The Other Empire

Episodes

EpisodeFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
012011091220120910

Julian Jackson uncovers the forgotten - and indeed in this country largely unknown - story of the French Empire. In the first of five Essays, he tells the story of France's first war of decolonisation, a slave rebellion in Haiti, sparked off by the French revolution in Paris and led by the charismatic Toussaint L'Ouverture.

The French Empire was second only to the British. At its peak in the 1930s it covered some 10 million square miles with a population of 100 million. It stretched from the West Indies to the South Pacific, from Indo-China to the Maghreb, from Sub-Saharan Africa to the Levant. The Empire may be gone now but its legacy lives on both in France and in the former colonies. With a Muslim population of 4.5 million today, France, thanks to her former Empire, has the largest Islamic population of any country in Europe; couscous is as much national dish as coq au vin (or chicken vindaloo in Britain). And with recent turbulent events in Africa and the Middle East reminding the French and us of the importance of these former links, this is a story that is worth telling in some detail.

France's imperial story which ended with the Algerian War of the 1950s in fact started over a century earlier with the first war of decolonization in the French sugar colony of St Domingue - now Haiti - in the Caribbean. A slave rebellion there, led by Toussaint L'Ouverture, resulted in his eventual capture by Napoleon, and death in a jail in the French Jura. But despite his capture, in the end the revolution was successful, 50,000 French troops perished, Napoleon suffered his first ever defeat and Haiti became independent in 1804

Producer: Simon Elmes

First broadcast in September 2011.

Julian Jackson explores France's first war of decolonisation: a slave rebellion in Haiti.

022011091320120911

Julian Jackson uncovers the forgotten - and indeed in this country largely unknown - story of the French Empire. In the second of five Essays, he tells the story of France's involvement in sub-Saharan Africa.

The French Empire was second only to the British. At its peak in the 1930s it covered some 10 million square miles with a population of 100 million. It stretched from the West Indies to the South Pacific, from Indo-China to the Maghreb, from Sub-Saharan Africa to the Levant. The Empire may be gone now but its legacy lives on both in France and in the former colonies. With a Muslim population of 4.5 million today, France, thanks to her former Empire, has the largest Islamic population of any country in Europe; couscous is as much national dish as coq au vin (or chicken vindaloo in Britain). And with recent turbulent events in Africa and the Middle East reminding the French and us of the importance of these former links, this is a story that is worth telling in some detail.

The inheritance of France's sub-Saharan empire in Africa is complex: What was once the Upper Volta, then part of French Sudan, then part of Niger in 1927, then divided up between Cote d'Ivoire, Sudan and Niger, then (1947) Upper Volta again - and is now Burkina Faso. The arbitrary divisions imposed by the French - are of course part of the reasons for the difficult history of this region ever since...

Producer: Simon Elmes.

Julian Jackson uncovers the forgotten - and indeed in this country largely unknown - story of the French Empire. In the second of five Essays, he tells the story of France's involvement in sub-Saharan Africa.

The French Empire was second only to the British. At its peak in the 1930s it covered some 10 million square miles with a population of 100 million. It stretched from the West Indies to the South Pacific, from Indo-China to the Maghreb, from Sub-Saharan Africa to the Levant. The Empire may be gone now but its legacy lives on both in France and in the former colonies. With a Muslim population of 4.5 million today, France, thanks to her former Empire, has the largest Islamic population of any country in Europe; couscous is as much national dish as coq au vin (or chicken vindaloo in Britain). And with recent turbulent events in Africa and the Middle East reminding the French and us of the importance of these former links, this is a story that is worth telling in some detail.

The inheritance of France's sub-Saharan empire in Africa is complex: What was once the Upper Volta, then part of French Sudan, then part of Niger in 1927, then divided up between Cote d'Ivoire, Sudan and Niger, then (1947) Upper Volta again - and is now Burkina Faso. The arbitrary divisions imposed by the French - are of course part of the reasons for the difficult history of this region ever since...

Producer: Simon Elmes.

Julian Jackson uncovers the forgotten - and indeed in this country largely unknown - story of the French Empire.

In the second of five Essays, he tells the story of France's involvement in sub-Saharan Africa.

The French Empire was second only to the British.

At its peak in the 1930s it covered some 10 million square miles with a population of 100 million.

It stretched from the West Indies to the South Pacific, from Indo-China to the Maghreb, from Sub-Saharan Africa to the Levant.

The Empire may be gone now but its legacy lives on both in France and in the former colonies.

With a Muslim population of 4.5 million today, France, thanks to her former Empire, has the largest Islamic population of any country in Europe; couscous is as much national dish as coq au vin (or chicken vindaloo in Britain).

And with recent turbulent events in Africa and the Middle East reminding the French and us of the importance of these former links, this is a story that is worth telling in some detail.

The inheritance of France's sub-Saharan empire in Africa is complex: What was once the Upper Volta, then part of French Sudan, then part of Niger in 1927, then divided up between Cote d'Ivoire, Sudan and Niger, then (1947) Upper Volta again - and is now Burkina Faso.

The arbitrary divisions imposed by the French - are of course part of the reasons for the difficult history of this region ever since...

Julian Jackson tells the story of France's involvement in sub-Saharan Africa.

032011091420120912

Julian Jackson uncovers the forgotten - and indeed in this country largely unknown - story of the French Empire. In the third of five Essays, he tells the story of the imperial troops who fought for France in two world wars.

The French Empire was second only to the British. At its peak in the 1930s it covered some 10 million square miles with a population of 100 million. It stretched from the West Indies to the South Pacific, from Indo-China to the Maghreb, from Sub-Saharan Africa to the Levant. The Empire may be gone now but its legacy lives on both in France and in the former colonies. With a Muslim population of 4.5 million today, France, thanks to her former Empire, has the largest Islamic population of any country in Europe; couscous is as much national dish as coq au vin (or chicken vindaloo in Britain). And with recent turbulent events in Africa and the Middle East reminding the French and us of the importance of these former links, this is a story that is worth telling in some detail.

The armies lauded by de Gaulle on his triumphant return to Paris in 1944, who had liberated Italy and southern France were largely made up of black and North African troops. But this was not true of the French troops that helped liberate Paris because the British, American and Free French had all colluded in ensuring that those troops were white.Tonight, Julian focuses on the vital importance played by colonial troops in the French armies - both in the conquest of other parts of the Empire but also in the First and Second World Wars.

Producer: Simon Elmes.

Julian Jackson uncovers the forgotten - and indeed in this country largely unknown - story of the French Empire.

In the third of five Essays, he tells the story of the imperial troops who fought for France in two world wars.

The French Empire was second only to the British.

At its peak in the 1930s it covered some 10 million square miles with a population of 100 million.

It stretched from the West Indies to the South Pacific, from Indo-China to the Maghreb, from Sub-Saharan Africa to the Levant.

The Empire may be gone now but its legacy lives on both in France and in the former colonies.

With a Muslim population of 4.5 million today, France, thanks to her former Empire, has the largest Islamic population of any country in Europe; couscous is as much national dish as coq au vin (or chicken vindaloo in Britain).

And with recent turbulent events in Africa and the Middle East reminding the French and us of the importance of these former links, this is a story that is worth telling in some detail.

The armies lauded by de Gaulle on his triumphant return to Paris in 1944, who had liberated Italy and southern France were largely made up of black and North African troops.

But this was not true of the French troops that helped liberate Paris because the British, American and Free French had all colluded in ensuring that those troops were white.Tonight, Julian focuses on the vital importance played by colonial troops in the French armies - both in the conquest of other parts of the Empire but also in the First and Second World Wars.

Julian Jackson discusses the imperial troops who fought for France in two world wars.

042011091520120913

Julian Jackson uncovers the forgotten - and indeed in this country largely unknown - story of the French Empire. In the fourth of five Essays, he tells the story of France's involvement in Indo-China - Cambodia, Laos and of course, Vietnam.

The French Empire was second only to the British. At its peak in the 1930s it covered some 10 million square miles with a population of 100 million. It stretched from the West Indies to the South Pacific, from Indo-China to the Maghreb, from Sub-Saharan Africa to the Levant. The Empire may be gone now but its legacy lives on both in France and in the former colonies. With a Muslim population of 4.5 million today, France, thanks to her former Empire, has the largest Islamic population of any country in Europe; couscous is as much national dish as coq au vin (or chicken vindaloo in Britain). And with recent turbulent events in Africa and the Middle East reminding the French and us of the importance of these former links, this is a story that is worth telling in some detail.

The beginnings of the French Empire in Indo-China in the Far East were in the 1880s.This was France's most productive colony, especially the rubber industry. Julian tells the story of that achievement and eventual collapse as a result of the Japanese successes in the Far East. France's far eastern adventure ended in disaster in 1954 with the terrible battle of Dien Bien Phu: France's most catastrophic colonial defeat.

Producer: Simon Elmes.

Julian Jackson uncovers the forgotten - and indeed in this country largely unknown - story of the French Empire.

In the fourth of five Essays, he tells the story of France's involvement in Indo-China - Cambodia, Laos and of course, Vietnam.

The French Empire was second only to the British.

At its peak in the 1930s it covered some 10 million square miles with a population of 100 million.

It stretched from the West Indies to the South Pacific, from Indo-China to the Maghreb, from Sub-Saharan Africa to the Levant.

The Empire may be gone now but its legacy lives on both in France and in the former colonies.

With a Muslim population of 4.5 million today, France, thanks to her former Empire, has the largest Islamic population of any country in Europe; couscous is as much national dish as coq au vin (or chicken vindaloo in Britain).

And with recent turbulent events in Africa and the Middle East reminding the French and us of the importance of these former links, this is a story that is worth telling in some detail.

The beginnings of the French Empire in Indo-China in the Far East were in the 1880s.This was France's most productive colony, especially the rubber industry.

Julian tells the story of that achievement and eventual collapse as a result of the Japanese successes in the Far East.

France's far eastern adventure ended in disaster in 1954 with the terrible battle of Dien Bien Phu: France's most catastrophic colonial defeat.

Julian Jackson focuses on France's involvement in Indo-China - Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam.

05 LAST2011091620120914

Julian Jackson uncovers the forgotten - and indeed in this country largely unknown - story of the French Empire. In the last of five Essays, he tells the story of France's last great colonial crisis that sowed the seeds for decades of racial tension at home that still endures today.

The French Empire was second only to the British. At its peak in the 1930s it covered some 10 million square miles with a population of 100 million. It stretched from the West Indies to the South Pacific, from Indo-China to the Maghreb, from Sub-Saharan Africa to the Levant. The Empire may be gone now but its legacy lives on both in France and in the former colonies. With a Muslim population of 4.5 million today, France, thanks to her former Empire, has the largest Islamic population of any country in Europe; couscous is as much national dish as coq au vin (or chicken vindaloo in Britain). And with recent turbulent events in Africa and the Middle East reminding the French and us of the importance of these former links, this is a story that is worth telling in some detail.

Tunisia and Morocco had been granted independence relatively easily in 1950s because they were technically only protectorates while Algeria with a white population of over a million was seen as an integral part of France. What also made the Algerian war so bloody and painful was the way the army used torture to break the resistance. Julian explains how this became a crisis of conscience for the French: having been the victims of Nazi torture in WWII they are now the torturers...

Producer: Simon Elmes.

Julian Jackson uncovers the forgotten - and indeed in this country largely unknown - story of the French Empire.

In the last of five Essays, he tells the story of France's last great colonial crisis that sowed the seeds for decades of racial tension at home that still endures today.

The French Empire was second only to the British.

At its peak in the 1930s it covered some 10 million square miles with a population of 100 million.

It stretched from the West Indies to the South Pacific, from Indo-China to the Maghreb, from Sub-Saharan Africa to the Levant.

The Empire may be gone now but its legacy lives on both in France and in the former colonies.

With a Muslim population of 4.5 million today, France, thanks to her former Empire, has the largest Islamic population of any country in Europe; couscous is as much national dish as coq au vin (or chicken vindaloo in Britain).

And with recent turbulent events in Africa and the Middle East reminding the French and us of the importance of these former links, this is a story that is worth telling in some detail.

Tunisia and Morocco had been granted independence relatively easily in 1950s because they were technically only protectorates while Algeria with a white population of over a million was seen as an integral part of France.

What also made the Algerian war so bloody and painful was the way the army used torture to break the resistance.

Julian explains how this became a crisis of conscience for the French: having been the victims of Nazi torture in WWII they are now the torturers...

Julian Jackson focuses on the Algerian War, France's last great colonial crisis.