Langland's visionary allegorical poem `Piers Plowman', which are presented by the translators in subsequent programmes this week. Langland's poem satirised church and state and contributed to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381.

Ploughing The Half-acre19990630

John Burnside introduces and reads his version of `Ploughing the Half-Acre' from William Langland's visionary allegorical poem `Piers Plowman', which satirised church and state and contributed to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381.

Ploughing The Half-acre19990630

John Burnside introduces and reads his version of `Ploughing the Half-Acre' from William Langland's visionary allegorical poem `Piers Plowman', which satirised church and state and contributed to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381.

Postscript1998112319990419

The return of the `Postscript' series in which Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he visits the studio of Gilbert and George as they prepare for a new exhibition in Naples. The Italian show will be the first time all the recent `New Testamental Pictures' have been seen together. As they talk about the forthcoming show, Gilbert and George describe their working practices as glimpses of their latest work emerge.

Postscript1998112319990419

The return of the `Postscript' series in which Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he visits the studio of Gilbert and George as they prepare for a new exhibition in Naples. The Italian show will be the first time all the recent `New Testamental Pictures' have been seen together. As they talk about the forthcoming show, Gilbert and George describe their working practices as glimpses of their latest work emerge.

Private View1998042019980803

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. For the past thirty years, artist Peter Joseph has pursued a very particular form of abstraction in his painting. Nicholas Ward Jackson visits the artist's studio near Stroud and explores how the light and landscape of the Cotswolds continues to inform Joseph's work.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the fourth programme, he talks to Ilya and Emilia Kabakov as they race against time to install their Palace of Projects inside LONDON's Roundhouse. In its 67 rooms, fictitious characters dream and scheme their way to the end of the century.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the second programme, he talks to Gillian Wearing about life after the Turner Prize. Recorded on the streets of LONDON, Wearing talks about her ongoing fascination with the city's public spaces and private lives. The programme contains new audio works by her.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80 he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80s he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Private View1998042019980803

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. For the past thirty years, artist Peter Joseph has pursued a very particular form of abstraction in his painting. Nicholas Ward Jackson visits the artist's studio near Stroud and explores how the light and landscape of the Cotswolds continues to inform Joseph's work.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the fourth programme, he talks to Ilya and Emilia Kabakov as they race against time to install their Palace of Projects inside LONDON's Roundhouse. In its 67 rooms, fictitious characters dream and scheme their way to the end of the century.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the second programme, he talks to Gillian Wearing about life after the Turner Prize. Recorded on the streets of LONDON, Wearing talks about her ongoing fascination with the city's public spaces and private lives. The programme contains new audio works by her.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80 he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80s he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Private View1998042019980804

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. For the past thirty years, artist Peter Joseph has pursued a very particular form of abstraction in his painting. Nicholas Ward Jackson visits the artist's studio near Stroud and explores how the light and landscape of the Cotswolds continues to inform Joseph's work.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the fourth programme, he talks to Ilya and Emilia Kabakov as they race against time to install their Palace of Projects inside LONDON's Roundhouse. In its 67 rooms, fictitious characters dream and scheme their way to the end of the century.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the second programme, he talks to Gillian Wearing about life after the Turner Prize. Recorded on the streets of LONDON, Wearing talks about her ongoing fascination with the city's public spaces and private lives. The programme contains new audio works by her.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80 he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80s he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Private View1998042019980804

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. For the past thirty years, artist Peter Joseph has pursued a very particular form of abstraction in his painting. Nicholas Ward Jackson visits the artist's studio near Stroud and explores how the light and landscape of the Cotswolds continues to inform Joseph's work.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the fourth programme, he talks to Ilya and Emilia Kabakov as they race against time to install their Palace of Projects inside LONDON's Roundhouse. In its 67 rooms, fictitious characters dream and scheme their way to the end of the century.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the second programme, he talks to Gillian Wearing about life after the Turner Prize. Recorded on the streets of LONDON, Wearing talks about her ongoing fascination with the city's public spaces and private lives. The programme contains new audio works by her.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80 he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80s he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Private View1998042019980806

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. For the past thirty years, artist Peter Joseph has pursued a very particular form of abstraction in his painting. Nicholas Ward Jackson visits the artist's studio near Stroud and explores how the light and landscape of the Cotswolds continues to inform Joseph's work.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the fourth programme, he talks to Ilya and Emilia Kabakov as they race against time to install their Palace of Projects inside LONDON's Roundhouse. In its 67 rooms, fictitious characters dream and scheme their way to the end of the century.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the second programme, he talks to Gillian Wearing about life after the Turner Prize. Recorded on the streets of LONDON, Wearing talks about her ongoing fascination with the city's public spaces and private lives. The programme contains new audio works by her.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80 he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80s he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Private View1998042019980806

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. For the past thirty years, artist Peter Joseph has pursued a very particular form of abstraction in his painting. Nicholas Ward Jackson visits the artist's studio near Stroud and explores how the light and landscape of the Cotswolds continues to inform Joseph's work.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the fourth programme, he talks to Ilya and Emilia Kabakov as they race against time to install their Palace of Projects inside LONDON's Roundhouse. In its 67 rooms, fictitious characters dream and scheme their way to the end of the century.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the second programme, he talks to Gillian Wearing about life after the Turner Prize. Recorded on the streets of LONDON, Wearing talks about her ongoing fascination with the city's public spaces and private lives. The programme contains new audio works by her.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80 he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80s he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Private View1998042019990420

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. For the past thirty years, artist Peter Joseph has pursued a very particular form of abstraction in his painting. Nicholas Ward Jackson visits the artist's studio near Stroud and explores how the light and landscape of the Cotswolds continues to inform Joseph's work.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the fourth programme, he talks to Ilya and Emilia Kabakov as they race against time to install their Palace of Projects inside LONDON's Roundhouse. In its 67 rooms, fictitious characters dream and scheme their way to the end of the century.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the second programme, he talks to Gillian Wearing about life after the Turner Prize. Recorded on the streets of LONDON, Wearing talks about her ongoing fascination with the city's public spaces and private lives. The programme contains new audio works by her.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80 he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80s he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Private View1998042019990420

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. For the past thirty years, artist Peter Joseph has pursued a very particular form of abstraction in his painting. Nicholas Ward Jackson visits the artist's studio near Stroud and explores how the light and landscape of the Cotswolds continues to inform Joseph's work.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the fourth programme, he talks to Ilya and Emilia Kabakov as they race against time to install their Palace of Projects inside LONDON's Roundhouse. In its 67 rooms, fictitious characters dream and scheme their way to the end of the century.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the second programme, he talks to Gillian Wearing about life after the Turner Prize. Recorded on the streets of LONDON, Wearing talks about her ongoing fascination with the city's public spaces and private lives. The programme contains new audio works by her.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80 he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80s he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Private View1998042119980803

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. For the past thirty years, artist Peter Joseph has pursued a very particular form of abstraction in his painting. Nicholas Ward Jackson visits the artist's studio near Stroud and explores how the light and landscape of the Cotswolds continues to inform Joseph's work.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the fourth programme, he talks to Ilya and Emilia Kabakov as they race against time to install their Palace of Projects inside LONDON's Roundhouse. In its 67 rooms, fictitious characters dream and scheme their way to the end of the century.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the second programme, he talks to Gillian Wearing about life after the Turner Prize. Recorded on the streets of LONDON, Wearing talks about her ongoing fascination with the city's public spaces and private lives. The programme contains new audio works by her.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80 he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80s he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Private View1998042119980803

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. For the past thirty years, artist Peter Joseph has pursued a very particular form of abstraction in his painting. Nicholas Ward Jackson visits the artist's studio near Stroud and explores how the light and landscape of the Cotswolds continues to inform Joseph's work.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the fourth programme, he talks to Ilya and Emilia Kabakov as they race against time to install their Palace of Projects inside LONDON's Roundhouse. In its 67 rooms, fictitious characters dream and scheme their way to the end of the century.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the second programme, he talks to Gillian Wearing about life after the Turner Prize. Recorded on the streets of LONDON, Wearing talks about her ongoing fascination with the city's public spaces and private lives. The programme contains new audio works by her.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80 he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80s he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Private View1998042319980803

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. For the past thirty years, artist Peter Joseph has pursued a very particular form of abstraction in his painting. Nicholas Ward Jackson visits the artist's studio near Stroud and explores how the light and landscape of the Cotswolds continues to inform Joseph's work.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the fourth programme, he talks to Ilya and Emilia Kabakov as they race against time to install their Palace of Projects inside LONDON's Roundhouse. In its 67 rooms, fictitious characters dream and scheme their way to the end of the century.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the second programme, he talks to Gillian Wearing about life after the Turner Prize. Recorded on the streets of LONDON, Wearing talks about her ongoing fascination with the city's public spaces and private lives. The programme contains new audio works by her.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80 he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80s he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Private View1998042319980803

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. For the past thirty years, artist Peter Joseph has pursued a very particular form of abstraction in his painting. Nicholas Ward Jackson visits the artist's studio near Stroud and explores how the light and landscape of the Cotswolds continues to inform Joseph's work.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the fourth programme, he talks to Ilya and Emilia Kabakov as they race against time to install their Palace of Projects inside LONDON's Roundhouse. In its 67 rooms, fictitious characters dream and scheme their way to the end of the century.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the second programme, he talks to Gillian Wearing about life after the Turner Prize. Recorded on the streets of LONDON, Wearing talks about her ongoing fascination with the city's public spaces and private lives. The programme contains new audio works by her.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80 he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80s he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Private View1998112519980803

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. For the past thirty years, artist Peter Joseph has pursued a very particular form of abstraction in his painting. Nicholas Ward Jackson visits the artist's studio near Stroud and explores how the light and landscape of the Cotswolds continues to inform Joseph's work.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the fourth programme, he talks to Ilya and Emilia Kabakov as they race against time to install their Palace of Projects inside LONDON's Roundhouse. In its 67 rooms, fictitious characters dream and scheme their way to the end of the century.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the second programme, he talks to Gillian Wearing about life after the Turner Prize. Recorded on the streets of LONDON, Wearing talks about her ongoing fascination with the city's public spaces and private lives. The programme contains new audio works by her.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80 he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80s he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Private View1998112519980803

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. For the past thirty years, artist Peter Joseph has pursued a very particular form of abstraction in his painting. Nicholas Ward Jackson visits the artist's studio near Stroud and explores how the light and landscape of the Cotswolds continues to inform Joseph's work.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the fourth programme, he talks to Ilya and Emilia Kabakov as they race against time to install their Palace of Projects inside LONDON's Roundhouse. In its 67 rooms, fictitious characters dream and scheme their way to the end of the century.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the second programme, he talks to Gillian Wearing about life after the Turner Prize. Recorded on the streets of LONDON, Wearing talks about her ongoing fascination with the city's public spaces and private lives. The programme contains new audio works by her.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80 he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he meets Jon Thompson, perhaps the most important figure to have taught art in Britain over the last thirty years. At Goldsmiths' College in the 80s he directly influenced the current generation of young British artists, but he now lives in self-imposed exile in Antwerp, where an exhibition of his work is forthcoming. He talks about the contemporary art scene and the tensions between academia and his own practice.

Rereading Auden1998092819990329

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998092819990329

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998092819990330

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998092819990330

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998092819990331

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998092819990331

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998092819990401

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998092819990401

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998092819990402

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998092819990402

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998092919990329

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998092919990329

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998093019990329

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998093019990329

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998100119990329

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998100119990329

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998100219990329

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Rereading Auden1998100219990329

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (5/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (4/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (3/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings (2/5).

Twenty-five years after W H Auden's death, five poets and critics reassess his poetry and make a personal selection of readings.

Reshaping, New Poetries19980430

`Reshaping, New Poetries'. Michael Schmidt introduces the work of poets who have taken the ENGLISH language into their own cultures. Featured poets include Gertrude Stein, John Ashbery, Edward Kamau Brathwaite and Hugh MacDiarmid. Readers Melissa Sinden and Russell Dixon.

Reshaping, New Poetries19980430

`Reshaping, New Poetries'. Michael Schmidt introduces the work of poets who have taken the ENGLISH language into their own cultures. Featured poets include Gertrude Stein, John Ashbery, Edward Kamau Brathwaite and Hugh MacDiarmid. Readers Melissa Sinden and Russell Dixon.

Ruslan And Lyudmila19990531

The final instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The third instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The second instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

Translated and adapted in five parts by Gary Yershon. The prologue of `Ruslan and Lyudmila' is one of the most famous pieces of verse in the RUSSIAn language. Full of wandering knights, captive princesses, witches and wizards and all kinds of miraculous sights, the prologue it is the epitome of romanticism. Cast: Alex Jennings, Donald Sinden, David Ryall, Kevin McKidd, Katie Fleetwood, Chris Langham, Toby Jones, Pam Ferris

Ruslan And Lyudmila19990531

The final instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The third instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The second instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

Translated and adapted in five parts by Gary Yershon. The prologue of `Ruslan and Lyudmila' is one of the most famous pieces of verse in the RUSSIAn language. Full of wandering knights, captive princesses, witches and wizards and all kinds of miraculous sights, the prologue it is the epitome of romanticism. Cast: Alex Jennings, Donald Sinden, David Ryall, Kevin McKidd, Katie Fleetwood, Chris Langham, Toby Jones, Pam Ferris

Ruslan And Lyudmila19990601

The final instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The third instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The second instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

Translated and adapted in five parts by Gary Yershon. The prologue of `Ruslan and Lyudmila' is one of the most famous pieces of verse in the RUSSIAn language. Full of wandering knights, captive princesses, witches and wizards and all kinds of miraculous sights, the prologue it is the epitome of romanticism. Cast: Alex Jennings, Donald Sinden, David Ryall, Kevin McKidd, Katie Fleetwood, Chris Langham, Toby Jones, Pam Ferris

Ruslan And Lyudmila19990601

The final instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The third instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The second instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

Translated and adapted in five parts by Gary Yershon. The prologue of `Ruslan and Lyudmila' is one of the most famous pieces of verse in the RUSSIAn language. Full of wandering knights, captive princesses, witches and wizards and all kinds of miraculous sights, the prologue it is the epitome of romanticism. Cast: Alex Jennings, Donald Sinden, David Ryall, Kevin McKidd, Katie Fleetwood, Chris Langham, Toby Jones, Pam Ferris

Ruslan And Lyudmila19990602

The final instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The third instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The second instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

Translated and adapted in five parts by Gary Yershon. The prologue of `Ruslan and Lyudmila' is one of the most famous pieces of verse in the RUSSIAn language. Full of wandering knights, captive princesses, witches and wizards and all kinds of miraculous sights, the prologue it is the epitome of romanticism. Cast: Alex Jennings, Donald Sinden, David Ryall, Kevin McKidd, Katie Fleetwood, Chris Langham, Toby Jones, Pam Ferris

Ruslan And Lyudmila19990602

The final instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The third instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The second instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

Translated and adapted in five parts by Gary Yershon. The prologue of `Ruslan and Lyudmila' is one of the most famous pieces of verse in the RUSSIAn language. Full of wandering knights, captive princesses, witches and wizards and all kinds of miraculous sights, the prologue it is the epitome of romanticism. Cast: Alex Jennings, Donald Sinden, David Ryall, Kevin McKidd, Katie Fleetwood, Chris Langham, Toby Jones, Pam Ferris

Ruslan And Lyudmila19990604

The final instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The third instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The second instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

Translated and adapted in five parts by Gary Yershon. The prologue of `Ruslan and Lyudmila' is one of the most famous pieces of verse in the RUSSIAn language. Full of wandering knights, captive princesses, witches and wizards and all kinds of miraculous sights, the prologue it is the epitome of romanticism. Cast: Alex Jennings, Donald Sinden, David Ryall, Kevin McKidd, Katie Fleetwood, Chris Langham, Toby Jones, Pam Ferris

Ruslan And Lyudmila19990604

The final instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The third instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

The second instalment of Gary Yershon's five-part dramatisation of Pushkin's epic poem, with Kevin McKidd and Kate Fleetwood in the title roles, Alex Jennings as the poet, David Ryall, Chris Langham, Toby Jones and Pam Ferris. Pam Ferris.

Translated and adapted in five parts by Gary Yershon. The prologue of `Ruslan and Lyudmila' is one of the most famous pieces of verse in the RUSSIAn language. Full of wandering knights, captive princesses, witches and wizards and all kinds of miraculous sights, the prologue it is the epitome of romanticism. Cast: Alex Jennings, Donald Sinden, David Ryall, Kevin McKidd, Katie Fleetwood, Chris Langham, Toby Jones, Pam Ferris

Shared Visions19980313

Much of Olivier Messiaen's piano music was inspired and first performed by his wife Yvonne Loriod. Did they in some way become a single personality? In the concluding programme on artistic collaborations, Brian Morton talks to Paul Griffiths and composer George Benjamin.

Shared Visions19980313

Much of Olivier Messiaen's piano music was inspired and first performed by his wife Yvonne Loriod. Did they in some way become a single personality? In the concluding programme on artistic collaborations, Brian Morton talks to Paul Griffiths and composer George Benjamin.

Sharp Focus19990510

The last of this week's programmes exploring the power of photography focuses on Sebastiao Salgado's images of the gold rush in the Brazilian Amazon.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Don McCullin talks about his own work. Eamonn McCabe finds out what happened when this renowned war photographer decided to turn his attention to somewhere closer to home.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Eamonn McCabe concentrates on the work of Czech photographer Josef Koudelka and his photographs of the 1968 Soviet invasion of Prague.

Eamonn McCabe looks at the power of photography to shock and to transform the world - or at least our view of it. He begins with Lewis Hine, who in 1908 used his camera to crusade against child labour.

Sharp Focus19990510

The last of this week's programmes exploring the power of photography focuses on Sebastiao Salgado's images of the gold rush in the Brazilian Amazon.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Don McCullin talks about his own work. Eamonn McCabe finds out what happened when this renowned war photographer decided to turn his attention to somewhere closer to home.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Eamonn McCabe concentrates on the work of Czech photographer Josef Koudelka and his photographs of the 1968 Soviet invasion of Prague.

Eamonn McCabe looks at the power of photography to shock and to transform the world - or at least our view of it. He begins with Lewis Hine, who in 1908 used his camera to crusade against child labour.

Sharp Focus19990512

The last of this week's programmes exploring the power of photography focuses on Sebastiao Salgado's images of the gold rush in the Brazilian Amazon.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Don McCullin talks about his own work. Eamonn McCabe finds out what happened when this renowned war photographer decided to turn his attention to somewhere closer to home.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Eamonn McCabe concentrates on the work of Czech photographer Josef Koudelka and his photographs of the 1968 Soviet invasion of Prague.

Eamonn McCabe looks at the power of photography to shock and to transform the world - or at least our view of it. He begins with Lewis Hine, who in 1908 used his camera to crusade against child labour.

Sharp Focus19990512

The last of this week's programmes exploring the power of photography focuses on Sebastiao Salgado's images of the gold rush in the Brazilian Amazon.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Don McCullin talks about his own work. Eamonn McCabe finds out what happened when this renowned war photographer decided to turn his attention to somewhere closer to home.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Eamonn McCabe concentrates on the work of Czech photographer Josef Koudelka and his photographs of the 1968 Soviet invasion of Prague.

Eamonn McCabe looks at the power of photography to shock and to transform the world - or at least our view of it. He begins with Lewis Hine, who in 1908 used his camera to crusade against child labour.

Sharp Focus19990513

The last of this week's programmes exploring the power of photography focuses on Sebastiao Salgado's images of the gold rush in the Brazilian Amazon.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Don McCullin talks about his own work. Eamonn McCabe finds out what happened when this renowned war photographer decided to turn his attention to somewhere closer to home.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Eamonn McCabe concentrates on the work of Czech photographer Josef Koudelka and his photographs of the 1968 Soviet invasion of Prague.

Eamonn McCabe looks at the power of photography to shock and to transform the world - or at least our view of it. He begins with Lewis Hine, who in 1908 used his camera to crusade against child labour.

Sharp Focus19990513

The last of this week's programmes exploring the power of photography focuses on Sebastiao Salgado's images of the gold rush in the Brazilian Amazon.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Don McCullin talks about his own work. Eamonn McCabe finds out what happened when this renowned war photographer decided to turn his attention to somewhere closer to home.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Eamonn McCabe concentrates on the work of Czech photographer Josef Koudelka and his photographs of the 1968 Soviet invasion of Prague.

Eamonn McCabe looks at the power of photography to shock and to transform the world - or at least our view of it. He begins with Lewis Hine, who in 1908 used his camera to crusade against child labour.

Sharp Focus19990514

The last of this week's programmes exploring the power of photography focuses on Sebastiao Salgado's images of the gold rush in the Brazilian Amazon.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Don McCullin talks about his own work. Eamonn McCabe finds out what happened when this renowned war photographer decided to turn his attention to somewhere closer to home.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Eamonn McCabe concentrates on the work of Czech photographer Josef Koudelka and his photographs of the 1968 Soviet invasion of Prague.

Eamonn McCabe looks at the power of photography to shock and to transform the world - or at least our view of it. He begins with Lewis Hine, who in 1908 used his camera to crusade against child labour.

Sharp Focus19990514

The last of this week's programmes exploring the power of photography focuses on Sebastiao Salgado's images of the gold rush in the Brazilian Amazon.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Don McCullin talks about his own work. Eamonn McCabe finds out what happened when this renowned war photographer decided to turn his attention to somewhere closer to home.

In tonight's programme exploring the power of photography, Eamonn McCabe concentrates on the work of Czech photographer Josef Koudelka and his photographs of the 1968 Soviet invasion of Prague.

Eamonn McCabe looks at the power of photography to shock and to transform the world - or at least our view of it. He begins with Lewis Hine, who in 1908 used his camera to crusade against child labour.

Sister Act19971209

Four programmes in which Christopher Cook talks to Hollywood's most successful young screenwriters.

Today, he meets Paul Rudnick, writer of `Sister Act', `Addams Family Values' and `Jeffrey'.

Sister Act19971209

Four programmes in which Christopher Cook talks to Hollywood's most successful young screenwriters.

Today, he meets Paul Rudnick, writer of `Sister Act', `Addams Family Values' and `Jeffrey'.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052519990802

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052519990802

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052519990804

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052519990804

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052519990805

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052519990805

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052519990806

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052519990806

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052619990802

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052619990802

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052719990802

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052719990802

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052819990802

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052819990802

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052919990802

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Sleeping On A Volcano1998052919990802

Five personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

A new map of Europe was drawn up after the events of 1848, as independent regions became nation states.

A century and a half later it is regionalism, not nationalism, that is testing Europe's borders.

As calls for regional independence in Italy grow louder, Dacia Maraini offers a timely review of the building of the state of Italy.

Personal European views on the legacy of 1848.

For Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely to the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, where thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, despite resisting a full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals came to lead revolts in other countries across Europe.

The state of Germany as a great modern power was built after 1848, upon ideals of democracy.

Sabine Freitag chronicles the uses and abuses of these ideals by German governments, of all political hues, ever since.

After the dramatic events of the PARIS uprisings in the spring of 1848, only a handful of countries resisted the call to revolt.

Gearoid O Tuathaigh explains how, despite famine, desperate POVERTY and political frustrations, revolution was averted in IRELAND.

A century and a half ago, countries across Europe were in turmoil as revolution raged.

Peasants fought for freedom, the middle classes for suffrage, and political leaders for national independence and the end of empire.

From the first stirrings of unrest in the spring of 1848, Europe realised that it was SLEEPing on a volcano.

Jacques Darras contemplates the artistic legacy of the PARISian uprisings and the events taking place this year in FRANCE to mark the 150th anniversary of the 1848 revolution.

Personal views of the legacy of 1848, when revolution swept across Europe.

Hubert Zawadzki explains how, for Poland, despite its fervent nationalist movement, the spring of 1848 followed too closely on the bloodshed of its own peasant uprising of 1846, when thousands of Polish aristocrats were massacred.

But although Poland resisted full-scale revolution in 1848, Polish radicals led revolts in other European countries.

Somewhere Else19981124

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he talks to artist Willie Doherty about his recent video work `Somewhere Else'. Recorded on location in Derry, Doherty explores conflicting images of Northern IRELAND as a landscape of mythic beauty and as a site of violence and covert surveillance.

Somewhere Else19981124

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Today, he talks to artist Willie Doherty about his recent video work `Somewhere Else'. Recorded on location in Derry, Doherty explores conflicting images of Northern IRELAND as a landscape of mythic beauty and as a site of violence and covert surveillance.

Stasi City1998112619990421

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Tonight, he joins Jane and Louise Wilson as they prepare for the shoot of their new film at the decommissioned Greenham Common air force base. As they rummage through hangers and bunkers, the Wilsons discuss their fascination with the Cold War and talk about the experience of filming `Stasi City' in BERLIN.

Stasi City1998112619990421

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Tonight, he joins Jane and Louise Wilson as they prepare for the shoot of their new film at the decommissioned Greenham Common air force base. As they rummage through hangers and bunkers, the Wilsons discuss their fascination with the Cold War and talk about the experience of filming `Stasi City' in BERLIN.

Summer With Monika20080602 BT=1050 (BBC7)
20080602 BT=2150 (BBC7)
20080603 BT=0250 (BBC7)

Talking about the enigmatic muse for his 1960s magical poem of love, Roger Mcgough reveals who Monika really was.

Summer With Monika20080602 BT=1050 (BBC7)
20080602 BT=2150 (BBC7)
20080603 BT=0250 (BBC7)

Talking about the enigmatic muse for his 1960s magical poem of love, Roger Mcgough reveals who Monika really was.

Taking Shape, Where Poetry Began19980429

`Taking Shape, Where Poetry Began'. Michael Schmidt introduces poems which were the first of their kind, from Caedmon to Ezra Pound. Readers Melissa Sinden and Russell Dixon.

Taking Shape, Where Poetry Began19980429

`Taking Shape, Where Poetry Began'. Michael Schmidt introduces poems which were the first of their kind, from Caedmon to Ezra Pound. Readers Melissa Sinden and Russell Dixon.

Tales From The Stacks19971117

In the last of five reflections on libraries, biographer Michael Holroyd remembers his aunt lightly roasting the books she borrowed for fear of germs.

He found an alternative education in the public library at Maidenhead.

The fourth of five reflections on the experience of libraries - great and small, here and abroad.

The third of five reflections on libraries.

The lost library of Alexandria is said to have contained around 400,000 manuscripts, many of which were accidentally burnt when Julius Caesar was besieged in Alexandria.

But what of modern Egypt - do equally great treasures survive?

The main building of the RUSSIAn State Library in Moscow was reworked from a design for a hydroelectric power station.

Though it now houses more than 40 million books and periodicals, some 40,000 were lost when the opening of a nearby metro station caused subsidence.

In the first of five reflections on libraries, the South AFRICAn novelist Christopher Hope recalls student days in the university libraries of Witwatersrand and Natal.

Tales From The Stacks19971117

In the last of five reflections on libraries, biographer Michael Holroyd remembers his aunt lightly roasting the books she borrowed for fear of germs.

He found an alternative education in the public library at Maidenhead.

The fourth of five reflections on the experience of libraries - great and small, here and abroad.

The third of five reflections on libraries.

The lost library of Alexandria is said to have contained around 400,000 manuscripts, many of which were accidentally burnt when Julius Caesar was besieged in Alexandria.

But what of modern Egypt - do equally great treasures survive?

The main building of the RUSSIAn State Library in Moscow was reworked from a design for a hydroelectric power station.

Though it now houses more than 40 million books and periodicals, some 40,000 were lost when the opening of a nearby metro station caused subsidence.

In the first of five reflections on libraries, the South AFRICAn novelist Christopher Hope recalls student days in the university libraries of Witwatersrand and Natal.

Tales From The Stacks19971118
Tales From The Stacks19971118

In the last of five reflections on libraries, biographer Michael Holroyd remembers his aunt lightly roasting the books she borrowed for fear of germs.

He found an alternative education in the public library at Maidenhead.

The fourth of five reflections on the experience of libraries - great and small, here and abroad.

The third of five reflections on libraries.

The lost library of Alexandria is said to have contained around 400,000 manuscripts, many of which were accidentally burnt when Julius Caesar was besieged in Alexandria.

But what of modern Egypt - do equally great treasures survive?

The main building of the RUSSIAn State Library in Moscow was reworked from a design for a hydroelectric power station.

Though it now houses more than 40 million books and periodicals, some 40,000 were lost when the opening of a nearby metro station caused subsidence.

In the first of five reflections on libraries, the South AFRICAn novelist Christopher Hope recalls student days in the university libraries of Witwatersrand and Natal.

Tales From The Stacks19971119
Tales From The Stacks19971119

In the last of five reflections on libraries, biographer Michael Holroyd remembers his aunt lightly roasting the books she borrowed for fear of germs.

He found an alternative education in the public library at Maidenhead.

The fourth of five reflections on the experience of libraries - great and small, here and abroad.

The third of five reflections on libraries.

The lost library of Alexandria is said to have contained around 400,000 manuscripts, many of which were accidentally burnt when Julius Caesar was besieged in Alexandria.

But what of modern Egypt - do equally great treasures survive?

The main building of the RUSSIAn State Library in Moscow was reworked from a design for a hydroelectric power station.

Though it now houses more than 40 million books and periodicals, some 40,000 were lost when the opening of a nearby metro station caused subsidence.

In the first of five reflections on libraries, the South AFRICAn novelist Christopher Hope recalls student days in the university libraries of Witwatersrand and Natal.

Tales From The Stacks19971120
Tales From The Stacks19971120

In the last of five reflections on libraries, biographer Michael Holroyd remembers his aunt lightly roasting the books she borrowed for fear of germs.

He found an alternative education in the public library at Maidenhead.

The fourth of five reflections on the experience of libraries - great and small, here and abroad.

The third of five reflections on libraries.

The lost library of Alexandria is said to have contained around 400,000 manuscripts, many of which were accidentally burnt when Julius Caesar was besieged in Alexandria.

But what of modern Egypt - do equally great treasures survive?

The main building of the RUSSIAn State Library in Moscow was reworked from a design for a hydroelectric power station.

Though it now houses more than 40 million books and periodicals, some 40,000 were lost when the opening of a nearby metro station caused subsidence.

In the first of five reflections on libraries, the South AFRICAn novelist Christopher Hope recalls student days in the university libraries of Witwatersrand and Natal.

Tales From The Stacks19971121
Tales From The Stacks19971121

In the last of five reflections on libraries, biographer Michael Holroyd remembers his aunt lightly roasting the books she borrowed for fear of germs.

He found an alternative education in the public library at Maidenhead.

The fourth of five reflections on the experience of libraries - great and small, here and abroad.

The third of five reflections on libraries.

The lost library of Alexandria is said to have contained around 400,000 manuscripts, many of which were accidentally burnt when Julius Caesar was besieged in Alexandria.

But what of modern Egypt - do equally great treasures survive?

The main building of the RUSSIAn State Library in Moscow was reworked from a design for a hydroelectric power station.

Though it now houses more than 40 million books and periodicals, some 40,000 were lost when the opening of a nearby metro station caused subsidence.

In the first of five reflections on libraries, the South AFRICAn novelist Christopher Hope recalls student days in the university libraries of Witwatersrand and Natal.

Telephone Call From Down Under1998030619980724

The last in the series of entertainments in which Maureen Lipman recreates monologues, sketches and songs originally written and performed by comedian Joyce Grenfell. Featuring `Telephone Call from Down Under', a touching scene of divided loyalties; `Mrs Mendlicote', a musical account of life and times in Pont Street; and, to end, `When You Go'. The songs were composed by Richard Addinsell.

Telephone Call From Down Under1998030619980724

The last in the series of entertainments in which Maureen Lipman recreates monologues, sketches and songs originally written and performed by comedian Joyce Grenfell. Featuring `Telephone Call from Down Under', a touching scene of divided loyalties; `Mrs Mendlicote', a musical account of life and times in Pont Street; and, to end, `When You Go'. The songs were composed by Richard Addinsell.

The Confession And The Harrowing Of Hell19990701

Helen Dunmore introduces and reads her version of `The Confession and the Harrowing of Hell' from William Langland's visionary allegorical poem `Piers Plowman', which satirised church and state and contributed to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381.

The Confession And The Harrowing Of Hell19990701

Helen Dunmore introduces and reads her version of `The Confession and the Harrowing of Hell' from William Langland's visionary allegorical poem `Piers Plowman', which satirised church and state and contributed to the Peasants' Revolt of 1381.

The Demon Lover19990617

Neil Corcoran introduces the third of five readings from the work of the Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer. Fiona Shaw reads `The Demon Lover', a short story set in LONDON during the Second World War which explores Bowen's preoccupations with suppressed emotion, dislocation and the supernatural.

The Demon Lover19990617

Neil Corcoran introduces the third of five readings from the work of the Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer. Fiona Shaw reads `The Demon Lover', a short story set in LONDON during the Second World War which explores Bowen's preoccupations with suppressed emotion, dislocation and the supernatural.

The Heat Of The Day19990618

Neil Corcoran introduces a finAl Reading from the work of the Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer.

Fiona Shaw reads from `The Heat of the Day', Bowen's great novel of treachery and deception set in LONDON and IRELAND during the Second World War.

The Heat Of The Day19990618

Neil Corcoran introduces a finAl Reading from the work of the Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer.

Fiona Shaw reads from `The Heat of the Day', Bowen's great novel of treachery and deception set in LONDON and IRELAND during the Second World War.

The House In Paris19990616

Neil Corcoran introduces the third of five readings from the work of the Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer in the year which marks the centenary of her birth.

Fiona Shaw reads from `The House in PARIS', Bowen's 1935 novel of deception, childhood and the tyranny of the past.

The House In Paris19990616

Neil Corcoran introduces the third of five readings from the work of the Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer in the year which marks the centenary of her birth.

Fiona Shaw reads from `The House in PARIS', Bowen's 1935 novel of deception, childhood and the tyranny of the past.

The Last September19990615

Neil Corcoran introduces the second of five readings from the work of the Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer in the year which marks the centenary of her birth. Fiona Shaw reads from `The Last September', Bowen's great novel of political struggle and snobbery set in County Cork during the Irish war of independence.

The Last September19990615

Neil Corcoran introduces the second of five readings from the work of the Anglo-Irish novelist and short story writer in the year which marks the centenary of her birth. Fiona Shaw reads from `The Last September', Bowen's great novel of political struggle and snobbery set in County Cork during the Irish war of independence.

The Magician19981023

In the last of five interviews with international writers, Hermione Lee talks to Belfast-born novelist Brian Moore about the craft of writing and the themes he has pursued in his books including the latest, `The Magician's Wife'.

The Magician19981023

In the last of five interviews with international writers, Hermione Lee talks to Belfast-born novelist Brian Moore about the craft of writing and the themes he has pursued in his books including the latest, `The Magician's Wife'.

The Migrant Mother19990511

The plight of farm labourers streaming into California desperate for work during the DEPRESSION was epitomised in Dorothea Lange's picture `The Migrant Mother'. Eamonn McCabe discovers why this photograph became an icon of the 1930s and explores its impact.

The Migrant Mother19990511

The plight of farm labourers streaming into California desperate for work during the DEPRESSION was epitomised in Dorothea Lange's picture `The Migrant Mother'. Eamonn McCabe discovers why this photograph became an icon of the 1930s and explores its impact.

The Muse19980427

`The Muse's Babes'. Michael Schmidt introduces a selection of poems by well known poets taking their first faltering steps, including Edgar Allan Poe, George Herbert, Milton, Pope and Burns. Readers Melissa Sinden and Russell Dixon.

The Muse19980427

`The Muse's Babes'. Michael Schmidt introduces a selection of poems by well known poets taking their first faltering steps, including Edgar Allan Poe, George Herbert, Milton, Pope and Burns. Readers Melissa Sinden and Russell Dixon.

The Old Testament Trinity19990817

Five writers reflect on their selection of images inspired by CHRISTIANity and explore how deeply those images resonate in contemporary culture. Today, religious historian Karen Armstrong talks about Rublev's `The Old Testament Trinity'.

The Old Testament Trinity19990817

Five writers reflect on their selection of images inspired by CHRISTIANity and explore how deeply those images resonate in contemporary culture. Today, religious historian Karen Armstrong talks about Rublev's `The Old Testament Trinity'.

The Vision After The Sermon, Jacob Wrestling With The Angel19990818

Five writers reflect on their selection of images inspired by CHRISTIANity and explore how deeply those images resonate in contemporary culture. Today, poet and lecturer Professor Geoffrey Hill talks about Gauguin's `The Vision after the Sermon, Jacob Wrestling with the Angel'.

The Vision After The Sermon, Jacob Wrestling With The Angel19990818

Five writers reflect on their selection of images inspired by CHRISTIANity and explore how deeply those images resonate in contemporary culture. Today, poet and lecturer Professor Geoffrey Hill talks about Gauguin's `The Vision after the Sermon, Jacob Wrestling with the Angel'.

The Waste Land19980310

Brian Morton looks at five complex artistic partnerships in which the work is more than usually dependent on collaboration. T S Eliot dedicated `The Waste Land' to `il miglior fabbro', acknowledging that Ezra Pound, who edited the manuscript, was `the better craftsman'. In the second programme, Brian Morton talks to Pound's biographer Humphrey Carpenter and poet Charles Tomlinson.

The Waste Land19980310

Brian Morton looks at five complex artistic partnerships in which the work is more than usually dependent on collaboration. T S Eliot dedicated `The Waste Land' to `il miglior fabbro', acknowledging that Ezra Pound, who edited the manuscript, was `the better craftsman'. In the second programme, Brian Morton talks to Pound's biographer Humphrey Carpenter and poet Charles Tomlinson.

Thinking Aloud1998112719990423

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Tonight, he talks to sculptor Richard Wentworth about the exhibition `Thinking Aloud'. Devised by Wentworth, the show brings together a bizarre collection of art objects and artefacts, including paintings by Churchill, a wooden mole trap, a tally stick from the Bank of ENGLAND, as well as works by Gilbert and George and Rachel Whiteread.

Thinking Aloud1998112719990423

Nicholas Ward Jackson explores the contemporary art world. Tonight, he talks to sculptor Richard Wentworth about the exhibition `Thinking Aloud'. Devised by Wentworth, the show brings together a bizarre collection of art objects and artefacts, including paintings by Churchill, a wooden mole trap, a tally stick from the Bank of ENGLAND, as well as works by Gilbert and George and Rachel Whiteread.

Thursdays1998030419980722

A five-part entertainment compiled by and starring Maureen Lipman, recreating monologues, sketches and songs originally written and performed by comedienne Joyce Grenfell. Featuring `Thursdays', a commonplace story in which a wrong number nearly turns into a blind date; and a poignant song, `Dear Francois', with music composed by Richard Addinsell. Plus Grenfell's letters to Virginia Graham.

A five-part entertainment compiled by and starring Maureen Lipman, recreating monologues, sketches and songs originally written and performed by comedienne Joyce Grenfell. Featuring `Thursdays', in which a wrong number nearly turns into a blind date; and a poignant song, `Dear Francois', with music by Richard Addinsell. Plus Grenfell's letters to Virginia Graham.

Thursdays1998030419980722

A five-part entertainment compiled by and starring Maureen Lipman, recreating monologues, sketches and songs originally written and performed by comedienne Joyce Grenfell. Featuring `Thursdays', a commonplace story in which a wrong number nearly turns into a blind date; and a poignant song, `Dear Francois', with music composed by Richard Addinsell. Plus Grenfell's letters to Virginia Graham.

A five-part entertainment compiled by and starring Maureen Lipman, recreating monologues, sketches and songs originally written and performed by comedienne Joyce Grenfell. Featuring `Thursdays', in which a wrong number nearly turns into a blind date; and a poignant song, `Dear Francois', with music by Richard Addinsell. Plus Grenfell's letters to Virginia Graham.

Tuberama1998042419980807

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. To conclude the week, he talks to Georgina Starr as she puts the finishing touches to `Tuberama', a special commission for BIRMINGHAM's Ikon Gallery. The work features a scaled-down underground train and a musical commentary that follows the progress of the carriage's fictional characters. Nicholas Ward-Jackson attends the private viewing, a night equally important for Starr and for gallery director Elizabeth A MacGregor.

Tuberama1998042419980807

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. To conclude the week, he talks to Georgina Starr as she puts the finishing touches to `Tuberama', a special commission for BIRMINGHAM's Ikon Gallery. The work features a scaled-down underground train and a musical commentary that follows the progress of the carriage's fictional characters. Nicholas Ward-Jackson attends the private viewing, a night equally important for Starr and for gallery director Elizabeth A MacGregor.

01A Century Of Science19990524

John Durant, professor of the public understanding of science at Imperial College, explores the scientific discoveries that have had a major cultural impact and have changed our way of looking at the world.

2: The Information Explosion.

1: The Atom.

01A Century Of Science19990524

John Durant, professor of the public understanding of science at Imperial College, explores the scientific discoveries that have had a major cultural impact and have changed our way of looking at the world.

2: The Information Explosion.

1: The Atom.

01Arrondissements19990201

Patrick Wright talks with five unsung, witty and engaging figures on the cultural scene who are distinguished by their originality and imagination. 1: Douglas Oliver. PARIS-based poet Douglas Oliver, author of `Arrondissements', `Penniless Politics' and `The Infant Pearl', talks about how poetry functions in contemporary political discourse.

01Arrondissements19990201

Patrick Wright talks with five unsung, witty and engaging figures on the cultural scene who are distinguished by their originality and imagination. 1: Douglas Oliver. PARIS-based poet Douglas Oliver, author of `Arrondissements', `Penniless Politics' and `The Infant Pearl', talks about how poetry functions in contemporary political discourse.

01Azouz Begag: Le Gone De Chaaba19980921

Tibor Fischer introduces five of the world's leading writers who are, as yet, little known to British audiences. 1: `Azouz Begag: Le gone de Chaaba'. Born in the Arab slums of Lyon, Azouz Begag explores his experience of growing up as an outsider in French society. Frequently compared to Camus, Begag is one of FRANCE's most important young novelists.

01Azouz Begag: Le Gone De Chaaba19980921

Tibor Fischer introduces five of the world's leading writers who are, as yet, little known to British audiences. 1: `Azouz Begag: Le gone de Chaaba'. Born in the Arab slums of Lyon, Azouz Begag explores his experience of growing up as an outsider in French society. Frequently compared to Camus, Begag is one of FRANCE's most important young novelists.

01Bedtime Stories19980202

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 5: Androgyny. An androgynous look has often been revered as an ideal of physical beauty, and gender confusion is explored by many people through fashion. But what is the reality of androgyny for those born neither male or female?

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 4: Bisexuality. While some believe we are all bisexual, others deny the very existence of bisexuality. Is it a third gender, or a new way to look at desires we all share?

A five part cultural history of sexuality. 3: Transvestism. Men and women have dressed in each other's clothes from Shakespeare to pantomime, yet transvestism today remains a secret lifestyle. Writers and psychologists explore the history of cross-dressing, and transvestites talk about their lives.

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 2: HOMOSEXUALity. An exploration of gay and lesbian life from ancient Greece to today. How has gay and lesbian sexuality found a voice and an identity in the past?

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 1: Heterosexuality. Since Adam and Eve's first kiss, we have been a heterosexual society, but how have men and women's desires for one another changed with the times? Institutionalised through marriage, heterosexual love has often forged political as well as romantic alliances, but always with the family at its heart. This programme looks at how as well as whom we love.

01Bedtime Stories19980202

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 5: Androgyny. An androgynous look has often been revered as an ideal of physical beauty, and gender confusion is explored by many people through fashion. But what is the reality of androgyny for those born neither male or female?

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 4: Bisexuality. While some believe we are all bisexual, others deny the very existence of bisexuality. Is it a third gender, or a new way to look at desires we all share?

A five part cultural history of sexuality. 3: Transvestism. Men and women have dressed in each other's clothes from Shakespeare to pantomime, yet transvestism today remains a secret lifestyle. Writers and psychologists explore the history of cross-dressing, and transvestites talk about their lives.

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 2: HOMOSEXUALity. An exploration of gay and lesbian life from ancient Greece to today. How has gay and lesbian sexuality found a voice and an identity in the past?

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 1: Heterosexuality. Since Adam and Eve's first kiss, we have been a heterosexual society, but how have men and women's desires for one another changed with the times? Institutionalised through marriage, heterosexual love has often forged political as well as romantic alliances, but always with the family at its heart. This programme looks at how as well as whom we love.

01Cheltenham - The Musical Spa1998021619980706

Kathleen Griffin begins a week-long exploration of the European spas where the royal, the rich and the artistic flocked for purging, purification and pleasure. 1: `Cheltenham - the Musical Spa'.

01Cheltenham - The Musical Spa1998021619980706

Kathleen Griffin begins a week-long exploration of the European spas where the royal, the rich and the artistic flocked for purging, purification and pleasure. 1: `Cheltenham - the Musical Spa'.

01Contemporary American Poets19990719

With Michael Schmidt. 5: John Ashbery. A final programme of readings by contemporary American poets reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. One of the most prolific American poets of our time, Ashbery reads a selection of his writing past and present.

With Michael Schmidt. 4: Deborah Garrison and Yusef Komunyakaa. The fourth in a series of readings by leading contemporary poets from America reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. Garrison, a senior editor for the NEW YORKer, reads from her very first collection; Komunyakaa, a Vietnam veteran, delivers a powerful meditation on AFRICAn-American life.

With Michael Schmidt. 3: Sharon Olds and August Kleinzahler. The third in a series of readings by contemporary American poets reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. Olds is a winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award; Kleinzahler has also received many top awards.

With Michael Schmidt. 2: Louise Gluck and Charles Simic. The second in a series of readings by contempoarary poets from America reflecting the diverse range of poetry written in the States today. Gluck's work is delicate and oblique; Serbian-born Simic's is warm-hearted and slightly surreal. Both are winners of the Pulitzer Prize for poetry.

With Michael Schmidt. 1: Rita Dove and Mark Doty. The first in a series of readings by contemporary poets from America reflecting the diverse range of poetry being written in the States today. Dove was the first AFRICAn-American poet laureate of the US, and her work is suffused with a quiet humanity. Doty, forceful and inventive, was the winner of the 1995 T S Eliot Prize.

01Contemporary American Poets19990719

With Michael Schmidt. 5: John Ashbery. A final programme of readings by contemporary American poets reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. One of the most prolific American poets of our time, Ashbery reads a selection of his writing past and present.

With Michael Schmidt. 4: Deborah Garrison and Yusef Komunyakaa. The fourth in a series of readings by leading contemporary poets from America reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. Garrison, a senior editor for the NEW YORKer, reads from her very first collection; Komunyakaa, a Vietnam veteran, delivers a powerful meditation on AFRICAn-American life.

With Michael Schmidt. 3: Sharon Olds and August Kleinzahler. The third in a series of readings by contemporary American poets reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. Olds is a winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award; Kleinzahler has also received many top awards.

With Michael Schmidt. 2: Louise Gluck and Charles Simic. The second in a series of readings by contempoarary poets from America reflecting the diverse range of poetry written in the States today. Gluck's work is delicate and oblique; Serbian-born Simic's is warm-hearted and slightly surreal. Both are winners of the Pulitzer Prize for poetry.

With Michael Schmidt. 1: Rita Dove and Mark Doty. The first in a series of readings by contemporary poets from America reflecting the diverse range of poetry being written in the States today. Dove was the first AFRICAn-American poet laureate of the US, and her work is suffused with a quiet humanity. Doty, forceful and inventive, was the winner of the 1995 T S Eliot Prize.

01Cultural Nationalism19990301

5: Finland is less than 100 years old as a country. It defined itself as neither Swedish nor RUSSIAn, while both countries exerted great influence over it. Is its indigenous culture now under threat from mobile phones, the European Union and Hollywood? Joe Farrell reports from Helsinki.

3: Catalonia is a nation with its own language and history which asserts its rights to be independent of Spain and part of a wider Europe. Joe Farrell reports from Barcelona.

2: One island, two IRELANDs: how does culture differ in Dublin and Belfast? Joe Farrell talks to Declan Kiberd and Terrence Brown.

A week of programmes exploring the ancient and continuing association of the arts with nation-building. Do a people need a distinctive culture of their own in order to feel themselves a people apart? Can you be a nation without your own language, national epic or type of bread? Written and presented by Joe Farrell.

01Dancing Words19980330

The 20th century has seen an explosion in the number of writers who have used music in their work, from classical to rock 'n' roll and the blues. Over four programmes, Philip Dodd talks to leading novelists to find out why words and music have become so interwoven. 1: `Dancing Words'. From Tolstoy to Hanif Kureishi, the purity of music has obsessed writers who have endeavoured to capture its spirit in their work. But do writers translate the intangible qualities of sound into prose, and how do the different qualities of music inform their work?

01Dancing Words19980330

The 20th century has seen an explosion in the number of writers who have used music in their work, from classical to rock 'n' roll and the blues. Over four programmes, Philip Dodd talks to leading novelists to find out why words and music have become so interwoven. 1: `Dancing Words'. From Tolstoy to Hanif Kureishi, the purity of music has obsessed writers who have endeavoured to capture its spirit in their work. But do writers translate the intangible qualities of sound into prose, and how do the different qualities of music inform their work?

01Dissenting Voices19990125

Five programmes in which the work of a writer from the past who argued with passion for change is introduced by a contemporary outspoken voice. 5: George Monbiot introduces excerpts from the writings of 17th-century activist Gerard Winstanley. Reader Stephen Thorne.

Five programmes in which the work of a writer from the past who argued with passion for change is introduced by a contemporary outspoken voice. In this first programme, Tony Benn presents excerpts from the essays of William Morris. Reader David Horovitch

01Dissenting Voices19990125

Five programmes in which the work of a writer from the past who argued with passion for change is introduced by a contemporary outspoken voice. 5: George Monbiot introduces excerpts from the writings of 17th-century activist Gerard Winstanley. Reader Stephen Thorne.

Five programmes in which the work of a writer from the past who argued with passion for change is introduced by a contemporary outspoken voice. In this first programme, Tony Benn presents excerpts from the essays of William Morris. Reader David Horovitch

01Doctors Of Philosophy19990222

Alain De Botton looks to some of the great thinkers of the past in the hope of finding philosophical cures for some everyday ills.

5: The milk has gone off, the car has been clamped, and tax forms are overdue, but Alain De Botton opens Nietzsche in search of advice for the faint-hearted.

4: Never mind agony aunts or lonely hearts pages - Alain De Botton discovers how Schopenhauer soothes the broken-hearted.

3: Bewildered by semantics, semiotics or systems analysis? Alain De Botton finds Montaigne has a message for those with a sense of intellectual inferiority.

2: From loss of hair to loss of employment, Alain De Botton turns to Seneca for sage advice.

1: From foreign holidays to expensive meals, we live in an age that equates money with happiness.

So what has Epicurus to say to those with a cash-flow problem?

01Doctors Of Philosophy19990222

Alain De Botton looks to some of the great thinkers of the past in the hope of finding philosophical cures for some everyday ills.

5: The milk has gone off, the car has been clamped, and tax forms are overdue, but Alain De Botton opens Nietzsche in search of advice for the faint-hearted.

4: Never mind agony aunts or lonely hearts pages - Alain De Botton discovers how Schopenhauer soothes the broken-hearted.

3: Bewildered by semantics, semiotics or systems analysis? Alain De Botton finds Montaigne has a message for those with a sense of intellectual inferiority.

2: From loss of hair to loss of employment, Alain De Botton turns to Seneca for sage advice.

1: From foreign holidays to expensive meals, we live in an age that equates money with happiness.

So what has Epicurus to say to those with a cash-flow problem?

01George Szirtes: Lullaby Of Broadway19990308

For the third year running, Radio 3 has commissioned five of the finest poets writing in ENGLISH today to write a new poem for radio. The poems include specially recorded sound and music. 1: `George Szirtes: Lullaby of Broadway'. A poem inspired by the remarkable extended dance sequence by Busby Berkeley in the film `Gold Diggers of 1935'.

01George Szirtes: Lullaby Of Broadway19990308

For the third year running, Radio 3 has commissioned five of the finest poets writing in ENGLISH today to write a new poem for radio. The poems include specially recorded sound and music. 1: `George Szirtes: Lullaby of Broadway'. A poem inspired by the remarkable extended dance sequence by Busby Berkeley in the film `Gold Diggers of 1935'.

01I Beg You To Hear Me: The File On Isaac Babel19981005

Five dramatised documentaries drawn from the KGB's literary archive by Vitaly Shentalinsky and presented by Professor James Riordan. 1: `I Beg You to Hear Me: the File on Isaac Babel'. The legacy of writer Isaac Babel is recalled by his grandson. Babel rode with the Cossacks in RUSSIA's bloody civil war, gave the world his short story collection `Red Cavalry', and was arrested and executed in 1939. With Stephen Grief as Babel and Jon Strickland as the interrogator.

01I Beg You To Hear Me: The File On Isaac Babel19981005

Five dramatised documentaries drawn from the KGB's literary archive by Vitaly Shentalinsky and presented by Professor James Riordan. 1: `I Beg You to Hear Me: the File on Isaac Babel'. The legacy of writer Isaac Babel is recalled by his grandson. Babel rode with the Cossacks in RUSSIA's bloody civil war, gave the world his short story collection `Red Cavalry', and was arrested and executed in 1939. With Stephen Grief as Babel and Jon Strickland as the interrogator.

01It Couldn19990111

In five programmes this week, Paul Neuberg explores the Communist project which sought to use the arts to remould people's minds so that they would join in reshaping the world. In the course of the century, this project involved thousands of writers and artists, who had to remould their own artistic agendas and sometimes their personalities. 1: `It Couldn't Be Helped, Comrades'. The suicide of Mayakovsky in April 1930 symbolised the defeat of the RUSSIAn avant-garde, which had been fighting proletarian artistic movements, their realist agendas and their claim to Party and popular approval almost since the Revolution.

01It Couldn19990111

In five programmes this week, Paul Neuberg explores the Communist project which sought to use the arts to remould people's minds so that they would join in reshaping the world. In the course of the century, this project involved thousands of writers and artists, who had to remould their own artistic agendas and sometimes their personalities. 1: `It Couldn't Be Helped, Comrades'. The suicide of Mayakovsky in April 1930 symbolised the defeat of the RUSSIAn avant-garde, which had been fighting proletarian artistic movements, their realist agendas and their claim to Party and popular approval almost since the Revolution.

01Jane Eyre19980126

Every day this week, Cambridge lecturer and psychoanalyst Juliet Mitchell journeys into the minds of some of literature's best known fictional characters. 1: `Jane Eyre'. Psychoanalyst Margot Waddell and writer Jenny Diski discuss the most famous orphan of 19th-century literature.

01Jane Eyre19980126

Every day this week, Cambridge lecturer and psychoanalyst Juliet Mitchell journeys into the minds of some of literature's best known fictional characters. 1: `Jane Eyre'. Psychoanalyst Margot Waddell and writer Jenny Diski discuss the most famous orphan of 19th-century literature.

01Lempriere19970929

Five programmes this week about novelists. Lawrence Norfolk, author of `Lempriere's Dictionary' and `The Pope's Rhinoceros', is one of the most admired and successful of British novelists. Today, he introduces his next book, which is about a contemporary suicidal love affair and boar-hunting in ancient Greece.

01Lempriere19970929

Five programmes this week about novelists. Lawrence Norfolk, author of `Lempriere's Dictionary' and `The Pope's Rhinoceros', is one of the most admired and successful of British novelists. Today, he introduces his next book, which is about a contemporary suicidal love affair and boar-hunting in ancient Greece.

01Living Ideas1999051719980907

In the last of the series in which leading philosophers offer an appreciation of great thinkers of the past. Ray Monk, lecturer at Southampton University, has written widely acclaimed biographies of Wittgenstein and Russell. Today, he takes up Wittgenstein's suggestion that there are limits to a scientific understanding of human beliefs, values and conduct.

In the third programme of the series offering an insight into how modern philosophers work and how they relate to thinkers from the past, Jonathan Ree, a leading interpreter of modern European philosophy who teaches at Middlesex University, talks about Heidegger's philosophy of art and examines in particular why Heidegger rejected traditional approaches to art criticism.

Leading philosophers acknowledge our indebtedness to great thinkers from the past. 2: Kant. Onora O'Neill, principal of Newnham College, Cambridge, looks at the enduring philosophy of Immanuel Kant and argues for the continuing significance of his fundamental principle that humans should respect others' rights and interests as fiercely as their own.

A second series in which leading philosophers acknowledge our indebtedness to great thinkers from the past. 1: Descartes. David Papineau, professor of the philosophy of science at King's College, LONDON, offers an appreciation of Descartes, usually remembered as the originator of the modern distinction between the mind and the body who Papineau argues should be celebrated as a pioneer materialist.

A five-part series in which leading philosophers offer their appreciation of great thinkers. 5: Emmanuel Levinas. Dr Simon Critchely defends the modern French-Jewish philosopher whose work was profoundly marked by the Holocaust and by the Nazism of his philosophical hero, Heidegger. Critchely argues that Levinas offers a moving and valuable account of the respect we owe each other as unique individuals.

A five-part series in which leading philosophers offer their appreciation of great thinkers. 4: Otto Neurath. Professor Nancy Cartwright talks about the little-known positivist Otto Neurath. She argues that Neurath combines a modernist commitment to science and progress with a postmodernist acceptance that there is no such thing as absolute and objective truth, even in the empirical sciences.

A five-part series in which leading philosophers offer their appreciation of great thinkers. 3: Hume. Professor Simon Blackburn is best known for his defence of quasi-realism, an account of the world which attempts to reconcile our experience of the world's richness with the stark ontology of modern science. In this programme, he talks about his hero, David Hume, who he thinks laid the foundations for a modern scientific philosophy.

A five-part series in which leading philosophers offer their appreciation of great thinkers. 2: Machiavelli. Quentin Skinner, one of today's leading historians of political thought, argues that Machiavelli still has a great deal to teach us about the importance of civic participation in guaranteeing our individual freedom.

A five-part series in which leading philosophers offer their appreciation of great thinkers who have influenced their work and understanding of the world. 1: Aristotle. Martha Nussbaum, professor of law and ethics at the University of Chicago, champions the thinking of the ancient Stoics about our obligations to one another as citizens of the world. She argues that we need to develop further their theories of international law.

01Living Ideas1999051719980907

In the last of the series in which leading philosophers offer an appreciation of great thinkers of the past. Ray Monk, lecturer at Southampton University, has written widely acclaimed biographies of Wittgenstein and Russell. Today, he takes up Wittgenstein's suggestion that there are limits to a scientific understanding of human beliefs, values and conduct.

In the third programme of the series offering an insight into how modern philosophers work and how they relate to thinkers from the past, Jonathan Ree, a leading interpreter of modern European philosophy who teaches at Middlesex University, talks about Heidegger's philosophy of art and examines in particular why Heidegger rejected traditional approaches to art criticism.

Leading philosophers acknowledge our indebtedness to great thinkers from the past. 2: Kant. Onora O'Neill, principal of Newnham College, Cambridge, looks at the enduring philosophy of Immanuel Kant and argues for the continuing significance of his fundamental principle that humans should respect others' rights and interests as fiercely as their own.

A second series in which leading philosophers acknowledge our indebtedness to great thinkers from the past. 1: Descartes. David Papineau, professor of the philosophy of science at King's College, LONDON, offers an appreciation of Descartes, usually remembered as the originator of the modern distinction between the mind and the body who Papineau argues should be celebrated as a pioneer materialist.

A five-part series in which leading philosophers offer their appreciation of great thinkers. 5: Emmanuel Levinas. Dr Simon Critchely defends the modern French-Jewish philosopher whose work was profoundly marked by the Holocaust and by the Nazism of his philosophical hero, Heidegger. Critchely argues that Levinas offers a moving and valuable account of the respect we owe each other as unique individuals.

A five-part series in which leading philosophers offer their appreciation of great thinkers. 4: Otto Neurath. Professor Nancy Cartwright talks about the little-known positivist Otto Neurath. She argues that Neurath combines a modernist commitment to science and progress with a postmodernist acceptance that there is no such thing as absolute and objective truth, even in the empirical sciences.

A five-part series in which leading philosophers offer their appreciation of great thinkers. 3: Hume. Professor Simon Blackburn is best known for his defence of quasi-realism, an account of the world which attempts to reconcile our experience of the world's richness with the stark ontology of modern science. In this programme, he talks about his hero, David Hume, who he thinks laid the foundations for a modern scientific philosophy.

A five-part series in which leading philosophers offer their appreciation of great thinkers. 2: Machiavelli. Quentin Skinner, one of today's leading historians of political thought, argues that Machiavelli still has a great deal to teach us about the importance of civic participation in guaranteeing our individual freedom.

A five-part series in which leading philosophers offer their appreciation of great thinkers who have influenced their work and understanding of the world. 1: Aristotle. Martha Nussbaum, professor of law and ethics at the University of Chicago, champions the thinking of the ancient Stoics about our obligations to one another as citizens of the world. She argues that we need to develop further their theories of international law.

01Lullaby Of Broadway19990809

Five poems for radio commissioned by Radio 3. 1: `Lullaby of Broadway' by George Szirtes was inspired by the remarkable extended dance sequence by Busby Berkeley in the film `Gold Diggers of 1935'.

01Lullaby Of Broadway19990809

Five poems for radio commissioned by Radio 3. 1: `Lullaby of Broadway' by George Szirtes was inspired by the remarkable extended dance sequence by Busby Berkeley in the film `Gold Diggers of 1935'.

01Monet In Giverny19990118

A series on reflections on the life and work of Claude Monet to coincide with the Royal Academy's new Monet exhibition. 1: `Monet in Giverny'. Anna Pavord, gardening correspondent for the Independent, and art historian Paul Hayes Tucker reflect on Monet's garden and the paintings it inspired. With excerpts from the artist's letters read by Paul Scofield

01Monet In Giverny19990118

A series on reflections on the life and work of Claude Monet to coincide with the Royal Academy's new Monet exhibition. 1: `Monet in Giverny'. Anna Pavord, gardening correspondent for the Independent, and art historian Paul Hayes Tucker reflect on Monet's garden and the paintings it inspired. With excerpts from the artist's letters read by Paul Scofield

01Mrs Birtwhistle19981130

Five monologues about women. 1: `Mrs Birtwhistle'. Played by Geraldine McEwan. The new-found independence of her handicapped daughter threatens Mrs Birtwhistle's very raison d'etre.

01Mrs Birtwhistle19981130

Five monologues about women. 1: `Mrs Birtwhistle'. Played by Geraldine McEwan. The new-found independence of her handicapped daughter threatens Mrs Birtwhistle's very raison d'etre.

01Music19971229

Five programmes asking how people's tastes change as they grow older. 1: `Music'. Sir William Glock, Minna Keal, Dr Anthony Storr, Sir Ernst Gombrich, Richard Hoggart and Sir Frank Kermode discuss how their tastes in music have changed during their lives.

01Music19971229

Five programmes asking how people's tastes change as they grow older. 1: `Music'. Sir William Glock, Minna Keal, Dr Anthony Storr, Sir Ernst Gombrich, Richard Hoggart and Sir Frank Kermode discuss how their tastes in music have changed during their lives.

01My First Sony19980511

Noah Richler talks to new Israeli and Palestinian authors about their work, 50 years after the foundation of the Israeli state. 1: `My First Sony'. In screenwriter, author and ex-soldier Benny Barrabash's `My First Sony', the child Yotam dutifully uses the gift of a tape machine to record the stories and arguments of his `Peace Now' parents and pioneer grandparents, whose pains, pleasures, wildly varied politics and generational differences wryly reflect the traumas of Israel's difficult past and present. With readings by David Schneider.

01My First Sony19980511

Noah Richler talks to new Israeli and Palestinian authors about their work, 50 years after the foundation of the Israeli state. 1: `My First Sony'. In screenwriter, author and ex-soldier Benny Barrabash's `My First Sony', the child Yotam dutifully uses the gift of a tape machine to record the stories and arguments of his `Peace Now' parents and pioneer grandparents, whose pains, pleasures, wildly varied politics and generational differences wryly reflect the traumas of Israel's difficult past and present. With readings by David Schneider.

01Nietzsche Versus Aristotle19980323

In four programmes this week, ethicist Dr David Cook examines the impact of philosopher Alasdair MacIntyre's ideas with the help of some of those profoundly influenced by him. MacIntyre's devastating critique of our culture has changed the way morality is discussed in many contexts, from NHS ethics committees to political groups. But is it too late to save our moral and intellectual life? 1: `Nietzsche versus Aristotle'. With Chief Rabbi Dr Jonathan Sacks.

01Nietzsche Versus Aristotle19980323

In four programmes this week, ethicist Dr David Cook examines the impact of philosopher Alasdair MacIntyre's ideas with the help of some of those profoundly influenced by him. MacIntyre's devastating critique of our culture has changed the way morality is discussed in many contexts, from NHS ethics committees to political groups. But is it too late to save our moral and intellectual life? 1: `Nietzsche versus Aristotle'. With Chief Rabbi Dr Jonathan Sacks.

01Of Poor B B19980209

Famous as one of the major playwrights of the 20th century, Bertolt Brecht is now seen as perhaps Germany's greatest modern poet. In five programmes this week, Adrian Mitchell looks at Brecht poems and songs. The readers include Maria Friedman and Harold Pinter. 1: `Of Poor B B'. A look at the early poems.

01Of Poor B B19980209

Famous as one of the major playwrights of the 20th century, Bertolt Brecht is now seen as perhaps Germany's greatest modern poet. In five programmes this week, Adrian Mitchell looks at Brecht poems and songs. The readers include Maria Friedman and Harold Pinter. 1: `Of Poor B B'. A look at the early poems.

01Of Poor B B19980824

Famous as one of the major playwrights of the 20th century, Bertolt Brecht is now seen as perhaps Germany's greatest modern poet. In five programmes this week, Adrian Mitchell looks at Brecht poems and songs. The readers include Maria Friedman and Harold Pinter. 1: `Of Poor B B'. A look at the early poems.

01Of Poor B B19980824

Famous as one of the major playwrights of the 20th century, Bertolt Brecht is now seen as perhaps Germany's greatest modern poet. In five programmes this week, Adrian Mitchell looks at Brecht poems and songs. The readers include Maria Friedman and Harold Pinter. 1: `Of Poor B B'. A look at the early poems.

01One Giant Leap1998110219990104

Five specially commissioned dramatic monologues that combine fiction and a news story.

1: `One Giant Leap'.

By Sue Teddern.

01One Giant Leap1998110219990104

Five specially commissioned dramatic monologues that combine fiction and a news story.

1: `One Giant Leap'.

By Sue Teddern.

01One God, One Land?19971110

Five religious dialogues between representatives of the great world faiths, with Keith Ward, Regius professor of divinity at OXFORD, in the chair.

1: `One God, One Land?' With the Chief Rabbi, Dr Jonathan Sacks, and Dr Zaki Badawi, chairman of the Imams and Mosques of the United Kingdom.

01One God, One Land?19971110

Five religious dialogues between representatives of the great world faiths, with Keith Ward, Regius professor of divinity at OXFORD, in the chair.

1: `One God, One Land?' With the Chief Rabbi, Dr Jonathan Sacks, and Dr Zaki Badawi, chairman of the Imams and Mosques of the United Kingdom.

01Orlando1998102819980504

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 1: Sally Potter - the British director of `Orlando' and `The Tango Lesson'.

01Orlando1998102819980504

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 1: Sally Potter - the British director of `Orlando' and `The Tango Lesson'.

01Projections19971006

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 5: Terry Gilliam. Cartoonist turned film-maker who first came to prominence through his work on Monty Python's Flying Circus.

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 5:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 4:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 3:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 2:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 1:.

01Projections19971006

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 5: Terry Gilliam. Cartoonist turned film-maker who first came to prominence through his work on Monty Python's Flying Circus.

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 5:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 4:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 3:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 2:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 1:.

01Psychological Plague19981109

David Gale talks to five leading thinkers about their own radical vision of the future. 1: Controversial American academic Elaine Showalter argues that modern illnesses like Gulf War syndrome and Chronic Fatigue syndrome are really forms of mass hysteria. She explores the new and mutant forms of `psychological plague' likely to emerge as we enter the next millennium.

01Psychological Plague19981109

David Gale talks to five leading thinkers about their own radical vision of the future. 1: Controversial American academic Elaine Showalter argues that modern illnesses like Gulf War syndrome and Chronic Fatigue syndrome are really forms of mass hysteria. She explores the new and mutant forms of `psychological plague' likely to emerge as we enter the next millennium.

01Role Play1997121519980901

Five conversations in which Michael Billington talks to actors and singers about their experiences of playing the same character in theatrical and operatic productions. 5: Josephine Barstow and Katharine Schlesinger on Salome.

Five conversations in which Michael Billington talks to actors and singers about their experiences of playing the same character in theatrical and operatic productions. 4: Donald Maxwell and Denis Quilley on Falstaff.

Five conversations in which Michael Billington talks to actors and singers about their experiences of playing the same character in theatrical and operatic productions. 3: Gwyneth Jones and Zoe Wanamaker talk about Electra.

Five conversations in which Michael Billington talks to actors and singers about their experiences of playing the same character in theatrical and operatic productions. 2: Kristine Ciesinski and Sara Kestelman talk about playing Lady Macbeth.

Five conversations in which Michael Billington talks to actors and singers about their experiences of playing the same character in theatrical and operatic productions.

Four programmes in which Michael Billington talks to actors about key roles in the repertoire. 1: Michael Pennington and Fiona Shaw discuss the complex figure of Shakespeare's Richard II.

01Role Play1997121519980901

Five conversations in which Michael Billington talks to actors and singers about their experiences of playing the same character in theatrical and operatic productions. 5: Josephine Barstow and Katharine Schlesinger on Salome.

Five conversations in which Michael Billington talks to actors and singers about their experiences of playing the same character in theatrical and operatic productions. 4: Donald Maxwell and Denis Quilley on Falstaff.

Five conversations in which Michael Billington talks to actors and singers about their experiences of playing the same character in theatrical and operatic productions. 3: Gwyneth Jones and Zoe Wanamaker talk about Electra.

Five conversations in which Michael Billington talks to actors and singers about their experiences of playing the same character in theatrical and operatic productions. 2: Kristine Ciesinski and Sara Kestelman talk about playing Lady Macbeth.

Five conversations in which Michael Billington talks to actors and singers about their experiences of playing the same character in theatrical and operatic productions.

Four programmes in which Michael Billington talks to actors about key roles in the repertoire. 1: Michael Pennington and Fiona Shaw discuss the complex figure of Shakespeare's Richard II.

01Seamus Heaney At 6019990412

Five programmes celebrating and reassessing the poetry of Seamus Heaney in the week of his sixtieth birthday. 4: Irish poet and critic Bernard O'Donoghue explores Heaney's use of language - the meaning of his careful fusion of an Irish idiom and the ENGLISH lyric.

Five programmes celebrating and reassessing the poetry of Seamus Heaney in the week of his sixtieth birthday. 3: Eminent American critic Helen Vendler considers Heaney's most recent work, about the death of his parents and his preoccupation with the idea of the invisible.

Five programmes celebrating and reassessing the poetry of Seamus Heaney in the week of his sixtieth birthday. 1: Poet and fellow Nobel Prize-winner Derek Walcott discusses Heaney's role as a true poetry internationalist.

01Seamus Heaney At 6019990412

Five programmes celebrating and reassessing the poetry of Seamus Heaney in the week of his sixtieth birthday. 4: Irish poet and critic Bernard O'Donoghue explores Heaney's use of language - the meaning of his careful fusion of an Irish idiom and the ENGLISH lyric.

Five programmes celebrating and reassessing the poetry of Seamus Heaney in the week of his sixtieth birthday. 3: Eminent American critic Helen Vendler considers Heaney's most recent work, about the death of his parents and his preoccupation with the idea of the invisible.

Five programmes celebrating and reassessing the poetry of Seamus Heaney in the week of his sixtieth birthday. 1: Poet and fellow Nobel Prize-winner Derek Walcott discusses Heaney's role as a true poetry internationalist.

01Shakespeare19981228

Peter Holland talks to ten Shakespeare experts about the Bard today. 1: `Shakespeare's Life and Work'. With biographer Park Honan and Katherine Duncan-Jones, editor of the sonnets.

01Shakespeare19981228

Peter Holland talks to ten Shakespeare experts about the Bard today. 1: `Shakespeare's Life and Work'. With biographer Park Honan and Katherine Duncan-Jones, editor of the sonnets.

01Snow White19980223

Five programmes this week retelling the world's most enduring fairy stories and revealing the psychological power of their symbols and characters. 1: `Snow White'. Author A S Byatt and film-maker Nick Willing relive the story of Snow White, a victim of Oedipal jealousy, frozen in her glass coffin with a half-swallowed apple of experience stuck in her throat as she waits to wreak terrible vengeance on the wicked queen who must dance herself to death in red-hot shoes. Including the `Winter' music from Glazunov's `The Seasons'.

01Snow White19980223

Five programmes this week retelling the world's most enduring fairy stories and revealing the psychological power of their symbols and characters. 1: `Snow White'. Author A S Byatt and film-maker Nick Willing relive the story of Snow White, a victim of Oedipal jealousy, frozen in her glass coffin with a half-swallowed apple of experience stuck in her throat as she waits to wreak terrible vengeance on the wicked queen who must dance herself to death in red-hot shoes. Including the `Winter' music from Glazunov's `The Seasons'.

01Spirit Machines1997102719980713

Five specially commissioned poems blending words and sound. 1: `Spirit Machines'. By Robert Crawford.

Four commissioned poems blending words and sound. 1: `Spirit Machines' by Robert Crawford.

01Spirit Machines1997102719980713

Five specially commissioned poems blending words and sound. 1: `Spirit Machines'. By Robert Crawford.

Four commissioned poems blending words and sound. 1: `Spirit Machines' by Robert Crawford.

01The Body Zone19990322

Five programmes in which Iwan Russell-Jones looks at attitudes to the body in our culture. 1: `The Body Zone'. At the heart of the Millennium Dome is a giant sculpture of the human body. What does this say about the role and importance of the body in society?

01The Body Zone19990322

Five programmes in which Iwan Russell-Jones looks at attitudes to the body in our culture. 1: `The Body Zone'. At the heart of the Millennium Dome is a giant sculpture of the human body. What does this say about the role and importance of the body in society?

01The Canti Of Giacomo Leopardi19981214

Kevin Jackson unravels the stories behind classic works of European literature. 1: `The Canti of Giacomo Leopardi'. Mocked as a hunchback, virtually imprisoned by his parents and unrequited in love, Giacomo Leopardi (1798-1837) produced some of the most musical and moving poetry ever written in Italian. Though scarcely known in his own time, many now rate him second only to Dante. Kevin Jackson examines why he means so much to those who read him and talks to Edwin Morgan, one of a growing number of contemporary poets who have translated his work into ENGLISH.

01The Canti Of Giacomo Leopardi19981214

Kevin Jackson unravels the stories behind classic works of European literature. 1: `The Canti of Giacomo Leopardi'. Mocked as a hunchback, virtually imprisoned by his parents and unrequited in love, Giacomo Leopardi (1798-1837) produced some of the most musical and moving poetry ever written in Italian. Though scarcely known in his own time, many now rate him second only to Dante. Kevin Jackson examines why he means so much to those who read him and talks to Edwin Morgan, one of a growing number of contemporary poets who have translated his work into ENGLISH.

01The Choirmaster19990426

Derek Alsop explores what makes a great musical setting through five case studies which dip into the riches of British literature of the last half millennium and reflect the richness of its musical treatment in our own century. 1: `The Choirmaster's Burial'. Thomas Hardy's poem as set for voice and piano by Britten.

01The Choirmaster19990426

Derek Alsop explores what makes a great musical setting through five case studies which dip into the riches of British literature of the last half millennium and reflect the richness of its musical treatment in our own century. 1: `The Choirmaster's Burial'. Thomas Hardy's poem as set for voice and piano by Britten.

01The Classic19990315

An idiosyncratic history of classical duets and an incidental history of loving, told by dancers and thinkers. 1: `The Classic'. For romantics, some Swan Lakes.

01The Classic19990315

An idiosyncratic history of classical duets and an incidental history of loving, told by dancers and thinkers. 1: `The Classic'. For romantics, some Swan Lakes.

01The Courthouse19970922

To mark 100 years since the birth of William Faulkner, Ron Berglas reads five short stories set in Faulkner's mythical Mississippi county. 1: `The Courthouse'.

01The Courthouse19970922

To mark 100 years since the birth of William Faulkner, Ron Berglas reads five short stories set in Faulkner's mythical Mississippi county. 1: `The Courthouse'.

01The First Taboo19981221

Comedian and broadcaster Rainer Hersch presents five personal and idiosyncratic studies of the music of our century.

1: `The First Taboo'.

Holding the book upside down: the Second Viennese School and atonality.

01The Kitsch Show!19981207

Four illustrated reflections on kitsch. 3: Roger Scruton, visiting professor of philosophy at Birkbeck, argues that kitsch is a corrupt reflection of a society without genuine values, and one which fatally undermines art.

Four illustrated reflections on kitsch. 2: Richard Dyer, professor of film studies at Warwick University, asks how intellectuals can enjoy what they know to be kitsch without resorting to inverted commas.

Four illustrated reflections on kitsch. 1: Dubravka Ugresic, a Croatian writer and thinker, describes the ability of kitsch to survive Communism, to thrive on war and to reinforce nationalism.

01The Kitsch Show!19981207

Four illustrated reflections on kitsch. 3: Roger Scruton, visiting professor of philosophy at Birkbeck, argues that kitsch is a corrupt reflection of a society without genuine values, and one which fatally undermines art.

Four illustrated reflections on kitsch. 2: Richard Dyer, professor of film studies at Warwick University, asks how intellectuals can enjoy what they know to be kitsch without resorting to inverted commas.

Four illustrated reflections on kitsch. 1: Dubravka Ugresic, a Croatian writer and thinker, describes the ability of kitsch to survive Communism, to thrive on war and to reinforce nationalism.

01The Landscapes Of Man19970915

A series examining the history of thought about landscape, the influence it has drawn from art and politics, and the revolutionary work in the genre now taking place around the world. 1: What ARCHITECTure was to the eighties, landscape is to the nineties as the art of landscape is being reborn after years of neglect. New scholarship, heightened public concern for a higher-quality environment, and a new generation of innovative designers and artists have helped restore much of the cultural significance landscape used to enjoy. Written and presented by Susan Marling.

01The Landscapes Of Man19970915

A series examining the history of thought about landscape, the influence it has drawn from art and politics, and the revolutionary work in the genre now taking place around the world. 1: What ARCHITECTure was to the eighties, landscape is to the nineties as the art of landscape is being reborn after years of neglect. New scholarship, heightened public concern for a higher-quality environment, and a new generation of innovative designers and artists have helped restore much of the cultural significance landscape used to enjoy. Written and presented by Susan Marling.

01The Mary Tyler Moore Show19990705

Christopher Cook talks to five American television comedy writers. 1: James L Brooks, creator of comedies ranging from `The Mary Tyler Moore Show' in the 1960s to `The Simpsons' in the 1990s.

01The Mary Tyler Moore Show19990705

Christopher Cook talks to five American television comedy writers. 1: James L Brooks, creator of comedies ranging from `The Mary Tyler Moore Show' in the 1960s to `The Simpsons' in the 1990s.

01The Nature Of Inspiration19981012

October 1798 saw the publication of one of the foundations of British romanticism: Wordsworth and Coleridge's `Lyrical Ballads'. To mark this bicentenary, Steve Connor explores how this slim volume made such a profound impression on ENGLISH literature and thought. 1: `The Nature of Inspiration'.

01The Power Of The Brand19990713

In four programmes this week Kevin Jackson explores the notion of the brand - the search for identity and consumer loyalty that has spawned a massive industry. He talks to brand creators, designers and persuaders - and to sceptics who look more objectively at the branding of the world. 1: `The Power of the Brand'.

01The Power Of The Brand19990713

In four programmes this week Kevin Jackson explores the notion of the brand - the search for identity and consumer loyalty that has spawned a massive industry. He talks to brand creators, designers and persuaders - and to sceptics who look more objectively at the branding of the world. 1: `The Power of the Brand'.

01The School Of Love19980119

Five writers each choose a picture in the National Gallery and use it as a basis to develop a short imaginative narrative. 1: Marina Warner on Correggio's `The School of Love'.

01The School Of Love19980119

Five writers each choose a picture in the National Gallery and use it as a basis to develop a short imaginative narrative. 1: Marina Warner on Correggio's `The School of Love'.

01The Screenwriters - Hollywood In The 90s19980615

Christopher Cook talks to five of Hollywood's most successful screenwriters. 1: Paul Rudnick, writer of Sister Act, Addams Family Values and Jeffrey.

01The Screenwriters - Hollywood In The 90s19980615

Christopher Cook talks to five of Hollywood's most successful screenwriters. 1: Paul Rudnick, writer of Sister Act, Addams Family Values and Jeffrey.

01The Sense Of An Ending19990405

Five explorations by Ian Christie of how cinema has continued the literary and visual tradition of apocalypse, reflecting the 20th Century's own history of catastrophe and its search for meaning in an increasingly secular world through a variety of forms, both traditional and innovative. 1: `The Sense of an Ending'. Cinema quickly lent itself to spectacles of decadence and destruction, but it has also reflected many of the apocalyptic themes that critics identify as underpinning modernist culture, ranging from technological anxiety and revolution to fears of environmental disaster and alien invasion.

01The Sense Of An Ending19990405

Five explorations by Ian Christie of how cinema has continued the literary and visual tradition of apocalypse, reflecting the 20th Century's own history of catastrophe and its search for meaning in an increasingly secular world through a variety of forms, both traditional and innovative. 1: `The Sense of an Ending'. Cinema quickly lent itself to spectacles of decadence and destruction, but it has also reflected many of the apocalyptic themes that critics identify as underpinning modernist culture, ranging from technological anxiety and revolution to fears of environmental disaster and alien invasion.

01The Turn Of The Screw19980831

Five conversations in which Michael Billington talks to actors and singers about their experiences of playing the same character in theatrical and operatic productions. 1: Joan Rodgers and Andrea Gascoigne talk about playing the Governess in Henry James's `The Turn of the Screw'.

01The Turn Of The Screw19980831

Five conversations in which Michael Billington talks to actors and singers about their experiences of playing the same character in theatrical and operatic productions. 1: Joan Rodgers and Andrea Gascoigne talk about playing the Governess in Henry James's `The Turn of the Screw'.

01The Way The World Washes1998111619990208

Five programmes celebrating 50 years of photojournalism from the world's most famous photo agency. 1: `The Way the World Washes'.

01The Way The World Washes1998111619990208

Five programmes celebrating 50 years of photojournalism from the world's most famous photo agency. 1: `The Way the World Washes'.

01The World19990607

Readings from Vikram Seth's epic poem, a homage to Pushkin's `Eugene Onegin', which focuses experiences of love and loss of a group of twentysomethings in the San Francisco of the early 80s. Cast: Mark Leake, Barbara Barnes, Laurel Lefkow, Michael Neil. 1: `The world's discussed while friends are eating'.

01The World19990607

Readings from Vikram Seth's epic poem, a homage to Pushkin's `Eugene Onegin', which focuses experiences of love and loss of a group of twentysomethings in the San Francisco of the early 80s. Cast: Mark Leake, Barbara Barnes, Laurel Lefkow, Michael Neil. 1: `The world's discussed while friends are eating'.

01The Writing Lark1997101319980817

Following the example of W H Auden's `Letter to Lord Byron', five poets read a newly commissioned verse letter to a poet from the past whom they admire. 1: Tom Paulin reads his letter to John Clare called `The Writing Lark'.

01The Writing Lark1997101319980817

Following the example of W H Auden's `Letter to Lord Byron', five poets read a newly commissioned verse letter to a poet from the past whom they admire. 1: Tom Paulin reads his letter to John Clare called `The Writing Lark'.

01Velazquez19990621

Reflections on the great Spanish artist Velazquez, born 400 years ago. 2: Historian Felipe Fernandez Armesto considers the glittering but politically menacing court of 17th-century Spain through Velazquez's portraits of Philip IV and his chief minister Olivares.

To mark the four hundredth anniversary of the birth of Spanish painter Velazquez, five writers and artists select a painting by which they have been influenced. 1: Writer and feminist Michele Roberts looks at Velazquez's women through the Rokeby Venus and muses on his treatment of youth and age.

01Velazquez19990621

Reflections on the great Spanish artist Velazquez, born 400 years ago. 2: Historian Felipe Fernandez Armesto considers the glittering but politically menacing court of 17th-century Spain through Velazquez's portraits of Philip IV and his chief minister Olivares.

To mark the four hundredth anniversary of the birth of Spanish painter Velazquez, five writers and artists select a painting by which they have been influenced. 1: Writer and feminist Michele Roberts looks at Velazquez's women through the Rokeby Venus and muses on his treatment of youth and age.

01Veterans19981026

Christopher Hitchens talks to people who have spent long lives in opposition and are distinguished veterans of military, political and intellectual struggles. 3: Basil Davidson, widely revered historian of AFRICA and former intelligence operative in the Balkans in the Second World War.

Christopher Hitchens talks to people who have spent long lives in opposition and are distinguished veterans of military, political and intellectual struggles. 2: More from Bernard Knox, who recounts his combat in the Second World War and his postwar defence of the classics in the USA.

Christopher Hitchens talks to people who have spent long lives in opposition and are distinguished veterans of military, political and intellectual struggles. 1: Bernard Knox, classicist and defender of what he calls the oldest dead white European males. He was also a combatant in the Spanish Civil War and the Second World War.

01Veterans19981026

Christopher Hitchens talks to people who have spent long lives in opposition and are distinguished veterans of military, political and intellectual struggles. 3: Basil Davidson, widely revered historian of AFRICA and former intelligence operative in the Balkans in the Second World War.

Christopher Hitchens talks to people who have spent long lives in opposition and are distinguished veterans of military, political and intellectual struggles. 2: More from Bernard Knox, who recounts his combat in the Second World War and his postwar defence of the classics in the USA.

Christopher Hitchens talks to people who have spent long lives in opposition and are distinguished veterans of military, political and intellectual struggles. 1: Bernard Knox, classicist and defender of what he calls the oldest dead white European males. He was also a combatant in the Spanish Civil War and the Second World War.

01Who Speaks For The Present?1998010519980810

Valentine Cunningham presents a five-part personal guide to contemporary ENGLISH fiction. 1: `Who Speaks for the Present?' Who dares command a fiction, tell a story? A look at the problem of voice.

01Who Speaks For The Present?1998010519980810

Valentine Cunningham presents a five-part personal guide to contemporary ENGLISH fiction. 1: `Who Speaks for the Present?' Who dares command a fiction, tell a story? A look at the problem of voice.

02A Century Of Science19990525

John Durant, professor of the public understanding of science at Imperial College, explores the scientific discoveries that have had a major cultural impact and have changed our way of looking at the world.

2: The Information Explosion.

1: The Atom.

02A Century Of Science19990525

John Durant, professor of the public understanding of science at Imperial College, explores the scientific discoveries that have had a major cultural impact and have changed our way of looking at the world.

2: The Information Explosion.

1: The Atom.

02A Concert Generates A Meeting19990608

Readings from Vikram Seth's epic poem, a homage to Pushkin's `Eugene Onegin', which focuses experiences of love and loss of a group of twentysomethings in the San Francisco of the early 80s.

Cast: Mark Leake, Barbara Barnes, Laurel Lefkow, Michael Neil.

2: `A concert generates a meeting'.

02A Concert Generates A Meeting19990608

Readings from Vikram Seth's epic poem, a homage to Pushkin's `Eugene Onegin', which focuses experiences of love and loss of a group of twentysomethings in the San Francisco of the early 80s.

Cast: Mark Leake, Barbara Barnes, Laurel Lefkow, Michael Neil.

2: `A concert generates a meeting'.

02Adoration Of The Magi19980120

Five writers each choose a picture in the National Gallery and use it as a basis to develop a short imaginative narrative. 2: David Dabydeen on Pieter Bruegel the Elder's `Adoration of the Magi'.

02Adoration Of The Magi19980120

Five writers each choose a picture in the National Gallery and use it as a basis to develop a short imaginative narrative. 2: David Dabydeen on Pieter Bruegel the Elder's `Adoration of the Magi'.

02Ambuscade19970923

To mark 100 years since the birth of William Faulkner, Ron Berglas reads five short stories set in Faulkner's mythical Mississippi county. 2: `Ambuscade'.

02Ambuscade19970923

To mark 100 years since the birth of William Faulkner, Ron Berglas reads five short stories set in Faulkner's mythical Mississippi county. 2: `Ambuscade'.

02Aspirationals Unite19990714

Four programmes about the branding of products. 2: `Aspirationals Unite'. Kevin Jackson explores how branding affects our individuality, instancing the clothing industry's ability to turn us into walking advertisements. But he also discovers that the world at large is resisting becoming a giant advertising hoarding.

02Aspirationals Unite19990714

Four programmes about the branding of products. 2: `Aspirationals Unite'. Kevin Jackson explores how branding affects our individuality, instancing the clothing industry's ability to turn us into walking advertisements. But he also discovers that the world at large is resisting becoming a giant advertising hoarding.

02Avril19981201

Five monologues about women. 2: `Avril'. Played by FRANCEs Barber. An overweight librarian hopes her life will be transformed by a kickboxer from Dudley.

02Avril19981201

Five monologues about women. 2: `Avril'. Played by FRANCEs Barber. An overweight librarian hopes her life will be transformed by a kickboxer from Dudley.

02Bad Girls1998010619980811

Valentine Cunningham presents a five-part personal guide to contemporary ENGLISH fiction. 2: `Bad Girls'. How the daughters of Virginia Woolf and Angela Carter set out to undo patriarchal narrative.

02Bad Girls1998010619980811

Valentine Cunningham presents a five-part personal guide to contemporary ENGLISH fiction. 2: `Bad Girls'. How the daughters of Virginia Woolf and Angela Carter set out to undo patriarchal narrative.

02Barbarians At The Gate19980324

In four programmes this week, ethicist Dr David Cook examines the impact of philosopher Alasdair MacIntyre's ideas with the help of some of those profoundly influenced by him. 2: `Barbarians at the Gate'. With philosopher and educationalist Dr Marianne Talbot.

02Barbarians At The Gate19980324

In four programmes this week, ethicist Dr David Cook examines the impact of philosopher Alasdair MacIntyre's ideas with the help of some of those profoundly influenced by him. 2: `Barbarians at the Gate'. With philosopher and educationalist Dr Marianne Talbot.

02Bedtime Stories19980203
02Bedtime Stories19980203

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 5: Androgyny. An androgynous look has often been revered as an ideal of physical beauty, and gender confusion is explored by many people through fashion. But what is the reality of androgyny for those born neither male or female?

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 4: Bisexuality. While some believe we are all bisexual, others deny the very existence of bisexuality. Is it a third gender, or a new way to look at desires we all share?

A five part cultural history of sexuality. 3: Transvestism. Men and women have dressed in each other's clothes from Shakespeare to pantomime, yet transvestism today remains a secret lifestyle. Writers and psychologists explore the history of cross-dressing, and transvestites talk about their lives.

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 2: HOMOSEXUALity. An exploration of gay and lesbian life from ancient Greece to today. How has gay and lesbian sexuality found a voice and an identity in the past?

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 1: Heterosexuality. Since Adam and Eve's first kiss, we have been a heterosexual society, but how have men and women's desires for one another changed with the times? Institutionalised through marriage, heterosexual love has often forged political as well as romantic alliances, but always with the family at its heart. This programme looks at how as well as whom we love.

02Bluebeard19980224

The world's favourite fairy tales unravelled. 2: `Bluebeard'. Marina Warner, Robert Irwin and Adam Phillips examine the meaning of Bluebeard, the devil figure based on a French medieval serial killer who lures his wives into the bloody chamber. With music from Bartok's opera `Bluebeard's Castle'.

02Bluebeard19980224

The world's favourite fairy tales unravelled. 2: `Bluebeard'. Marina Warner, Robert Irwin and Adam Phillips examine the meaning of Bluebeard, the devil figure based on a French medieval serial killer who lures his wives into the bloody chamber. With music from Bartok's opera `Bluebeard's Castle'.

02Chang Ta Chun: The Speaker Of The Aside19980922

Tibor Fischer introduces five of the world's leading writers who are, as yet, little known to British audiences. 2: `Chang Ta Chun: The Speaker of the Aside'. Journalist and short-story writer Chang Ta Chun gently satirises contemporary Taiwanese society and explores the boundaries between fantasy and reality.

02Chang Ta Chun: The Speaker Of The Aside19980922

Tibor Fischer introduces five of the world's leading writers who are, as yet, little known to British audiences. 2: `Chang Ta Chun: The Speaker of the Aside'. Journalist and short-story writer Chang Ta Chun gently satirises contemporary Taiwanese society and explores the boundaries between fantasy and reality.

02Chapters Of Madness19980127

Tolstoy's romantic hero, Vronsky, is best remembered as the cad that won Anna Karenina's heart. The complexities of his character are probed today as Juliet Mitchell revisits the RUSSIAn classic with psychoanalyst Michael Brearley and writer and journalist A N Wilson.

Juliet Mitchell talks to psychoanalyst Felicity Dirmeik and writer Lisa Appignanesi about Doris Lessing's portrait of madness in the character Martha Quest.

02Chapters Of Madness19980127

Tolstoy's romantic hero, Vronsky, is best remembered as the cad that won Anna Karenina's heart. The complexities of his character are probed today as Juliet Mitchell revisits the RUSSIAn classic with psychoanalyst Michael Brearley and writer and journalist A N Wilson.

Juliet Mitchell talks to psychoanalyst Felicity Dirmeik and writer Lisa Appignanesi about Doris Lessing's portrait of madness in the character Martha Quest.

02Clerks1997121019980616

Four programmes in which Christopher Cook talks to Hollywood's most successful young screenwriters. In the second programme, he meets Kevin Smith, the writer-director whose first film three years ago, `Clerks', was a huge success. Now his latest film, `Chasing Amy', is on release.

Christopher Cook talks to five of Hollywood's most successful screenwriters. 2: Kevin Smith, the writer-director whose first film four years ago - `Clerks' - was a huge commercial and critical success.

02Clerks1997121019980616

Four programmes in which Christopher Cook talks to Hollywood's most successful young screenwriters. In the second programme, he meets Kevin Smith, the writer-director whose first film three years ago, `Clerks', was a huge success. Now his latest film, `Chasing Amy', is on release.

Christopher Cook talks to five of Hollywood's most successful screenwriters. 2: Kevin Smith, the writer-director whose first film four years ago - `Clerks' - was a huge commercial and critical success.

02Come The Day1998110319990105

Five specially commissioned dramatic monologues that combine fiction and a news story. 2: `Come the Day'. By Fraser Harrison.

02Come The Day1998110319990105

Five specially commissioned dramatic monologues that combine fiction and a news story. 2: `Come the Day'. By Fraser Harrison.

02Contemporary American Poets19990720

With Michael Schmidt. 5: John Ashbery. A final programme of readings by contemporary American poets reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. One of the most prolific American poets of our time, Ashbery reads a selection of his writing past and present.

With Michael Schmidt. 4: Deborah Garrison and Yusef Komunyakaa. The fourth in a series of readings by leading contemporary poets from America reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. Garrison, a senior editor for the NEW YORKer, reads from her very first collection; Komunyakaa, a Vietnam veteran, delivers a powerful meditation on AFRICAn-American life.

With Michael Schmidt. 3: Sharon Olds and August Kleinzahler. The third in a series of readings by contemporary American poets reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. Olds is a winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award; Kleinzahler has also received many top awards.

With Michael Schmidt. 2: Louise Gluck and Charles Simic. The second in a series of readings by contempoarary poets from America reflecting the diverse range of poetry written in the States today. Gluck's work is delicate and oblique; Serbian-born Simic's is warm-hearted and slightly surreal. Both are winners of the Pulitzer Prize for poetry.

With Michael Schmidt. 1: Rita Dove and Mark Doty. The first in a series of readings by contemporary poets from America reflecting the diverse range of poetry being written in the States today. Dove was the first AFRICAn-American poet laureate of the US, and her work is suffused with a quiet humanity. Doty, forceful and inventive, was the winner of the 1995 T S Eliot Prize.

02Contemporary American Poets19990720

With Michael Schmidt. 5: John Ashbery. A final programme of readings by contemporary American poets reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. One of the most prolific American poets of our time, Ashbery reads a selection of his writing past and present.

With Michael Schmidt. 4: Deborah Garrison and Yusef Komunyakaa. The fourth in a series of readings by leading contemporary poets from America reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. Garrison, a senior editor for the NEW YORKer, reads from her very first collection; Komunyakaa, a Vietnam veteran, delivers a powerful meditation on AFRICAn-American life.

With Michael Schmidt. 3: Sharon Olds and August Kleinzahler. The third in a series of readings by contemporary American poets reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. Olds is a winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award; Kleinzahler has also received many top awards.

With Michael Schmidt. 2: Louise Gluck and Charles Simic. The second in a series of readings by contempoarary poets from America reflecting the diverse range of poetry written in the States today. Gluck's work is delicate and oblique; Serbian-born Simic's is warm-hearted and slightly surreal. Both are winners of the Pulitzer Prize for poetry.

With Michael Schmidt. 1: Rita Dove and Mark Doty. The first in a series of readings by contemporary poets from America reflecting the diverse range of poetry being written in the States today. Dove was the first AFRICAn-American poet laureate of the US, and her work is suffused with a quiet humanity. Doty, forceful and inventive, was the winner of the 1995 T S Eliot Prize.

02Cultural Nationalism19990302
02Doctors Of Philosophy19990223

Alain De Botton looks to some of the great thinkers of the past in the hope of finding philosophical cures for some everyday ills.

5: The milk has gone off, the car has been clamped, and tax forms are overdue, but Alain De Botton opens Nietzsche in search of advice for the faint-hearted.

4: Never mind agony aunts or lonely hearts pages - Alain De Botton discovers how Schopenhauer soothes the broken-hearted.

3: Bewildered by semantics, semiotics or systems analysis? Alain De Botton finds Montaigne has a message for those with a sense of intellectual inferiority.

2: From loss of hair to loss of employment, Alain De Botton turns to Seneca for sage advice.

1: From foreign holidays to expensive meals, we live in an age that equates money with happiness.

So what has Epicurus to say to those with a cash-flow problem?

02Doctors Of Philosophy19990223

Alain De Botton looks to some of the great thinkers of the past in the hope of finding philosophical cures for some everyday ills.

5: The milk has gone off, the car has been clamped, and tax forms are overdue, but Alain De Botton opens Nietzsche in search of advice for the faint-hearted.

4: Never mind agony aunts or lonely hearts pages - Alain De Botton discovers how Schopenhauer soothes the broken-hearted.

3: Bewildered by semantics, semiotics or systems analysis? Alain De Botton finds Montaigne has a message for those with a sense of intellectual inferiority.

2: From loss of hair to loss of employment, Alain De Botton turns to Seneca for sage advice.

1: From foreign holidays to expensive meals, we live in an age that equates money with happiness.

So what has Epicurus to say to those with a cash-flow problem?

02Engineering The Engineer19990112

Paul Neuberg continues his exploration of the Communist project which sought to use the arts to remould people's minds. 2: `Engineering the Engineer's. With the dawn of the socialist realist era, the re-engineering of human souls - and the reconstruction of writers and artists into engineers of the vast effort - took centre stage in the drama of Communism and the arts.

02Engineering The Engineer19990112

Paul Neuberg continues his exploration of the Communist project which sought to use the arts to remould people's minds. 2: `Engineering the Engineer's. With the dawn of the socialist realist era, the re-engineering of human souls - and the reconstruction of writers and artists into engineers of the vast effort - took centre stage in the drama of Communism and the arts.

02Food19971230

2: `Food'.

Derek Cooper, Marguerite Patten and Alan Long discuss how food has changed during the century and how their own personal tastes have changed during their lives.

02Food19971230

2: `Food'.

Derek Cooper, Marguerite Patten and Alan Long discuss how food has changed during the century and how their own personal tastes have changed during their lives.

02Gabriel19970930

Five programmes this week about novelists. Eight years ago, Paul Bailey, whose books include `Gabriel's Lament' and `At the Jerusalem', made his first visit to Romania, knowing very little about the country. He has now learned the language, and introduces and reads from his next novel, which is set there - `Kitty and Virgil: a Romance'.

02Gabriel19970930

Five programmes this week about novelists. Eight years ago, Paul Bailey, whose books include `Gabriel's Lament' and `At the Jerusalem', made his first visit to Romania, knowing very little about the country. He has now learned the language, and introduces and reads from his next novel, which is set there - `Kitty and Virgil: a Romance'.

02Germany: A Bad Time For Poetry1998021019980825

Five programmes this week in which Adrian Mitchell looks at the poems and songs of Bertolt Brecht. The readers include Maria Friedman and Harold Pinter. 2: `Germany: a Bad Time for Poetry'. Brecht's poetry under the Nazis.

02Germany: A Bad Time For Poetry1998021019980825

Five programmes this week in which Adrian Mitchell looks at the poems and songs of Bertolt Brecht. The readers include Maria Friedman and Harold Pinter. 2: `Germany: a Bad Time for Poetry'. Brecht's poetry under the Nazis.

02Grave New World19981110

David Gale talks to five leading thinkers about their own radical vision of the future. 4: Science-fiction writer Paul McAuley is a former research biologist fascinated by the possibilities of biotechnology. He projects the dreams and nightmares of genetic engineering into the near and distant future.

David Gale talks to five leading thinkers about their own radical vision of the future. 3: Feminist writer Sadie Plant sees the internet as a liberating space for women and believes they will be empowered by technology in the next century.

David Gale talks to five leading thinkers about their own radical vision of the future. 2: Visionary novelist J G Ballard talks about the psychological future and the emerge of new personality types we have never seen before. He sees the 21st century as a place where the psychopath will prosper.

02Grave New World19981110

David Gale talks to five leading thinkers about their own radical vision of the future. 4: Science-fiction writer Paul McAuley is a former research biologist fascinated by the possibilities of biotechnology. He projects the dreams and nightmares of genetic engineering into the near and distant future.

David Gale talks to five leading thinkers about their own radical vision of the future. 3: Feminist writer Sadie Plant sees the internet as a liberating space for women and believes they will be empowered by technology in the next century.

David Gale talks to five leading thinkers about their own radical vision of the future. 2: Visionary novelist J G Ballard talks about the psychological future and the emerge of new personality types we have never seen before. He sees the 21st century as a place where the psychopath will prosper.

02Has The Messiah Come?19971111

Five religious dialogues between representatives of the great world faiths, with Keith Ward, Regius professor of divinity at OXFORD, in the chair. 2: `Has the Messiah Come?' With Dr Clive Lawton, founding chief executive of the educational charity Jewish Continuity, and Dr Elaine Storkey, director of the Institute for Contemporary CHRISTIANity.

02Has The Messiah Come?19971111

Five religious dialogues between representatives of the great world faiths, with Keith Ward, Regius professor of divinity at OXFORD, in the chair. 2: `Has the Messiah Come?' With Dr Clive Lawton, founding chief executive of the educational charity Jewish Continuity, and Dr Elaine Storkey, director of the Institute for Contemporary CHRISTIANity.

02Hedda Gabler19971216

Five programmes in which Michael Billington talks to actors about key roles in the repertoire. 2: When `Hedda Gabler' opened in LONDON in 1891, the Daily Telegraph critic wrote, `What a horrible story! What a hideous play!' Alexandra Gilbreath and Harriet Walter reveal the challenges in playing the passionate, destructive character of Hedda.

02Hedda Gabler19971216

Five programmes in which Michael Billington talks to actors about key roles in the repertoire. 2: When `Hedda Gabler' opened in LONDON in 1891, the Daily Telegraph critic wrote, `What a horrible story! What a hideous play!' Alexandra Gilbreath and Harriet Walter reveal the challenges in playing the passionate, destructive character of Hedda.

02Isolate But Preserve: The Files On Osip Mandelstam19981006

Five dramatised documentaries adapted from the KGB's literary archive by Vitaly Shentalinsky and presented by Professor James Riordan. 2: `Isolate but Preserve: the Files on Osip Mandelstam'. The story of the RUSSIAn poet who came under attack in the 1920s for being out of step with the Soviet regime and was first arrested in 1934 for a poem denouncing Stalin. He died in 1938 en route to a labour camp. With Alex Jennings as Osip Mandelstam, Eleanor Bron and Jon Strickland.

02Isolate But Preserve: The Files On Osip Mandelstam19981006

Five dramatised documentaries adapted from the KGB's literary archive by Vitaly Shentalinsky and presented by Professor James Riordan. 2: `Isolate but Preserve: the Files on Osip Mandelstam'. The story of the RUSSIAn poet who came under attack in the 1920s for being out of step with the Soviet regime and was first arrested in 1934 for a poem denouncing Stalin. He died in 1938 en route to a labour camp. With Alex Jennings as Osip Mandelstam, Eleanor Bron and Jon Strickland.

02Lyrical Ballads19981013

The fourth of five programmes in which Steve Connor explores the effect on ENGLISH literature and thought made by Wordsworth and Coleridge's `Lyrical Ballads'. `Politics'.

The third of five programmes in which Steve Connor explores the effect on ENGLISH literature and thought made by Wordsworth and Coleridge's `Lyrical Ballads'. `The Language of Man'.

The second of five programmes in which Steve Connor explores the effect on ENGLISH literature and thought made by Wordsworth and Coleridge's `Lyrical Ballads'. `Children and Childhood'.

02Lyrical Ballads19981013

The fourth of five programmes in which Steve Connor explores the effect on ENGLISH literature and thought made by Wordsworth and Coleridge's `Lyrical Ballads'. `Politics'.

The third of five programmes in which Steve Connor explores the effect on ENGLISH literature and thought made by Wordsworth and Coleridge's `Lyrical Ballads'. `The Language of Man'.

The second of five programmes in which Steve Connor explores the effect on ENGLISH literature and thought made by Wordsworth and Coleridge's `Lyrical Ballads'. `Children and Childhood'.

02Michael Hofmann: Tea For My Father19990309

Five commissioned poems blending words and sound. 2: `Michael Hofmann: Tea for My Father'. A sequence of poems on the death of the poet's father, the novelist Gert Hofmann.

02Michael Hofmann: Tea For My Father19990309

Five commissioned poems blending words and sound. 2: `Michael Hofmann: Tea for My Father'. A sequence of poems on the death of the poet's father, the novelist Gert Hofmann.

02Monet19990119

2: `Monet's Light'. Monet's fascination with different conditions of light and their representation in paint can be seen as the connecting theme in all his work. Artist Tacita Dean, shortlisted for this year's Turner Prize, theatrical lighting designer Rick Fisher and neuropsychologist Richard Gregory offer personal responses. With extracts from Monet's letters read by Paul Scofield

02Monet19990119

2: `Monet's Light'. Monet's fascination with different conditions of light and their representation in paint can be seen as the connecting theme in all his work. Artist Tacita Dean, shortlisted for this year's Turner Prize, theatrical lighting designer Rick Fisher and neuropsychologist Richard Gregory offer personal responses. With extracts from Monet's letters read by Paul Scofield

02Murphy Brown19990706

Christopher Cook talks to five American television comedy writers. 2: Diane ENGLISH, creator of the award-winning `Murphy Brown', which notoriously prompted Dan Quayle to comment on its feminist agenda.

02Murphy Brown19990706

Christopher Cook talks to five American television comedy writers. 2: Diane ENGLISH, creator of the award-winning `Murphy Brown', which notoriously prompted Dan Quayle to comment on its feminist agenda.

02Outriders19990202

Patrick Wright talks to five unsung, witty and engaging figures on the cultural scene who are distinguished by their originality and imagination. 5: Marion Boyars. A leading publisher of the avant-garde since 1960, Marion Boyars introduced British readers to Georges Bataille, Michael Ondaatje and Ivan Illich. She discusses how she has fought to bring new ideas to audiences who do not always think that they need them.

Patrick Wright talks to five unsung, witty and engaging figures on the cultural scene who are distinguished by their originality and imagination. 3: Derek Bailey. Free-improvising guitarist of nearly 50 years' standing, Derek Bailey was also co-founder of the first independent, musician-owned record company in Britain.

Patrick Wright talks to five unsung, witty and engaging figures on the cultural scene who are distinguished by their originality and imagination. 2: Marc Karlin. Independent film-maker and publisher Marc Karlin has courted controversy with films on Rupert Murdoch and Diana, Princess of Wales, and with his unsparing analysis of the flaws of today's broadcasters.

02Outriders19990202

Patrick Wright talks to five unsung, witty and engaging figures on the cultural scene who are distinguished by their originality and imagination. 5: Marion Boyars. A leading publisher of the avant-garde since 1960, Marion Boyars introduced British readers to Georges Bataille, Michael Ondaatje and Ivan Illich. She discusses how she has fought to bring new ideas to audiences who do not always think that they need them.

Patrick Wright talks to five unsung, witty and engaging figures on the cultural scene who are distinguished by their originality and imagination. 3: Derek Bailey. Free-improvising guitarist of nearly 50 years' standing, Derek Bailey was also co-founder of the first independent, musician-owned record company in Britain.

Patrick Wright talks to five unsung, witty and engaging figures on the cultural scene who are distinguished by their originality and imagination. 2: Marc Karlin. Independent film-maker and publisher Marc Karlin has courted controversy with films on Rupert Murdoch and Diana, Princess of Wales, and with his unsparing analysis of the flaws of today's broadcasters.

02Politics And The English Language19990126

Five programmes in which the work of a writer from the past who argued with passion for change is introduced by a contemporary outspoken voice. 2: Sir Stephen Tumim introduces excerpts from George Orwell's essay `Politics and the ENGLISH Language'. Reader Samuel West

02Politics And The English Language19990126

Five programmes in which the work of a writer from the past who argued with passion for change is introduced by a contemporary outspoken voice. 2: Sir Stephen Tumim introduces excerpts from George Orwell's essay `Politics and the ENGLISH Language'. Reader Samuel West

02Projections19971007

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 5: Terry Gilliam. Cartoonist turned film-maker who first came to prominence through his work on Monty Python's Flying Circus.

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 5:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 4:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 3:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 2:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 1:.

02Projections19971007

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 5: Terry Gilliam. Cartoonist turned film-maker who first came to prominence through his work on Monty Python's Flying Circus.

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 5:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 4:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 3:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 2:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 1:.

02Shakespeare On Stage19981229

Peter Holland talks to ten Shakespeare experts about the Bard today. 2: `Shakespeare on Stage'. Michael Bogdanov from the ENGLISH Shakespeare Company and Mark Rylance of the Globe theatre discuss `Henry V'.

02Shakespeare On Stage19981229

Peter Holland talks to ten Shakespeare experts about the Bard today. 2: `Shakespeare on Stage'. Michael Bogdanov from the ENGLISH Shakespeare Company and Mark Rylance of the Globe theatre discuss `Henry V'.

02Sublime Words19980331

The second of four programmes in which Philip Dodd talks to leading novelists to find out why words and music have become so interwoven. 2: `Sublime Words'. At the beginning of the 20th century, classical music became a touchstone for writers who found in it a means of weaving together disparate themes in their novels. Modern day novelists Peter Ackroyd, Alison Lurie and Rose Tremain are part of this tradition of authors who have used music to colour their work.

02Sublime Words19980331

The second of four programmes in which Philip Dodd talks to leading novelists to find out why words and music have become so interwoven. 2: `Sublime Words'. At the beginning of the 20th century, classical music became a touchstone for writers who found in it a means of weaving together disparate themes in their novels. Modern day novelists Peter Ackroyd, Alison Lurie and Rose Tremain are part of this tradition of authors who have used music to colour their work.

02Tea For My Father19990810

Five poems blending words and sound which were commissioned by Radio 3. 2: `Tea for My Father' by Michael Hofmann is a sequence of poems on the death of the poet's father, the novelist Gert Hofmann.

02Tea For My Father19990810

Five poems blending words and sound which were commissioned by Radio 3. 2: `Tea for My Father' by Michael Hofmann is a sequence of poems on the death of the poet's father, the novelist Gert Hofmann.

02The Best Alive Or Dead19981222

Comedian and broadcaster Rainer Hersch presents five personal and idiosyncratic studies of the music of our century. 2: `The Best Alive or Dead'. Who were the great musicians of the century?

02The Best Alive Or Dead19981222

Comedian and broadcaster Rainer Hersch presents five personal and idiosyncratic studies of the music of our century. 2: `The Best Alive or Dead'. Who were the great musicians of the century?

02The Evening Watch19990427

Derek Alsop explores what makes a great musical setting through five case studies which dip into the riches of British literature of the last half millennium and reflect the richness of its musical treatment in our own century. 2: `The Evening Watch'. Henry Vaughan's metaphysical poem as set for unaccompanied chorus by Holst.

02The Kitsch Show!19981208
02The Kitsch Show!19981208

Four illustrated reflections on kitsch. 3: Roger Scruton, visiting professor of philosophy at Birkbeck, argues that kitsch is a corrupt reflection of a society without genuine values, and one which fatally undermines art.

Four illustrated reflections on kitsch. 2: Richard Dyer, professor of film studies at Warwick University, asks how intellectuals can enjoy what they know to be kitsch without resorting to inverted commas.

Four illustrated reflections on kitsch. 1: Dubravka Ugresic, a Croatian writer and thinker, describes the ability of kitsch to survive Communism, to thrive on war and to reinforce nationalism.

02The Lusads19981215

Kevin Jackson unravels the stories behind classic works of European literature. 2: Luis Vaz de Camoes: `The Lusads'. First published in 1572, `The Lusiads' recounts Vasco de Gama's pioneering voyage to INDIA and is widely regarded as the greatest epic poem of the Renaissance. In Victorian Britain, Camoes was much admired for the imperial theme of his verse and the romantic adventures of his own life, but our century has been more supicious of the poetry of empire. Kevin Jackson examines changing interpretations of the epic and its powerful place in Portuguese culture.

02The Lusads19981215

Kevin Jackson unravels the stories behind classic works of European literature. 2: Luis Vaz de Camoes: `The Lusads'. First published in 1572, `The Lusiads' recounts Vasco de Gama's pioneering voyage to INDIA and is widely regarded as the greatest epic poem of the Renaissance. In Victorian Britain, Camoes was much admired for the imperial theme of his verse and the romantic adventures of his own life, but our century has been more supicious of the poetry of empire. Kevin Jackson examines changing interpretations of the epic and its powerful place in Portuguese culture.

02The Modernist19990316

An idiosyncratic history of classical duets and an incidental history of loving, told by dancers and thinkers. 2: `The Modernist'. Apollo meets his muse.

02The Modernist19990316

An idiosyncratic history of classical duets and an incidental history of loving, told by dancers and thinkers. 2: `The Modernist'. Apollo meets his muse.

02The Narrative Landscape19970916

A five-part series examining the history of thinking about landscape. 2: `The Narrative Landscape'. An exploration of how man makes his mark on the ground in pursuit of all manner of ends: from self-glorification in the famous Renaissance gardens of Rome to gaining a profound understanding and nature in the work of artist Andy Goldsworthy.

02The Persian Brides19980512

Noah Richler talks to new Israeli and Palestinian authors about their work, 50 years after the foundation of the Israeli state. 2: `The Persian Brides'. Dorit Rabinyan was only 21 when, after years of listening to the kitchen stories of her Sephardic immigrant family, she wrote her sensationally successful first novel, `The Persian Brides'. It is a rich, exotic, deeply feminist and painfully bittersweet tale of three teenage brides and their betrothals and fates in the Jewish quarter of an oppressively patriarchal Iranian town. With readings by Alison Pettitt.

02The Persian Brides19980512

Noah Richler talks to new Israeli and Palestinian authors about their work, 50 years after the foundation of the Israeli state. 2: `The Persian Brides'. Dorit Rabinyan was only 21 when, after years of listening to the kitchen stories of her Sephardic immigrant family, she wrote her sensationally successful first novel, `The Persian Brides'. It is a rich, exotic, deeply feminist and painfully bittersweet tale of three teenage brides and their betrothals and fates in the Jewish quarter of an oppressively patriarchal Iranian town. With readings by Alison Pettitt.

02The Protective Shield19990323

A five-part series in which Iwan Russell-Jones looks at attitudes to the body in our culture. 2: `The Protective Shield'. Examining our preoccupation with maintaining and nurturing the body, including visits to the Sanger Centre in Cambridge - at the cutting edge of mapping the human genome - and the Mind Body Spirit Festival about New Age therapies and philosophies.

02The Protective Shield19990323

A five-part series in which Iwan Russell-Jones looks at attitudes to the body in our culture. 2: `The Protective Shield'. Examining our preoccupation with maintaining and nurturing the body, including visits to the Sanger Centre in Cambridge - at the cutting edge of mapping the human genome - and the Mind Body Spirit Festival about New Age therapies and philosophies.

02Velazquez19990622

Reflections on the great Spanish artist Velazquez, born 400 years ago. 2: Historian Felipe Fernandez Armesto considers the glittering but politically menacing court of 17th-century Spain through Velazquez's portraits of Philip IV and his chief minister Olivares.

To mark the four hundredth anniversary of the birth of Spanish painter Velazquez, five writers and artists select a painting by which they have been influenced. 1: Writer and feminist Michele Roberts looks at Velazquez's women through the Rokeby Venus and muses on his treatment of youth and age.

02Velazquez19990622

Reflections on the great Spanish artist Velazquez, born 400 years ago. 2: Historian Felipe Fernandez Armesto considers the glittering but politically menacing court of 17th-century Spain through Velazquez's portraits of Philip IV and his chief minister Olivares.

To mark the four hundredth anniversary of the birth of Spanish painter Velazquez, five writers and artists select a painting by which they have been influenced. 1: Writer and feminist Michele Roberts looks at Velazquez's women through the Rokeby Venus and muses on his treatment of youth and age.

02Veterans19981027

Christopher Hitchens talks to people who have spent long lives in opposition and are distinguished veterans of military, political and intellectual struggles. 3: Basil Davidson, widely revered historian of AFRICA and former intelligence operative in the Balkans in the Second World War.

Christopher Hitchens talks to people who have spent long lives in opposition and are distinguished veterans of military, political and intellectual struggles. 2: More from Bernard Knox, who recounts his combat in the Second World War and his postwar defence of the classics in the USA.

Christopher Hitchens talks to people who have spent long lives in opposition and are distinguished veterans of military, political and intellectual struggles. 1: Bernard Knox, classicist and defender of what he calls the oldest dead white European males. He was also a combatant in the Spanish Civil War and the Second World War.

02Veterans19981027

Christopher Hitchens talks to people who have spent long lives in opposition and are distinguished veterans of military, political and intellectual struggles. 3: Basil Davidson, widely revered historian of AFRICA and former intelligence operative in the Balkans in the Second World War.

Christopher Hitchens talks to people who have spent long lives in opposition and are distinguished veterans of military, political and intellectual struggles. 2: More from Bernard Knox, who recounts his combat in the Second World War and his postwar defence of the classics in the USA.

Christopher Hitchens talks to people who have spent long lives in opposition and are distinguished veterans of military, political and intellectual struggles. 1: Bernard Knox, classicist and defender of what he calls the oldest dead white European males. He was also a combatant in the Spanish Civil War and the Second World War.

02Wars Of The World19990406

Five explorations by Ian Christie of how cinema has continued the literary and visual tradition of apocalypse.

2: `Wars of the World'.

The First World War was widely interpreted in apocalyptic terms, which shaped its portrayal in films such as `J'accuse' and `The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse' and inaugurated a tradition of moralistic and prophetic spectacle in the cinema of the 20s and 30s.

02Wars Of The World19990406

Five explorations by Ian Christie of how cinema has continued the literary and visual tradition of apocalypse.

2: `Wars of the World'.

The First World War was widely interpreted in apocalyptic terms, which shaped its portrayal in films such as `J'accuse' and `The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse' and inaugurated a tradition of moralistic and prophetic spectacle in the cinema of the 20s and 30s.

02Whatever You Say, Say Nothing19990413

Five programmes celebrating and reassessing the poetry of Seamus Heaney in the week of his sixtieth birthday. 2: `Whatever You Say, Say Nothing'. A consideration of the way Heaney has reflected the troubled politics of Northern IRELAND.

02Whatever You Say, Say Nothing19990413

Five programmes celebrating and reassessing the poetry of Seamus Heaney in the week of his sixtieth birthday. 2: `Whatever You Say, Say Nothing'. A consideration of the way Heaney has reflected the troubled politics of Northern IRELAND.

02Wire Through The Heart1997102819980714

Five specially commissioned poems blending words and sound. 2: `Wire through the Heart'. By Ken Smith.

Four commissioned poems blending words and sound. 2: `Wire through the Heart' by Ken Smith.

02Wire Through The Heart1997102819980714

Five specially commissioned poems blending words and sound. 2: `Wire through the Heart'. By Ken Smith.

Four commissioned poems blending words and sound. 2: `Wire through the Heart' by Ken Smith.

03A Cat Reacts To Competition19990609

Readings from Vikram Seth's epic poem, a homage to Pushkin's `Eugene Onegin', which focuses experiences of love and loss of a group of twentysomethings in the San Francisco of the early 80s.

Cast: Mark Leake, Barbara Barnes, Laurel Lefkow, Michael Neil.

3: `A cat reacts to competition'.

03A Cat Reacts To Competition19990609

Readings from Vikram Seth's epic poem, a homage to Pushkin's `Eugene Onegin', which focuses experiences of love and loss of a group of twentysomethings in the San Francisco of the early 80s.

Cast: Mark Leake, Barbara Barnes, Laurel Lefkow, Michael Neil.

3: `A cat reacts to competition'.

03Aladdin19980225

The world's favourite fairy tales unravelled.

3: `Aladdin'.

Jatinder Verma, Maureen Duffy and Robert Irwin explore the traditions of AFRICAn sorcery, the sexual symbolism of the lamp and the Eastern ideas of materialism and spirituality that lie behind the `Arabian Nights' tale.

With music from Nielsen's drama.

03Aladdin19980225

The world's favourite fairy tales unravelled.

3: `Aladdin'.

Jatinder Verma, Maureen Duffy and Robert Irwin explore the traditions of AFRICAn sorcery, the sexual symbolism of the lamp and the Eastern ideas of materialism and spirituality that lie behind the `Arabian Nights' tale.

With music from Nielsen's drama.

03Any Satirist In The Ussr Must Question The Soviet System. Am I Conceivable In The Ussr?19981007

Five dramatised documentaries adapted from the KGB's literary archive by Vitaly Shentalinsky and presented by Professor James Riordan. 3: `Any Satirist in the USSR Must Question the Soviet System. Am I Conceivable in the USSR?'. The story of RUSSIAn prose writer and dramatist Mikhail Bulgakov, author of `The Master and Margarita', who waged an astonishing and daring war of words against the secret police that yielded surprising results. With John Sessions as Bulgakov.

03Any Satirist In The Ussr Must Question The Soviet System. Am I Conceivable In The Ussr?19981007

Five dramatised documentaries adapted from the KGB's literary archive by Vitaly Shentalinsky and presented by Professor James Riordan. 3: `Any Satirist in the USSR Must Question the Soviet System. Am I Conceivable in the USSR?'. The story of RUSSIAn prose writer and dramatist Mikhail Bulgakov, author of `The Master and Margarita', who waged an astonishing and daring war of words against the secret police that yielded surprising results. With John Sessions as Bulgakov.

03Aspects Of The Life Of St Francis19980121

Five writers each choose a picture in the National Gallery and use it as a basis to develop a short imaginative narrative. 3: Peter Porter on Sassetta's `Aspects of the Life of St Francis'.

03Aspects Of The Life Of St Francis19980121

Five writers each choose a picture in the National Gallery and use it as a basis to develop a short imaginative narrative. 3: Peter Porter on Sassetta's `Aspects of the Life of St Francis'.

03Barn Burning19970924

To mark 100 years since the birth of William Faulkner, Ron Berglas reads five short stories set in Faulkner's mythical Mississippi county. 3: `Barn Burning'.

03Barn Burning19970924

To mark 100 years since the birth of William Faulkner, Ron Berglas reads five short stories set in Faulkner's mythical Mississippi county. 3: `Barn Burning'.

03Bedtime Stories19980204
03Bedtime Stories19980204

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 5: Androgyny. An androgynous look has often been revered as an ideal of physical beauty, and gender confusion is explored by many people through fashion. But what is the reality of androgyny for those born neither male or female?

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 4: Bisexuality. While some believe we are all bisexual, others deny the very existence of bisexuality. Is it a third gender, or a new way to look at desires we all share?

A five part cultural history of sexuality. 3: Transvestism. Men and women have dressed in each other's clothes from Shakespeare to pantomime, yet transvestism today remains a secret lifestyle. Writers and psychologists explore the history of cross-dressing, and transvestites talk about their lives.

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 2: HOMOSEXUALity. An exploration of gay and lesbian life from ancient Greece to today. How has gay and lesbian sexuality found a voice and an identity in the past?

A five-part cultural history of sexuality. 1: Heterosexuality. Since Adam and Eve's first kiss, we have been a heterosexual society, but how have men and women's desires for one another changed with the times? Institutionalised through marriage, heterosexual love has often forged political as well as romantic alliances, but always with the family at its heart. This programme looks at how as well as whom we love.

03Contemporary American Poets19990721

With Michael Schmidt. 5: John Ashbery. A final programme of readings by contemporary American poets reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. One of the most prolific American poets of our time, Ashbery reads a selection of his writing past and present.

With Michael Schmidt. 4: Deborah Garrison and Yusef Komunyakaa. The fourth in a series of readings by leading contemporary poets from America reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. Garrison, a senior editor for the NEW YORKer, reads from her very first collection; Komunyakaa, a Vietnam veteran, delivers a powerful meditation on AFRICAn-American life.

With Michael Schmidt. 3: Sharon Olds and August Kleinzahler. The third in a series of readings by contemporary American poets reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. Olds is a winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award; Kleinzahler has also received many top awards.

With Michael Schmidt. 2: Louise Gluck and Charles Simic. The second in a series of readings by contempoarary poets from America reflecting the diverse range of poetry written in the States today. Gluck's work is delicate and oblique; Serbian-born Simic's is warm-hearted and slightly surreal. Both are winners of the Pulitzer Prize for poetry.

With Michael Schmidt. 1: Rita Dove and Mark Doty. The first in a series of readings by contemporary poets from America reflecting the diverse range of poetry being written in the States today. Dove was the first AFRICAn-American poet laureate of the US, and her work is suffused with a quiet humanity. Doty, forceful and inventive, was the winner of the 1995 T S Eliot Prize.

03Contemporary American Poets19990721

With Michael Schmidt. 5: John Ashbery. A final programme of readings by contemporary American poets reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. One of the most prolific American poets of our time, Ashbery reads a selection of his writing past and present.

With Michael Schmidt. 4: Deborah Garrison and Yusef Komunyakaa. The fourth in a series of readings by leading contemporary poets from America reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. Garrison, a senior editor for the NEW YORKer, reads from her very first collection; Komunyakaa, a Vietnam veteran, delivers a powerful meditation on AFRICAn-American life.

With Michael Schmidt. 3: Sharon Olds and August Kleinzahler. The third in a series of readings by contemporary American poets reflecting the diversity of poetry written in the States today. Olds is a winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award; Kleinzahler has also received many top awards.

With Michael Schmidt. 2: Louise Gluck and Charles Simic. The second in a series of readings by contempoarary poets from America reflecting the diverse range of poetry written in the States today. Gluck's work is delicate and oblique; Serbian-born Simic's is warm-hearted and slightly surreal. Both are winners of the Pulitzer Prize for poetry.

With Michael Schmidt. 1: Rita Dove and Mark Doty. The first in a series of readings by contemporary poets from America reflecting the diverse range of poetry being written in the States today. Dove was the first AFRICAn-American poet laureate of the US, and her work is suffused with a quiet humanity. Doty, forceful and inventive, was the winner of the 1995 T S Eliot Prize.

03Cultural Nationalism19990303
03Doctors Of Philosophy19990224

Alain De Botton looks to some of the great thinkers of the past in the hope of finding philosophical cures for some everyday ills.

5: The milk has gone off, the car has been clamped, and tax forms are overdue, but Alain De Botton opens Nietzsche in search of advice for the faint-hearted.

4: Never mind agony aunts or lonely hearts pages - Alain De Botton discovers how Schopenhauer soothes the broken-hearted.

3: Bewildered by semantics, semiotics or systems analysis? Alain De Botton finds Montaigne has a message for those with a sense of intellectual inferiority.

2: From loss of hair to loss of employment, Alain De Botton turns to Seneca for sage advice.

1: From foreign holidays to expensive meals, we live in an age that equates money with happiness.

So what has Epicurus to say to those with a cash-flow problem?

03Doctors Of Philosophy19990224

Alain De Botton looks to some of the great thinkers of the past in the hope of finding philosophical cures for some everyday ills.

5: The milk has gone off, the car has been clamped, and tax forms are overdue, but Alain De Botton opens Nietzsche in search of advice for the faint-hearted.

4: Never mind agony aunts or lonely hearts pages - Alain De Botton discovers how Schopenhauer soothes the broken-hearted.

3: Bewildered by semantics, semiotics or systems analysis? Alain De Botton finds Montaigne has a message for those with a sense of intellectual inferiority.

2: From loss of hair to loss of employment, Alain De Botton turns to Seneca for sage advice.

1: From foreign holidays to expensive meals, we live in an age that equates money with happiness.

So what has Epicurus to say to those with a cash-flow problem?

03God(s) Or No God?19971112

Five religious dialogues between representatives of the great world faiths, with Keith Ward, Regius professor of divinity at OXFORD, in the chair. 3: `God(s) or No God?' With Stephen Batchelor, director of studies at the Sharpham College for Buddhist Studies and Contemporary Enquiry; and Shaunaka Rishi Das, European Communications director of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness.

03God(s) Or No God?19971112

Five religious dialogues between representatives of the great world faiths, with Keith Ward, Regius professor of divinity at OXFORD, in the chair. 3: `God(s) or No God?' With Stephen Batchelor, director of studies at the Sharpham College for Buddhist Studies and Contemporary Enquiry; and Shaunaka Rishi Das, European Communications director of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness.

03Grave New World19981111

David Gale talks to five leading thinkers about their own radical vision of the future. 4: Science-fiction writer Paul McAuley is a former research biologist fascinated by the possibilities of biotechnology. He projects the dreams and nightmares of genetic engineering into the near and distant future.

David Gale talks to five leading thinkers about their own radical vision of the future. 3: Feminist writer Sadie Plant sees the internet as a liberating space for women and believes they will be empowered by technology in the next century.

David Gale talks to five leading thinkers about their own radical vision of the future. 2: Visionary novelist J G Ballard talks about the psychological future and the emerge of new personality types we have never seen before. He sees the 21st century as a place where the psychopath will prosper.

03Grave New World19981111

David Gale talks to five leading thinkers about their own radical vision of the future. 4: Science-fiction writer Paul McAuley is a former research biologist fascinated by the possibilities of biotechnology. He projects the dreams and nightmares of genetic engineering into the near and distant future.

David Gale talks to five leading thinkers about their own radical vision of the future. 3: Feminist writer Sadie Plant sees the internet as a liberating space for women and believes they will be empowered by technology in the next century.

David Gale talks to five leading thinkers about their own radical vision of the future. 2: Visionary novelist J G Ballard talks about the psychological future and the emerge of new personality types we have never seen before. He sees the 21st century as a place where the psychopath will prosper.

03Las Meninas19990623

Reflections on the great Spanish artist Velazquez, born 400 years ago. 3: Sculptor Anthony Caro talks about form in Velazquez's paintings with reference to the painting `Las Meninas'.

03Las Meninas19990623

Reflections on the great Spanish artist Velazquez, born 400 years ago. 3: Sculptor Anthony Caro talks about form in Velazquez's paintings with reference to the painting `Las Meninas'.

03Living With The Bomb19990407

Five explorations by Ian Christie of how cinema has continued the literary and visual tradition of apocalypse. 3: `Living with the Bomb'. The threat of NUCLEAR annihilation, linked with the tensions of the Cold War, encouraged a new apocalyptic fear in the 50s and 60s which included popular science-fiction catastrophe and horror movies as well as anguished meditations on morality and Bergman's influential evocation of medieval apocalypse in `The Seventh Seal'.

03Living With The Bomb19990407

Five explorations by Ian Christie of how cinema has continued the literary and visual tradition of apocalypse. 3: `Living with the Bomb'. The threat of NUCLEAR annihilation, linked with the tensions of the Cold War, encouraged a new apocalyptic fear in the 50s and 60s which included popular science-fiction catastrophe and horror movies as well as anguished meditations on morality and Bergman's influential evocation of medieval apocalypse in `The Seventh Seal'.

03Ludmilla Ulitskaya: Sonechka Bronnka, Daughter Of Bokhara19980923

Tibor Fischer introduces five of the world's leading writers who are, as yet, little known to British audiences. 3: `Ludmilla Ulitskaya: Sonechka Bronnka, Daughter of Bokhara'. Ludmilla Ulitskaya - twice shortlisted for the RUSSIAn equivalent of the Booker Prize - is a leading light in the new generation of RUSSIAn feminist writers. Her latest novel is a tender exploration of womanhood and a celebration of the possible in the face of the impossible.

03Ludmilla Ulitskaya: Sonechka Bronnka, Daughter Of Bokhara19980923

Tibor Fischer introduces five of the world's leading writers who are, as yet, little known to British audiences. 3: `Ludmilla Ulitskaya: Sonechka Bronnka, Daughter of Bokhara'. Ludmilla Ulitskaya - twice shortlisted for the RUSSIAn equivalent of the Booker Prize - is a leading light in the new generation of RUSSIAn feminist writers. Her latest novel is a tender exploration of womanhood and a celebration of the possible in the face of the impossible.

03Lyrical Ballads19981014

The fourth of five programmes in which Steve Connor explores the effect on ENGLISH literature and thought made by Wordsworth and Coleridge's `Lyrical Ballads'. `Politics'.

The third of five programmes in which Steve Connor explores the effect on ENGLISH literature and thought made by Wordsworth and Coleridge's `Lyrical Ballads'. `The Language of Man'.

The second of five programmes in which Steve Connor explores the effect on ENGLISH literature and thought made by Wordsworth and Coleridge's `Lyrical Ballads'. `Children and Childhood'.

03Lyrical Ballads19981014

The fourth of five programmes in which Steve Connor explores the effect on ENGLISH literature and thought made by Wordsworth and Coleridge's `Lyrical Ballads'. `Politics'.

The third of five programmes in which Steve Connor explores the effect on ENGLISH literature and thought made by Wordsworth and Coleridge's `Lyrical Ballads'. `The Language of Man'.

The second of five programmes in which Steve Connor explores the effect on ENGLISH literature and thought made by Wordsworth and Coleridge's `Lyrical Ballads'. `Children and Childhood'.

03Mark Beeson: The Blue Monkeys Of Zomba19990310

Five commissioned poems blending words and sound. 3: `Mark Beeson: The Blue Monkeys of Zomba'. A poem written by a poet-cum-biologist about his research on monkeys in Malawi.

03Monet In London19990120

3: `Monet in LONDON'. The Savoy Hotel may seem an unlikely place in which to retrace the steps of a bohemian artist, but Monet was already well established and wealthy when he made a series of visits to LONDON at the beginning of this century, painting the Thames from the balcony outside his room and revelling in the various qualities of the LONDON fog. Tim Marlow, editor of Tate magazine, and art historian John House trace Monet's LONDON visits.

03Monet In London19990120

3: `Monet in LONDON'. The Savoy Hotel may seem an unlikely place in which to retrace the steps of a bohemian artist, but Monet was already well established and wealthy when he made a series of visits to LONDON at the beginning of this century, painting the Thames from the balcony outside his room and revelling in the various qualities of the LONDON fog. Tim Marlow, editor of Tate magazine, and art historian John House trace Monet's LONDON visits.

03New Art Space1998042219980805

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the third programme, he follows Graham Gussin as he creates a new sound and video piece in the New Art Space at the Tate, drawing together the diverse influences of Edgar Allen Poe and Kubrick's `2001'.

03New Art Space1998042219980805

Five programmes this week in which Nicholas Ward-Jackson explores the contemporary art world. In the third programme, he follows Graham Gussin as he creates a new sound and video piece in the New Art Space at the Tate, drawing together the diverse influences of Edgar Allen Poe and Kubrick's `2001'.

03Once Upon A Zoo19971029

Four commissioned poems blending words and sound. 3: `Once upon a Zoo' by Lavinia Greenlaw.

Five specially commissioned poems blending words and sound. 3: `Once Upon a Zoo'. By Lavinia Greenlaw

03Once Upon A Zoo19971029

Four commissioned poems blending words and sound. 3: `Once upon a Zoo' by Lavinia Greenlaw.

Five specially commissioned poems blending words and sound. 3: `Once Upon a Zoo'. By Lavinia Greenlaw

03Once Upon A Zoo19980715

Four commissioned poems blending words and sound. 3: `Once upon a Zoo' by Lavinia Greenlaw.

Five specially commissioned poems blending words and sound. 3: `Once Upon a Zoo'. By Lavinia Greenlaw

03Once Upon A Zoo19980715

Four commissioned poems blending words and sound. 3: `Once upon a Zoo' by Lavinia Greenlaw.

Five specially commissioned poems blending words and sound. 3: `Once Upon a Zoo'. By Lavinia Greenlaw

03Outriders19990203

Patrick Wright talks to five unsung, witty and engaging figures on the cultural scene who are distinguished by their originality and imagination. 5: Marion Boyars. A leading publisher of the avant-garde since 1960, Marion Boyars introduced British readers to Georges Bataille, Michael Ondaatje and Ivan Illich. She discusses how she has fought to bring new ideas to audiences who do not always think that they need them.

Patrick Wright talks to five unsung, witty and engaging figures on the cultural scene who are distinguished by their originality and imagination. 3: Derek Bailey. Free-improvising guitarist of nearly 50 years' standing, Derek Bailey was also co-founder of the first independent, musician-owned record company in Britain.

Patrick Wright talks to five unsung, witty and engaging figures on the cultural scene who are distinguished by their originality and imagination. 2: Marc Karlin. Independent film-maker and publisher Marc Karlin has courted controversy with films on Rupert Murdoch and Diana, Princess of Wales, and with his unsparing analysis of the flaws of today's broadcasters.

03Outriders19990203

Patrick Wright talks to five unsung, witty and engaging figures on the cultural scene who are distinguished by their originality and imagination. 5: Marion Boyars. A leading publisher of the avant-garde since 1960, Marion Boyars introduced British readers to Georges Bataille, Michael Ondaatje and Ivan Illich. She discusses how she has fought to bring new ideas to audiences who do not always think that they need them.

Patrick Wright talks to five unsung, witty and engaging figures on the cultural scene who are distinguished by their originality and imagination. 3: Derek Bailey. Free-improvising guitarist of nearly 50 years' standing, Derek Bailey was also co-founder of the first independent, musician-owned record company in Britain.

Patrick Wright talks to five unsung, witty and engaging figures on the cultural scene who are distinguished by their originality and imagination. 2: Marc Karlin. Independent film-maker and publisher Marc Karlin has courted controversy with films on Rupert Murdoch and Diana, Princess of Wales, and with his unsparing analysis of the flaws of today's broadcasters.

03Philomena19981202

Played by Val Lilley. Away from her homeland, Philomena realises that life has passed her by.

03Philomena19981202

Played by Val Lilley. Away from her homeland, Philomena realises that life has passed her by.

03Projections19971008

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 5: Terry Gilliam. Cartoonist turned film-maker who first came to prominence through his work on Monty Python's Flying Circus.

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 5:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 4:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 3:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 2:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 1:.

03Projections19971008

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 5: Terry Gilliam. Cartoonist turned film-maker who first came to prominence through his work on Monty Python's Flying Circus.

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 5:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 4:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 3:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 2:

Five programmes in which film historian Ian Christie talks to leading figures in contemporary film-making about influences on their careers, how they work and the state of cinema as it enters its second century. 1:.

03Rhythms And Blues19980401

The third of four programmes in which Philip Dodd talks to leading novelists to find out why words and music have become so interwoven. `Rhythms and Blues'. The sounds of jazz and the blues have transformed not only music, but also the language of fiction and poetry. Ed McBain, Walter Mosley and Charlotte Carter are among many writers whose work uses these rhythms to evoke dramatic cityscapes and raw emotions.

03Rhythms And Blues19980401

The third of four programmes in which Philip Dodd talks to leading novelists to find out why words and music have become so interwoven. `Rhythms and Blues'. The sounds of jazz and the blues have transformed not only music, but also the language of fiction and poetry. Ed McBain, Walter Mosley and Charlotte Carter are among many writers whose work uses these rhythms to evoke dramatic cityscapes and raw emotions.

03Rights Of Man19990127

Five programmes in which the work of a writer from the past who argued with passion for change is introduced by a contemporary outspoken voice. 3: Will Hutton introduces excerpts from Thomas Paine's revolutionary essay `Rights of Man'. Reader John Sessions

03Rights Of Man19990127

Five programmes in which the work of a writer from the past who argued with passion for change is introduced by a contemporary outspoken voice. 3: Will Hutton introduces excerpts from Thomas Paine's revolutionary essay `Rights of Man'. Reader John Sessions

03Seamus Heaney At 6019990414
03Seamus Heaney At 6019990414

Five programmes celebrating and reassessing the poetry of Seamus Heaney in the week of his sixtieth birthday. 4: Irish poet and critic Bernard O'Donoghue explores Heaney's use of language - the meaning of his careful fusion of an Irish idiom and the ENGLISH lyric.

Five programmes celebrating and reassessing the poetry of Seamus Heaney in the week of his sixtieth birthday. 3: Eminent American critic Helen Vendler cons