Other Times, Other Places

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
Comments
Symphonic Metamorphosis19970802

The third of four programmes in which Jonathan Swain explores the differences and developments and instrumental tone and playing styles throughout the century. This programme focuses on the United States, a country famous for its virtuoso orchestras, and includes George Szell in Cleveland conducting Hindemith's `Symphonic Metamorphosis', Rachmaninov's `Isle of the Dead' from the Boston Symphony Orchestra under Serge Koussevitzky, and, at 11.15, Fritz Reiner's celebrated Chicago recording of Bartok's `Concerto for Orchestra'.

The Changing Sounds Of The World's Great Orchestras19970809

The last of four programmes in which Jonathan Swain explores the differences and developments in instrumental tone and playing styles throughout the century, contrasting orchestras from various countries and periods. Orchestras in this country have been praised for doing justice to the music in a self-denying team spirit. This programme looks at the teamwork and the trendsetters in British orchestral playing, with Elgar, Holst and Vaughan Williams conducting their own music, Sir Adrian Boult conducting Wagner, Andre Previn conducting Rachmaninov, and, from 11.30, Thomas Beecham and John Barbirolli conducting Delius.

The Tempest19970726

The second of four programmes in which Jonathan Swain explores the differences and developments and instrumental tone and playing styles throughout the century. This programme focuses on orchestral playing in the Czech Republic and Russia, drawing on the recorded legacy of the Czech Philharmonic and comparing the orchestras of Moscow and St Petersburg in the Soviet and post-Soviet eras. It includes Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms from Karel Ancerl, Yevgeni Mravinsky conducting Bruckner, and at 11.30 Tchaikovsky's `The Tempest' from Yevgeni Svetlanov and the USSR Symphony Orchestra.

01 OF 4The Sorcerer19970719

Four programmes in which Jonathan Swain explores the differences and developments and instrumental tone and playing styles throughout the century. The first programme focuses on some of the great European orchestras - the Berlin Philharmonic, the Vienna Philharmonic, the Royal Concertgebouw of Amsterdam and the Dresden Staatskapelle. The music includes `The Sorcerer's Apprentice' by Dukas, in performances conducted by Ernest Ansermet and James Levine; Strauss's `Don Juan' from Rudolf Kempe in Dresden; Willem Mengelberg in music by Wagner; and at 11.20, Cesar Franck's Symphony in D minor, conducted in Paris by Thomas Beecham.