The Piano In Five Pieces

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Episodes

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01Alastair Sooke2012092420130715

In the first of five essays about the piano, art critic Alastair Sooke explores how the piano has infused and informed the fine art world since its first entries onto the world stage over two centuries ago. Nineteenth century artists including Renoir, Matisse, Klimt, Whistler, Cezanne and Van Gogh all painted pianos, and in the twentieth century, Dali too was notoriously infatuated with the piano in all its surreal, Freudian glory.

First broadcast in September 2012.

In the first of five essays about the piano, art critic Alastair Sooke explores how the piano has infused and informed the fine art world since its first entries on to the world stage over two centuries ago. Nineteenth-century artists including Renoir, Matisse, Klimt, Whistler, Cezanne and Van Gogh all painted pianos, and in the twentieth century Dali too was notoriously infatuated with the piano in all its surreal, Freudian glory. Part of the Piano Season on the BBC.

02Stuart Isacoff2012092520130718

Pianist and writer Stuart Isacoff explores how the piano's "four sounds" - melody, rhythm, harmonic chemistry - and its vast dynamic range, have shaped the music over the past 250 years. He mixes the Baroque with the Rock n Roll, comparing Beethoven with Jerry Lee Lewis and Debussy with Jazz pianist Bill Evans, to reveal how piano music transcends traditional chronological categories.

First broadcast in September 2012.

Pianist and writer Stuart Isacoff explores how the piano's "four sounds" - melody, rhythm, harmonic chemistry - and its vast dynamic range, have shaped the music over the past 250 years. He mixes the baroque with rock 'n' roll, comparing Beethoven with Jerry Lee Lewis and Debussy with jazz pianist Bill Evans, to reveal how piano music transcends traditional chronological categories. Part of the Piano Season on the BBC.

03Wendy Cope2012092620130722

The poet Wendy Cope presents a personal look at pianos in her life, from piano music she heard her parents playing, including her father's rendition of Chopsticks, to her memories of childhood piano lessons, and the piano in the school hall as a primary school teacher. Part of the Piano Season on the BBC.

The poet Wendy Cope presents a personal look at pianos in her life, from piano music she heard her parents playing, including her father's rendition of Chopsticks, to her memories of childhood piano lessons, and the piano in the school hall as a primary school teacher.

First broadcast in September 2012.

04Luke Jerram2012092720130724

Artist Luke Jerram has put over 700 pianos across the world, for the public to play as part of his Play Me I'm Yours project. In this essay, he describes how the project has inspired public creativity in cities from London to New York, Budapest and Brazil, as people have rediscovered their love for the humble domestic piano.

First broadcast in September 2012.

Artist Luke Jerram has put over 700 pianos across the world, for the public to play as part of his Play Me I'm Yours project. In this essay, he describes how the project has inspired public creativity in cities from London to New York, Budapest and Brazil, as people have rediscovered their love for the humble domestic piano. Part of the Piano Season on the BBC.

05 LASTSusan Tomes2012092820130725

reveals the pianist's experience of constantly playing unfamiliar instruments on the concert platform. Unlike string and woodwind players, who take their beloved instruments with them, pianists face the unknown as they sit down to perform on unknown pianos. How does this impact on the playing and what surprises does it offer?

First broadcast in September 2012.

reveals the pianist's experience of constantly playing unfamiliar instruments on the concert platform. Unlike string and woodwind players, who take their beloved instruments with them, pianists face the unknown as they sit down to perform on unknown pianos. How does this impact on the playing and what surprises does it offer? Part of the Piano Season the BBC.

Susan Tomes reveals the pianist's experience of constantly playing unfamiliar instruments on the concert platform. Unlike string and woodwind players, who take their beloved instruments with them, pianists face the unknown as they sit down to perform on unknown pianos. How does this impact on the playing and what surprises does it offer? Part of the Piano Season the BBC.