Plain Tales From The Commonwealth

From 1947 through to the 1960s, in country after country, the Union Jack was hauled down for the last time.

Thousands of Britons who had run the empire returned home.

But not all.

In the first of a new series, Aidan Hartley finds out what happened to those Britons who stayed on in the newly-independent countries.

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
20050606

From 1947 through to the 1960s, in country after country, the Union Jack was hauled down for the last time. Thousands of Britons who had run the empire returned home. But not all. In the first of a new series, Aidan Hartley finds out what happened to those Britons who stayed on in the newly-independent countries.

1/4. My Land Is Kenya

Aidan starts with the white farmers of Kenya, who in colonial days were given the prime agricultural land, and who were famous for their dissolute and promiscuous lifestyles. After independence, they were required to move to more distant, less fertile ground.

Why did they stay? Have they become true Kenyans or do they still look to Britain for their identity?

20050613

Aidan Hartley presents a series about Britons who remained in former colonies.

2/4. Never the Twain

When, in 1947, the British in India packed their bags, their polo sticks, their regimental jackets, and their memories, not everybody cheered. Among those left behind were over 300,000 people of mixed European and Indian descent. Despite in many cases being more Anglo than Indian, and speaking no language but English, they had no real choice but to stay on, and now feel that their culture is disappearing into the Indian mainstream.

Aidan Hartley travels to Calcutta, and speaks to Anglo-Indians who were once prosperous but now live on the pavements. He also visits McCluskieganj, a remote hill station founded in the 1930s as an Anglo-Indian utopia, and finds that even here, a unique way of life has all but vanished.

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Aidan Hartley presents a series about Britons who remained in former colonies.

2/4. Never the Twain

When, in 1947, the British in India packed their bags, their polo sticks, their regimental jackets, and their memories, not everybody cheered. Among those left behind were over 300,000 people of mixed European and Indian descent. Despite in many cases being more Anglo than Indian, and speaking no language but English, they had no real choice but to stay on, and now feel that their culture is disappearing into the Indian mainstream.

Aidan Hartley travels to Calcutta, and speaks to Anglo-Indians who were once prosperous but now live on the pavements. He also visits McCluskieganj, a remote hill station founded in the 1930s as an Anglo-Indian utopia, and finds that even here, a unique way of life has all but vanished."

20050620

Aidan Hartley presents a series about Britons who remained in former colonies.

3/4. My Friend the President

In the 1950s and 60s, many British people got caught up in the liberation struggle that was taking place in the colonies, and became close to the charismatic leaders of the independence movements. After independence, some were rewarded with political positions in the new governments.

Aidan Hartley talks to white men and women who held high office under Black African presidents and in some cases became disillusioned as the lofty ideals became tainted with corruption and violence.

20050627

Aidan Hartley presents a series about Britons who remained in former colonies.

4/4. Mr Chips of Chitral

At 87, Major Geoffrey Langlands is the only British resident remaining in the Pakistani Chitral valley of Pakistan, and almost certainly the only inhabitant of the Hindu Kush who goes to work wearing a blazer, tie, and polished leather shoes. He is head teacher of the Sayurj school, which aims to give a high class secular education to boys and girls in an area where religious schools - for boys only - are still the norm.

Langlands has been teaching in Pakistan since independence, for much of the time in remote tribal areas, and has been kidnapped and held hostage by tribesmen. Since the war in Afghanistan, westerners have evacuated the area, but Major Langlands isn't going anywhere. The people of Chitral have declared that he is under their protection.

Aidan Hartley meets a remarkable man.

20051002

From 1947 through to the 1960s, in country after country, the Union Jack was hauled down for the last time. Thousands of Britons who had run the empire returned home. But not all. In the first of a new series, Aidan Hartley finds out what happened to those Britons who stayed on in the newly-independent countries.

1/4. My Land is Kenya

Aidan starts with the white farmers of Kenya, who in colonial days were given the prime agricultural land, and who were famous for their dissolute and promiscuous lifestyles. After independence they were required to move to more distant, less fertile ground. Why did they stay? Have they become true Kenyans or do they still look to Britain for their identity?

Then News.

20051009

From 1947 through to the 1960s, in country after country, the Union Jack was hauled down for the last time. Thousands of Britons who had run the empire returned home. But not all. In the first of a new series, Aidan Hartley finds out what happened to those Britons who stayed on in the newly-independent countries.

2/4. Never the Twain

When, in 1947, the British in India packed their bags, their polo sticks, their regimental jackets, and their memories, not everybody cheered. Among those left behind were over 300,000 people of mixed European and Indian descent. Despite in many cases being more Anglo than Indian, and speaking no language but English, they had no real choice but to stay on, and now feel that their culture is disappearing into the Indian mainstream.

Aidan Hartley travels to Calcutta, and speaks to Anglo-Indians who were once prosperous but now live on the pavements; and to McCluskieganj, a remote hill station founded in the 1930s as an Anglo-Indian utopia, and finds that even here, a unique way of life has all but vanished.

Followed by News.

20051016

From 1947 through to the 1960s, in country after country, the Union Jack was hauled down for the last time. Thousands of Britons who had run the empire returned home. But not all. Aidan Hartley finds out what happened to those Britons who stayed on in the newly-independent countries.

3/4. My Friend the President

In the 1950s and 60s, many British people got caught up in the liberation struggle that was taking place in the colonies, and became close to the charismatic leaders of the independence movements. After independence, some were rewarded with political positions in the new governments. Aidan talks to white men and women who held high office under black African presidents - and in some cases became disillusioned as the lofty ideals became tainted with corruption and violence.

Followed by News.

20051023

From 1947 through to the 1960s, in country after country, the Union Jack was hauled down for the last time. Thousands of Britons who had run the empire returned home. But not all. Aidan Hartley finds out what happened to those Britons who stayed on in the newly-independent countries.

3/4. My Friend the President

At 87, Major Geoffrey Langlands is the only British resident remaining in the Pakistani Chitral valley of Pakistan, and almost certainly the only inhabitant of the Hindu Kush who goes to work wearing a blazer, tie, and polished leather shoes. He is head teacher of the Sayurj school, which aims to give a high class secular education to boys and girls in an area where religious schools - for boys only - are still the norm.

Langlands has been teaching in Pakistan since independence, for much of the time in remote tribal areas, and has been kidnapped and held hostage by tribesmen. Since the war in Afghanistan, westerners have evacuated the area, but Major Langlands isn't going anywhere. The people of Chitral have declared that he is under their protection.

Aidan Hartley meets a remarkable man.

Followed by News.

0101My Land Is Kenya2005060620051002

From 1947 through to the 1960s, in country after country, the Union Jack was hauled down for the last time.

Thousands of Britons who had run the empire returned home.

But not all.

In the first of a new series, Aidan Hartley finds out what happened to those Britons who stayed on in the newly-independent countries.Aidan starts with the white farmers of KENYA, who in colonial days were given the prime agricultural land, and who were famous for their dissolute and promiscuous lifestyles.

After independence, they were required to move to more distant, less fertile ground.

Why did they stay? Have they become true KENYAns or do they still look to Britain for their identity?

0101My Land Is Kenya2005060620051002

From 1947 through to the 1960s, in country after country, the Union Jack was hauled down for the last time.

Thousands of Britons who had run the empire returned home.

But not all.

In the first of a new series, Aidan Hartley finds out what happened to those Britons who stayed on in the newly-independent countries.Aidan starts with the white farmers of KENYA, who in colonial days were given the prime agricultural land, and who were famous for their dissolute and promiscuous lifestyles.

After independence, they were required to move to more distant, less fertile ground.

Why did they stay? Have they become true KENYAns or do they still look to Britain for their identity?

0102Never The Twain2005061320051009

When, in 1947, the British in INDIA packed their bags, their polo sticks, their regimental jackets, and their memories, not everybody cheered.

Among those left behind were over 300,000 people of mixed European and INDIAn descent.

Despite in many cases being more Anglo than INDIAn, and speaking no language but ENGLISH, they had no real choice but to stay on, and now feel that their culture is disappearing into the INDIAn mainstream.

Aidan Hartley travels to CALCUTTA, and speaks to Anglo-INDIAns who were once prosperous but now live on the pavements.

He also visits McCluskieganj, a remote hill station founded in the 1930s as an Anglo-INDIAn utopia, and finds that even here, a unique way of life has all but vanished.

0102Never The Twain2005061320051009

When, in 1947, the British in INDIA packed their bags, their polo sticks, their regimental jackets, and their memories, not everybody cheered.

Among those left behind were over 300,000 people of mixed European and INDIAn descent.

Despite in many cases being more Anglo than INDIAn, and speaking no language but ENGLISH, they had no real choice but to stay on, and now feel that their culture is disappearing into the INDIAn mainstream.

Aidan Hartley travels to CALCUTTA, and speaks to Anglo-INDIAns who were once prosperous but now live on the pavements.

He also visits McCluskieganj, a remote hill station founded in the 1930s as an Anglo-INDIAn utopia, and finds that even here, a unique way of life has all but vanished.

0103My Friend The President2005062020051023

In the 1950s and 60s, many British people got caught up in the liberation struggle that was taking place in the colonies, and became close to the charismatic leaders of the independence movements.

After independence, some were rewarded with political positions in the new governments.

Aidan talks to white men and women who held high office under black African presidents - and in some cases became disillusioned as the lofty ideals became tainted with corruption and violence.

0103My Friend The President2005062020051023

In the 1950s and 60s, many British people got caught up in the liberation struggle that was taking place in the colonies, and became close to the charismatic leaders of the independence movements.

After independence, some were rewarded with political positions in the new governments.

Aidan talks to white men and women who held high office under black African presidents - and in some cases became disillusioned as the lofty ideals became tainted with corruption and violence.

0104 LASTMr Chips Of Chitral2005062720051016

At 87, Major Geoffrey Langlands is the only British resident remaining in the PAKISTANi Chitral valley of PAKISTAN, and almost certainly the only inhabitant of the Hindu Kush who goes to work wearing a blazer, tie, and polished leather shoes.

He is head teacher of the Sayurj school, which aims to give a high class secular education to boys and girls in an area where religious schools - for boys only - are still the norm.

Langlands has been teaching in PAKISTAN since independence, for much of the time in remote tribal areas, and has been kidnapped and held hostage by tribesmen.

Since the war in AFGHANISTAN, westerners have evacuated the area, but Major Langlands isn't going anywhere.

The people of Chitral have declared that he is under their protection.

Aidan Hartley meets a remarkable man.

0104 LASTMr Chips Of Chitral2005062720051016

At 87, Major Geoffrey Langlands is the only British resident remaining in the PAKISTANi Chitral valley of PAKISTAN, and almost certainly the only inhabitant of the Hindu Kush who goes to work wearing a blazer, tie, and polished leather shoes.

He is head teacher of the Sayurj school, which aims to give a high class secular education to boys and girls in an area where religious schools - for boys only - are still the norm.

Langlands has been teaching in PAKISTAN since independence, for much of the time in remote tribal areas, and has been kidnapped and held hostage by tribesmen.

Since the war in AFGHANISTAN, westerners have evacuated the area, but Major Langlands isn't going anywhere.

The people of Chitral have declared that he is under their protection.

Aidan Hartley meets a remarkable man.