Pastures New

With agriculture often in the news, stories of farmers moving abroad in search of a better life are becoming increasingly common. In this series, the sheep farmer and countryman Johnny Scott meets British farming families who have relocated to FRANCE, CANADA and New Zealand. He investigates why they went and what they've found - and asks whether the grass really is greener on the other side?

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Lancashire To France2004020220041128

Mark and Julie Dewhurst recently exchanged a small dairy farm in Lancashire for a bigger one in the heart of FRANCE. How are they coping with farming and rural life in another country and a different language? (the first broadcast was delayed by 5 minutes due to a fire alarm).

02Northern Ireland To Canada2004020920041205

Until two years ago, the Dunlop family's home was a 300 acre vegetable farm in the rolling countryside of Northern IRELAND. Now it's a 2000 acre cereal farm on the Saskatchewan prairies, in the heart of the Canadian grain belt, where the land is under snow for half the year. How are they dealing with a different kind of farming in an unfamiliar country, and with the extremes of temperature?

03 LAST20041212

Jim and Jean Davidson farmed on the Scottish borders on land that had been in the family for generations. At the beginning of 2003 they fulfilled their dream of emigrating to New Zealand and now own a sheep farm in the Wairerapa region of North Island. How are they and their three children meeting the challenge of their new life on the other side of the world and what are their hopes for the future?

03 LASTNew Zealand20040216

Jean and Jim Davidson farmed on the Scottish borders on land that had been in the family for generations. After years of disillusionment with farming in the UK they fulfilled a long-term dream of Jim's and emigrated to New Zealand at the end of 2002. They now own a sheep farm in the beautiful Wairerapa region of North Island. One of their three children has special needs and this has made their decision to leave family and friends particularly challenging. One year on, how are they meeting that challenge and what are their hopes for the future?