Our Lives In Our Hands

Two people directly affected by the chronic illnesses; Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and breast cancer, explore the realities of living with their disease and investigate science breakthroughs that could potentially transform their lives. They put questions to scientists at the cutting edge of conventional medicine and those working on so-called 'novel' approaches to disease. How far have scientists actually progressed and which avenues hold the most promise?

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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Asthma, Living On A Knife Edge20060222

Jenny Negus is 29 and one of 2.6m people in the UK who suffer from severe asthma. She is regularly in hospital and still lives at home with her parents. Jenny reacts badly to steroids and is desperate to find an alternative. She visits leading doctors and researchers to see how much progress has been made in investigating and treating severe asthma. What are the new vaccines and inhibitors, and could vitamin D prove an unlikely cure?

Lupus, The Misunderstood Epidemic20060215

In her twenties, Jane Robinson was diagnosed with Lupus, a disease which is more common than MS. It is also the most widespread, but least frequently diagnosed, form of arthritis. Now in her thirties, Jane meets top scientists to explore the realities of living with the disease and investigates the science breakthroughs that could potentially transform her life.

01Waiting For Daniel20041201

We meet Linda Balls, whose brother died from Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy when he was thirteen. Now her 3-year-old son has developed the terminal disease. Here she meets top scientists to explore the realities of living with their disease and investigate science breakthroughs that could potentially transform their lives.

02 LAST20041208

A woman whose twin sister was diagnosed with breast cancer 8 years ago discusses the devastating effects of living with a potential genetic time-bomb.