The Politics Of The Romantic Hero

The heroes and heroines of romantic art have traditionally been represented as exiles from politics and society, visionaries who enter a glorious other world of the pure imagination.

But now the cult of the romantic hero is viewed differently: as part of a committed response to industrialisation, the rise of mass culture and disillusionment with the consequences of the French Revolution.

Nicholas Roe of St Andrews University explores the politics of the romantic hero in the Golden Age of romanticism - from the French Revolution in 1789 to the exile of Napoleon in 1815.

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The heroes and heroines of romantic art have traditionally been represented as exiles from politics and society, visionaries who enter a glorious other world of the pure imagination.

But now the cult of the romantic hero is viewed differently: as part of a committed response to industrialisation, the rise of mass culture and disillusionment with the consequences of the French Revolution.

Nicholas Roe of St Andrews University explores the politics of the romantic hero in the Golden Age of romanticism - from the French Revolution in 1789 to the exile of Napoleon in 1815.