Parting Shots

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
Comments
GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940418]

A series of "audio notelets" from

Julian Critchley , MP, to his successor Gerald Howarth , helped by his friends Michael Heseltine and Lord Howe. 1: How Not to Get Involved in Politics. Saucy goings-on at the Sorbonne. Producer Jane Ray

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940418]

Unknown: Julian Critchley

Unknown: Gerald Howarth

Unknown: Michael Heseltine

Producer: Jane Ray

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940425]

A series of "audio notelets" from Julian Critchley , MP for Aldershot, to his successor Gerald Howarth.

2:How Notto Be an MP. Harold Macmillan 's advice to Oswald Mosley , the Profumo scandal and how to flatter the whips. Producer Jane Ray

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940425]

Unknown: Julian Critchley

Unknown: Gerald Howarth.

Unknown: Harold MacMillan

Unknown: Oswald Mosley

Producer: Jane Ray

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940502]

"Audio notelets" from Julian Critchley , MP, to his successor Gerald Howarth.

3: How Not to Become a Knight of the Shire. TheThatcheryears, in which Julian likens Margaret's legs to those of a Jack Russell terrier and now ponders on what might have been if only he'd been able to keep such observations to himself. Producer Jane Ray

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940502]

Unknown: Julian Critchley

Unknown: Gerald Howarth.

Unknown: Jack Russell

Producer: Jane Ray

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940509]

Last of the "audio notelets" from Julian Critchley

, MP for Aldershot, to his successor Gerald Howarth.

How Not to Retire Gracefully. The 1990 leadership contest, how John Major failed an agility test, a gentlemanly ticking-off from John Biffen , and a park bench in Aldershot.

Producer Jane Ray

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940509]

Unknown: Julian Critchley

Unknown: Gerald Howarth.

Unknown: John Major

Unknown: John Biffen

Producer: Jane Ray

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320091103
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420091110
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5 LAST20091117
010120091020

Matthew Parris marks the passing of the valedictory despatch, the traditional final telegram home in which British ambassadors could let their hair down and settle a few scores.

The series features newly declassified Foreign Office files alongside interviews with the diplomats who wrote them.

Matthew delves into the archives to find valedictories in which ambassadors heading into retirement poked fun at foreign nations where they had served.

Valedictories in which retiring ambassadors poked fun at the nations where they had served.

010120091020

Matthew Parris marks the passing of the valedictory despatch, the traditional final telegram home in which British ambassadors could let their hair down and settle a few scores.

The series features newly declassified Foreign Office files alongside interviews with the diplomats who wrote them.

Matthew delves into the archives to find valedictories in which ambassadors heading into retirement poked fun at foreign nations where they had served.

Valedictories in which retiring ambassadors poked fun at the nations where they had served.

0102*20091027

Matthew Parris marks the passing of the valedictory despatch, the traditional final telegram home in which British ambassadors could let their hair down and settle a few scores.

The series features newly declassified Foreign Office files alongside interviews with the diplomats who wrote them.

How successful diplomacy requires an ambassador to both see beyond the shortcomings of their foreign hosts and persuade them to look kindly on our own.

How diplomacy requires an ambassador to see beyond the shortcomings of foreign hosts.

0102*20091027

Matthew Parris marks the passing of the valedictory despatch, the traditional final telegram home in which British ambassadors could let their hair down and settle a few scores.

The series features newly declassified Foreign Office files alongside interviews with the diplomats who wrote them.

How successful diplomacy requires an ambassador to both see beyond the shortcomings of their foreign hosts and persuade them to look kindly on our own.

How diplomacy requires an ambassador to see beyond the shortcomings of foreign hosts.

010320091103

Matthew Parris marks the passing of the valedictory despatch, the traditional final telegram home in which British ambassadors could let their hair down and settle a few scores.

The series features newly declassified Foreign Office files alongside interviews with the diplomats who wrote them.

The privations of embassy life.

In their valedictories, diplomats recount the hardships of foreign service - rat infested rooms, defunct plumbing and death threats.

In their valedictories, diplomats recount the hardships of foreign service.

010320091103

Matthew Parris marks the passing of the valedictory despatch, the traditional final telegram home in which British ambassadors could let their hair down and settle a few scores.

The series features newly declassified Foreign Office files alongside interviews with the diplomats who wrote them.

The privations of embassy life.

In their valedictories, diplomats recount the hardships of foreign service - rat infested rooms, defunct plumbing and death threats.

In their valedictories, diplomats recount the hardships of foreign service.

0104*20091110

Matthew Parris marks the passing of the valedictory despatch, the traditional final telegram home in which British ambassadors could let their hair down and settle a few scores.

The series features newly declassified Foreign Office files alongside interviews with the diplomats who wrote them.

Despatches which changed the course of history, including Nicholas Henderson's 1979 valedictory lament to a Britain 'poor and unproud', in economic decline and losing ground to her European rivals.

Despatches which changed the course of history.

0104*20091110

Matthew Parris marks the passing of the valedictory despatch, the traditional final telegram home in which British ambassadors could let their hair down and settle a few scores.

The series features newly declassified Foreign Office files alongside interviews with the diplomats who wrote them.

Despatches which changed the course of history, including Nicholas Henderson's 1979 valedictory lament to a Britain 'poor and unproud', in economic decline and losing ground to her European rivals.

Despatches which changed the course of history.

0105 LAST20091117

Matthew Parris marks the passing of the valedictory despatch, the traditional final telegram home in which British ambassadors could let their hair down and settle a few scores.

The series features newly declassified Foreign Office files alongside interviews with the diplomats who wrote them.

Valedictories which embarrassed ministers.

Featuring interviews with Sir Ivor Roberts, whose 2006 valedictory led to the Foreign Office banning their circulation, and Sir Peter Ricketts, head of the Diplomatic Service.

Matthew Parris on valedictories which embarrassed ministers.

0105 LAST20091117

Matthew Parris marks the passing of the valedictory despatch, the traditional final telegram home in which British ambassadors could let their hair down and settle a few scores.

The series features newly declassified Foreign Office files alongside interviews with the diplomats who wrote them.

Valedictories which embarrassed ministers.

Featuring interviews with Sir Ivor Roberts, whose 2006 valedictory led to the Foreign Office banning their circulation, and Sir Peter Ricketts, head of the Diplomatic Service.

Matthew Parris on valedictories which embarrassed ministers.

21

2120100929

Matthew Parris returns with more revealing despatches from Foreign Office archives in a new series celebrating diplomacy's least diplomatic tradition.

Until 2006, a British ambassador departing a foreign capital would write a valedictory despatch, a candid and often very funny report summing up their time at the post. Ambassadors heading into retirement would reflect back on their whole career; an elegant formal equivalent of the unguarded speeches one sometimes hears at office leaving-dos.

During a stint as a desk officer in the diplomatic service in the 1970s, one of Matthew Parris' duties was to copy the most celebrated despatches and - to those with the appropriate security clearance - circulate them across Whitehall.

As classified documents these reports were never intended for prying eyes, but by returning to the Freedom of Information process and to the National Archives the programme team have unearthed a fresh treasure trove of this glorious tradition of indiscretion.

In this programme, foreigners are once more the butt of the jokes, as ambassadors cast an unsparing eye over the national characteristics of their unwitting overseas hosts.

Also in this episode, we look at how diplomats in years gone by paid tribute in their valedictories to their wives - the famous 'trailing spouse' who sacrifices her own career to act as unpaid cook, cleaner and hotel manager in embassy residences from Cairo to Kathmandu.

Producer: Andrew Bryson.

. Matthew Parris returns with more undiplomatic reports from departing British ambassadors.

020120100929

Matthew Parris returns with more revealing despatches from Foreign Office archives in a new series celebrating diplomacy's least diplomatic tradition.

Until 2006, a British ambassador departing a foreign capital would write a valedictory despatch, a candid and often very funny report summing up their time at the post.

Ambassadors heading into retirement would reflect back on their whole career; an elegant formal equivalent of the unguarded speeches one sometimes hears at office leaving-dos.

During a stint as a desk officer in the diplomatic service in the 1970s, one of Matthew Parris' duties was to copy the most celebrated despatches and - to those with the appropriate security clearance - circulate them across Whitehall.

As classified documents these reports were never intended for prying eyes, but by returning to the Freedom of Information process and to the National Archives the programme team have unearthed a fresh treasure trove of this glorious tradition of indiscretion.

In this programme, foreigners are once more the butt of the jokes, as ambassadors cast an unsparing eye over the national characteristics of their unwitting overseas hosts.

Also in this episode, we look at how diplomats in years gone by paid tribute in their valedictories to their wives - the famous 'trailing spouse' who sacrifices her own career to act as unpaid cook, cleaner and hotel manager in embassy residences from Cairo to Kathmandu.

Producer: Andrew Bryson.

Matthew Parris returns with more undiplomatic reports from departing British ambassadors.

020120100929

Matthew Parris returns with more revealing despatches from Foreign Office archives in a new series celebrating diplomacy's least diplomatic tradition.

Until 2006, a British ambassador departing a foreign capital would write a valedictory despatch, a candid and often very funny report summing up their time at the post.

Ambassadors heading into retirement would reflect back on their whole career; an elegant formal equivalent of the unguarded speeches one sometimes hears at office leaving-dos.

During a stint as a desk officer in the diplomatic service in the 1970s, one of Matthew Parris' duties was to copy the most celebrated despatches and - to those with the appropriate security clearance - circulate them across Whitehall.

As classified documents these reports were never intended for prying eyes, but by returning to the Freedom of Information process and to the National Archives the programme team have unearthed a fresh treasure trove of this glorious tradition of indiscretion.

In this programme, foreigners are once more the butt of the jokes, as ambassadors cast an unsparing eye over the national characteristics of their unwitting overseas hosts.

Also in this episode, we look at how diplomats in years gone by paid tribute in their valedictories to their wives - the famous 'trailing spouse' who sacrifices her own career to act as unpaid cook, cleaner and hotel manager in embassy residences from Cairo to Kathmandu.

Producer: Andrew Bryson.

Matthew Parris returns with more undiplomatic reports from departing British ambassadors.

22Cold Warriors and the perils of forecasting

22Cold Warriors and the perils of forecasting20101006

Matthew Parris opens classified Foreign Office files to discover valedictory despatches from behind the Iron Curtain. British diplomats used the traditional last telegram home from a foreign post to recount the strains of life under Communism - and its occasional upsides.

The programme reveals landmark despatches from Britain's last ambassadors to the Soviet Union, released for the first time under Freedom of Information, as well as a wealth of earlier material from the depths of the Cold War.

This episode also looks at the perils of forecasting; the valedictory was a place where ambassadors would chance their arm with predictions about the direction of future events abroad.

Producer: Andrew Bryson.

. Matthew Parris reveals the final despatches from British diplomats behind the Iron Curtain

0202Cold Warriors And The Perils Of Forecasting20101006

Matthew Parris opens classified Foreign Office files to discover valedictory despatches from behind the Iron Curtain.

British diplomats used the traditional last telegram home from a foreign post to recount the strains of life under Communism - and its occasional upsides.

The programme reveals landmark despatches from Britain's last ambassadors to the Soviet Union, released for the first time under Freedom of Information, as well as a wealth of earlier material from the depths of the Cold War.

This episode also looks at the perils of forecasting; the valedictory was a place where ambassadors would chance their arm with predictions about the direction of future events abroad.

Producer: Andrew Bryson.

Matthew Parris reveals the final despatches from British diplomats behind the Iron Curtain.

0202Cold Warriors And The Perils Of Forecasting20101006

Matthew Parris opens classified Foreign Office files to discover valedictory despatches from behind the Iron Curtain.

British diplomats used the traditional last telegram home from a foreign post to recount the strains of life under Communism - and its occasional upsides.

The programme reveals landmark despatches from Britain's last ambassadors to the Soviet Union, released for the first time under Freedom of Information, as well as a wealth of earlier material from the depths of the Cold War.

This episode also looks at the perils of forecasting; the valedictory was a place where ambassadors would chance their arm with predictions about the direction of future events abroad.

Producer: Andrew Bryson.

Matthew Parris reveals the final despatches from British diplomats behind the Iron Curtain.

23The sun sets on Empire

23The sun sets on Empire20101013

Despatches from diplomats in the last outposts of Empire capture the dying days of British rule. With Matthew Parris.

The valedictory despatch - an open letter to the Foreign Secretary which for decades British diplomats would send before leaving an overseas post - was often a platform for bittersweet reflection about the past.

During the period of decolonisation, many Ambassadors and High Commissioners expressed misgivings about the manner in which Britain was shedding its imperial role. In this programme, diplomats from the old school argue the case for the Empire as a force for good, and bemoan the unseemly haste with which Britain hauled down the flag in colonies across Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

Producer: Andrew Bryson.

. Valedictory despatches from the last outposts of the British Empire. With Matthew Parris.

0203The Sun Sets On Empire20101013

Despatches from diplomats in the last outposts of Empire capture the dying days of British rule.

With Matthew Parris.

The valedictory despatch - an open letter to the Foreign Secretary which for decades British diplomats would send before leaving an overseas post - was often a platform for bittersweet reflection about the past.

During the period of decolonisation, many Ambassadors and High Commissioners expressed misgivings about the manner in which Britain was shedding its imperial role.

In this programme, diplomats from the old school argue the case for the Empire as a force for good, and bemoan the unseemly haste with which Britain hauled down the flag in colonies across Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

Producer: Andrew Bryson.

Valedictory despatches from the last outposts of the British Empire.

0203The Sun Sets On Empire20101013

Despatches from diplomats in the last outposts of Empire capture the dying days of British rule.

With Matthew Parris.

The valedictory despatch - an open letter to the Foreign Secretary which for decades British diplomats would send before leaving an overseas post - was often a platform for bittersweet reflection about the past.

During the period of decolonisation, many Ambassadors and High Commissioners expressed misgivings about the manner in which Britain was shedding its imperial role.

In this programme, diplomats from the old school argue the case for the Empire as a force for good, and bemoan the unseemly haste with which Britain hauled down the flag in colonies across Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

Producer: Andrew Bryson.

Valedictory despatches from the last outposts of the British Empire.