Portraying The Poor

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
1In Print2010022820100906

. Paul Mason surveys the account of working-class life given by middle-class writers.

The first of two programmes about the image of poverty and of the working class that has been created by writers (Part 1) and by films and television (Part 2).

Whether it's Friedrich Engels's report on the Salford slums in the 1840s through to George Orwell's account of his expeditions to Wigan and the hop-fields of Kent, our picture of the poor has been painted by members of the middle class.

Paul Mason asks whether this outsider's view gives us a full and fair account - or whether it says more about the attitudes of the literary class than about the poor themselves.

Interviewees include Orwell's biographer D.J.Taylor; Polly Toynbee (author of "Hard Work: Life In Low-Pay Britain") and Michael Collins (author of "The Likes Of Us - A Biography Of The White Working Class"). Producer Peter Everett.

. Paul Mason surveys the account of working-class life given by middle-class writers.

01In Print2010022820100906

Paul Mason surveys the account of working-class life given by middle-class writers.

The first of two programmes about the image of poverty and of the working class that has been created by writers (Part 1) and by films and television (Part 2).

Whether it's Friedrich Engels's report on the Salford slums in the 1840s through to George Orwell's account of his expeditions to Wigan and the hop-fields of Kent, our picture of the poor has been painted by members of the middle class.

Paul Mason asks whether this outsider's view gives us a full and fair account - or whether it says more about the attitudes of the literary class than about the poor themselves.

Interviewees include Orwell's biographer D.J.Taylor; Polly Toynbee (author of "Hard Work: Life In Low-Pay Britain") and Michael Collins (author of "The Likes Of Us - A Biography Of The White Working Class").

Producer Peter Everett.

01In Print2010022820100906

Paul Mason surveys the account of working-class life given by middle-class writers.

The first of two programmes about the image of poverty and of the working class that has been created by writers (Part 1) and by films and television (Part 2).

Whether it's Friedrich Engels's report on the Salford slums in the 1840s through to George Orwell's account of his expeditions to Wigan and the hop-fields of Kent, our picture of the poor has been painted by members of the middle class.

Paul Mason asks whether this outsider's view gives us a full and fair account - or whether it says more about the attitudes of the literary class than about the poor themselves.

Interviewees include Orwell's biographer D.J.Taylor; Polly Toynbee (author of "Hard Work: Life In Low-Pay Britain") and Michael Collins (author of "The Likes Of Us - A Biography Of The White Working Class").

Producer Peter Everett.

02In Film And Tv

02 LASTIn Film And Tv2010030720100913

Paul Mason explores the image of poverty and the working class that has been created by writers.

From Saturday Night and Sunday Morning to Coronation Street, and from On The Buses to Big Brother, British film and TV has had plenty to say about the working class.

But precious little of it has been written, less of it directed and virtually none of it commissioned by people who have themselves grown up among the poor.

Paul Mason asks how the picture has changed over the decades, and whether or not we are now any closer to seeing real lives on screen than we were in the days of the Ealing Comedies or the 'kitchen sink' dramas.

Interviewees include film director Ken Loach, whose career spans almost half a century from Cathy Come Home (1966) to Looking For Eric (2009); California-born playwright Donna Franceschild, whose 2003 TV series The Key was the story of three generations of working-class Glasgow women; Anthony Wonke, director of the BAFTA-winning documentary series The Tower: A Tale Of Two Cities (BBC TV 2007); John Jewell of Cardiff University, who has studied the representation of class in comedy; and TV reality show presenter Trisha Goddard.

Paul Mason surveys the account of working-class life given by films and TV.

The second of two programmes about the image of poverty and of the working class that has been created by writers (Part 1) and by films and television (Part 2).

Paul Mason asks how the picture has changed over the decades - and whether we're now any closer to seeing real lives on screen than we were in the days of the Ealing comedies or the 'kitchen sink' dramas.

Interviewees include film director Ken Loach, whose career spans more than half a century from 'Cathy Come Home' (1966) to 'Looking For Eric' (2009); Donna Franceschild, California-born playwright whose 2003 TV series 'The Key' was the story of three generations of working-class Glasgow women; Anthony Wonke, director of the BAFTA-winning documentary series 'The Tower: A Tale Of Two Cities' (BBC TV 2007); John Jewell of Cardiff University who has studied the representation of class in comedy, and TV reality-show presenter Trisha Goddard..

Producer: Peter Everett

BBC Bristol.

02 LASTIn Film And Tv2010030720100913

Paul Mason explores the image of poverty and the working class that has been created by writers.

From Saturday Night and Sunday Morning to Coronation Street, and from On The Buses to Big Brother, British film and TV has had plenty to say about the working class.

But precious little of it has been written, less of it directed and virtually none of it commissioned by people who have themselves grown up among the poor.

Paul Mason asks how the picture has changed over the decades, and whether or not we are now any closer to seeing real lives on screen than we were in the days of the Ealing Comedies or the 'kitchen sink' dramas.

Interviewees include film director Ken Loach, whose career spans almost half a century from Cathy Come Home (1966) to Looking For Eric (2009); California-born playwright Donna Franceschild, whose 2003 TV series The Key was the story of three generations of working-class Glasgow women; Anthony Wonke, director of the BAFTA-winning documentary series The Tower: A Tale Of Two Cities (BBC TV 2007); John Jewell of Cardiff University, who has studied the representation of class in comedy; and TV reality show presenter Trisha Goddard.

Paul Mason surveys the account of working-class life given by films and TV.

The second of two programmes about the image of poverty and of the working class that has been created by writers (Part 1) and by films and television (Part 2).

Paul Mason asks how the picture has changed over the decades - and whether we're now any closer to seeing real lives on screen than we were in the days of the Ealing comedies or the 'kitchen sink' dramas.

Interviewees include film director Ken Loach, whose career spans more than half a century from 'Cathy Come Home' (1966) to 'Looking For Eric' (2009); Donna Franceschild, California-born playwright whose 2003 TV series 'The Key' was the story of three generations of working-class Glasgow women; Anthony Wonke, director of the BAFTA-winning documentary series 'The Tower: A Tale Of Two Cities' (BBC TV 2007); John Jewell of Cardiff University who has studied the representation of class in comedy, and TV reality-show presenter Trisha Goddard..

Producer: Peter Everett

BBC Bristol.

2 LASTIn Film and TV2010030720100913

class="blq-clearfix">

The second of two programmes about the image of poverty and of the working class that has been created by writers (Part 1) and by films and television (Part 2).

From 'Saturday Night and Sunday Morning' to 'Coronation Street' and from 'On The Buses' to 'Big Brother', British film and TV has had plenty to say about the working class. But precious little of it has been written, less of it directed and virtually none of it commissioned by people who have themselves grown up among the poor.

Paul Mason asks how the picture has changed over the decades - and whether we're now any closer to seeing real lives on screen than we were in the days of the Ealing comedies or the 'kitchen sink' dramas.

Interviewees include film director Ken Loach, whose career spans more than half a century from 'Cathy Come Home' (1966) to 'Looking For Eric' (2009); Donna Franceschild, California-born playwright whose 2003 TV series 'The Key' was the story of three generations of working-class Glasgow women; Anthony Wonke, director of the BAFTA-winning documentary series 'The Tower: A Tale Of Two Cities' (BBC TV 2007); John Jewell of Cardiff University who has studied the representation of class in comedy, and TV reality-show presenter Trisha Goddard..

Producer: Peter Everett

BBC Bristol.

. Paul Mason surveys the account of working-class life given by films and TV.

22 LASTIn Film and TV