Penguin Post Office

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0120140901

012014090120151229 (R4)

The team boards their yacht Pelagic, designed for the glacial ice fields they encounter.

In October 2013, wildlife cameraman and director Andrew Graham-Brown and assistant producer Ruth Peacey set sail for Antarctica to film the lives of a colony of Gentoo penguins for a BBC Natural World film. Every year the Gentoos return to Port Lockroy which is on a tiny island called Goudier to find a mate and raise their young in the shadow of world's most southerly public Post Office. It was to be one of the most challenging filming trips the team had ever undertaken. Joining them in Antarctica was wildlife cameraman Doug Allan who narrates this series of five programmes which follows the team's adventures. In the first programme, we join them as they board their yacht Pelagic, which with its 12mm steel hull is designed for the glacial ice fields they encounter on their journey south. But fields of ice and giant icebergs are not their only challenge they also have to cross the notorious Drake Passage. Here the unimpeded waves of the vast Southern Ocean squeeze through the relatively narrow, shallow bottleneck of the Drake Passage, resulting in often unpredictable and brutal seas. It's a terrifying ordeal for them all. Producer Sarah Blunt.

0120140901

0120140901

In October 2013, wildlife cameraman and director Andrew Graham-Brown and assistant producer Ruth Peacey set sail for Antarctica to film the lives of a colony of Gentoo penguins for a BBC Natural World film. Every year the Gentoos return to Port Lockroy which is on a tiny island called Goudier to find a mate and raise their young in the shadow of world's most southerly public Post Office. It was to be one of the most challenging filming trips the team had ever undertaken. Joining them in Antarctica was wildlife cameraman Doug Allan who narrates this series of five programmes which follows the team's adventures. In the first programme, we join them as they board their yacht Pelagic, which with its 12mm steel hull is designed for the glacial ice fields they encounter on their journey south. But fields of ice and giant icebergs are not their only challenge they also have to cross the notorious Drake Passage. Here the unimpeded waves of the vast Southern Ocean squeeze through the relatively narrow, shallow bottleneck of the Drake Passage, resulting in often unpredictable and brutal seas. It's a terrifying ordeal for them all. Producer Sarah Blunt.

0220140902

022014090220151230 (R4)

In October 2013, wildlife cameraman and director Andrew Graham-Brown and assistant producer Ruth Peacey set sail for Antarctica to film a colony of Gentoo penguins for a BBC Natural World film which every year return to Port Lockroy on a tiny island called Goudier to find a mate and raise their young in the shadow of world's most southerly public Post Office. It was to be one of the most challenging filming trips they had ever undertaken. Joining them in Antarctica was wildlife cameraman Doug Allan who narrates this series of five programmes which follows the team's adventures. Having survived the notorious Drake Passage, the team have reached the southern oceans but their troubles aren't over. They are surrounded by sea ice and send the first mate up the mast to help navigate a safe journey through the maze. All goes well until a fierce storm takes them by surprise and once again they endure a terrifying journey until they reach Anvers island and sanctuary for the night. Next morning they set off on the last leg of their journey but instead of reaching Port Lockroy are forced to stop within a few hundred metres of Goudier island by yet more dense sea ice. Producer Sarah Blunt.

022014090220151230 (R4)

In October 2013, wildlife cameraman and director Andrew Graham-Brown and assistant producer Ruth Peacey set sail for Antarctica to film a colony of Gentoo penguins for a BBC Natural World film which every year return to Port Lockroy on a tiny island called Goudier to find a mate and raise their young in the shadow of world's most southerly public Post Office. It was to be one of the most challenging filming trips they had ever undertaken. Joining them in Antarctica was wildlife cameraman Doug Allan who narrates this series of five programmes which follows the team's adventures. Having survived the notorious Drake Passage, the team have reached the southern oceans but their troubles aren't over. They are surrounded by sea ice and send the first mate up the mast to help navigate a safe journey through the maze. All goes well until a fierce storm takes them by surprise and once again they endure a terrifying journey until they reach Anvers island and sanctuary for the night. Next morning they set off on the last leg of their journey but instead of reaching Port Lockroy are forced to stop within a few hundred metres of Goudier island by yet more dense sea ice. Producer Sarah Blunt.

0220140902

022014090220151230 (R4)

In October 2013, wildlife cameraman and director Andrew Graham-Brown and assistant producer Ruth Peacey set sail for Antarctica to film a colony of Gentoo penguins for a BBC Natural World film which every year return to Port Lockroy on a tiny island called Goudier to find a mate and raise their young in the shadow of world's most southerly public Post Office. It was to be one of the most challenging filming trips they had ever undertaken. Joining them in Antarctica was wildlife cameraman Doug Allan who narrates this series of five programmes which follows the team's adventures. Having survived the notorious Drake Passage, the team have reached the southern oceans but their troubles aren't over. They are surrounded by sea ice and send the first mate up the mast to help navigate a safe journey through the maze. All goes well until a fierce storm takes them by surprise and once again they endure a terrifying journey until they reach Anvers island and sanctuary for the night. Next morning they set off on the last leg of their journey but instead of reaching Port Lockroy are forced to stop within a few hundred metres of Goudier island by yet more dense sea ice. Producer Sarah Blunt.

022014090220151230 (R4)

In October 2013, wildlife cameraman and director Andrew Graham-Brown and assistant producer Ruth Peacey set sail for Antarctica to film a colony of Gentoo penguins for a BBC Natural World film which every year return to Port Lockroy on a tiny island called Goudier to find a mate and raise their young in the shadow of world's most southerly public Post Office. It was to be one of the most challenging filming trips they had ever undertaken. Joining them in Antarctica was wildlife cameraman Doug Allan who narrates this series of five programmes which follows the team's adventures. Having survived the notorious Drake Passage, the team have reached the southern oceans but their troubles aren't over. They are surrounded by sea ice and send the first mate up the mast to help navigate a safe journey through the maze. All goes well until a fierce storm takes them by surprise and once again they endure a terrifying journey until they reach Anvers island and sanctuary for the night. Next morning they set off on the last leg of their journey but instead of reaching Port Lockroy are forced to stop within a few hundred metres of Goudier island by yet more dense sea ice. Producer Sarah Blunt.

0220140902

In October 2013, wildlife cameraman and director Andrew Graham-Brown and assistant producer Ruth Peacey set sail for Antarctica to film a colony of Gentoo penguins for a BBC Natural World film which every year return to Port Lockroy on a tiny island called Goudier to find a mate and raise their young in the shadow of world's most southerly public Post Office. It was to be one of the most challenging filming trips they had ever undertaken. Joining them in Antarctica was wildlife cameraman Doug Allan who narrates this series of five programmes which follows the team's adventures. Having survived the notorious Drake Passage, the team have reached the southern oceans but their troubles aren't over. They are surrounded by sea ice and send the first mate up the mast to help navigate a safe journey through the maze. All goes well until a fierce storm takes them by surprise and once again they endure a terrifying journey until they reach Anvers island and sanctuary for the night. Next morning they set off on the last leg of their journey but instead of reaching Port Lockroy are forced to stop within a few hundred metres of Goudier island by yet more dense sea ice. Producer Sarah Blunt

0320140903

032014090320151231 (R4)

With their ship locked in ice, the crew attempt to walk across the frozen Antarctic waters

032014090320151231 (R4)

With their ship locked in ice, the crew attempt to walk across the frozen Antarctic waters

0320140903

032014090320151231 (R4)

In October 2013, wildlife cameraman and director Andrew Graham-Brown and assistant producer Ruth Peacey set sail for Antarctica to film a colony of Gentoo penguins for a BBC Natural World film which every year return to Port Lockroy on a tiny island called Goudier to find a mate and raise their young in the shadow of world's most southerly public Post Office. It was to be one of the most challenging filming trips they had ever undertaken. Joining them in Antarctica was wildlife cameraman Doug Allan who narrates this series of five programmes which follows the team's adventures. Having survived the notorious Drake Passage , the team have reached the southern oceans but their troubles aren't over. They are surrounded by sea ice and so have to send the first mate up the mast to help navigate a safe journey through the maze. All goes well until a fierce storm takes them by surprise and once again they endure a terrifying journey until they reach Anvers island and sanctuary for the night. Next morning they set off on the last leg of their journey but instead of reaching Goudier are forced to stop within a few hundred metres by yet more sea ice. Producer Sarah Blunt.

032014090320151231 (R4)

In October 2013, wildlife cameraman and director Andrew Graham-Brown and assistant producer Ruth Peacey set sail for Antarctica to film a colony of Gentoo penguins for a BBC Natural World film which every year return to Port Lockroy on a tiny island called Goudier to find a mate and raise their young in the shadow of world's most southerly public Post Office. It was to be one of the most challenging filming trips they had ever undertaken. Joining them in Antarctica was wildlife cameraman Doug Allan who narrates this series of five programmes which follows the team's adventures. Having survived the notorious Drake Passage , the team have reached the southern oceans but their troubles aren't over. They are surrounded by sea ice and so have to send the first mate up the mast to help navigate a safe journey through the maze. All goes well until a fierce storm takes them by surprise and once again they endure a terrifying journey until they reach Anvers island and sanctuary for the night. Next morning they set off on the last leg of their journey but instead of reaching Goudier are forced to stop within a few hundred metres by yet more sea ice. Producer Sarah Blunt.

0320140903

In October 2013, wildlife cameraman and director Andrew Graham-Brown and assistant producer Ruth Peacey set sail for Antarctica to film a colony of Gentoo penguins for a BBC Natural World film which every year return to Port Lockroy on a tiny island called Goudier to find a mate and raise their young in the shadow of world's most southerly public Post Office. It was to be one of the most challenging filming trips they had ever undertaken. Joining them in Antarctica was wildlife cameraman Doug Allan who narrates this series of five programmes which follows the team's adventures. Having survived the notorious Drake Passage , the team have reached the southern oceans but their troubles aren't over. They are surrounded by sea ice and so have to send the first mate up the mast to help navigate a safe journey through the maze. All goes well until a fierce storm takes them by surprise and once again they endure a terrifying journey until they reach Anvers island and sanctuary for the night. Next morning they set off on the last leg of their journey but instead of reaching Goudier are forced to stop within a few hundred metres by yet more sea ice. Producer Sarah Blunt.

0420140904

042014090420160101 (R4)

Life is tough not only for the penguins, but also for the team filming their lives.

In October 2013, wildlife cameraman and director Andrew Graham-Brown and assistant producer Ruth Peacey set sail for Antarctica to film a colony of Gentoo penguins for a BBC Natural World film which every year return to Port Lockroy on a tiny island called Goudier to find a mate and raise their young in the shadow of world's most southerly public Post Office. It was to be one of the most challenging filming trips they had ever undertaken. Joining them in Antarctica was wildlife cameraman Doug Allan who narrates this series of five programmes which follows the team's adventures. Having finally arrived at Goudier island, the film crew waste no time filming the lives of the Gentoo penguins which return here every year to mate and raise a family. Once they have found their mate, the penguins build nests from small stones which resemble mini volcanoes - to keep the eggs off the ground and keep them dry. Squabbles break out when penguins steal stone from each other's nests. The nesting parents also have to watch out for predators like the skuas which nest on nearby islands and won't hesitate to steal an egg or a chick to feed their own young. As the weeks pass, the reality of life an island with no running water and no electricity begins to take its toll on the team. Producer Sarah Blunt.

0420140904

0420140904

In October 2013, wildlife cameraman and director Andrew Graham-Brown and assistant producer Ruth Peacey set sail for Antarctica to film a colony of Gentoo penguins for a BBC Natural World film which every year return to Port Lockroy on a tiny island called Goudier to find a mate and raise their young in the shadow of world's most southerly public Post Office. It was to be one of the most challenging filming trips they had ever undertaken. Joining them in Antarctica was wildlife cameraman Doug Allan who narrates this series of five programmes which follows the team's adventures. Having finally arrived at Goudier island, the film crew waste no time filming the lives of the Gentoo penguins which return here every year to mate and raise a family. Once they have found their mate, the penguins build nests from small stones which resemble mini volcanoes - to keep the eggs off the ground and keep them dry. Squabbles break out when penguins steal stone from each other's nests. The nesting parents also have to watch out for predators like the skuas which nest on nearby islands and won't hesitate to steal an egg or a chick to feed their own young. As the weeks pass, the reality of life an island with no running water and no electricity begins to take its toll on the team. Producer Sarah Blunt.

0520140905

052014090520160102 (R4)

The young Gentoo penguins prepare to enter the water for the first time.

In October 2013, wildlife cameraman and director Andrew Graham-Brown and assistant producer Ruth Peacey set sail for Antarctica to film a colony of Gentoo penguins for a BBC Natural World film which every year return to Port Lockroy on a tiny island called Goudier to find a mate and raise their young in the shadow of world's most southerly public Post Office. It was to be one of the most challenging filming trips they had ever undertaken. Joining them in Antarctica was wildlife cameraman Doug Allan who narrates this series of five programmes which follows the team's adventures. As the young Gentoo penguins prepare to enter the water for the first time - they face another of life's challenges - leopard seals. These fearsome predators patrol the shores waiting for the young penguins to take their first dive. Doug Allan joins the team to film the hunt that is likely to follow - but Antarctica is an unpredictable place; the bay is filling with ice which deters the seals, the weather becomes worse and time is fast running out before the team must leave Antarctica and head for home. Producer Sarah Blunt.

0520140905

05 LAST20140905

In October 2013, wildlife cameraman and director Andrew Graham-Brown and assistant producer Ruth Peacey set sail for Antarctica to film a colony of Gentoo penguins for a BBC Natural World film which every year return to Port Lockroy on a tiny island called Goudier to find a mate and raise their young in the shadow of world's most southerly public Post Office. It was to be one of the most challenging filming trips they had ever undertaken. Joining them in Antarctica was wildlife cameraman Doug Allan who narrates this series of five programmes which follows the team's adventures. As the young Gentoo penguins prepare to enter the water for the first time - they face another of life's challenges - leopard seals. These fearsome predators patrol the shores waiting for the young penguins to take their first dive. Doug Allan joins the team to film the hunt that is likely to follow - but Antarctica is an unpredictable place; the bay is filling with ice which deters the seals, the weather becomes worse and time is fast running out before the team must leave Antarctica and head for home. Producer Sarah Blunt.