Patient Progress

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Strokes20030917

are the greatest single cause of severe disability in the UK. They're caused by an area of the brain being deprived of its blood supply for so long that the cells become damaged and die. They can affect people of all ages, from all backgrounds, of all talents, and they have been documented since the fifth century BC. In this two part series, poignant personal tales and modern medicine meet literature, as the accounts of stroke patients and those who have cared for them, are interwoven with the words of doctors and therapists seeking to aid the rehabilitation of people following a stroke. 1/2: A Life-Altering Event Each year, 130 000 people in Britain suffer a stroke. But at present, stroke care in Britain has a long way to go. The Royal College of Physicians estimates that over 6000 of those stroke victims are dying, and a similar number left disabled, because they do not have sufficient access to a dedicated stroke unit. Isabel Fraser hears of the confusion, frustration and anger that both patients and their families, and doctors feel at the inadequate provision of stroke services. However, there is also hope for the future - improvements are being made with new research enabling doctors to save lives with better drugs and therapies. Patients and their families also tell Isabel about the aftermath of stroke - what it's like for a stroke survivor and their family when they return home; often a different person. For many, realizing the enormity of what has happened is a huge challenge, and post-stroke DEPRESSION is very common. Isabel meets people who have fought to overcome DEPRESSION after suffering a stroke, and who are leading full lives once more.

03Tombstone Tangles And Landfill Plaques19990817

3:`Tombstone Tangles and Landfill Plaques'. Sue Armstrong reveals cutting-edge research into Alzheimer's disease. The brain contains sticky plaques of debris and the tangled remains of nerve cells. The link between them may reveal hidden secrets of this dementia.

04Losing It19990824

`Losing It'. Sue Armstrong continues her exploration into the biology of Alzheimer's disease. She investigates genetic and environmental risk factors and reveals the latest findings in diagnosis and treatment.

198C01The Guardian Angel Gene19980818

`The Guardian Angel Gene'.

In the first of four programmes, Sue Armstrong investigates the latest medical research into what causes cancer at a cellular level.

One of the most promising lines of enquiry centres on a tumour-suppressing gene which is now the most widely studied gene in cell biology.

198C02Intelligent Therapies19980825

`Intelligent Therapies'.

In the second of four programmes, Sue Armstrong explores cutting-edge developments in the management and treatment of cancer.

198C03Prisoners Of Pleasure19980901

`Prisoners of Pleasure'.

In the third of four programmes, Sue Armstrong discovers why some people become addicted to drugs while others are able to walk away.

Cutting-edge science, both in Britain and in the USA, is teasing apart the genes that may be responsible for addiction, while new imaging work reveals important changes in the brains of addicts.

198C04Natural Born Swillers19980908

Sue Armstrong explores the biology of alcoholism.

As leading scientists unravel the biochemistry of complex brain circuits, they are gaining a more detailed understanding of what happens to us when we drink alcohol.

199C01A Biological Heresy19990727

A two-part medical programme.

1: `A Biological Heresy'.

Sue Armstrong reveals cutting-edge research into spongiform encephalopathy and reveals how rogue prions may be at the root of a new variant of CJD.

199C02Lethal Protein19990803

A two-part medical programme.

2: `Lethal Protein'.

The origin of new variant CJD and its route of infection come under scrutiny as Sue Armstrong continues her review of the cutting-edge research into this most baffling of new diseases.

200D01Stressed Out20001003

A two-part medical programme.

1: Sue Armstrong measures the impact of stress on our bodies and minds.

As stress-related complaints increase hugely, scientists are discovering that the toll taken by stress can last a lifetime.

200D02Stressed Out20001010

A two-part medical programme.

Sue Armstrong finds out why psychologists think our stress levels are rising, and asks what we should do to stay in control.

201A01Stressed Out20010110

A two-part medical programme.

1: Sue Armstrong assesses the impact of stress on our bodies and minds.

As stress-related complaints increase hugely, scientists are discovering that the toll taken by stress can last a lifetime.

201A02Stressed Out20010117

A two-part medical programme.

Sue Armstrong finds out why psychologists think our stress levels are rising, and asks what we should do to stay in control.