One To One

Episodes

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20120828

Paddy O'Connell talks to Chantal, widowed and left to bring up three children alone.

Paddy O'Connell has taken over the One to One interviewer's microphone to explore a subject that reflects his own experience: the effect of great emotional upheaval on family life. When Paddy was 11 his father died which, of course, meant that his mother was widowed.

In the first of three programmes, Paddy meets Chantal who was widowed in 1995 and left to bring up three children alone. They discuss the initial reactions; the process of gradually moving on with your life; when - if ever - is it the right time to remove your wedding rings; and - if you do meet someone new - what role does the memory of your first partner play in your new relationship.

Next week Paddy meets the former Children's Commissioner, Sir Al Aynsley-Green, whose decision to become a doctor was directly linked to the experience, at the age of 10, of losing his father.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

20120828

Paddy O'Connell talks to Chantal, widowed and left to bring up three children alone.

Paddy O'Connell has taken over the One to One interviewer's microphone to explore a subject that reflects his own experience: the effect of great emotional upheaval on family life. When Paddy was 11 his father died which, of course, meant that his mother was widowed.

In the first of three programmes, Paddy meets Chantal who was widowed in 1995 and left to bring up three children alone. They discuss the initial reactions; the process of gradually moving on with your life; when - if ever - is it the right time to remove your wedding rings; and - if you do meet someone new - what role does the memory of your first partner play in your new relationship.

Next week Paddy meets the former Children's Commissioner, Sir Al Aynsley-Green, whose decision to become a doctor was directly linked to the experience, at the age of 10, of losing his father.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

20120904

Paddy O'Connell meets Sir Al Aynsley-Green who has forged a career helping children.

Paddy O'Connell has taken over the One to One interviewer's microphone to explore a subject that reflects his own experience: the effect of great emotional upheaval on family life.

When Paddy was 11 his father died, and in this week's programme -- in order to explore what impact this can have -- he meets Sir Al Aynsley-Green who, at the age of 10, lost his own father. Almost immediately he decided that, when he grew up, he would become a doctor so that other children "didn't have to lose their mummies and daddies".

This passion for helping children has continued throughout his career: Sir Al was the first Children's Commissioner for England (2005-2010), having been involved in the political arena of Children's Services since 2000. He was appointed Chair of the NHS Taskforce for Children and then the first National Clinical Director for Children in government.

He believes strongly that the topic of childhood bereavement should be spoken about more openly. He recalls watching an event on a television programme about Winston's Wish (a bereavement charity) where children were encouraged to write messages to those they had lost, attach them to balloons, and release them. Sir Al describes how he broke down in tears; even at 55 the pain of not having had the chance to say goodbye to his own father still felt fresh.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

20120904

Paddy O'Connell meets Sir Al Aynsley-Green who has forged a career helping children.

Paddy O'Connell has taken over the One to One interviewer's microphone to explore a subject that reflects his own experience: the effect of great emotional upheaval on family life.

When Paddy was 11 his father died, and in this week's programme -- in order to explore what impact this can have -- he meets Sir Al Aynsley-Green who, at the age of 10, lost his own father. Almost immediately he decided that, when he grew up, he would become a doctor so that other children "didn't have to lose their mummies and daddies".

This passion for helping children has continued throughout his career: Sir Al was the first Children's Commissioner for England (2005-2010), having been involved in the political arena of Children's Services since 2000. He was appointed Chair of the NHS Taskforce for Children and then the first National Clinical Director for Children in government.

He believes strongly that the topic of childhood bereavement should be spoken about more openly. He recalls watching an event on a television programme about Winston's Wish (a bereavement charity) where children were encouraged to write messages to those they had lost, attach them to balloons, and release them. Sir Al describes how he broke down in tears; even at 55 the pain of not having had the chance to say goodbye to his own father still felt fresh.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

20120911

Paddy O'Connell has taken over the One to One interviewer's microphone to explore a subject that reflects his own experience: the effect of great emotional upheaval on family life.

Paddy lost his father when he was 11, and in last week's programme he met Sir Al Aynsley-Green whose career was shaped by the early loss of his own father.

This week's programme takes a slightly different tack as Paddy meets Lisa Cherry, whose childhood was spent in the Care System.

Born in a home for unmarried mothers, her childhood was spent moving from foster home to care home and a spell of homelessness. Eventually Lisa managed to get control of her spiralling life - giving up drinking and getting an education was the making of her.

producer: Karen Gregor.

20120911

Paddy O'Connell has taken over the One to One interviewer's microphone to explore a subject that reflects his own experience: the effect of great emotional upheaval on family life.

Paddy lost his father when he was 11, and in last week's programme he met Sir Al Aynsley-Green whose career was shaped by the early loss of his own father.

This week's programme takes a slightly different tack as Paddy meets Lisa Cherry, whose childhood was spent in the Care System.

Born in a home for unmarried mothers, her childhood was spent moving from foster home to care home and a spell of homelessness. Eventually Lisa managed to get control of her spiralling life - giving up drinking and getting an education was the making of her.

producer: Karen Gregor.

20120918

Journalist and broadcaster Sarfraz Manzoor explores the risks and rewards of taking a personal story and making it public. This is something he's done in his book ' Greetings from Bury Park' and within his journalism where he's written - amongst other topics - about his mixed-marriage and the experience of being a new father. He's intrigued by both the process and the ramifications of revealing private thoughts and experiences: How do people react to you? Do they see it as a betrayal? Do you risk hurting friends and family? Is it worth the risk if you achieve something that truly resonates with your audience?

As he prepares to adapt his memoir into a screenplay Sarfraz Manzoor speaks to others who have mined their own lives for creative purposes..This week he is in conversation with children's author, Judith Kerr, whose famous children's book 'When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit' was based on her own experience of escaping the Nazis in the 1930s.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

20120918

Journalist and broadcaster Sarfraz Manzoor explores the risks and rewards of taking a personal story and making it public. This is something he's done in his book ' Greetings from Bury Park' and within his journalism where he's written - amongst other topics - about his mixed-marriage and the experience of being a new father. He's intrigued by both the process and the ramifications of revealing private thoughts and experiences: How do people react to you? Do they see it as a betrayal? Do you risk hurting friends and family? Is it worth the risk if you achieve something that truly resonates with your audience?

As he prepares to adapt his memoir into a screenplay Sarfraz Manzoor speaks to others who have mined their own lives for creative purposes..This week he is in conversation with children's author, Judith Kerr, whose famous children's book 'When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit' was based on her own experience of escaping the Nazis in the 1930s.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Journalist and broadcaster Sarfraz Manzoor explores the risks and rewards of taking a personal story and making it public. This is something he's done in his book ' Greetings from Bury Park' and within his journalism where he's written - amongst other topics - about his mixed-marriage and the experience of being a new father. He's intrigued by both the process and the ramifications of revealing private thoughts and experiences: How do people react to you? Do they see it as a betrayal? Do you risk hurting friends and family? Is it worth the risk if you achieve something that truly resonates with your audience?

As he prepares to adapt his memoir into a screenplay Sarfraz Manzoor speaks to others who have mined their own lives for creative purposes..This week he is in conversation with children's author, Judith Kerr, whose famous children's book 'When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit' was based on her own experience of escaping the Nazis in the 1930s.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

20121002

Sarfraz Manzoor meets author, Elizabeth Wurtzel, to discuss her book 'Prozac Nation'.

In 'One to One' the journalist and broadcaster, Sarfraz Manzoor, has been exploring the risks and rewards of taking a personal story and making it public. This is something he's done in his book 'Greetings from Bury Park' and within his journalism where he's written - amongst other topics - about his mixed-marriage and the experience of being a new father. He's intrigued by both the process and the ramifications of revealing private thoughts and experiences: How do people react to you? Do they see it as a betrayal? Do you risk hurting friends and family? Is it worth the risk if you achieve something that truly resonates with your audience?

In this, the last of his three interviews, Sarfraz Manzoor speaks to the author of 'Prozac Nation', Elizabeth Wurtzel. Published in the mid-1990s, it was considered the first in the 'misery memoir' genre and was a huge success. But how does Wurtzel feel about what she wrote now, almost 20 years on?

Producer: Karen Gregor.

20121002

Sarfraz Manzoor meets author, Elizabeth Wurtzel, to discuss her book 'Prozac Nation'.

In 'One to One' the journalist and broadcaster, Sarfraz Manzoor, has been exploring the risks and rewards of taking a personal story and making it public. This is something he's done in his book 'Greetings from Bury Park' and within his journalism where he's written - amongst other topics - about his mixed-marriage and the experience of being a new father. He's intrigued by both the process and the ramifications of revealing private thoughts and experiences: How do people react to you? Do they see it as a betrayal? Do you risk hurting friends and family? Is it worth the risk if you achieve something that truly resonates with your audience?

In this, the last of his three interviews, Sarfraz Manzoor speaks to the author of 'Prozac Nation', Elizabeth Wurtzel. Published in the mid-1990s, it was considered the first in the 'misery memoir' genre and was a huge success. But how does Wurtzel feel about what she wrote now, almost 20 years on?

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Sarfraz Manzoor meets author, Elizabeth Wurtzel, to discuss her book 'Prozac Nation'.

In 'One to One' the journalist and broadcaster, Sarfraz Manzoor, has been exploring the risks and rewards of taking a personal story and making it public. This is something he's done in his book 'Greetings from Bury Park' and within his journalism where he's written - amongst other topics - about his mixed-marriage and the experience of being a new father. He's intrigued by both the process and the ramifications of revealing private thoughts and experiences: How do people react to you? Do they see it as a betrayal? Do you risk hurting friends and family? Is it worth the risk if you achieve something that truly resonates with your audience?

In this, the last of his three interviews, Sarfraz Manzoor speaks to the author of 'Prozac Nation', Elizabeth Wurtzel. Published in the mid-1990s, it was considered the first in the 'misery memoir' genre and was a huge success. But how does Wurtzel feel about what she wrote now, almost 20 years on?

Producer: Karen Gregor.

20121009

Kate Silverton wanted desperately to be a journalist from the age of 12. In her teens she travelled extensively - hitch-hiking across Israel and visiting the Palestinian territories in an attempt to better understand the conflict there, she stayed in a Bedouin in the desert and at nineteen went to Zimbabwe for four months armed with just a dictaphone to capture the stories of the people she met along the way. Despite her natural curiosity about the world and her desire to report stories of people living in conflict she didn't follow her heart because she feared she might fail. As the first in her family to go to university much depended on her and her career choice and she opted to enter the City as a Corporate Financier - a demanding job but one that diverted from her doing the one thing she wanted to do - because she feared she might not be good enough.It took the death of her best friend to convince her to change her mind. In the first of this two part series for One to One Kate talks to composer Raymond Yiu who despite his love for music at an early age, his strict parental upbringing stopped him from pursuing this as a career as he thought he wasn't good enough.

Presenter: Kate Silverton

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

20121009

Kate Silverton wanted desperately to be a journalist from the age of 12. In her teens she travelled extensively - hitch-hiking across Israel and visiting the Palestinian territories in an attempt to better understand the conflict there, she stayed in a Bedouin in the desert and at nineteen went to Zimbabwe for four months armed with just a dictaphone to capture the stories of the people she met along the way. Despite her natural curiosity about the world and her desire to report stories of people living in conflict she didn't follow her heart because she feared she might fail. As the first in her family to go to university much depended on her and her career choice and she opted to enter the City as a Corporate Financier - a demanding job but one that diverted from her doing the one thing she wanted to do - because she feared she might not be good enough.It took the death of her best friend to convince her to change her mind. In the first of this two part series for One to One Kate talks to composer Raymond Yiu who despite his love for music at an early age, his strict parental upbringing stopped him from pursuing this as a career as he thought he wasn't good enough.

Presenter: Kate Silverton

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

20121016

Kate Silverton wanted desperately to be a journalist from the age of 12. In her teens she travelled extensively - hitch-hiking across Israel and visiting the Palestinian territories in an attempt to better understand the conflict there, she stayed with Bedouin in the desert and at nineteen went to Zimbabwe for four months armed with just a Dictaphone to capture the stories of the people she met along the way. Despite her natural curiosity about the world and her desire to report stories of people living in conflict she didn't follow her heart because. she feared she might fail. As the first in her family to go to university much depended on her and her career choice and she opted to enter the City as a Corporate Financier - a demanding job but one that diverted from her doing the one thing she wanted to do - because she feared she might not be good enough. It took the death of her best friend to convince her to change her mind.

Presenter: Kate Silverton

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

20121016

Kate Silverton wanted desperately to be a journalist from the age of 12. In her teens she travelled extensively - hitch-hiking across Israel and visiting the Palestinian territories in an attempt to better understand the conflict there, she stayed with Bedouin in the desert and at nineteen went to Zimbabwe for four months armed with just a Dictaphone to capture the stories of the people she met along the way. Despite her natural curiosity about the world and her desire to report stories of people living in conflict she didn't follow her heart because. she feared she might fail. As the first in her family to go to university much depended on her and her career choice and she opted to enter the City as a Corporate Financier - a demanding job but one that diverted from her doing the one thing she wanted to do - because she feared she might not be good enough. It took the death of her best friend to convince her to change her mind.

Presenter: Kate Silverton

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

20130205

John McCarthy talks to a young woman who was made to feel an outsider within her own community, for becoming the victim of her husband's physical and psychological abuse.

John says of the series:

I hope to talk to people who are living on the 'outside' of mainstream UK society. On the street they would look like anyone else but in fact they are somehow apart. I have experienced being an 'outsider' myself; on my return from captivity in Lebanon, when I'd look like any other Londoner, but would feel utterly self-conscious and confused by the world around me. I've had similar feelings following the deaths of close family members. One experience was very rare, the other universal.

I want to explore the idea of being an outsider; having conversations with others who will have walked those same private/public paths either through choice or because of circumstances beyond their control.

What is it like being on the 'outside'? How do you cope with loneliness and feelings of being excluded? What are the attractions of removing yourself from society? What are the practicalities of such a life, the numbness of living in a fog for so long? How do you keep strong and maintain your hopes of coming in from the cold; of not giving in and renouncing your solitary way?

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

20130205

John McCarthy talks to a young woman who was made to feel an outsider within her own community, for becoming the victim of her husband's physical and psychological abuse.

John says of the series:

I hope to talk to people who are living on the 'outside' of mainstream UK society. On the street they would look like anyone else but in fact they are somehow apart. I have experienced being an 'outsider' myself; on my return from captivity in Lebanon, when I'd look like any other Londoner, but would feel utterly self-conscious and confused by the world around me. I've had similar feelings following the deaths of close family members. One experience was very rare, the other universal.

I want to explore the idea of being an outsider; having conversations with others who will have walked those same private/public paths either through choice or because of circumstances beyond their control.

What is it like being on the 'outside'? How do you cope with loneliness and feelings of being excluded? What are the attractions of removing yourself from society? What are the practicalities of such a life, the numbness of living in a fog for so long? How do you keep strong and maintain your hopes of coming in from the cold; of not giving in and renouncing your solitary way?

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

20140923

Some of the UK's most respected broadcasters conduct 15-minute interviews with the people whose personal stories interest them the most.Producer: Isobel Eaton.

20140923

Some of the UK's most respected broadcasters conduct 15-minute interviews with the people whose personal stories interest them the most.Producer: Isobel Eaton.

20141007

Interview series in which UK broadcasters talk to people whose personal stories interest them the most.

20141007

Interview series in which UK broadcasters talk to people whose personal stories interest them the most.

20141111

Broadcaster Nihal owns a Staffordshire Bull Terrier, but doesn't want to be stereotyped by his dog. In this second of two programmes for the interview series One to One, he talks to Paul who is a first time owner of a Staffie. For Paul, his dog 'Bee Bee' has been a revelation and came into his life at just the right time.

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

20141111

Broadcaster Nihal owns a Staffordshire Bull Terrier, but doesn't want to be stereotyped by his dog. In this second of two programmes for the interview series One to One, he talks to Paul who is a first time owner of a Staffie. For Paul, his dog 'Bee Bee' has been a revelation and came into his life at just the right time.

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

20161115

Miranda Rae is a single mum with a young son who is 9 years old. Life is far from easy for any single parent, but in this programme Miranda meets mother-of-three, Josephine Pepper, who found herself on her own with 3 children under the age of three, when her husband died of cancer. Despite her grief at the death of her husband, Josephine's story is one of remarkable courage, resilience and joy in her children and in life itself. Producer Sarah Blunt.

20161115

Miranda Rae is a single mum with a young son who is 9 years old. Life is far from easy for any single parent, but in this programme Miranda meets mother-of-three, Josephine Pepper, who found herself on her own with 3 children under the age of three, when her husband died of cancer. Despite her grief at the death of her husband, Josephine's story is one of remarkable courage, resilience and joy in her children and in life itself. Producer Sarah Blunt.

Adrian Chiles Speaks To Kerstin Rodgers20150804

Adrian Chiles talks to Kerstin Rodgers, aka Ms Marmite Lover, food writer, cook and pioneer of the supper club movement.

It's well known that TV and radio presenter Adrian Chiles loves football. What's less well known is his real passion: food, both eating and cooking it. Adrian believes in the power of food to change lives, to improve society and to bring people together.

At this year's Bristol Food Connections festival, he recorded two editions of One to One in front of an audience with guests who have extraordinary life changing food stories to tell.

Kerstin's love of preparing, cooking and sharing food started early in life but a visit to Cuba and their paladar restaurants which are set up in people's homes, inspired her to try it here. She guides Adrian through the pleasures and pitfalls of cooking for strangers in your own house and charging them for the experience.

Producer: Lucy Lunt

Adrian Chiles Speaks To Kerstin Rodgers20150804

Adrian Chiles talks to Kerstin Rodgers, aka Ms Marmite Lover, food writer, cook and pioneer of the supper club movement.

It's well known that TV and radio presenter Adrian Chiles loves football. What's less well known is his real passion: food, both eating and cooking it. Adrian believes in the power of food to change lives, to improve society and to bring people together.

At this year's Bristol Food Connections festival, he recorded two editions of One to One in front of an audience with guests who have extraordinary life changing food stories to tell.

Kerstin's love of preparing, cooking and sharing food started early in life but a visit to Cuba and their paladar restaurants which are set up in people's homes, inspired her to try it here. She guides Adrian through the pleasures and pitfalls of cooking for strangers in your own house and charging them for the experience.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Adrian Chiles Speaks To Larissa Pelham20150728

Adrian Chiles talks to Larissa Pelham, Head of Emergency Food Security and Livelihoods for Oxfam, about how charities seek to eradicate malnourishment in the Third World, by working with local food producers.

It's well known that TV and radio presenter Adrian Chiles loves football. What's less well known is his real passion: food, both eating and cooking it. Adrian believes in the power of food to change lives, to improve society and to bring people together.

At this year's Bristol Food Connections festival, he recorded two editions of One to One in front of an audience with guests who have extraordinary life changing food stories to tell.

Larissa Pelham has spent most of her career trying to ensure that all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food, that's the definition of food security, but she explains the difficulties of doing this in areas of political unrest or natural disaster.

She also discusses with Adrian the effect her work has had on her own attitude to food and eating.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Adrian Chiles Speaks To Larissa Pelham20150728

Adrian Chiles talks to Larissa Pelham, Head of Emergency Food Security and Livelihoods for Oxfam, about how charities seek to eradicate malnourishment in the Third World, by working with local food producers.

It's well known that TV and radio presenter Adrian Chiles loves football. What's less well known is his real passion: food, both eating and cooking it. Adrian believes in the power of food to change lives, to improve society and to bring people together.

At this year's Bristol Food Connections festival, he recorded two editions of One to One in front of an audience with guests who have extraordinary life changing food stories to tell.

Larissa Pelham has spent most of her career trying to ensure that all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food, that's the definition of food security, but she explains the difficulties of doing this in areas of political unrest or natural disaster.

She also discusses with Adrian the effect her work has had on her own attitude to food and eating.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Adrian Goldberg On Mixed Marriage20150113

In the first of a new series of One to One, broadcaster Adrian Goldberg - who is married to a British Asian woman - explores the topic of mixed marriage.

The dry facts, from the Office of National Statistics, state that "Nearly 1 in 10 people living in as a couple were in an inter-ethnic relationship in 2011"*

Over the next three weeks Adrian brings this statistic to life as he meets three people who married outside their own faith or cultural background, across three decades: the 1960s, 70s and 2000s.

In this first programme he meets Tara Bariana. Tara arrived in England from India in the 1960s and was, in his words, an illiterate 13 year old who couldn't speak English. He was expected to marry a Punjabi girl, but went against his family's wishes when he met and fell in love with Beryl, the daughter of a Baptist minister. Adrian hears Tara's story, and finds out what happened next.

*the latest available figures from the 2011 census.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Adrian Goldberg On Mixed Marriage20150113

In the first of a new series of One to One, broadcaster Adrian Goldberg - who is married to a British Asian woman - explores the topic of mixed marriage.

The dry facts, from the Office of National Statistics, state that "Nearly 1 in 10 people living in as a couple were in an inter-ethnic relationship in 2011"*

Over the next three weeks Adrian brings this statistic to life as he meets three people who married outside their own faith or cultural background, across three decades: the 1960s, 70s and 2000s.

In this first programme he meets Tara Bariana. Tara arrived in England from India in the 1960s and was, in his words, an illiterate 13 year old who couldn't speak English. He was expected to marry a Punjabi girl, but went against his family's wishes when he met and fell in love with Beryl, the daughter of a Baptist minister. Adrian hears Tara's story, and finds out what happened next.

*the latest available figures from the 2011 census.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Adrian Goldberg On Mixed Marriage20150120

In the second of three editions of One to One, broadcaster Adrian Goldberg - who is married to a British Asian woman - explores the topic of mixed marriage. Today Adrian meets Rosalind Birtwistle, a Christian woman who married a Jewish man in the 1970s.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Adrian Goldberg On Mixed Marriage20150120

In the second of three editions of One to One, broadcaster Adrian Goldberg - who is married to a British Asian woman - explores the topic of mixed marriage. Today Adrian meets Rosalind Birtwistle, a Christian woman who married a Jewish man in the 1970s.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Adrian Goldberg On Mixed Marriage20150127

Broadcaster Adrian Goldberg, who is married to a British Asian woman, explores the topic of mixed marriage for One to One. Today, in the third and final of his interviews, he meets Mandy. Mandy is of Sikh/Hindu heritage and had to deal with the rejection by most of her family when she refused to contemplate the idea of an arranged marriage. She went on to meet and marry an Afro-Caribbean man; something which has brought her happiness, although it hasn't been the smoothest of journeys.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Adrian Goldberg On Mixed Marriage20150127

Broadcaster Adrian Goldberg, who is married to a British Asian woman, explores the topic of mixed marriage for One to One. Today, in the third and final of his interviews, he meets Mandy. Mandy is of Sikh/Hindu heritage and had to deal with the rejection by most of her family when she refused to contemplate the idea of an arranged marriage. She went on to meet and marry an Afro-Caribbean man; something which has brought her happiness, although it hasn't been the smoothest of journeys.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Andrea Catherwood20140218

Andrea Catherwood talks to senior Women in the City of London about how they have combined motherhood with a high flying career.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Andrea Catherwood20140218

Andrea Catherwood talks to senior Women in the City of London about how they have combined motherhood with a high flying career.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Anita Anand Talks To Juliet Lyon20140114

Anita Anand knew she was meant to be a journalist from the moment she covered her first news story. An instinct she followed proved to be correct, and convinced her that she should pursue journalism.

In this series of interviews for 'One to One', Anita discovers what drives people to pursue certain careers. Was there an epiphany, something they discovered in their very core, or a series of events that motivated them?

Anita's first guest is Juliet Lyon. She's the director of the Prison Reform Trust, a charity 'working to create a just, humane and effective penal system.' In her early 20s she fostered children, and went on to work in a school at the adolescent-unit of a psychiatric hospital. One patient was due to enter a young offenders' institution, so she went to see what it was like. Shocked by what she found, she knew she wanted to try and improve conditions within prisons.

Anita also interviews world-renowned maxillo-facial surgeon, Professor Iain Hutchison and lawyer Mathew Waddington, who specialised in Children's Law following the death of his daughter.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Anita Anand Talks To Juliet Lyon20140114

Anita Anand knew she was meant to be a journalist from the moment she covered her first news story. An instinct she followed proved to be correct, and convinced her that she should pursue journalism.

In this series of interviews for 'One to One', Anita discovers what drives people to pursue certain careers. Was there an epiphany, something they discovered in their very core, or a series of events that motivated them?

Anita's first guest is Juliet Lyon. She's the director of the Prison Reform Trust, a charity 'working to create a just, humane and effective penal system.' In her early 20s she fostered children, and went on to work in a school at the adolescent-unit of a psychiatric hospital. One patient was due to enter a young offenders' institution, so she went to see what it was like. Shocked by what she found, she knew she wanted to try and improve conditions within prisons.

Anita also interviews world-renowned maxillo-facial surgeon, Professor Iain Hutchison and lawyer Mathew Waddington, who specialised in Children's Law following the death of his daughter.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Bel Mooney On Home20151020

Bel Mooney explores whether home is an idea as much as a place. She goes to Birmingham to meet student Alan, who shares a rented house with two friends. While they return home to their parents at weekends, Alan stays in the student digs, the only home he currently has. He explains to Bel how family breakdown led to him to be homeless twice, first emotionally and then physically when his mother finally evicted him and his possessions from her house when he was eighteen.

Now twenty four, Alan describes how devastated he felt and how through the help of a local charity he got back onto his feet again.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Bel Mooney On Home20151020

Bel Mooney explores whether home is an idea as much as a place. She goes to Birmingham to meet student Alan, who shares a rented house with two friends. While they return home to their parents at weekends, Alan stays in the student digs, the only home he currently has. He explains to Bel how family breakdown led to him to be homeless twice, first emotionally and then physically when his mother finally evicted him and his possessions from her house when he was eighteen.

Now twenty four, Alan describes how devastated he felt and how through the help of a local charity he got back onto his feet again.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Bel Mooney Talks To Penelope Lively20151103

Bel Mooney talks to author Penelope Lively about the nature of home. Is it an idea as much as a place?

Bel Mooney Talks To Penelope Lively20151103

Bel Mooney talks to author Penelope Lively about the nature of home. Is it an idea as much as a place?

Bridget Kendall With Alexander Mccall Smith20120207

Bridget Kendall talks to those who are well known in one field but are experts in another. She talks to the prolific author Alexander McCall Smith, best known for The No 1 Ladies Detective Agency who's also an Emeritus Professor of Medical Law. They discuss how his academic interest in the legal and philosophical aspects of responsibility feed into his work as a novelist.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Bridget Kendall talks to author Alexander McCall Smith about his work as an academic.

Bridget Kendall With Alexander Mccall Smith20120207

Bridget Kendall talks to those who are well known in one field but are experts in another. She talks to the prolific author Alexander McCall Smith, best known for The No 1 Ladies Detective Agency who's also an Emeritus Professor of Medical Law. They discuss how his academic interest in the legal and philosophical aspects of responsibility feed into his work as a novelist.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Bridget Kendall talks to author Alexander McCall Smith about his work as an academic.

Bridget Kendall With Archbishop Rowan Williams20111227

Bridget Kendall takes over the One to One chair and talks to those who are well known in one field but have another compelling area of expertise. Before becoming the BBC's diplomatic correspondent, like her first interviewee, Bridget too was a Russian scholar. She talks to Archbishop Rowan Williams about his fascination with Dostoyevsky and why he finds the author's work so helpful in his own.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Bridget Kendall talks to Archbishop Rowan Williams about his fascination with Dostoyevsky.

Bridget Kendall With Prof Dianna Bowles20120214

Bridget Kendall has never liked to pigeon hole people and in her series of One to One she talks to those who are known in one particular field but have a second string to their bow, an expertise in a very different field. As a special treat, for today's programme Bridget's out in the Yorkshire Dales near Middlesmoor to meet Prof Dianna Bowles, an eminent plant biochemist who's spent much of her career investigating how biology can benefit society. She's also an enthusiastic owner of an expanding flock of Herdwick sheep and when Foot and Mouth struck in 2001, her two passions came together as she fought, with other breeders, to protect the future of the breed. While science, in some ways connects the two interests, it is above all the joy Dianna finds in both activities that unites them.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Bridget Kendall talks to plant biochemist Dianna Bowles about her joy for work and sheep.

Bridget Kendall With Prof Dianna Bowles20120214

Bridget Kendall has never liked to pigeon hole people and in her series of One to One she talks to those who are known in one particular field but have a second string to their bow, an expertise in a very different field. As a special treat, for today's programme Bridget's out in the Yorkshire Dales near Middlesmoor to meet Prof Dianna Bowles, an eminent plant biochemist who's spent much of her career investigating how biology can benefit society. She's also an enthusiastic owner of an expanding flock of Herdwick sheep and when Foot and Mouth struck in 2001, her two passions came together as she fought, with other breeders, to protect the future of the breed. While science, in some ways connects the two interests, it is above all the joy Dianna finds in both activities that unites them.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Bridget Kendall talks to plant biochemist Dianna Bowles about her joy for work and sheep.

Bridget Kendall has never liked to pigeon hole people and in her series of One to One she talks to those who are known in one particular field but have a second string to their bow, an expertise in a very different field. As a special treat, for today's programme Bridget's out in the Yorkshire Dales near Middlesmoor to meet Prof Dianna Bowles, an eminent plant biochemist who's spent much of her career investigating how biology can benefit society. She's also an enthusiastic owner of an expanding flock of Herdwick sheep and when Foot and Mouth struck in 2001, her two passions came together as she fought, with other breeders, to protect the future of the breed. While science, in some ways connects the two interests, it is above all the joy Dianna finds in both activities that unites them.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Bridget Kendall talks to plant biochemist Dianna Bowles about her joy for work and sheep.

Carolyn Quinn Speaks To Claire Derry20130924

As a Radio 4 presenter, covering a range of stories everyday, Carolyn Quinn interviews people while the story is live but rarely gets the chance to find out what happened next.

For these editions of One to One, Carolyn wanted to find out what happens to individuals who've found themselves in the media spotlight and have had to live with intense, unsolicited scrutiny. How do they cope once the media caravan has moved on and they have to try to get on with their lives

This week, Carolyn speaks to Claire Derry, the mother of Samuel Woodhead, the British teenager who went missing in the Australian outback in February 2013.

Samuel Woodhead was working on a cattle station in rural Queensland - just a few days into his gap year in Australia - when he decided to go for a run. He failed to return and was reported missing. A land and air search eventually found him three days later: three stone lighter, severely dehydrated and apparently 'hours from death'.

In this interview Claire Derry describes what it was like to cope with what had happened to her son, at the same time as dealing with intense media interest which - at one stage - turned against her son, accusing him of deliberately getting lost. And has she been able to return to "life as normal" after the experience?

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Carolyn Quinn Speaks To Claire Derry20130924

As a Radio 4 presenter, covering a range of stories everyday, Carolyn Quinn interviews people while the story is live but rarely gets the chance to find out what happened next.

For these editions of One to One, Carolyn wanted to find out what happens to individuals who've found themselves in the media spotlight and have had to live with intense, unsolicited scrutiny. How do they cope once the media caravan has moved on and they have to try to get on with their lives

This week, Carolyn speaks to Claire Derry, the mother of Samuel Woodhead, the British teenager who went missing in the Australian outback in February 2013.

Samuel Woodhead was working on a cattle station in rural Queensland - just a few days into his gap year in Australia - when he decided to go for a run. He failed to return and was reported missing. A land and air search eventually found him three days later: three stone lighter, severely dehydrated and apparently 'hours from death'.

In this interview Claire Derry describes what it was like to cope with what had happened to her son, at the same time as dealing with intense media interest which - at one stage - turned against her son, accusing him of deliberately getting lost. And has she been able to return to "life as normal" after the experience?

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Carolyn Quinn Speaks To Gillian Duffy20130917

As a Radio 4 presenter, covering a range of stories everyday, Carolyn Quinn interviews people while the story is live but rarely gets the chance to find out what happened next.

For these editions of One to One, Carolyn wanted to find out what happens to individuals who've found themselves in the media spotlight and have had to live with intense, unsolicited scrutiny. How do they cope once the media caravan has moved on and they have to try to get on with their lives?

In this, her second interview, Carolyn hears from the woman who hit the headlines during the general election campaign of 2010 when Gordon Brown infamously called her a "bigoted woman". That remark, and the subsequent apology from the then Prime Minister, made Gillian Duffy a household name. Three years on, Carolyn Quinn talks to Gillian Duffy to find out how she dealt with persistent doorstepping newshounds, how she regards the experience now and whether her relationship with the Labour party survived the experience.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Carolyn Quinn Speaks To Gillian Duffy20130917

As a Radio 4 presenter, covering a range of stories everyday, Carolyn Quinn interviews people while the story is live but rarely gets the chance to find out what happened next.

For these editions of One to One, Carolyn wanted to find out what happens to individuals who've found themselves in the media spotlight and have had to live with intense, unsolicited scrutiny. How do they cope once the media caravan has moved on and they have to try to get on with their lives?

In this, her second interview, Carolyn hears from the woman who hit the headlines during the general election campaign of 2010 when Gordon Brown infamously called her a "bigoted woman". That remark, and the subsequent apology from the then Prime Minister, made Gillian Duffy a household name. Three years on, Carolyn Quinn talks to Gillian Duffy to find out how she dealt with persistent doorstepping newshounds, how she regards the experience now and whether her relationship with the Labour party survived the experience.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Carolyn Quinn Speaks To Stephanie Slater20130910

As a Radio 4 presenter, covering a range of stories everyday, Carolyn Quinn interviews people while the story is live but rarely gets the chance to find out what happened next.

For these editions of One to One, Carolyn wanted to find out what happens to individuals who've found themselves in the media spotlight and have had to live with intense, unsolicited scrutiny. How do they cope once the media caravan has moved on and they have to try to get on with their lives?

In this first interview, she speaks to Stephanie Slater, who survived a violent kidnapping in 1992. Michael Sams, later also convicted of murdering Julie Dart, held Stephanie for eight days. Following her release, she and her family were besieged by the media who camped in the field opposite her parents' house for 18 months. In this interview Carolyn finds out what impact the experience and subsequent media attention had on Stephanie as she attempted to come to terms with her ordeal, and rebuild her life.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Carolyn Quinn Speaks To Stephanie Slater20130910

As a Radio 4 presenter, covering a range of stories everyday, Carolyn Quinn interviews people while the story is live but rarely gets the chance to find out what happened next.

For these editions of One to One, Carolyn wanted to find out what happens to individuals who've found themselves in the media spotlight and have had to live with intense, unsolicited scrutiny. How do they cope once the media caravan has moved on and they have to try to get on with their lives?

In this first interview, she speaks to Stephanie Slater, who survived a violent kidnapping in 1992. Michael Sams, later also convicted of murdering Julie Dart, held Stephanie for eight days. Following her release, she and her family were besieged by the media who camped in the field opposite her parents' house for 18 months. In this interview Carolyn finds out what impact the experience and subsequent media attention had on Stephanie as she attempted to come to terms with her ordeal, and rebuild her life.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Charlotte Smith Meets Gill Hollis20150203

Charlotte Smith was diagnosed with a rare form of chronic lung disease, lymphangioleiomyomatosis (now known as LAM) three years ago. She immediately went onto the internet and linked up with other sufferers on a dedicated website. Gill Hollis was diagnosed in 1992 before there was a self-help group. Charlotte and Gill discuss the positives and negatives of self help groups for those with chronic illnesses. Does it help or hinder acceptance or simply build up false hope and increase dependency?

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Charlotte Smith Meets Gill Hollis20150203

Charlotte Smith was diagnosed with a rare form of chronic lung disease, lymphangioleiomyomatosis (now known as LAM) three years ago. She immediately went onto the internet and linked up with other sufferers on a dedicated website. Gill Hollis was diagnosed in 1992 before there was a self-help group. Charlotte and Gill discuss the positives and negatives of self help groups for those with chronic illnesses. Does it help or hinder acceptance or simply build up false hope and increase dependency?

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Charlotte Smith Meets Sarah O'donoghue20150210

Charlotte Smith looks at the support offered by self help groups to those suffering from emotional trauma.

When Sarah O'Donoghue's eighteen year old son died while out celebrating his A level results, she felt she needed to turn to the professionals for help; doctors, bereavement counsellors, therapists.

It was only after many months that she finally turned to The Compassionate Friends; one of the several charities that offers support and help to bereaved families after the death of a child. Here she found solace by talking to and being with others who had been through the same experience themselves.

Sarah now runs a group for bereaved families in her area.

Charlotte and Sarah discuss the positives and negatives of being part of such a group; the support that is given to people who so badly need it, whether there is a danger members could become too dependent, and at what point people might make the sometimes painful decision to leave a group.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Charlotte Smith Meets Sarah O'donoghue20150210

Charlotte Smith looks at the support offered by self help groups to those suffering from emotional trauma.

When Sarah O'Donoghue's eighteen year old son died while out celebrating his A level results, she felt she needed to turn to the professionals for help; doctors, bereavement counsellors, therapists.

It was only after many months that she finally turned to The Compassionate Friends; one of the several charities that offers support and help to bereaved families after the death of a child. Here she found solace by talking to and being with others who had been through the same experience themselves.

Sarah now runs a group for bereaved families in her area.

Charlotte and Sarah discuss the positives and negatives of being part of such a group; the support that is given to people who so badly need it, whether there is a danger members could become too dependent, and at what point people might make the sometimes painful decision to leave a group.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Christina Lamb Talks To Adam Hargreaves20150324

Christina Lamb is an author and foreign correspondent for the Sunday Times.

Her career kicked off when she met Pakistan's then opposition leader Benazir Bhutto. Christina was fascinated by the fact that she had no choice but to take over her father's party when she was just 24 years old after he was arrested and then executed.

In this series of One to One, Christina explores the idea of family legacy.

Almost everyone is familiar with the Mr Men, the pocket-size books that have caught the imagination of children over the past 40 years.

In the first of three programmes, Christina talks to Adam Hargreaves, whose father was Roger Hargreaves, the creator of the Mr Men and Little Miss series. What was it like growing up with his father's fame and fortune? And she finds out how he made the decision to continue his father's legacy.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Christina Lamb Talks To Adam Hargreaves20150324

Christina Lamb is an author and foreign correspondent for the Sunday Times.

Her career kicked off when she met Pakistan's then opposition leader Benazir Bhutto. Christina was fascinated by the fact that she had no choice but to take over her father's party when she was just 24 years old after he was arrested and then executed.

In this series of One to One, Christina explores the idea of family legacy.

Almost everyone is familiar with the Mr Men, the pocket-size books that have caught the imagination of children over the past 40 years.

In the first of three programmes, Christina talks to Adam Hargreaves, whose father was Roger Hargreaves, the creator of the Mr Men and Little Miss series. What was it like growing up with his father's fame and fortune? And she finds out how he made the decision to continue his father's legacy.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Christina Lamb Talks To Lady Khadija Idi Amin20150407

Christina Lamb is an author and foreign correspondent for the Sunday Times and in this series of One to One she explores family legacies.

In the final of her three programmes, she explores what it's like to grow up the son or daughter of someone regarded as one of the most evil people on earth. And what happens if you are not aware of that legacy - how do you come to terms with it ?

Few people are seen as more of a byword for barbarity than Idi Amin, the Ugandan despot whose regime killed as many as 400,000 people when he was President from 1971 to 1979.

Christina Lamb talks to Lady Khadija Idi Amin dada, born in Saudi Arabia where her father was living in exile until he died. She tells Christina about her childhood and not being aware of her father's brutal legacy.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Christina Lamb Talks To Lady Khadija Idi Amin20150407

Christina Lamb is an author and foreign correspondent for the Sunday Times and in this series of One to One she explores family legacies.

In the final of her three programmes, she explores what it's like to grow up the son or daughter of someone regarded as one of the most evil people on earth. And what happens if you are not aware of that legacy - how do you come to terms with it ?

Few people are seen as more of a byword for barbarity than Idi Amin, the Ugandan despot whose regime killed as many as 400,000 people when he was President from 1971 to 1979.

Christina Lamb talks to Lady Khadija Idi Amin dada, born in Saudi Arabia where her father was living in exile until he died. She tells Christina about her childhood and not being aware of her father's brutal legacy.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Christina Lamb Talks To Ziauddin Yousafzai - Malala's Dad.20150331

Christina Lamb is an author and foreign correspondent for the Sunday Times and in this series of One to One she explores the issues around family legacies.

In the second of three programmes, Christina looks at what can happen when you build a legacy only to find it overshadowed by your child's fame. Ziauddin is father of the world's most famous schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai.

Malala was shot by the Taleban in Pakistan in October 2012 for standing up for her rights to an education. While extremely proud of his daughter's bravery and her campaigning, he tells Christina where her passion stems from and that for him it's important to return to his home village and continue with his own work.

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

Christina Lamb Talks To Ziauddin Yousafzai - Malala's Dad.20150331

Christina Lamb is an author and foreign correspondent for the Sunday Times and in this series of One to One she explores the issues around family legacies.

In the second of three programmes, Christina looks at what can happen when you build a legacy only to find it overshadowed by your child's fame. Ziauddin is father of the world's most famous schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai.

Malala was shot by the Taleban in Pakistan in October 2012 for standing up for her rights to an education. While extremely proud of his daughter's bravery and her campaigning, he tells Christina where her passion stems from and that for him it's important to return to his home village and continue with his own work.

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

City Women And Motherhood20140225

Andrea Catherwood decided to give up her career as a foreign correspondent after she had her first child as leaving him for weeks or months at a time to report from the frontline was something she felt she wasn't able to do. Instead she moved into presenting the news.

Last month Nigel Farage said controversially that if women in the City were prepared to sacrifice family life they could do just as well as men.

But there are now a number of senior City women who do combine their careers with motherhood. Charlotte Crosswell is Chief Executive Officer of the trading derivatives platform of NASDAQ in London and a mother of one, so how does she make it work ?

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

City Women And Motherhood20140225

Andrea Catherwood decided to give up her career as a foreign correspondent after she had her first child as leaving him for weeks or months at a time to report from the frontline was something she felt she wasn't able to do. Instead she moved into presenting the news.

Last month Nigel Farage said controversially that if women in the City were prepared to sacrifice family life they could do just as well as men.

But there are now a number of senior City women who do combine their careers with motherhood. Charlotte Crosswell is Chief Executive Officer of the trading derivatives platform of NASDAQ in London and a mother of one, so how does she make it work ?

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Clive Myrie Talks To Alp Mehmet20130528

BBC News presenter, Clive Myrie, takes over the reins of 'One to One' for a three-part series on immigration.

As the son of Jamaican immigrants who came to the UK in the 1960s, Clive has a very personal take on this topic. He lived abroad as a foreign correspondent for almost 15 years, returning once or twice a year to see his family. After 2004 he noticed how much the UK was changing. The EU had expanded, Polish people were settling here in large numbers, and the transformation came as a shock to him.

In these interviews, Clive explores an immigrant's view of immigration. In the first programme, he speaks to Alp Mehmet, Vice-Chair of Migration Watch. Mehmet came to the UK at the age of 8, he went on to become an immigration officer and Ambassador to Iceland. As someone who was born abroad and has lived and worked in many different countries, what are his views on immigration and have they changed during his time with an organisation which has itself attracted plenty of controversy on the subject.

Clive Myrie Talks To Alp Mehmet20130528

BBC News presenter, Clive Myrie, takes over the reins of 'One to One' for a three-part series on immigration.

As the son of Jamaican immigrants who came to the UK in the 1960s, Clive has a very personal take on this topic. He lived abroad as a foreign correspondent for almost 15 years, returning once or twice a year to see his family. After 2004 he noticed how much the UK was changing. The EU had expanded, Polish people were settling here in large numbers, and the transformation came as a shock to him.

In these interviews, Clive explores an immigrant's view of immigration. In the first programme, he speaks to Alp Mehmet, Vice-Chair of Migration Watch. Mehmet came to the UK at the age of 8, he went on to become an immigration officer and Ambassador to Iceland. As someone who was born abroad and has lived and worked in many different countries, what are his views on immigration and have they changed during his time with an organisation which has itself attracted plenty of controversy on the subject.

Clive Myrie Talks To Mike Nowak20130611

BBC News presenter, Clive Myrie, presents the last of three interviews on immigration as seen from an immigrant's point of view.

As the son of Jamaican immigrants who came to the UK in the 1960s, Clive has a personal interest in this topic. Clive lived abroad as a foreign correspondent for almost 15 years, returning once or twice a year to see his family. After 2004 he noticed how much the UK was changing: the EU had expanded, Polish people were settling here in large numbers and the transformation came as a shock.

In the first programme he spoke to Alp Mehmet, Vice-Chair of Migration Watch. Then he met Sylvia Emenike who came to the UK from Jamaica in the 1950s and explored her experience of seeing other immigrant communities settling in the UK. In this, his third and final interview, he speaks to Mike Nowak, a Pole who lived for many years in Britain, but who has now returned home to Warsaw.

Mike came to England long before the 2004 enlargement of the European Union, so witnessed the increase in Polish immigration for himself. Suddenly he was able to speak in his mother-tongue all day, every day, and witnessed Polish shops and businesses starting up around him.

Recently he made the decision to return to Warsaw. Clive asks what changes Mike has seen back in Poland since he first left, and finds out where Polish opinion stands on further EU immigration.

Clive Myrie Talks To Mike Nowak20130611

BBC News presenter, Clive Myrie, presents the last of three interviews on immigration as seen from an immigrant's point of view.

As the son of Jamaican immigrants who came to the UK in the 1960s, Clive has a personal interest in this topic. Clive lived abroad as a foreign correspondent for almost 15 years, returning once or twice a year to see his family. After 2004 he noticed how much the UK was changing: the EU had expanded, Polish people were settling here in large numbers and the transformation came as a shock.

In the first programme he spoke to Alp Mehmet, Vice-Chair of Migration Watch. Then he met Sylvia Emenike who came to the UK from Jamaica in the 1950s and explored her experience of seeing other immigrant communities settling in the UK. In this, his third and final interview, he speaks to Mike Nowak, a Pole who lived for many years in Britain, but who has now returned home to Warsaw.

Mike came to England long before the 2004 enlargement of the European Union, so witnessed the increase in Polish immigration for himself. Suddenly he was able to speak in his mother-tongue all day, every day, and witnessed Polish shops and businesses starting up around him.

Recently he made the decision to return to Warsaw. Clive asks what changes Mike has seen back in Poland since he first left, and finds out where Polish opinion stands on further EU immigration.

Clive Myrie Talks To Sylvia Emenike20130604

BBC News presenter, Clive Myrie, presents the second of his three interviews on immigration as seen from an immigrant's point of view.

As the son of Jamaican immigrants who came to the UK in the 1960s, Clive has a personal interest in this topic. Clive lived abroad as a foreign correspondent for almost 15 years, returning once or twice a year to see his family. After 2004 he noticed how much the UK was changing: the EU had expanded, Polish people were settling here in large numbers and the transformation came as a shock.

In the first programme he spoke to Alp Mehmet, Vice-Chair of Migration Watch. This week he meets Sylvia Emenike. Sylvia came to the UK from Jamaica in the 1950s.

Clive will explore with Sylvia what her experience has been of living in the UK, but also of the changes she has seen since she moved here and her feelings about the waves of immigration that she's seen from other parts of the world.

Clive Myrie Talks To Sylvia Emenike20130604

BBC News presenter, Clive Myrie, presents the second of his three interviews on immigration as seen from an immigrant's point of view.

As the son of Jamaican immigrants who came to the UK in the 1960s, Clive has a personal interest in this topic. Clive lived abroad as a foreign correspondent for almost 15 years, returning once or twice a year to see his family. After 2004 he noticed how much the UK was changing: the EU had expanded, Polish people were settling here in large numbers and the transformation came as a shock.

In the first programme he spoke to Alp Mehmet, Vice-Chair of Migration Watch. This week he meets Sylvia Emenike. Sylvia came to the UK from Jamaica in the 1950s.

Clive will explore with Sylvia what her experience has been of living in the UK, but also of the changes she has seen since she moved here and her feelings about the waves of immigration that she's seen from other parts of the world.

Coming Back From The Brink20170803

Broadcaster Primrose Granville talks to chef Henroy Brown about recovering from illness.

Community Radio Broadcaster of the Year, Primrose Granville talks to the Jamaican chef Henroy Brown about his near death experience as a young man in his twenties, when he was diagnosed first with Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma, and then with the near fatal Steven Johnson syndrome.

She herself came through a very traumatic point in her own life. In 2003 she was an Early Years/Special Needs practitioner with dreams of becoming a Head Teacher, married with a young son.
Then a freak incident ended all of that. Within 18 months she was unemployed, unemployable, separated and with no financial security. She was also mourning the loss of her father.
"For years I did nothing & felt like nothing until someone introduced me to community radio." she says "Being out of work was the worst thing that ever happened to me, even more than the loss of my marriage, my father & my financial freedom. I knew I had ambition but others didn't seem to. However, I never gave up, as losing my ambition was one loss too many."

Primrose asks Henroy what gave him the strength to carry on when he was at his lowest point, and how he has managed to rebuild his life.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Coming Back From The Brink20170803

Broadcaster Primrose Granville talks to chef Henroy Brown about recovering from illness.

Community Radio Broadcaster of the Year, Primrose Granville talks to the Jamaican chef Henroy Brown about his near death experience as a young man in his twenties, when he was diagnosed first with Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma, and then with the near fatal Steven Johnson syndrome.

She herself came through a very traumatic point in her own life. In 2003 she was an Early Years/Special Needs practitioner with dreams of becoming a Head Teacher, married with a young son.
Then a freak incident ended all of that. Within 18 months she was unemployed, unemployable, separated and with no financial security. She was also mourning the loss of her father.
"For years I did nothing and felt like nothing until someone introduced me to community radio." she says "Being out of work was the worst thing that ever happened to me, even more than the loss of my marriage, my father and my financial freedom. I knew I had ambition but others didn't seem to. However, I never gave up, as losing my ambition was one loss too many."

Primrose asks Henroy what gave him the strength to carry on when he was at his lowest point, and how he has managed to rebuild his life.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Datshiane Navanayagam Speaks To Helen Pike20160719

Unexpected educational journeys: the journalist Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to the first female head teacher in the 500 year history of Magdalen College School in Oxford.

The journalist Datshiane Navanayagam had a challenging childhood punctuated by periods of homelessness but she was always expected to achieve academically. She won a bursary to a private school which led her onto Cambridge University. As a result she's fascinated by the transformative role education can have. For One to One she's speaking to three people who have been on unexpected educational journeys.

Today she meets Helen Pike. Born in Preston and educated entirely in the state sector, Helen Pike has almost exclusively worked in private schools and has just been appointed as the first female head teacher in the 500 year history of the independent Magdalen College School. At one stage she was the head teacher of the school that Datshiane attended (although not while Datshiane was there). They speak about background, confidence and breaking boundaries.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Datshiane Navanayagam Speaks To Helen Pike20160719

Unexpected educational journeys: the journalist Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to the first female head teacher in the 500 year history of Magdalen College School in Oxford.

The journalist Datshiane Navanayagam had a challenging childhood punctuated by periods of homelessness but she was always expected to achieve academically. She won a bursary to a private school which led her onto Cambridge University. As a result she's fascinated by the transformative role education can have. For One to One she's speaking to three people who have been on unexpected educational journeys.

Today she meets Helen Pike. Born in Preston and educated entirely in the state sector, Helen Pike has almost exclusively worked in private schools and has just been appointed as the first female head teacher in the 500 year history of the independent Magdalen College School. At one stage she was the head teacher of the school that Datshiane attended (although not while Datshiane was there). They speak about background, confidence and breaking boundaries.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Datshiane Navanayagam Speaks To Soweto Kinch20160705

Unexpected stories of education: Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to the musician and broadcaster Soweto Kinch about his experience as an inner-city child of going to a private school.

The journalist Datshiane Navanayagam had a challenging childhood which involved periods of homelessness. But her parents always had high expectations of her and what she could achieve educationally. She was awarded a bursary to a private school, and went onto Oxford University. As a result she's fascinated by the transformative role of education and for three editions of One to One is speaking to people who went on unexpected educational journeys.

Today she meets the musician and broadcaster Soweto Kinch. Soweto was brought up in inner city Birmingham, but from the age of nine was educated in private schools. On a daily basis he found himself crossing cultural boundaries and confounding expectations. He discusses this experience with Datshiane in terms of the confidence it gave him, and in the context of his West Indian heritage.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Datshiane Navanayagam Speaks To Soweto Kinch20160705

Unexpected stories of education: Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to the musician and broadcaster Soweto Kinch about his experience as an inner-city child of going to a private school.

The journalist Datshiane Navanayagam had a challenging childhood which involved periods of homelessness. But her parents always had high expectations of her and what she could achieve educationally. She was awarded a bursary to a private school, and went onto Oxford University. As a result she's fascinated by the transformative role of education and for three editions of One to One is speaking to people who went on unexpected educational journeys.

Today she meets the musician and broadcaster Soweto Kinch. Soweto was brought up in inner city Birmingham, but from the age of nine was educated in private schools. On a daily basis he found himself crossing cultural boundaries and confounding expectations. He discusses this experience with Datshiane in terms of the confidence it gave him, and in the context of his West Indian heritage.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Datshiane Navanayagam Speaks To Soweto Kinch20170608

Datshiane Navanayagam talks to Soweto Kinch about his unexpected educational journey.

Unexpected stories of education: Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to the musician and broadcaster Soweto Kinch about his experience as an inner-city child of going to a private school.

The journalist Datshiane Navanayagam had a challenging childhood which involved periods of homelessness. But her parents always had high expectations of her and what she could achieve educationally. She was awarded a bursary to a private school, and went onto Cambridge University. As a result she's fascinated by the transformative role of education and for three editions of One to One is speaking to people who went on unexpected educational journeys.

Today she meets the musician and broadcaster Soweto Kinch. Soweto was brought up in inner city Birmingham, but from the age of nine was educated in private schools. On a daily basis he found himself crossing cultural boundaries and confounding expectations. He discusses this experience with Datshiane in terms of the confidence it gave him, and in the context of his West Indian heritage.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Datshiane Navanayagam Speaks To Soweto Kinch20170608

Datshiane Navanayagam talks to Soweto Kinch about his unexpected educational journey.

Unexpected stories of education: Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to the musician and broadcaster Soweto Kinch about his experience as an inner-city child of going to a private school.

The journalist Datshiane Navanayagam had a challenging childhood which involved periods of homelessness. But her parents always had high expectations of her and what she could achieve educationally. She was awarded a bursary to a private school, and went onto Cambridge University. As a result she's fascinated by the transformative role of education and for three editions of One to One is speaking to people who went on unexpected educational journeys.

Today she meets the musician and broadcaster Soweto Kinch. Soweto was brought up in inner city Birmingham, but from the age of nine was educated in private schools. On a daily basis he found himself crossing cultural boundaries and confounding expectations. He discusses this experience with Datshiane in terms of the confidence it gave him, and in the context of his West Indian heritage.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Datshiane Navanayagam talks to Soweto Kinch about his unexpected educational journey.

Unexpected stories of education: Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to the musician and broadcaster Soweto Kinch about his experience as an inner-city child of going to a private school.

The journalist Datshiane Navanayagam had a challenging childhood which involved periods of homelessness. But her parents always had high expectations of her and what she could achieve educationally. She was awarded a bursary to a private school, and went onto Cambridge University. As a result she's fascinated by the transformative role of education and for three editions of One to One is speaking to people who went on unexpected educational journeys.

Today she meets the musician and broadcaster Soweto Kinch. Soweto was brought up in inner city Birmingham, but from the age of nine was educated in private schools. On a daily basis he found himself crossing cultural boundaries and confounding expectations. He discusses this experience with Datshiane in terms of the confidence it gave him, and in the context of his West Indian heritage.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Datshiane Navanayagam Speaks To Val Mcdermid20160712

Unexpected stories of education: The journalist Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to the crime writer, Val McDermid, about an unusual educational experiment she was part of in the 1960s.

Datshiane Navanayagam had a difficult childhood punctuated by periods of homelessness, but she was always expected to achieve educationally and won a bursary to a private school which led her onto Cambridge University. As a result she's fascinated by the transformative role of education and for three editions of One to One is speaking to people who went on an unexpected educational journey.

Today she meets the crime writer, Val McDermid, who was part of an educational experiment in the 1960s which separated her from her peers and pushed her forward by a year.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Datshiane Navanayagam Speaks To Val Mcdermid20160712

Unexpected stories of education: The journalist Datshiane Navanayagam speaks to the crime writer, Val McDermid, about an unusual educational experiment she was part of in the 1960s.

Datshiane Navanayagam had a difficult childhood punctuated by periods of homelessness, but she was always expected to achieve educationally and won a bursary to a private school which led her onto Cambridge University. As a result she's fascinated by the transformative role of education and for three editions of One to One is speaking to people who went on an unexpected educational journey.

Today she meets the crime writer, Val McDermid, who was part of an educational experiment in the 1960s which separated her from her peers and pushed her forward by a year.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

David Greig And Angela Mudge20160607

What does it take to be a successful runner of extreme distance and why do people do it?

David Greig is the Artistic Director of the Lyceum Theatre in Edinburgh and an internationally successful playwright. He's also an ultra-marathon runner who has twice completed the punishing 96 mile West Highland Way as well as many other long-distance races. He took up running fifteen years ago when he stopped smoking and running has since become an endorphin-fuelled obsession.

For One to One, David speaks to two fellow runners. Last week, he met Ben Smith who is attempting to set a world record by running 401 marathons on 401 consecutive days. Today he speaks to former world hill running champion, Angela Mudge. Born with birth defects that affected her feet, Angela spent the first two and half years of life almost continually with her lower legs and feet in plaster. Despite this, she went onto be a hugely successful long-distance runner. Her most memorable race was when she became the first woman to break three hours when she won the Sierre-Zinal - 'the race of the 4000m peaks'.

But why do they do it?

Producer: Karen Gregor.

David Greig And Angela Mudge20160607

What does it take to be a successful runner of extreme distance and why do people do it?

David Greig is the Artistic Director of the Lyceum Theatre in Edinburgh and an internationally successful playwright. He's also an ultra-marathon runner who has twice completed the punishing 96 mile West Highland Way as well as many other long-distance races. He took up running fifteen years ago when he stopped smoking and running has since become an endorphin-fuelled obsession.

For One to One, David speaks to two fellow runners. Last week, he met Ben Smith who is attempting to set a world record by running 401 marathons on 401 consecutive days. Today he speaks to former world hill running champion, Angela Mudge. Born with birth defects that affected her feet, Angela spent the first two and half years of life almost continually with her lower legs and feet in plaster. Despite this, she went onto be a hugely successful long-distance runner. Her most memorable race was when she became the first woman to break three hours when she won the Sierre-Zinal - 'the race of the 4000m peaks'.

But why do they do it?

Producer: Karen Gregor.

David Greig And Ben Smith20160531

What does it take to be a successful runner of extreme distance, and why do people do it? David Greig finds out in the next two editions of One to One.

David Greig is the Artistic Director of the Lyceum Theatre in Edinburgh and an internationally successful playwright. He's also an ultra-marathon runner who has twice completed the punishing 96 mile West Highland Way amongst many other long-distance races. He took up running fifteen years ago when he stopped smoking and running has since become an endorphin-fuelled obsession.

For One to One, David speaks to two fellow runners. In this, the first programme, he meets Ben Smith who is attempting to set a world record by running 401 marathons on 401 consecutive days. Following a difficult childhood and a challenging time during his 20s, Ben discovered running and it became a form of confidence building and healing. Out of this new sense of confidence, Ben decided to set himself an outlandish challenge, and the 401 was the result. Ben is eating 6,500 calories a day, his body had changed physiologically and his heart is bigger, so when the task is complete, he can't simply stop: Ben will have to run half-marathons, then 10ks for several months, adjust his diet and try, somehow, to get back to normal.

Next week David speaks to former world hill running champion, Angela Mudge.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

David Greig And Ben Smith20160531

What does it take to be a successful runner of extreme distance, and why do people do it? David Greig finds out in the next two editions of One to One.

David Greig is the Artistic Director of the Lyceum Theatre in Edinburgh and an internationally successful playwright. He's also an ultra-marathon runner who has twice completed the punishing 96 mile West Highland Way amongst many other long-distance races. He took up running fifteen years ago when he stopped smoking and running has since become an endorphin-fuelled obsession.

For One to One, David speaks to two fellow runners. In this, the first programme, he meets Ben Smith who is attempting to set a world record by running 401 marathons on 401 consecutive days. Following a difficult childhood and a challenging time during his 20s, Ben discovered running and it became a form of confidence building and healing. Out of this new sense of confidence, Ben decided to set himself an outlandish challenge, and the 401 was the result. Ben is eating 6,500 calories a day, his body had changed physiologically and his heart is bigger, so when the task is complete, he can't simply stop: Ben will have to run half-marathons, then 10ks for several months, adjust his diet and try, somehow, to get back to normal.

Next week David speaks to former world hill running champion, Angela Mudge.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

David Loyn Talks To Hekmat Karzai20140325

Next month, Afghanistan goes to the polls and its president, Hamid Karzai steps down. The BBC's Kabul correspondent, David Loyn, talks to his cousin, political analyst Hekmat Karzai. Western-educated and urbane, Hekmat Karzai nonetheless has to operate in a system where what your grandfather did can be more important than your own achievements, and where blood feuds can cut short a political career - both his father and his nephew were assassinated. What chance does Afghanistan have of moving towards a stable democracy?

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.

David Loyn Talks To Hekmat Karzai20140325

Next month, Afghanistan goes to the polls and its president, Hamid Karzai steps down. The BBC's Kabul correspondent, David Loyn, talks to his cousin, political analyst Hekmat Karzai. Western-educated and urbane, Hekmat Karzai nonetheless has to operate in a system where what your grandfather did can be more important than your own achievements, and where blood feuds can cut short a political career - both his father and his nephew were assassinated. What chance does Afghanistan have of moving towards a stable democracy?

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.

David Loyn Talks To Soraya Pakzat20140318

As western forces prepare to withdraw from Afghanistan, and the country faces elections, the BBC's Kabul correspondent David Loyn talks to Soraya Pakzat, a woman's rights campaigner. She tells him of how she has rescued young girls sold in marriage, of the extraordinary Afghan crime of "running away", and of her fears for the future of women in the country.

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins

David Loyn Talks To Soraya Pakzat20140318

As western forces prepare to withdraw from Afghanistan, and the country faces elections, the BBC's Kabul correspondent David Loyn talks to Soraya Pakzat, a woman's rights campaigner. She tells him of how she has rescued young girls sold in marriage, of the extraordinary Afghan crime of "running away", and of her fears for the future of women in the country.

Producer: Jolyon Jenkins.

David Schneider Talks To Palliative Care Consultant Kathryn Mannix20151110

David Schneider is terrified of death. In his two editions of One to One he wants to try to overcome his fear by talking to those who have first-hand understanding of dying. In this programme, he talks to Palliative Care consultant, Kathryn Mannix. With almost forty years of clinical experience and witnessing over twelve thousand deaths, she believes that a 'good death' is possible even when you are seriously ill. She explains the process of dying to David. This, she believes, if accepted by the patient, removes much of the anxiety and fear surrounding the end of life.

To hear an extended version of this programme please visit the programme page.

Next week he talks to writer and journalist, Jenny Diski, who has been diagnosed with terminal cancer.

Producer: Lucy Lunt

David Schneider Talks To Palliative Care Consultant Kathryn Mannix20151110

David Schneider is terrified of death. In his two editions of One to One he wants to try to overcome his fear by talking to those who have first-hand understanding of dying. In this programme, he talks to Palliative Care consultant, Kathryn Mannix. With almost forty years of clinical experience and witnessing over twelve thousand deaths, she believes that a 'good death' is possible even when you are seriously ill. She explains the process of dying to David. This, she believes, if accepted by the patient, removes much of the anxiety and fear surrounding the end of life.

To hear an extended version of this programme please visit the programme page.

Next week he talks to writer and journalist, Jenny Diski, who has been diagnosed with terminal cancer.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

David Schneider With Jenny Diski20151117

David Schneider, despite being healthy, is terrified of dying. He wants to overcome his fears and find out whether a 'good death' is ever possible and how those facing up to it, cope. He visits the journalist and writer Jenny Diski who was told last summer that she had inoperable lung cancer and, at best, another three years to live. She now writes about the experience and her treatment, with her usual wit and candour, and her tweets have a devoted following. But as she says, 'I tell jokes but that doesn't mean that I'm not terrified at the prospect of my own non-existence.' They discuss this fear, what it is they are afraid of and whether faith might make a difference.

Producer: Lucy Lunt

David Schneider With Jenny Diski20151117

David Schneider, despite being healthy, is terrified of dying. He wants to overcome his fears and find out whether a 'good death' is ever possible and how those facing up to it, cope. He visits the journalist and writer Jenny Diski who was told last summer that she had inoperable lung cancer and, at best, another three years to live. She now writes about the experience and her treatment, with her usual wit and candour, and her tweets have a devoted following. But as she says, 'I tell jokes but that doesn't mean that I'm not terrified at the prospect of my own non-existence.' They discuss this fear, what it is they are afraid of and whether faith might make a difference.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Emma Barnett20140304

Emma Barnett is 29 and Women's Editor of the Daily Telegraph. She regards herself as a feminist, she demands equality in the workplace and in all aspects of her secular life. But she has a secret: as an orthodox Jew, when attending synagogue, she is happy to sit separately from the men, not to take part in the service and finds it hard to embrace the concept of women rabbis.

For the next two weeks in One to One, Emma tries to get to resolve this contradiction by talking to women who also wrestle with this dilemma; when the values you hold in secular life are not the same as those in your religious life, those you hold in your public life may not be the same as those in your private life.

Emma says; 'This is an uncomfortable position, I want to rid my brain of these views, which don't make sense to me in my daily life. I would like unpack this double standard and get rid of this illogical hypocrisy.'

This week she talks to a highly successful barrister, feminist and orthodox jew who explains how she relieves the tensions raised by her contradictory life.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Emma Barnett20140304

Emma Barnett is 29 and Women's Editor of the Daily Telegraph. She regards herself as a feminist, she demands equality in the workplace and in all aspects of her secular life. But she has a secret: as an orthodox Jew, when attending synagogue, she is happy to sit separately from the men, not to take part in the service and finds it hard to embrace the concept of women rabbis.

For the next two weeks in One to One, Emma tries to get to resolve this contradiction by talking to women who also wrestle with this dilemma; when the values you hold in secular life are not the same as those in your religious life, those you hold in your public life may not be the same as those in your private life.

Emma says; 'This is an uncomfortable position, I want to rid my brain of these views, which don't make sense to me in my daily life. I would like unpack this double standard and get rid of this illogical hypocrisy.'

This week she talks to a highly successful barrister, feminist and orthodox jew who explains how she relieves the tensions raised by her contradictory life.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Emma Barnett Talks To Rabbi Sylvia Rothschild20140311

Emma Barnett is 29 and the Women's Editor of the Daily Telegraph. She regards herself as a feminist, she demands equality in the workplace and in all aspects of her secular life. But she has a secret: as an orthodox Jew, when attending synagogue, she is happy to sit separately from the men, not to take part in the service and is finding it hard to embrace the concept of women rabbis.

In this second of two programmes for One to One, she discusses her prejudice with Rabbi Sylvia Rothschild who, when faced with the comment 'I don't really believe in a female Rabbi', retorts, 'Well I'm not Tinkerbell'.

Can Emma resolve the conflict between her public and her private life; the contradiction between her feminist self and her religious self?

Producer: Lucy Lunt

Emma Barnett Talks To Rabbi Sylvia Rothschild20140311

Emma Barnett is 29 and the Women's Editor of the Daily Telegraph. She regards herself as a feminist, she demands equality in the workplace and in all aspects of her secular life. But she has a secret: as an orthodox Jew, when attending synagogue, she is happy to sit separately from the men, not to take part in the service and is finding it hard to embrace the concept of women rabbis.

In this second of two programmes for One to One, she discusses her prejudice with Rabbi Sylvia Rothschild who, when faced with the comment 'I don't really believe in a female Rabbi', retorts, 'Well I'm not Tinkerbell'.

Can Emma resolve the conflict between her public and her private life; the contradiction between her feminist self and her religious self?

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis Talks To Penny Gadd20120501

Evan Davis continues his exploration into deception by talking to those who've had cause to be economical with the truth. We think of truth and falsehood as simple binary concepts. Statements surely have to be one or the other. Well not quite. In these interviews Evan meets people who've found themselves on the fuzzy boundary between truth and falsehood. This week he meets Penny Gadd who lead life as a married man but who became more and more aware that she needed to change sex. She'd concealed her feelings for years and as in so many deceptions she'd concealed them from herself too.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis talks to Penny, who for decades concealed her true self.

Evan Davis Talks To Penny Gadd20120501

Evan Davis continues his exploration into deception by talking to those who've had cause to be economical with the truth. We think of truth and falsehood as simple binary concepts. Statements surely have to be one or the other. Well not quite. In these interviews Evan meets people who've found themselves on the fuzzy boundary between truth and falsehood. This week he meets Penny Gadd who lead life as a married man but who became more and more aware that she needed to change sex. She'd concealed her feelings for years and as in so many deceptions she'd concealed them from herself too.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis talks to Penny, who for decades concealed her true self.

Evan Davis continues his exploration into deception by talking to those who've had cause to be economical with the truth. We think of truth and falsehood as simple binary concepts. Statements surely have to be one or the other. Well not quite. In these interviews Evan meets people who've found themselves on the fuzzy boundary between truth and falsehood. This week he meets Penny Gadd who lead life as a married man but who became more and more aware that she needed to change sex. She'd concealed her feelings for years and as in so many deceptions she'd concealed them from herself too.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis talks to Penny, who for decades concealed her true self.

Evan Davis Talks To Rob George20120424

Evan Davis explores the issue of deception by talking to those who have had cause to be economical with the truth. From doctors, guilty of well intentioned obfuscation, to ex-fraudsters skilled at outright lies, over the next four weeks, as Evan takes over the One to One chair, he discusses the complicated truth about lying with those, for whom the truth is rarely plain and never simple.

In the first programme he talks to Rob George, Consultant in Palliative Care who explains why complete honesty is not always in the best interest of the patient and his need to second guess what information the terminally ill need and when.

Evan Davis Talks To Rob George20120424

Evan Davis explores the issue of deception by talking to those who have had cause to be economical with the truth. From doctors, guilty of well intentioned obfuscation, to ex-fraudsters skilled at outright lies, over the next four weeks, as Evan takes over the One to One chair, he discusses the complicated truth about lying with those, for whom the truth is rarely plain and never simple.

In the first programme he talks to Rob George, Consultant in Palliative Care who explains why complete honesty is not always in the best interest of the patient and his need to second guess what information the terminally ill need and when.

Evan Davis explores the issue of deception by talking to those who have had cause to be economical with the truth. From doctors, guilty of well intentioned obfuscation, to ex-fraudsters skilled at outright lies, over the next four weeks, as Evan takes over the One to One chair, he discusses the complicated truth about lying with those, for whom the truth is rarely plain and never simple.

In the first programme he talks to Rob George, Consultant in Palliative Care who explains why complete honesty is not always in the best interest of the patient and his need to second guess what information the terminally ill need and when.

A palliative care consultant discusses the place of honesty in matters of life and death.

Evan Davis With Elliot Castro20111129

Evan Davis continues his exploration into deception by talking to those who've had cause to be economical with the truth. Today he talks to convicted fraudster Elliot Castro. Elliot was a teenage credit-card thief who found the buzz he got from lying about his identity was truly addictive.Yet when he was finally caught six years later, it was a relief. He talks to Evan about why he started lying and how it overtook his life, bringing material comfort and excitement but also social isolation. He says his career in fraud lasted so long because he often managed to lie to himself as well as others.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis talks to convicted fraudster Elliot Castro.

Evan Davis With Penny Gadd20111115
Evan Davis With Steve Henry20111122

Evan Davis continues his exploration into deception by talking to those who've had cause to be economical with the truth. Everyday we're bombarded with messages from people who are trying to sell us things , objects to buy, political messages or even just themselves. But how far should they go in putting a positive gloss on things, manipulating the truth to persuade us that mutton is lamb, sub-prime is prime or recession is recovery? In this programme Evan talks to a top advertiser who'll share his thoughts on some tricks of the trade but also the limits to those tricks, how to deceive and when not to.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis talks to advertising executive Steve Henry about deception.

Fi Glover Talks To Alice Taylor20120515
Fi Glover Talks To Alice Taylor20120515
Fi Glover Talks To Dan Crow20120508

In the new series of One to One, in which some of our most respected broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most, Fi Glover meets some of the men and women who've founded new tech companies that are putting Silicon Roundabout in East London on the map.

Living locally, Fi's been fascinated by the way this area of Hackney has rapidly become the third most important technical start up centre in the world.- after Silicon Valley and New York. As a magnet to some of the most enterprising and innovative internet companies, Old Street Roundabout has been renamed, Silicon Roundabout. This generation of entrepreneurs are bringing back some old British business values ; inventive, risk taking and barrier breaking. In the first programme she meets a veteran of Silicon Valley, Dan Crowe. Now the chief technology officer at Songkick, he's had the expected triumphs and disasters in internet start-ups but feels this quiet revolution, that's happening now in Hackney, may have a real impact in changing the economic fortunes of Britain.

He explains to Fi why this should make us cheerful, a survey from the Boston Consulting Group recently put the UK as the leader of the G20 nations in our internet economy - so we are top at something after all.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Fi Glover talks to the founders of the new tech companies in Silicone Roundabout, Hackney.

Fi Glover Talks To Dan Crow20120508

In the new series of One to One, in which some of our most respected broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most, Fi Glover meets some of the men and women who've founded new tech companies that are putting Silicon Roundabout in East London on the map.

Living locally, Fi's been fascinated by the way this area of Hackney has rapidly become the third most important technical start up centre in the world.- after Silicon Valley and New York. As a magnet to some of the most enterprising and innovative internet companies, Old Street Roundabout has been renamed, Silicon Roundabout. This generation of entrepreneurs are bringing back some old British business values ; inventive, risk taking and barrier breaking. In the first programme she meets a veteran of Silicon Valley, Dan Crowe. Now the chief technology officer at Songkick, he's had the expected triumphs and disasters in internet start-ups but feels this quiet revolution, that's happening now in Hackney, may have a real impact in changing the economic fortunes of Britain.

He explains to Fi why this should make us cheerful, a survey from the Boston Consulting Group recently put the UK as the leader of the G20 nations in our internet economy - so we are top at something after all.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Fi Glover talks to the founders of the new tech companies in Silicone Roundabout, Hackney.

In the new series of One to One, in which some of our most respected broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most, Fi Glover meets some of the men and women who've founded new tech companies that are putting Silicon Roundabout in East London on the map.

Living locally, Fi's been fascinated by the way this area of Hackney has rapidly become the third most important technical start up centre in the world.- after Silicon Valley and New York. As a magnet to some of the most enterprising and innovative internet companies, Old Street Roundabout has been renamed, Silicon Roundabout. This generation of entrepreneurs are bringing back some old British business values ; inventive, risk taking and barrier breaking. In the first programme she meets a veteran of Silicon Valley, Dan Crowe. Now the chief technology officer at Songkick, he's had the expected triumphs and disasters in internet start-ups but feels this quiet revolution, that's happening now in Hackney, may have a real impact in changing the economic fortunes of Britain.

He explains to Fi why this should make us cheerful, a survey from the Boston Consulting Group recently put the UK as the leader of the G20 nations in our internet economy - so we are top at something after all.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

In the new series of One to One, in which some of our most respected broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most, Fi Glover meets some of the men and women who've founded new tech companies that are putting Silicon Roundabout in East London on the map.

Living locally, Fi's been fascinated by the way this area of Hackney has rapidly become the third most important technical start up centre in the world.- after Silicon Valley and New York. As a magnet to some of the most enterprising and innovative internet companies, Old Street Roundabout has been renamed, Silicon Roundabout. This generation of entrepreneurs are bringing back some old British business values ; inventive, risk taking and barrier breaking. In the first programme she meets a veteran of Silicon Valley, Dan Crowe. Now the chief technology officer at Songkick, he's had the expected triumphs and disasters in internet start-ups but feels this quiet revolution, that's happening now in Hackney, may have a real impact in changing the economic fortunes of Britain.

He explains to Fi why this should make us cheerful, a survey from the Boston Consulting Group recently put the UK as the leader of the G20 nations in our internet economy - so we are top at something after all.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Fi Glover talks to the founders of the new tech companies in Silicone Roundabout, Hackney.

Fi Glover Talks To Tom Allason20120522

As a resident of Hackney, Fi Glover has been fascinated by the way her home patch is being turned into one of the world's most important internet start up centres. Old Street Roundabout has been renamed Silicon Roundabout. In this series of One to One she talks to the men and women responsible for this boom. She wants to know more about this generation of tech gurus, as part of our economic future lies in their hands and in their dreams. In this final programme in her series she talks to Tom Allason, chief executive of Shutl, a courier business that's grown 50% month on month since it started two years ago. Tom explains that it's his past failures that have led to his present success. Fi begs an invite to his exit event.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Fi Glover Talks To Tom Allason20120522

As a resident of Hackney, Fi Glover has been fascinated by the way her home patch is being turned into one of the world's most important internet start up centres. Old Street Roundabout has been renamed Silicon Roundabout. In this series of One to One she talks to the men and women responsible for this boom. She wants to know more about this generation of tech gurus, as part of our economic future lies in their hands and in their dreams. In this final programme in her series she talks to Tom Allason, chief executive of Shutl, a courier business that's grown 50% month on month since it started two years ago. Tom explains that it's his past failures that have led to his present success. Fi begs an invite to his exit event.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Frank Gardner Talks To Deborah Impiazzi20130903

Frank Gardner was shot several times by terrorists in Saudi Arabia in 2004, and suffered damage to his spinal nerve. He lost the use of his legs and is in a wheelchair for the rest of his life.

It was a catastrophic change to his life but having a supportive partner and being able to go back to work and continue with his career as a journalist for the BBC has been a key factor in his own recovery. In his third and final interview for the series 'One to One ', Frank meets Deborah Impiazzi who lost her sight and with it her job and her husband and explores how she is coping with this life changing trauma.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Frank Gardner Talks To Deborah Impiazzi20130903

Frank Gardner was shot several times by terrorists in Saudi Arabia in 2004, and suffered damage to his spinal nerve. He lost the use of his legs and is in a wheelchair for the rest of his life.

It was a catastrophic change to his life but having a supportive partner and being able to go back to work and continue with his career as a journalist for the BBC has been a key factor in his own recovery. In his third and final interview for the series 'One to One ', Frank meets Deborah Impiazzi who lost her sight and with it her job and her husband and explores how she is coping with this life changing trauma.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Frank Gardner Talks To Dr Stuart Butchart20130820

In 2004 , the BBC's Security Correspondent Frank Gardner was shot several times by terrorists while reporting in Saudi Arabia, some of those bullets hit the core of his body and damaged his spinal nerve which means that he can no longer use his legs and is in a wheelchair for the rest of his life. This was for him a catastrophic life changing injury. But while he was in hospital he received an email from someone who too had been shot in the back and said I've got some advice and tips on how to cope.In this first of three programmes for the series 'One to One' Frank Gardner explores how one copes with a life changing injury and begins by talking to Dr Stuart Butchart who gave Frank hope.

Presenter : Frank Gardner

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

Frank Gardner Talks To Dr Stuart Butchart20130820

In 2004 , the BBC's Security Correspondent Frank Gardner was shot several times by terrorists while reporting in Saudi Arabia, some of those bullets hit the core of his body and damaged his spinal nerve which means that he can no longer use his legs and is in a wheelchair for the rest of his life. This was for him a catastrophic life changing injury. But while he was in hospital he received an email from someone who too had been shot in the back and said I've got some advice and tips on how to cope.In this first of three programmes for the series 'One to One' Frank Gardner explores how one copes with a life changing injury and begins by talking to Dr Stuart Butchart who gave Frank hope.

Presenter : Frank Gardner

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

Frank Gardner Talks To Dr Stuart Butchart20170426

about coping with a life-changing injury.

In 2004 , the BBC's Security Correspondent Frank Gardner was shot several times by terrorists while reporting in Saudi Arabia, some of those bullets hit the core of his body and damaged his spinal nerve which means that he can no longer use his legs and is in a wheelchair for the rest of his life. This was for him a catastrophic life changing injury. But while he was in hospital he received an email from someone who too had been shot in the back and said- 'I've got some advice and tips on how to cope'. In this first of three programmes for the series 'One to One' Frank Gardner explores how one copes with a life changing injury and begins by talking to Dr Stuart Butchart who gave Frank hope.

Presenter : Frank Gardner
Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

Frank Gardner Talks To Dr Stuart Butchart20170426

Frank Gardner talks to Dr Stuart Butchart about coping with a life-changing injury.

In 2004 , the BBC's Security Correspondent Frank Gardner was shot several times by terrorists while reporting in Saudi Arabia, some of those bullets hit the core of his body and damaged his spinal nerve which means that he can no longer use his legs and is in a wheelchair for the rest of his life. This was for him a catastrophic life changing injury. But while he was in hospital he received an email from someone who too had been shot in the back and said- 'I've got some advice and tips on how to cope'. In this first of three programmes for the series 'One to One' Frank Gardner explores how one copes with a life changing injury and begins by talking to Dr Stuart Butchart who gave Frank hope.

Presenter : Frank Gardner
Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

Frank Gardner Talks To Tim Rushby-smith20130827

After a life changing injury or incident one of the things that makes a huge difference on how you then move on with the rest of your life is what you can still do and can't do.

The BBC's Security Correspondent Frank Gardner regards himself lucky that he was able to carry on doing journalism after being shot 9 years ago in Saudi Arabia by terrorists. Some of those bullets hit the core of his body and damaged his spinal nerve - he can no longer use his legs and is in a wheelchair for the rest of his life. However, being able to return to work and continue with his profession has been one of the biggest factors in his own recovery.

In this second programme for the series 'One to One', Frank meets Tim Rushby-Smith who fell from a tree and had to face the fact he would no longer be able to carry on with his profession and livelihood.

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

Frank Gardner Talks To Tim Rushby-smith20130827

After a life changing injury or incident one of the things that makes a huge difference on how you then move on with the rest of your life is what you can still do and can't do.

The BBC's Security Correspondent Frank Gardner regards himself lucky that he was able to carry on doing journalism after being shot 9 years ago in Saudi Arabia by terrorists. Some of those bullets hit the core of his body and damaged his spinal nerve - he can no longer use his legs and is in a wheelchair for the rest of his life. However, being able to return to work and continue with his profession has been one of the biggest factors in his own recovery.

In this second programme for the series 'One to One', Frank meets Tim Rushby-Smith who fell from a tree and had to face the fact he would no longer be able to carry on with his profession and livelihood.

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

Isabel Hardman on nature and depression20170926

"Can growing food can improve our mental health? Isabel talks to JK, a recovering alcoholic

Isabel Hardman of The Spectator asks whether growing food can improve our mental health. John Kennington or 'JK', as he's known, is a recovering alcoholic. He shares his life story with Isabel at Feed Bristol, a project that reconnects city dwellers with nature, while she explains how she learned to manage her own from being outdoors and growing plants.

Producer: Mark Smalley.

"

Isabel Hardman on nature and depression20170926

Can growing food can improve our mental health? Isabel talks to JK, a recovering alcoholic

Isabel Hardman of The Spectator asks whether growing food can improve our mental health. John Kennington or 'JK', as he's known, is a recovering alcoholic. He shares his life story with Isabel at Feed Bristol, a project that reconnects city dwellers with nature, while she explains how she learned to manage her own from being outdoors and growing plants.

Producer: Mark Smalley.

Isabel Hardman On Nature And Depression20170926

Can growing food can improve our mental health? Isabel talks to JK, a recovering alcoholic

Isabel Hardman of The Spectator asks whether growing food can improve our mental health. John Kennington or 'JK', as he's known, is a recovering alcoholic. He shares his life story with Isabel at Feed Bristol, a project that reconnects city dwellers with nature, while she explains how she learned to manage her own from being outdoors and growing plants.

Producer: Mark Smalley.

Isabel Oakeshott And Surrogacy20141021

Political journalist and commentator Isabel Oakeshott almost went down the route of surrogacy in India, after having four miscarriages when trying for her second child. In the end, she did have a baby naturally, but has always wondered about the route she almost took.

In the first of two interviews for One to One, she talks to Natalie, who had twins through a surrogate in the UK, and she explores how surrogacy works here.

Producer: Sara Conkey.

Isabel Oakeshott And Surrogacy20141021

Political journalist and commentator Isabel Oakeshott almost went down the route of surrogacy in India, after having four miscarriages when trying for her second child. In the end, she did have a baby naturally, but has always wondered about the route she almost took.

In the first of two interviews for One to One, she talks to Natalie, who had twins through a surrogate in the UK, and she explores how surrogacy works here.

Producer: Sara Conkey.

Isabel Oakeshott And Surrogacy20141028

Political journalist Isabel Oakeshott seriously considered surrogacy in India after having four miscarriages, when trying to have a second child. Although her fifth attempt at having a baby naturally worked, she's always wondered about the route she very nearly took.

In this series for One to One, Isabel talks to two mothers who went down the surrogacy road, one in the UK and now in the second of two programmes, to Rekha, who went to India in 2012 to try to have a baby there through surrogacy.

Producer: Sara Conkey.

Isabel Oakeshott And Surrogacy20141028

Political journalist Isabel Oakeshott seriously considered surrogacy in India after having four miscarriages, when trying to have a second child. Although her fifth attempt at having a baby naturally worked, she's always wondered about the route she very nearly took.

In this series for One to One, Isabel talks to two mothers who went down the surrogacy road, one in the UK and now in the second of two programmes, to Rekha, who went to India in 2012 to try to have a baby there through surrogacy.

Producer: Sara Conkey.

Jan Ravens Talks To Germaine Greer20160209

Jan Ravens has created impressions of some of our most iconic women but all she has to work with is the public persona, how someone in the public eye presents themselves for our view. In her series of One to One she talks to some of her subjects about their image as seen by others and how it differs from how they see themselves. Is image something they have consciously created or has it sprung naturally from their personality and from the way they look? Jan wants to know if their self perception is changed through their portrayal by impressionists and cartoonists.

Is image a useful tool, or does it become a millstone around your neck ?

Academic and author, Germaine Greer, has been in the public eye for over forty years, she talks to Jan about the way her image has changed over the decades.

Producer Lucy Lunt

Jan Ravens Talks To Germaine Greer20160209

Jan Ravens has created impressions of some of our most iconic women but all she has to work with is the public persona, how someone in the public eye presents themselves for our view. In her series of One to One she talks to some of her subjects about their image as seen by others and how it differs from how they see themselves. Is image something they have consciously created or has it sprung naturally from their personality and from the way they look? Jan wants to know if their self perception is changed through their portrayal by impressionists and cartoonists.

Is image a useful tool, or does it become a millstone around your neck ?

Academic and author, Germaine Greer, has been in the public eye for over forty years, she talks to Jan about the way her image has changed over the decades.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Jan Ravens Talks To Lyse Doucet20160216

Actress and impressionist, Jan Ravens talks to one of her favourite subjects, the BBC's Chief International Correspondent, Lyse Doucet. They discuss how much her public image reflects her private self and how much consideration she gives to clothes and jewellery when appearing on television.

Producer Lucy Lunt

Jan Ravens Talks To Lyse Doucet20160216

Actress and impressionist, Jan Ravens talks to one of her favourite subjects, the BBC's Chief International Correspondent, Lyse Doucet. They discuss how much her public image reflects her private self and how much consideration she gives to clothes and jewellery when appearing on television.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Jane Hill Meets Caroline Harding20140401

BBC presenter Jane Hill's father and uncle both lived with Parkinson's disease and, in the first of two programmes about people from families with inherited genetic disorders, she meets Caroline Harding. Caroline talks about her decision whether or not to have her second and third children tested after her first child was born with the rare condition HED (hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia).

Producer: Sally Heaven.

Jane Hill Meets Caroline Harding20140401

BBC presenter Jane Hill's father and uncle both lived with Parkinson's disease and, in the first of two programmes about people from families with inherited genetic disorders, she meets Caroline Harding. Caroline talks about her decision whether or not to have her second and third children tested after her first child was born with the rare condition HED (hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia).

Producer: Sally Heaven.

Jane Hill Meets Caroline Harding20170509

, who has two children with a rare genetic condition.

BBC presenter Jane Hill's father and uncle both lived with Parkinson's disease and, in the first of two programmes about people from families with inherited genetic disorders, she meets Caroline Harding. Caroline talks about her decision whether or not to have her second and third children tested after her first child was born with the rare condition HED (hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia).

Producer: Sally Heaven.

Jane Hill Meets Caroline Harding20170509

Jane Hill meets Caroline Harding, who has two children with a rare genetic condition.

BBC presenter Jane Hill's father and uncle both lived with Parkinson's disease and, in the first of two programmes about people from families with inherited genetic disorders, she meets Caroline Harding. Caroline talks about her decision whether or not to have her second and third children tested after her first child was born with the rare condition HED (hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia).

Producer: Sally Heaven.

Jane Hill Meets John Jennings20140408

More from the series where broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most. BBC newsreader Jane Hill's father and uncle both lived with Parkinson's disease, and in this series she talks to people from families with an inherited genetic disorder. In the second of two programmes she talks to John Jennings, who has a high chance of inheriting a rare form of early onset Alzheimer's disease. They discuss the emotional impact of having this disease in the family and his decision whether or not to get tested for the gene.

Producer: Sally Heaven.

Jane Hill Meets John Jennings20140408

More from the series where broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most. BBC newsreader Jane Hill's father and uncle both lived with Parkinson's disease, and in this series she talks to people from families with an inherited genetic disorder. In the second of two programmes she talks to John Jennings, who has a high chance of inheriting a rare form of early onset Alzheimer's disease. They discuss the emotional impact of having this disease in the family and his decision whether or not to get tested for the gene.

Producer: Sally Heaven.

Jane Hill Meets John Jennings20170516

, who does not know if he's inherited a gene for Alzheimer's.

More from the series where broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most. BBC newsreader Jane Hill's father and uncle both lived with Parkinson's disease, and in this series she talks to people from families with an inherited genetic disorder. In the second of two programmes she talks to John Jennings, who has a high chance of inheriting a rare form of early onset Alzheimer's disease. They discuss the emotional impact of having this disease in the family and his decision whether or not to get tested for the gene.
Producer: Sally Heaven.

Jane Hill Meets John Jennings20170516

Jane Hill meets John Jennings, who does not know if he's inherited a gene for Alzheimer's.

More from the series where broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most. BBC newsreader Jane Hill's father and uncle both lived with Parkinson's disease, and in this series she talks to people from families with an inherited genetic disorder. In the second of two programmes she talks to John Jennings, who has a high chance of inheriting a rare form of early onset Alzheimer's disease. They discuss the emotional impact of having this disease in the family and his decision whether or not to get tested for the gene.
Producer: Sally Heaven.

John Harris Talks To Penny Andrews About Autism20150224

John Harris, of the Guardian, talks to Penny Andrews, a university researcher, who, after a difficult childhood and adolescence was finally diagnosed as autistic in her early thirties.

John is known for having two consuming passions music, and politics - and luckily he's developed a career that revolves around both. But around five years ago, he acquired a third area of expertise and curiosity: autism.

His son James was born in 2006 and, when he was 3, it was discovered he was autistic. For John and his partner, the next two or three years passed in a blur of educational therapy, tussles with officialdom, James's successful entry to a mainstream school, and reading: lots and lots of it.

In his first edition of One to One, John talked to Simon Baron-Cohen, Professor of Developmental Psychopathology at Cambridge University and Director of the University's Autism Research Centre.

Today he talks to Penny about how the condition has affected her life and how she has learnt to live with it, holding down an intellectually challenging job and married life.

They discuss how schools and employers can help those on the autistic spectrum make the most of the gifts and talents they have and understand better the more challenging aspects of the condition.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

John Harris Talks To Penny Andrews About Autism20150224

John Harris, of the Guardian, talks to Penny Andrews, a university researcher, who, after a difficult childhood and adolescence was finally diagnosed as autistic in her early thirties.

John is known for having two consuming passions music, and politics - and luckily he's developed a career that revolves around both. But around five years ago, he acquired a third area of expertise and curiosity: autism.

His son James was born in 2006 and, when he was 3, it was discovered he was autistic. For John and his partner, the next two or three years passed in a blur of educational therapy, tussles with officialdom, James's successful entry to a mainstream school, and reading: lots and lots of it.

In his first edition of One to One, John talked to Simon Baron-Cohen, Professor of Developmental Psychopathology at Cambridge University and Director of the University's Autism Research Centre.

Today he talks to Penny about how the condition has affected her life and how she has learnt to live with it, holding down an intellectually challenging job and married life.

They discuss how schools and employers can help those on the autistic spectrum make the most of the gifts and talents they have and understand better the more challenging aspects of the condition.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

John Harris Talks To Prof Simon Baron-cohen20150217

John Harris of The Guardian talks to autism specialist, Professor Simon Baron-Cohen.

John is known for having two consuming passions: music and politics - and luckily he's developed a career that revolves round both. But five years ago, he acquired a third area of expertise and curiosity: autism.

His son James was born in 2006 and, when he was 3, it was discovered he was autistic. For John and his partner, the next two or three years passed in a blur of educational therapy, tussles with officialdom, James's successful entry to a mainstream school, and reading: lots and lots of it.

In these two editions of One to One, John talks to people who can give him greater insight into the condition and to discover how we can all become more accepting of it and those who suffer from it.

In this first programme, John talks to Simon Baron-Cohen, a professor at Cambridge University in psychology and psychiatry, and also the director of the University's Autism Research Centre. Over more than thirty years, his work has made a huge contribution to an increasingly nuanced, sophisticated understanding of autism, and helped a lot of people, including John.

Producer: Lucy Lunt

John Harris Talks To Prof Simon Baron-cohen20150217

John Harris of The Guardian talks to autism specialist, Professor Simon Baron-Cohen.

John is known for having two consuming passions: music and politics - and luckily he's developed a career that revolves round both. But five years ago, he acquired a third area of expertise and curiosity: autism.

His son James was born in 2006 and, when he was 3, it was discovered he was autistic. For John and his partner, the next two or three years passed in a blur of educational therapy, tussles with officialdom, James's successful entry to a mainstream school, and reading: lots and lots of it.

In these two editions of One to One, John talks to people who can give him greater insight into the condition and to discover how we can all become more accepting of it and those who suffer from it.

In this first programme, John talks to Simon Baron-Cohen, a professor at Cambridge University in psychology and psychiatry, and also the director of the University's Autism Research Centre. Over more than thirty years, his work has made a huge contribution to an increasingly nuanced, sophisticated understanding of autism, and helped a lot of people, including John.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

John Mccarthy Talks To Afghan Refugee, Rafi20130212

John McCarthy talks to those who by accident or design, feel they live outside mainstream British society. Today he talks to Rafi, who fled to this country from Afghanistan in 2011, after working as an interpreter for the allied occupying forces. Rafi explains how he took on the role in the hope of improving relations in his country but in fact it left him isolated from his home community and the people he worked for. Threats from the Taliban caused him to flee his homeland and to seek asylum here. After eighteen months he has now gained refugee status and can look for work but he explains the sense of isolation he feels living away from his homeland, his friends and family.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

John Mccarthy Talks To Afghan Refugee, Rafi20130212

John McCarthy talks to those who by accident or design, feel they live outside mainstream British society. Today he talks to Rafi, who fled to this country from Afghanistan in 2011, after working as an interpreter for the allied occupying forces. Rafi explains how he took on the role in the hope of improving relations in his country but in fact it left him isolated from his home community and the people he worked for. Threats from the Taliban caused him to flee his homeland and to seek asylum here. After eighteen months he has now gained refugee status and can look for work but he explains the sense of isolation he feels living away from his homeland, his friends and family.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

John Mccarthy Talks To Rachel Denton20130129

John McCarthy takes over the One to One chair to talk to a range of people who feel themselves to be outside mainstream UK society; today he talks to hermit, Rachel Denton.

Talking about the series, John says;

'I hope to talk to people who are living on the 'outside' of mainstream UK society. On the street they would look like anyone else but in fact they are somehow apart. I have experienced being an 'outsider' myself; on my return from captivity in Lebanon, when I'd look like any other Londoner, but would feel utterly self-conscious and confused by the world around me. I've had similar feelings following the deaths of close family members. One experience was very rare, the other universal.

I want to explore the idea of being an outsider; having conversations with others who will have walked those same private/public paths either through choice or because of circumstances beyond their control.

What is it like being on the 'outside'? How do you cope with loneliness and feelings of being excluded? What are the attractions of removing yourself from society? What are the practicalities of such a life, the numbness of living in a fog for so long? How do you keep strong and maintain your hopes of coming in from the cold; of not giving in and renouncing your solitary way?

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

John Mccarthy Talks To Rachel Denton20130129

John McCarthy takes over the One to One chair to talk to a range of people who feel themselves to be outside mainstream UK society; today he talks to hermit, Rachel Denton.

Talking about the series, John says;

'I hope to talk to people who are living on the 'outside' of mainstream UK society. On the street they would look like anyone else but in fact they are somehow apart. I have experienced being an 'outsider' myself; on my return from captivity in Lebanon, when I'd look like any other Londoner, but would feel utterly self-conscious and confused by the world around me. I've had similar feelings following the deaths of close family members. One experience was very rare, the other universal.

I want to explore the idea of being an outsider; having conversations with others who will have walked those same private/public paths either through choice or because of circumstances beyond their control.

What is it like being on the 'outside'? How do you cope with loneliness and feelings of being excluded? What are the attractions of removing yourself from society? What are the practicalities of such a life, the numbness of living in a fog for so long? How do you keep strong and maintain your hopes of coming in from the cold; of not giving in and renouncing your solitary way?

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Julia Bradbury On Emotionally Challenging Work20170110

Julia Bradbury talks to Dr Martin McKechnie, a Consultant in Emergency Medicine and Vice President of The Royal College of Emergency Medicine, about the challenges of working in an Emergency Department. Every day he is faced with intense mental and emotional situations as part of his working life. So how he does he switch off at the end of the day?

Producer Sarah Blunt.

Julia Bradbury On Emotionally Challenging Work20170110

Julia Bradbury talks to Dr Martin McKechnie, a Consultant in Emergency Medicine and Vice President of The Royal College of Emergency Medicine, about the challenges of working in an Emergency Department. Every day he is faced with intense mental and emotional situations as part of his working life. So how he does he switch off at the end of the day?

Producer Sarah Blunt.

Julia Bradbury On Emotionally Challenging Work20170117

Julia Bradbury talks to Dr Rory Conn, a Specialist Registrar in Psychiatry. Rory works in a Mental Health In-Patient Unit for adolescents, and he discusses the challenges of regularly dealing with intense mental and emotional situations as part of your working life, and how you switch off at the end of the day.

Julia Bradbury On Emotionally Challenging Work20170117

Julia Bradbury talks to Dr Rory Conn, a Specialist Registrar in Psychiatry. Rory works in a Mental Health In-Patient Unit for adolescents, and he discusses the challenges of regularly dealing with intense mental and emotional situations as part of your working life, and how you switch off at the end of the day.

Julia Bradbury On Emotionally Challenging Work20170124

Julia Bradbury talks to Laura Rutherford, a volunteer with the Samaritans, about the challenges of her work as a listener. How does she cope with the emotional demands and the need to 'step back' after challenging calls? Producer Sarah Blunt.

Julia Bradbury On Emotionally Challenging Work20170124

Julia Bradbury talks to Laura Rutherford, a volunteer with the Samaritans, about the challenges of her work as a listener. How does she cope with the emotional demands and the need to 'step back' after challenging calls? Producer Sarah Blunt.

Lucy Kellaway With Anon2011120620120504

Lucy Kellaway of The Financial Times, explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking to the super rich. For Ann (she wishes to remain anonymous) the day her company was floated on the stock market and became a multi millionaire, she was paralysed by fear.

'I had always believed that rich people were not nice people. I was terrified my money would taint and destroy my relationships with friends and loved ones'.

A decade on, she has come to terms with her position, becoming a member of The Network for Social Change, ' for people who want to do more than sign a cheque' and having worked out how she wants to spend her money and who she wants to give it to.

She talks honestly to Lucy about how she maintains boundaries on her spending and whether she now feels it's possible to be rich and nice.

http://thenetworkforsocialchange.org.uk/

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Lucy Kellaway of The Financial Times, explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking to the super rich. For Anne (she wishes to remain anonymous) the day her company was floated on the stock market and became a multi millionaire, she was paralysed by fear.

'I had always believed that rich people were not nice people. I was terrified my money would taint and destroy my relationships with friends and loved ones'.

A decade on, she has come to terms with her position, becoming a member of The Network for Social Change, ' for people who want to do more than sign a cheque' and having worked out how she wants to spend her money and who she wants to give it to.

She talks honestly to Lucy about how she maintains boundaries on her spending and whether she now feels it's possible to be rich and nice.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Lucy Kellaway explores the complexities of personal wealth with the super rich.

Lucy Kellaway of The Financial Times, explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking to the super rich. For Ann (she wishes to remain anonymous) the day her company was floated on the stock market and became a multi millionaire, she was paralysed by fear.

http://thenetworkforsocialchange.org.uk/

Lucy Kellaway With Jeremy Middleton20111213

Lucy Kellaway of The Financial Times, explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking to the super rich. Twenty five year ago Jeremy Middleton set out to make money. He wasn't sure how he was going to do it but he wanted the freedom and autonomy he felt it would bring. When Homeserve, the company he'd co-founded, was floated on the stock market, he achieved his goal and made the Rich list. So did it bring him the freedom he wanted? Lucy talks to him about the trappings of wealth and what they mean, the problems of lending money to friends and if he still gets a buzz from business.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Lucy Kellaway explores the complexities of making it onto the rich list.

Lucy Kellaway With Sir Peter Moores20111220

Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times concludes her exploration into the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking Sir Peter Moores. Son of John Moores, founder of the Littlewoods company, Sir Peter is now eighty and starting to wind up his foundation that has given an estimated ninety three million pounds to charity. He talks to Lucy about how he's used the money he inherited and earned, the things he's still stingy about and why he trusts no one to run his foundation after he has gone.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Lucy Kellaway explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth.

Lucy Mangan On Responsibility20170221

Lucy Mangan feels she avoids responsibility whenever possible. She has cats instead of dogs because she can't face a needy pet; she only has one child which is 'more than enough'. But she's always been fascinated by those who run towards responsibility rather than away from it. She talks to Bea Harvie, a post-graduate student, whose father got ill when she was thirteen. Bea chose to take on a lot of caring duties towards her younger siblings while her Mother was busy caring for her Father. She describes the experience as something she just got on with, and reveals that it also was a useful distraction from dealing with her own feelings about her Dad's illness. Until one day when she was sixteen and it all caught up with her. She says its like shaking up a bottle of fizzy pop: ' it's got to come out some way.'.

Lucy Mangan On Responsibility20170221

Lucy Mangan feels she avoids responsibility whenever possible. She has cats instead of dogs because she can't face a needy pet; she only has one child which is 'more than enough'. But she's always been fascinated by those who run towards responsibility rather than away from it. She talks to Bea Harvie, a post-graduate student, whose father got ill when she was thirteen. Bea chose to take on a lot of caring duties towards her younger siblings while her Mother was busy caring for her Father. She describes the experience as something she just got on with, and reveals that it also was a useful distraction from dealing with her own feelings about her Dad's illness. Until one day when she was sixteen and it all caught up with her. She says its like shaking up a bottle of fizzy pop: ' it's got to come out some way.'.

Lucy Mangan On Responsibility20170228

Lucy Mangan avoids responsibility wherever possible. She's got cats instead of dogs because she can't face a needy pet; she only has one child 'and that's more than enough.' But she's always been fascinated by those who run towards responsibility rather than away from it. Today she talks to Reverend Claire Herbert about a life dedicated to helping others. One of the first women priests to be ordained, Claire was working as a rector at St Anne's church in Soho when the Admiral Duncan bomb exploded. But she admits that being there for others has not been an easy road - in her 30s she took some time out from full-time church work to become a social worker and learn to be young 'perhaps for the first time'; she has realized that she needs to learn to play, and now gives herself permission sometimes to be 'naughty and horrible.'.

Lucy Mangan On Responsibility20170228

Lucy Mangan avoids responsibility wherever possible. She's got cats instead of dogs because she can't face a needy pet; she only has one child 'and that's more than enough.' But she's always been fascinated by those who run towards responsibility rather than away from it. Today she talks to Reverend Claire Herbert about a life dedicated to helping others. One of the first women priests to be ordained, Claire was working as a rector at St Anne's church in Soho when the Admiral Duncan bomb exploded. But she admits that being there for others has not been an easy road - in her 30s she took some time out from full-time church work to become a social worker and learn to be young 'perhaps for the first time'; she has realized that she needs to learn to play, and now gives herself permission sometimes to be 'naughty and horrible.'.

Lyse Doucet With Masood Khalili20120406

One to One is a new series of interviews on Radio 4 in which well respected broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most.

The first set of interviews will be presented by Lyse Doucet.

Lyse Doucet has a long-standing connection to the country and people of Afghanistan; she's reported from there for over 20 years.

Over the next four weeks Lyse will be in conversation with Afghans - young and old, living at home and abroad - to hear their remarkable stories. This month marks the 10th anniversary of the American-led invasion of Afghanistan, a good time to reflect on recent history and consider the future.

Masood Khalili is Afghanistan's Ambassador to Spain, but he's also a poet who says his life is "10% about politics and 90% about culture".

On the 9th of September 2001, he was the only survivor of an Al Qaeda suicide bomb attack which killed his friend and legendary military leader, Ahmad Shah Masood. An attack which is regarded as a pre-cursor to 9/11.

Khalili's injuries were so severe that he was lucky to live and can no longer endure the dry, dusty conditions of his homeland. Lyse Doucet went to see him in Madrid where he described the bomb blast and the impact it has had on him.

He also talked about his occasional visits to, and memories of, his beloved garden near Kabul. That garden is a metaphor for the way he regards his country -

"I see a flower there and it's blossoming and I say my country will be ok. my country will be like that flower".

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet speaks to Masood Khalili, Afghanistan's Ambassador to Spain.

Lyse Doucet With Masood Khalili20120406

One to One is a new series of interviews on Radio 4 in which well respected broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most.

The first set of interviews will be presented by Lyse Doucet.

Lyse Doucet has a long-standing connection to the country and people of Afghanistan; she's reported from there for over 20 years.

Over the next four weeks Lyse will be in conversation with Afghans - young and old, living at home and abroad - to hear their remarkable stories. This month marks the 10th anniversary of the American-led invasion of Afghanistan, a good time to reflect on recent history and consider the future.

Masood Khalili is Afghanistan's Ambassador to Spain, but he's also a poet who says his life is "10% about politics and 90% about culture".

On the 9th of September 2001, he was the only survivor of an Al Qaeda suicide bomb attack which killed his friend and legendary military leader, Ahmad Shah Masood. An attack which is regarded as a pre-cursor to 9/11.

Khalili's injuries were so severe that he was lucky to live and can no longer endure the dry, dusty conditions of his homeland. Lyse Doucet went to see him in Madrid where he described the bomb blast and the impact it has had on him.

He also talked about his occasional visits to, and memories of, his beloved garden near Kabul. That garden is a metaphor for the way he regards his country -

"I see a flower there and it's blossoming and I say my country will be ok. my country will be like that flower".

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet speaks to Masood Khalili, Afghanistan's Ambassador to Spain.

Mark Lawson Talks To Adam Mars-jones20160223

Mark Lawson has a problem. He is writing a memoir but he's always had the habit, when writing or broadcasting, of avoiding the first person pronoun. This rather puts him at odds with modern culture. Journalists and presenters are urged to use the one-letter vertical word. Bloggers, Vloggers and Tweeters lay their lives on-line and autobiography is an ever more crowded literary form. So in his series of One to One, Mark takes the opportunity to discuss self-revelation with artists who - in various ways - have taken themselves as their subject-matter, starting with the writer and critic Adam Mars-Jones. Long admired for his fiction and criticism, Adam has just published a work of non-fiction, Kid Gloves, which describes the experience of becoming end-of-life carer to his father, a retired judge, Sir William Mars-Jones. Mark and Adam reflect on the honesty and self knowledge needed when writing about your own life.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Mark Lawson Talks To Adam Mars-jones20160223

Mark Lawson has a problem. He is writing a memoir but he's always had the habit, when writing or broadcasting, of avoiding the first person pronoun. This rather puts him at odds with modern culture. Journalists and presenters are urged to use the one-letter vertical word. Bloggers, Vloggers and Tweeters lay their lives on-line and autobiography is an ever more crowded literary form. So in his series of One to One, Mark takes the opportunity to discuss self-revelation with artists who - in various ways - have taken themselves as their subject-matter, starting with the writer and critic Adam Mars-Jones. Long admired for his fiction and criticism, Adam has just published a work of non-fiction, Kid Gloves, which describes the experience of becoming end-of-life carer to his father, a retired judge, Sir William Mars-Jones. Mark and Adam reflect on the honesty and self knowledge needed when writing about your own life.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Mark Lawson Talks To Hannah Witton20160301

Mark Lawson has a problem. He is writing a memoir but he's always had the habit, when writing or broadcasting, of avoiding the first person pronoun. This rather puts him at odds with modern culture, where journalists and presenters are urged to use the one-letter vertical word. Bloggers, Vloggers and Tweeters lay out their lives on-line, and autobiography is an ever more crowded literary form. So, in his series of One to One, Mark takes the opportunity to discuss self-revelation with artists who - in various ways - have taken themselves as their subject matter.

Hannah Witton is a history graduate who has been a prolific vlogger, blogger and tweeter since her early twenties. She talks to Mark about making her life, her views and beliefs, ups and downs, all available for public consumption on the net.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Mark Lawson Talks To Hannah Witton20160301

Mark Lawson has a problem. He is writing a memoir but he's always had the habit, when writing or broadcasting, of avoiding the first person pronoun. This rather puts him at odds with modern culture, where journalists and presenters are urged to use the one-letter vertical word. Bloggers, Vloggers and Tweeters lay out their lives on-line, and autobiography is an ever more crowded literary form. So, in his series of One to One, Mark takes the opportunity to discuss self-revelation with artists who - in various ways - have taken themselves as their subject matter.

Hannah Witton is a history graduate who has been a prolific vlogger, blogger and tweeter since her early twenties. She talks to Mark about making her life, her views and beliefs, ups and downs, all available for public consumption on the net.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Mark Lawson Talks To Marvin Gaye Chetwynd20160308

Mark Lawson has a problem. He is writing a memoir but he's always had the habit, when writing or broadcasting, of avoiding the first person pronoun. This rather puts him at odds with modern culture where journalists and presenters are urged to use the one-letter vertical word. Bloggers, Vloggers and Tweeters lay their lives on-line, and autobiography is an ever more crowded literary form. So, in his series of One to One, Mark takes the opportunity to discuss self-revelation with artists who - in various ways - have taken themselves as their subject matter.

Here he talks to the artist and Turner Prize nominee, Marvin Gaye Chetwynd.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Mark Lawson Talks To Marvin Gaye Chetwynd20160308

Mark Lawson has a problem. He is writing a memoir but he's always had the habit, when writing or broadcasting, of avoiding the first person pronoun. This rather puts him at odds with modern culture where journalists and presenters are urged to use the one-letter vertical word. Bloggers, Vloggers and Tweeters lay their lives on-line, and autobiography is an ever more crowded literary form. So, in his series of One to One, Mark takes the opportunity to discuss self-revelation with artists who - in various ways - have taken themselves as their subject matter.

Here he talks to the artist and Turner Prize nominee, Marvin Gaye Chetwynd.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Mark Lawson Talks To Rachel Cusk20160315

Mark Lawson has a problem. He is writing a memoir but he's always had the habit, when writing or broadcasting, of avoiding the first person pronoun. This rather puts him at odds with modern culture where journalists and presenters are urged to use the one-letter vertical word. Bloggers, Vloggers and Tweeters lay their lives on-line, and autobiography is an ever more crowded literary form. So, in his series of One to One, Mark takes the opportunity to discuss self-revelation with artists who - in various ways - have taken themselves as their subject matter. Here he talks to writer and novelist Rachel Cusk who found herself branded, 'the worst mother in Britain' for writing candidly about her experience of motherhood.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Mark Lawson Talks To Rachel Cusk20160315

Mark Lawson has a problem. He is writing a memoir but he's always had the habit, when writing or broadcasting, of avoiding the first person pronoun. This rather puts him at odds with modern culture where journalists and presenters are urged to use the one-letter vertical word. Bloggers, Vloggers and Tweeters lay their lives on-line, and autobiography is an ever more crowded literary form. So, in his series of One to One, Mark takes the opportunity to discuss self-revelation with artists who - in various ways - have taken themselves as their subject matter. Here he talks to writer and novelist Rachel Cusk who found herself branded, 'the worst mother in Britain' for writing candidly about her experience of motherhood.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Mark Steel And Faye Didymus20170720

Does the sports psychologist agree that comedy and sport are kind of the same?

Mark Steel's guest this week is impressed by his flow-state, but would like him to reduce his dependence on ironing. She is sports psychologist, Dr. Faye Didymus, from Leeds Beckett University.

Mark believes that his two addictions have much in common - they are stand-up comedy (his job) and sport (watching, playing, talking about it). He's sure that there is a link between the way comedians and sporting types deal with performance anxiety, crowd hostility, risk taking and more. Dr. Didymus, who works with sports stars at the highest level, casts light upon this theory.

In this series, Mark speaks to the former Premiership and England footballer, Graeme Le Saux. And he meets former World Champion snooker player, John Parrott. All three programmes are available as podcasts, and the Parrott & Le Saux podcasts have extra bits.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Mark Steel And Faye Didymus20170720

Does the sports psychologist agree that comedy and sport are kind of the same?

Mark Steel's guest this week is impressed by his flow-state, but would like him to reduce his dependence on ironing. She is sports psychologist, Dr. Faye Didymus, from Leeds Beckett University.

Mark believes that his two addictions have much in common - they are stand-up comedy (his job) and sport (watching, playing, talking about it). He's sure that there is a link between the way comedians and sporting types deal with performance anxiety, crowd hostility, risk taking and more. Dr. Didymus, who works with sports stars at the highest level, casts light upon this theory.

In this series, Mark speaks to the former Premiership and England footballer, Graeme Le Saux. And he meets former World Champion snooker player, John Parrott. All three programmes are available as podcasts, and the Parrott and Le Saux podcasts have extra bits.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Mark Steel And Graeme Le Saux20170713

Are the skills you need for stand-up comedy the same as you need for sport? Really?

Mark Steel has two addictions: stand-up comedy (his job) and sport (watching, playing, talking about it). He's certain that the two have much in common - risk taking, performance anxiety, dealing with crowd hostility and more. His guest this week is former Premiership and England footballer, Graeme Le Saux, whose strategies for coping with playing at the highest level are more similar than you might think to Mark's own experiences - especially when it comes to dealing with crowds who don't really like you.

In this series, he meets Dr. Faye Didymus, a sports psychologist at Leeds Beckett University (who was impressed by his flow-state, but would like him to reduce his dependence on ironing). And Mark also meets former World Champion snooker player, John Parrott. All three programmes are available as podcasts after broadcast. And there are extra, un-broadcast, bits in the John Parrott & Graeme Le Saux podcasts.

Producer in Bristol: Karen Gregor.

Mark Steel And Graeme Le Saux20170713

Are the skills you need for stand-up comedy the same as you need for sport? Really?

Mark Steel has two addictions: stand-up comedy (his job) and sport (watching, playing, talking about it). He's certain that the two have much in common - risk taking, performance anxiety, dealing with crowd hostility and more. His guest this week is former Premiership and England footballer, Graeme Le Saux, whose strategies for coping with playing at the highest level are more similar than you might think to Mark's own experiences - especially when it comes to dealing with crowds who don't really like you.

In this series, he meets Dr. Faye Didymus, a sports psychologist at Leeds Beckett University (who was impressed by his flow-state, but would like him to reduce his dependence on ironing). And Mark also meets former World Champion snooker player, John Parrott. All three programmes are available as podcasts after broadcast. And there are extra, un-broadcast, bits in the John Parrott and Graeme Le Saux podcasts.

Producer in Bristol: Karen Gregor.

Mark Steel And John Parrott20170727

Are the skills you need for stand-up comedy the same as those you need for sport? Really?

Mark Steel is obsessed with sport. Obsessed! And he's certain there's a strong link between sport and stand-up comedy - risk taking, dealing with a hostile crowd, performance anxiety. In this programme he muses on his theory with the snooker player known as 'The Entertainer', John Parrott.

For this series of three programmes, he also meets sports psychologist and former figure skater, Dr. Faye Didymus; and also the former Premiership and England footballer Graeme Le Saux.

You can hear extra bits from both interviews on the podcasts, just go to the Radio 4 website.

Produced in Bristol by Karen Gregor.

Mark Steel And John Parrott20170727

Are the skills you need for stand-up comedy the same as those you need for sport? Really?

Mark Steel is obsessed with sport. Obsessed! And he's certain there's a strong link between sport and stand-up comedy - risk taking, dealing with a hostile crowd, performance anxiety. In this programme he muses on his theory with the snooker player known as 'The Entertainer', John Parrott.

For this series of three programmes, he also meets sports psychologist and former figure skater, Dr. Faye Didymus; and also the former Premiership and England footballer Graeme Le Saux.

You can hear extra bits from both interviews on the podcasts, just go to the Radio 4 website.

Produced in Bristol by Karen Gregor.

Martin Wainwright Talks To Lindis Percy20130108

In this series, where journalists follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most, Martin Wainwright interviews persistent campaigners. Having been brought up in a household that was always at action stations as part of his father's long campaign to become a Liberal MP, perseverance has always fascinated Martin. What instils it? What nurtures it? Can it become an obsession at the cost of everything else , including family?

In this first programme he talks to Lindis Percy, now approaching seventy, she's been a political campaigner for some forty years, for the last thirty of them on the issue of American airbases in the UK. Lindis has been arrested five hundred times and served fifteen prison terms but she continues to campaign undeterred. Under the banner of the Campaign for the Accountability of American Airbases she still demonstrated every Tuesday outside the base at Menwith Hill in North Yorkshire.

Martin joins her there to discover what still inspires her to lobby and litigate when so many of her fellow peace campaigners have fallen by the way side. As a mother of three and a lifelong worker in the National Health Service, how has she managed to juggle her campaigning with family and professional life?

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Martin Wainwright Talks To Lindis Percy20130108

In this series, where journalists follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most, Martin Wainwright interviews persistent campaigners. Having been brought up in a household that was always at action stations as part of his father's long campaign to become a Liberal MP, perseverance has always fascinated Martin. What instils it? What nurtures it? Can it become an obsession at the cost of everything else , including family?

In this first programme he talks to Lindis Percy, now approaching seventy, she's been a political campaigner for some forty years, for the last thirty of them on the issue of American airbases in the UK. Lindis has been arrested five hundred times and served fifteen prison terms but she continues to campaign undeterred. Under the banner of the Campaign for the Accountability of American Airbases she still demonstrated every Tuesday outside the base at Menwith Hill in North Yorkshire.

Martin joins her there to discover what still inspires her to lobby and litigate when so many of her fellow peace campaigners have fallen by the way side. As a mother of three and a lifelong worker in the National Health Service, how has she managed to juggle her campaigning with family and professional life?

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

In this series, where journalists follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most, Martin Wainwright interviews persistent campaigners. Having been brought up in a household that was always at action stations as part of his father's long campaign to become a Liberal MP, perseverance has always fascinated Martin. What instils it? What nurtures it? Can it become an obsession at the cost of everything else , including family?

In this first programme he talks to Lindis Percy, now approaching seventy, she's been a political campaigner for some forty years, for the last thirty of them on the issue of American airbases in the UK. Lindis has been arrested five hundred times and served fifteen prison terms but she continues to campaign undeterred. Under the banner of the Campaign for the Accountability of American Airbases she still demonstrated every Tuesday outside the base at Menwith Hill in North Yorkshire.

Martin joins her there to discover what still inspires her to lobby and litigate when so many of her fellow peace campaigners have fallen by the way side. As a mother of three and a lifelong worker in the National Health Service, how has she managed to juggle her campaigning with family and professional life?

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Martin Wainwright Talks To Malcolm Bowden20130122

Martin Wainwright concludes his series of interviews, with those who persist and persevere with their views no matter what, by talking to creationist, Malcolm Bowden.

Martin Wainwright Talks To Malcolm Bowden20130122

Martin Wainwright concludes his series of interviews, with those who persist and persevere with their views no matter what, by talking to creationist, Malcolm Bowden.

Martin Wainwright Talks To Paul Lambert20130115

Martin Wainwright continues his exploration into what makes people become persistent campaigners. Last week he talked to peace activist, Lindis Percy, who consciously chose her cause but in this weeks programme he talks to Paul Lambert, who took up the fight for safety on bulk carriers when his youngest brother was lost at sea when MV Derbyshire sank off Japan in 1980. Not a man used to writing letters or locking horns with MPs or shipping magnates, Paul campaigned tirelessly at great cost to his own health and happiness, to discover the truth about the Derbyshire.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Martin Wainwright Talks To Paul Lambert20130115

Martin Wainwright continues his exploration into what makes people become persistent campaigners. Last week he talked to peace activist, Lindis Percy, who consciously chose her cause but in this weeks programme he talks to Paul Lambert, who took up the fight for safety on bulk carriers when his youngest brother was lost at sea when MV Derbyshire sank off Japan in 1980. Not a man used to writing letters or locking horns with MPs or shipping magnates, Paul campaigned tirelessly at great cost to his own health and happiness, to discover the truth about the Derbyshire.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Mary Ann Sieghart Talks To Andrew20120605

Killing another person is humanity's greatest taboo. Mary Ann Sieghart continues her series of conversations with those who've been responsible for taking another life. Andrew knocked down and killed a young mother in a road traffic accident in 1989. He was given eighteen months despite the victim's family asking for a non custodial sentence. These events have always haunted him and they've shaped the rest of his life. He now works with young male drivers teaching them about speed awareness and safe driving.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Mary Ann Sieghart Talks To Andrew20120605

Killing another person is humanity's greatest taboo. Mary Ann Sieghart continues her series of conversations with those who've been responsible for taking another life. Andrew knocked down and killed a young mother in a road traffic accident in 1989. He was given eighteen months despite the victim's family asking for a non custodial sentence. These events have always haunted him and they've shaped the rest of his life. He now works with young male drivers teaching them about speed awareness and safe driving.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Mary Ann Sieghart Talks To Chantelle Taylor20120529

One to One allows journalists the chance to pursue their own passions by talking to the people who interest them most. Mary Ann Sieghart takes over the chair for the next three weeks talking to those who've killed another person. She says;

"Killing another person is humanity's greatest taboo. Most of us, thankfully, will go through life without having taken someone else's. And it's precisely because I'll never know at first hand what it's like (I hope) that I'm so curious to get inside the mind of a killer. Whether it's someone who is sanctioned to kill, like a soldier; someone who kills accidentally, like a dangerous driver; or someone who does it on purpose, like a murderer, I want to know the answers to all sorts of fascinating questions. What goes through their mind at the time? How did it happen? How do they feel afterwards? And are they haunted by the event for the rest of their life?"

In this first programme she talks to Chantelle Taylor, an army medic who shot a Taliban fighter when caught in an ambush in Afghanistan.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Mary Ann Sieghart Talks To Charles Hanson20120612

Mary Ann Sieghart concludes her series of interviews with people who've taken another life.

Here she talks to Charles Hanson who was convicted for the murder of his third wife, Julie, seventeen years ago.

Now in his sixties, Charles has spent over half his life in prison for a string of violence related crimes; violence being the only way he knew, to resolve conflict. When Julie ran off with his son from his first marriage,Charles decided the only course of action left open to him, was to resort to murder. He explains to Mary Ann why he came to this conclusion, why even the threat of the death penalty would not have deterred him, how it took him eight years to feel remorse and how the event still haunts him.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Mary Ann Sieghart Talks To Charles Hanson20120612

Mary Ann Sieghart concludes her series of interviews with people who've taken another life.

Here she talks to Charles Hanson who was convicted for the murder of his third wife, Julie, seventeen years ago.

Now in his sixties, Charles has spent over half his life in prison for a string of violence related crimes; violence being the only way he knew, to resolve conflict. When Julie ran off with his son from his first marriage,Charles decided the only course of action left open to him, was to resort to murder. He explains to Mary Ann why he came to this conclusion, why even the threat of the death penalty would not have deterred him, how it took him eight years to feel remorse and how the event still haunts him.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Mary Ann Sieghart concludes her series of interviews with people who've taken another life.

Here she talks to Charles Hanson who was convicted for the murder of his third wife, Julie, seventeen years ago.

Now in his sixties, Charles has spent over half his life in prison for a string of violence related crimes; violence being the only way he knew, to resolve conflict. When Julie ran off with his son from his first marriage,Charles decided the only course of action left open to him, was to resort to murder. He explains to Mary Ann why he came to this conclusion, why even the threat of the death penalty would not have deterred him, how it took him eight years to feel remorse and how the event still haunts him.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Mathew Waddington20140128

Anita Anand knew she was meant to be a journalist from the moment she covered her first news story. An instinct she followed proved to be correct, and convinced her that she should pursue journalism.

In this series of interviews for 'One to One', Anita discovers what drives people towards certain careers. Was there an epiphany, something they discovered in their very core, or a series of events that motivated them?

This week's guest is Mathew Waddington, a partner in a Midlands and South-West based legal firm. He entered law relatively late having worked in the travel industry, after studying history. He was a trainee solicitor, unsure where to specialise, when his daughter, who was born with a rare chromosomal abnormality, died. It suddenly became clear to him that he should work in children's law. He became a Children's Panel solicitor representing abused children in care cases, as well as parents and grandparents in other Children Act cases.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Mathew Waddington20140128

Anita Anand knew she was meant to be a journalist from the moment she covered her first news story. An instinct she followed proved to be correct, and convinced her that she should pursue journalism.

In this series of interviews for 'One to One', Anita discovers what drives people towards certain careers. Was there an epiphany, something they discovered in their very core, or a series of events that motivated them?

This week's guest is Mathew Waddington, a partner in a Midlands and South-West based legal firm. He entered law relatively late having worked in the travel industry, after studying history. He was a trainee solicitor, unsure where to specialise, when his daughter, who was born with a rare chromosomal abnormality, died. It suddenly became clear to him that he should work in children's law. He became a Children's Panel solicitor representing abused children in care cases, as well as parents and grandparents in other Children Act cases.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Michael Grade Speaks To Juno Roche20150623

Michael Grade has always been fascinated by those who choose to take great risks. Michael was born into an immigrant family who risked everything to find a new life in an unknown country.

In this programme for the interview series One to One, he talks to Juno Roche who also took the same leap of faith into a new world when she transitioned two years ago.

Juno says that in choosing to change sex the risk is all encompassing, 'You have no idea what awaits you on the other side. Will you be able to walk down the street without being labelled a freak? Will you have any friends or family who will accept you?'

Producer: Lucy Lunt

Michael Grade Speaks To Juno Roche20150623

Michael Grade has always been fascinated by those who choose to take great risks. Michael was born into an immigrant family who risked everything to find a new life in an unknown country.

In this programme for the interview series One to One, he talks to Juno Roche who also took the same leap of faith into a new world when she transitioned two years ago.

Juno says that in choosing to change sex the risk is all encompassing, 'You have no idea what awaits you on the other side. Will you be able to walk down the street without being labelled a freak? Will you have any friends or family who will accept you?'

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Michael Grade Talks To Chris Driver-williams20150630

Not a risk-taker by nature, Michael Grade has always been fascinated by those who are. In the final interview of his series he talks to Chris Driver-Williams about his career as a high threat bomb disposal officer. What attracts someone to such a dangerous business and how do friends and family deal with their anxiety?

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Michael Grade Talks To Chris Driver-williams20150630

Not a risk-taker by nature, Michael Grade has always been fascinated by those who are. In the final interview of his series he talks to Chris Driver-Williams about his career as a high threat bomb disposal officer. What attracts someone to such a dangerous business and how do friends and family deal with their anxiety?

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Michael Grade Talks To Kolbassia Haoussou20150616

Michael Grade freely admits he comes from a very privileged background, mainly because his grandparents took an enormous risk in fleeing from the Ukraine at the turn of the century and making a better life for their family in England. Michael has never had to take risks but he's fascinated by those who do and in this series of One to One he wants to talk to people who have risked everything for very different reasons.

In this programme he talks to Kolbassia Haoussou who fled from Chad leaving home, family and friends behind. He now lives here, in a country where the culture, climate and landscape are very alien and he still feels like an outsider. Has it all been worth it?

Kolbassia is now a spokesperson for Freedom from Torture, but why did he decide to take the unprecedented and very risky step of returning to Chad to check up on his family?

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Michael Grade Talks To Kolbassia Haoussou20150616

Michael Grade freely admits he comes from a very privileged background, mainly because his grandparents took an enormous risk in fleeing from the Ukraine at the turn of the century and making a better life for their family in England. Michael has never had to take risks but he's fascinated by those who do and in this series of One to One he wants to talk to people who have risked everything for very different reasons.

In this programme he talks to Kolbassia Haoussou who fled from Chad leaving home, family and friends behind. He now lives here, in a country where the culture, climate and landscape are very alien and he still feels like an outsider. Has it all been worth it?

Kolbassia is now a spokesperson for Freedom from Torture, but why did he decide to take the unprecedented and very risky step of returning to Chad to check up on his family?

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Miranda Rae On The Challenges Of Being A Single Parent20161122

Miranda Rae meets Gill Sargent to explore the challenges of being a single mum with a child of dual heritage - something they both have in common. Life for any single parent is far from easy, but whilst trying to raise her son, Gill has also had to endure prejudice and racism in addition to exhaustion, isolation and homelessness. Producer Sarah Blunt.

Miranda Rae On The Challenges Of Being A Single Parent20161122

Miranda Rae meets Gill Sargent to explore the challenges of being a single mum with a child of dual heritage - something they both have in common. Life for any single parent is far from easy, but whilst trying to raise her son, Gill has also had to endure prejudice and racism in addition to exhaustion, isolation and homelessness. Producer Sarah Blunt.

Miranda Rae On The Challenges Of Being A Single Parent20161129

Single mum, Miranda Rae meets father of three, Andy Hill, to explore the challenges of being a single dad. Producer Sarah Blunt.

Miranda Rae On The Challenges Of Being A Single Parent20161129

Single mum, Miranda Rae meets father of three, Andy Hill, to explore the challenges of being a single dad. Producer Sarah Blunt.

Nature Cure20170919

"Does being in nature help our mental health? Isabel Hardman discusses with Dr Alan Kellas.

Does being in nature aid our mental health? Isabel Hardman, Assistant Editor of The Spectator, discusses with Dr Alan Kellas, a psychiatrist who advises the Royal College of Psychiatry on the subject. Isabel struggled with depression, and found that developing an interest in plants and working outside has helped her to recover.

Meeting Alan in the woods, they talk of exercising outdoors, of watching the seasons turn, and of having regular places to visit that take us outside ourselves, allowing us to move beyond our own preoccupations. Alan reveals the ways in which he himself learned to resolve difficult things in a particular woodland setting.

Producer: Mark Smalley.

"

Nature Cure20170919

Does being in nature help our mental health? Isabel Hardman discusses with Dr Alan Kellas.

Does being in nature aid our mental health? Isabel Hardman, Assistant Editor of The Spectator, discusses with Dr Alan Kellas, a psychiatrist who advises the Royal College of Psychiatry on the subject. Isabel struggled with depression, and found that developing an interest in plants and working outside has helped her to recover.

Meeting Alan in the woods, they talk of exercising outdoors, of watching the seasons turn, and of having regular places to visit that take us outside ourselves, allowing us to move beyond our own preoccupations. Alan reveals the ways in which he himself learned to resolve difficult things in a particular woodland setting.

Producer: Mark Smalley.

Does being in nature aid our mental health? Isabel Hardman, Assistant Editor of The Spectator, discusses with Dr Alan Kellas, a psychiatrist who advises the Royal College of Psychiatry on the subject. Isabel struggled with depression, and found that developing an interest in plants and working outside has helped her to recover.

Meeting Alan in the woods, they talk of exercising outdoors, of watching the seasons turn, and of having regular places to visit that take us outside ourselves, allowing us to move beyond our own preoccupations. Alan reveals the ways in which he himself has learned to slowly resolve difficult things in a particular woodland setting.

Producer: Mark Smalley.

Nature Cure20170919

Does being in nature help our mental health? Isabel Hardman discusses with Dr Alan Kellas.

Does being in nature aid our mental health? Isabel Hardman, Assistant Editor of The Spectator, discusses with Dr Alan Kellas, a psychiatrist who advises the Royal College of Psychiatry on the subject. Isabel struggled with depression, and found that developing an interest in plants and working outside has helped her to recover.

Meeting Alan in the woods, they talk of exercising outdoors, of watching the seasons turn, and of having regular places to visit that take us outside ourselves, allowing us to move beyond our own preoccupations. Alan reveals the ways in which he himself learned to resolve difficult things in a particular woodland setting.

Producer: Mark Smalley.

Does being in nature aid our mental health? Isabel Hardman, Assistant Editor of The Spectator, discusses with Dr Alan Kellas, a psychiatrist who advises the Royal College of Psychiatry on the subject. Isabel struggled with depression, and found that developing an interest in plants and working outside has helped her to recover.

Meeting Alan in the woods, they talk of exercising outdoors, of watching the seasons turn, and of having regular places to visit that take us outside ourselves, allowing us to move beyond our own preoccupations. Alan reveals the ways in which he himself has learned to slowly resolve difficult things in a particular woodland setting.

Producer: Mark Smalley.

Nihal Talks Dogs20141104

Broadcaster and DJ Nihal owns a Staffordshire Bull Terrier, a breed that is often perceived as a 'dangerous dog', though they are legal.

In the first of his two part series for One to One, Nihal meets Jordan who does have two dogs that are banned under the '1991 Dangerous Dogs Act'.

Jordan's mixed pit-bull types were taken away from him by the police as they were deemed to be 'dangerous'. He tells Nihal why he fought to keep them and how he now wants to change people's attitude towards all bull breeds.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Nihal Talks Dogs20141104

Broadcaster and DJ Nihal owns a Staffordshire Bull Terrier, a breed that is often perceived as a 'dangerous dog', though they are legal.

In the first of his two part series for One to One, Nihal meets Jordan who does have two dogs that are banned under the '1991 Dangerous Dogs Act'.

Jordan's mixed pit-bull types were taken away from him by the police as they were deemed to be 'dangerous'. He tells Nihal why he fought to keep them and how he now wants to change people's attitude towards all bull breeds.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Nikesh Shukla Meets Hayley Campbell20170131

Novelist Nikesh Shukla is learning how to box. It's gone from memories of Rocky movies and watching the big match with family as a child to being a skill he wants for himself. When he voiced his thoughts on Twitter, journalist Hayley Campbell gave him 3 key pieces of advice. She took up kickboxing two and a half years ago and shares how the sport and the partnership with her trainer changed her physically and mentally, but also how the boxing world became a source of fascination leading her to meet and interview some of the most powerful fighters.

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.

Nikesh Shukla Meets Hayley Campbell20170131

Novelist Nikesh Shukla is learning how to box. It's gone from memories of Rocky movies and watching the big match with family as a child to being a skill he wants for himself. When he voiced his thoughts on Twitter, journalist Hayley Campbell gave him 3 key pieces of advice. She took up kickboxing two and a half years ago and shares how the sport and the partnership with her trainer changed her physically and mentally, but also how the boxing world became a source of fascination leading her to meet and interview some of the most powerful fighters.

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.

Nikesh Shukla meets Hayley Campbell20171112

Novelist Nikesh Shukla shares his fascination for boxing with Hayley Campbell.

Novelist Nikesh Shukla is learning how to box. It's gone from memories of Rocky movies and watching the big match with family as a child to being a skill he wants for himself. When he voiced his thoughts on Twitter, journalist Hayley Campbell gave him 3 key pieces of advice. She took up kickboxing three years ago and shares how the sport and the partnership with her trainer changed her physically and mentally, but also how the boxing world became a source of fascination leading her to meet and interview some of the most powerful fighters.

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.

Nikesh Shukla Meets Hayley Campbell20171112

Novelist Nikesh Shukla shares his fascination for boxing with Hayley Campbell.

Novelist Nikesh Shukla is learning how to box. It's gone from memories of Rocky movies and watching the big match with family as a child to being a skill he wants for himself. When he voiced his thoughts on Twitter, journalist Hayley Campbell gave him 3 key pieces of advice. She took up kickboxing three years ago and shares how the sport and the partnership with her trainer changed her physically and mentally, but also how the boxing world became a source of fascination leading her to meet and interview some of the most powerful fighters.

Produced by Anne-Marie Bullock.

Nikesh Shukla Talks To Deborah Jump20170214

Novelist Nikesh Shukla started to learn to box after a racist incident on a train left him feeling vulnerable and needing to learn how protect himself. In the last of his three interviews exploring the sport - and getting personal advice - he speaks to criminologist Dr Deborah Jump. She left her desk at Manchester Metropolitan University to do an ethnographic study - immersing herself into the world of boxing to research it from the inside. She wanted to investigate whether boxing gyms help reduce offending among young people. Her research made her fitter but gave her some food for thought.

Nikesh Shukla Talks To Deborah Jump20170214

Novelist Nikesh Shukla started to learn to box after a racist incident on a train left him feeling vulnerable and needing to learn how protect himself. In the last of his three interviews exploring the sport - and getting personal advice - he speaks to criminologist Dr Deborah Jump. She left her desk at Manchester Metropolitan University to do an ethnographic study - immersing herself into the world of boxing to research it from the inside. She wanted to investigate whether boxing gyms help reduce offending among young people. Her research made her fitter but gave her some food for thought.

Nikesh Shukla Talks To Kieran Farrell20170207

Nikesh Shukla continues his series of interviews on boxing. The level of violence and serious injury has always called the sport into question. Just last year it saw the tragic death of Mike Towell after a fatal head injury and Nick Blackwell retired after a bleed on the brain. These stories are familiar to Kieran Farrell, who discovered a love of boxing aged just 7, and who had 26 fights in a row unbeaten - 14 as a professional. But then he collapsed from a bleed on the brain after a fight against Anthony Crolla. Despite 30% brain damage he was desperate to fight again, but was forced to retire aged 22. Four years on he runs a gym and acts as coach and promoter. He tells Nikesh what attracts a child to the sport, what that night took from him and why he's still happy to encourage children and adults to put on the gloves.

Produced in Bristol by Anne-Marie Bullock.

Nikesh Shukla Talks To Kieran Farrell20170207

Nikesh Shukla continues his series of interviews on boxing. The level of violence and serious injury has always called the sport into question. Just last year it saw the tragic death of Mike Towell after a fatal head injury and Nick Blackwell retired after a bleed on the brain. These stories are familiar to Kieran Farrell, who discovered a love of boxing aged just 7, and who had 26 fights in a row unbeaten - 14 as a professional. But then he collapsed from a bleed on the brain after a fight against Anthony Crolla. Despite 30% brain damage he was desperate to fight again, but was forced to retire aged 22. Four years on he runs a gym and acts as coach and promoter. He tells Nikesh what attracts a child to the sport, what that night took from him and why he's still happy to encourage children and adults to put on the gloves.

Produced in Bristol by Anne-Marie Bullock.

Olivia O'leary With John Banville20121211

For 'One to One' Olivia O'Leary is interviewing three people at the peak of their profession about growing older. This week she meets the Booker Prize winning author, John Banville, who also writes crime fiction under the pseudonym Benjamin Black.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

For 'One to One' Olivia O'Leary is interviewing three people at the peak of their profession about growing older. This week she meets the Booker Prize winning author, John Banville, who also writes crime fiction under the pseudonym Benjamin Black.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Olivia O'leary With Mick Fitzgerald20121218

For 'One to One' Olivia O'Leary is speaking to people, who have reached the peak of their profession, about growing older.

This week she meets one of the greatest ever jump-jockeys, Mick Fitzgerald. He was forced to retire in 2008 after a very serious fall in the Grand National.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Olivia O'leary With Vladimir Ashkenazy20121204

In a new series of One to One, Olivia O'Leary speaks to people who've reached the peak of their careers about how growing older affects their approach to work.

In this first programme, Olivia speaks to one of her heroes - the great Russian-Icelandic pianist, Vladimir Ashkenazy. He left the Soviet union in the sixties, and has played a vast repertoire of the greatest piano music on stages all over the world. Ashkenazy is now conductor laureate with the Philharmonia Orchestra in London and Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor to the Sydney Symphony Orchestra.

At 75 he is still jetting around the world to engagements so we were lucky to catch up with him in a hotel at Heathrow as he was leaving after a brief visit to the UK.

In a candid discussion, Ashkenazy discussed the arthrosis (not arthritis as has been reported) in his hands which occasionally means his fingers cannot fit between the black keys; he talks about not wanting to become the kind of 'older' conductor, with failing physical capacity, that orchestras respond to purely out of respect.

He also talks more widely - about his decision to leave Russia in the 1960s; about the pianists he holds in great respect and about his decision to concentrate on conducting rather than live performance.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Owen Bennett Jones Talks To Jake Wood20130625

Owen talks to a British soldier about one particular day of fighting in Afghanistan.

Owen Bennett-Jones has spent most of his BBC career reporting on armed conflict around the world. On March 2003 he was in Kuwait as the US forces began their invasion of Iraq. While talking to the American writer PJ O'Rourke, Owen said how frightened the soldiers heading into Iraq must be, but O'Rourke replied: "Well, they are off to do the most exciting thing ever known to man: going to war".

It was a striking remark. Was he glorifying war? Or just telling a truth? Since humans first started to communicate, they have been telling - and listening to - war stories. And, alongside the empathy and fellow feeling for victims, the accounts of bravery, suffering and cheating death are compelling and perhaps vicariously thrilling.

Jake Wood knows the real story of war. As a member of the Territorial Army, Jake completed 3 tours of Iraq and Afghanistan over a five-year period. In the second of two programmes for 'One To One' about the reality of war, Owen asks him about his final tour in Southern Afghanistan and about one day in particular: the 11 August 2007.

Jake was at Forward Operating Base Inkerman - a camp with mud walls in the Sangin Valley - when the Taliban attacked.

Presenter: Owen Bennett-Jones.

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

Owen Bennett Jones Talks To Jake Wood20130625

Owen talks to a British soldier about one particular day of fighting in Afghanistan.

Owen Bennett-Jones has spent most of his BBC career reporting on armed conflict around the world. On March 2003 he was in Kuwait as the US forces began their invasion of Iraq. While talking to the American writer PJ O'Rourke, Owen said how frightened the soldiers heading into Iraq must be, but O'Rourke replied: "Well, they are off to do the most exciting thing ever known to man: going to war".

It was a striking remark. Was he glorifying war? Or just telling a truth? Since humans first started to communicate, they have been telling - and listening to - war stories. And, alongside the empathy and fellow feeling for victims, the accounts of bravery, suffering and cheating death are compelling and perhaps vicariously thrilling.

Jake Wood knows the real story of war. As a member of the Territorial Army, Jake completed 3 tours of Iraq and Afghanistan over a five-year period. In the second of two programmes for 'One To One' about the reality of war, Owen asks him about his final tour in Southern Afghanistan and about one day in particular: the 11 August 2007.

Jake was at Forward Operating Base Inkerman - a camp with mud walls in the Sangin Valley - when the Taliban attacked.

Presenter: Owen Bennett-Jones.

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

Owen Bennett Jones Talks To Mick Flynn20130618

Owen Bennett-Jones has spent most of his BBC career reporting on armed conflict around the world. On March 2003 he was in Kuwait as the US forces began their invasion of Iraq. While talking to the American writer PJ O'Rourke, Owen said how frightened the soldiers heading into Iraq must be, but O'Rourke replied: "Well, they are off to do the most exciting thing ever known to man: going to war".

It was a striking remark. Was he glorifying war? Or just telling a truth? Since humans first started to communicate, they have been telling - and listening to - war stories. And, alongside the empathy and fellow feeling for victims, the accounts of bravery, suffering and cheating death are compelling and perhaps vicariously thrilling.

Mick Flynn has many war stories. He is the most decorated serving soldier in the British army. He has served in Northern Ireland, the Falklands, Iraq and Bosnia and has had three tours of Afghanistan. In the first of a two part series of 'One to One', Owen hears from Mick about one particular day of fighting in Iraq.

Presenter: Owen Bennett-Jones.

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

Owen Bennett Jones Talks To Mick Flynn20130618

Owen Bennett-Jones has spent most of his BBC career reporting on armed conflict around the world. On March 2003 he was in Kuwait as the US forces began their invasion of Iraq. While talking to the American writer PJ O'Rourke, Owen said how frightened the soldiers heading into Iraq must be, but O'Rourke replied: "Well, they are off to do the most exciting thing ever known to man: going to war".

It was a striking remark. Was he glorifying war? Or just telling a truth? Since humans first started to communicate, they have been telling - and listening to - war stories. And, alongside the empathy and fellow feeling for victims, the accounts of bravery, suffering and cheating death are compelling and perhaps vicariously thrilling.

Mick Flynn has many war stories. He is the most decorated serving soldier in the British army. He has served in Northern Ireland, the Falklands, Iraq and Bosnia and has had three tours of Afghanistan. In the first of a two part series of 'One to One', Owen hears from Mick about one particular day of fighting in Iraq.

Presenter: Owen Bennett-Jones.

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

Pallab Ghosh Talks To Bob Greig20131001

In this series of One to One, where broadcasters pursue topics that interest them beyond their day to day job, BBC science correspondent Pallab Ghosh finds out more about the way fathers and daughters interact - a subject that's fascinated him since the birth of his daughter 5 years ago. In the first programme of two, he talks to lone parent Bob Greig about his experiences of fatherhood, especially when it was something that was thrust upon him by the breakdown of his marriage when his daughters were young.

Producer: Sally Heaven.

Pallab Ghosh Talks To Bob Greig20131001

In this series of One to One, where broadcasters pursue topics that interest them beyond their day to day job, BBC science correspondent Pallab Ghosh finds out more about the way fathers and daughters interact - a subject that's fascinated him since the birth of his daughter 5 years ago. In the first programme of two, he talks to lone parent Bob Greig about his experiences of fatherhood, especially when it was something that was thrust upon him by the breakdown of his marriage when his daughters were young.

Producer: Sally Heaven.

Pallab Ghosh Talks To Julie White20131008

More from the series where broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most.

Since his daughter was born five years ago, BBC Science correspondent Pallab Ghosh has been fascinated by the way father-daughter relationships work. In the second of a two part series, he talks to Julie White, CEO of a diamond drilling company, about her relationship with her father, who sold the company to her in 2008.

Producer: Sally Heaven.

Pallab Ghosh Talks To Julie White20131008

More from the series where broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most.

Since his daughter was born five years ago, BBC Science correspondent Pallab Ghosh has been fascinated by the way father-daughter relationships work. In the second of a two part series, he talks to Julie White, CEO of a diamond drilling company, about her relationship with her father, who sold the company to her in 2008.

Producer: Sally Heaven.

Peter Bazalgette On Empathy20161206

Television executive Peter Bazalgette examines empathy. He talks to primatologist Frans de Waal, whose pioneering work with chimpanzees has helped to illuminate how our own evolutionary history suggests a deep-rooted propensity, both emotional and cognitive, for feeling the emotions of others. 1/3.

Peter Bazalgette On Empathy20161206

Television executive Peter Bazalgette examines empathy. He talks to primatologist Frans de Waal, whose pioneering work with chimpanzees has helped to illuminate how our own evolutionary history suggests a deep-rooted propensity, both emotional and cognitive, for feeling the emotions of others. 1/3.

Peter Bazalgette On Empathy20161220

Television executive Peter Bazalgette examines empathy in doctors with Denis Pereira Gray, and the difference it makes for their patients.

Professor Sir Denis Pereira Gray was a GP for 38 years and is now Patron of the National Association for Patient Participation. He believes that humanity and empathy in medicine contributes to a better outcome for all concerned, and research evidence is piling up in support of that view. Empathy in clinical practice can be fostered through training, narrative medicine and continuity of care. 2/3.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Peter Bazalgette On Empathy20161220

Television executive Peter Bazalgette examines empathy in doctors with Denis Pereira Gray, and the difference it makes for their patients.

Professor Sir Denis Pereira Gray was a GP for 38 years and is now Patron of the National Association for Patient Participation. He believes that humanity and empathy in medicine contributes to a better outcome for all concerned, and research evidence is piling up in support of that view. Empathy in clinical practice can be fostered through training, narrative medicine and continuity of care. 2/3.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Peter Bazalgette On Empathy20161225

Television executive Peter Bazalgette talks to Jane Davis, founder of The Reader Organisation, about the power of shared reading in developing empathy, and how books can transform lives. Jane and her volunteers run small groups in which people meet to read books and poems aloud and talk about them. They meet in care homes, libraries, hostels, mental health centres, schools and prisons.

Reading helped Jane to make sense of her own life and she wants to share that. She says: "You've already got your feelings, sometimes you just haven't got any language for them. Something happens to you in shared reading, a sudden moment - a feeling of recognition, of seeing written down something you've had as nameless (and therefore in a sense unknown), taking some form in the visible world, so you can begin to know it. And there's something so important about that - it's a form of consciousness". 3/3.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Peter Bazalgette On Empathy20161225

Television executive Peter Bazalgette talks to Jane Davis, founder of The Reader Organisation, about the power of shared reading in developing empathy, and how books can transform lives. Jane and her volunteers run small groups in which people meet to read books and poems aloud and talk about them. They meet in care homes, libraries, hostels, mental health centres, schools and prisons.

Reading helped Jane to make sense of her own life and she wants to share that. She says: "You've already got your feelings, sometimes you just haven't got any language for them. Something happens to you in shared reading, a sudden moment - a feeling of recognition, of seeing written down something you've had as nameless (and therefore in a sense unknown), taking some form in the visible world, so you can begin to know it. And there's something so important about that - it's a form of consciousness". 3/3.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Peter Curran looks back at Northern Ireland 1/220171024

Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind.

Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind - they grew up there but then came over to mainland UK. With them he explores how they perceive the people and the politics, now that they don't live there, and how their childhood affected their own world view.

Peter first met Fiona Murphy when the two of them had recently arrived in Brixton from North Belfast in the 1980s. In the thirty years since they last saw each other Fiona has gone on to be a top human rights lawyer, with a specialism in police accountability. Peter talks to her about how the injustice she saw growing up during the troubles has influenced her own path, and how she sees Northern Ireland now.

Produced by Polly Weston in Bristol.

Peter Curran looks back at Northern Ireland 1/220171024

Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind.

Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind - they grew up there but then came over to mainland UK. With them he explores how they perceive the people and the politics, now that they don't live there, and how their childhood affected their own world view.

Peter first met Fiona Murphy when the two of them had recently arrived in Brixton from North Belfast in the 1980s. In the thirty years since they last saw each other Fiona has gone on to be a top human rights lawyer, with a specialism in police accountability. Peter talks to her about how the injustice she saw growing up during the troubles has influenced her own path, and how she sees Northern Ireland now.

Produced by Polly Weston in Bristol.

Peter Curran Looks Back At Northern Ireland 1/220171024

Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind.

Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind - they grew up there but then came over to mainland UK. With them he explores how they perceive the people and the politics, now that they don't live there, and how their childhood affected their own world view.

Peter first met Fiona Murphy when the two of them had recently arrived in Brixton from North Belfast in the 1980s. In the thirty years since they last saw each other Fiona has gone on to be a top human rights lawyer, with a specialism in police accountability. Peter talks to her about how the injustice she saw growing up during the troubles has influenced her own path, and how she sees Northern Ireland now.

Produced by Polly Weston in Bristol.

Peter Curran meets Fiona Murphy20171024

Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind.

Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind - they grew up there but then came over to mainland UK. With them he explores how they perceive the people and the politics, now that they don't live there, and how their childhood affected their own world view.

Peter first met Fiona Murphy when the two of them had recently arrived in Brixton from North Belfast in the 1980s. In the thirty years since they last saw each other Fiona has gone on to be a top human rights lawyer, with a specialism in police accountability. Peter talks to her about how the injustice she saw growing up during the troubles has influenced her own path, and how she sees Northern Ireland now.

Produced by Polly Weston in Bristol.

Peter Curran meets John Chambers20171031

Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind.

Peter Curran meets John Chambers20171031

Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind.

Peter Curran meets John Chambers20171031

Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind.

Peter Curran meets John Chambers20171031

Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind.

Peter Curran meets John Chambers20171031

Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind.

Peter Curran meets John Chambers20171031

Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind.

Peter Curran meets John Chambers20171031

Broadcaster Peter Curran talks to guests about the Northern Ireland they left behind.

Professor Iain Hutchison20140121

Anita Anand knew she was meant to be a journalist from the moment she covered her first news story. An instinct she followed proved to be correct, and convinced her that she should pursue journalism.

In this series of interviews for 'One to One', Anita discovers what drives people to pursue certain careers. Was there an epiphany, something in their very core, or a series of events that motivated them?

This week's guest is world-renowned facial surgeon, Professor Iain Hutchison. In the very early part of his career he spent a year working in casualty. He treated many young men with facial injuries sustained in car accidents. He realised that - simply by stitching them up under local anaesthetic - he could make not just a medical, but an emotional difference to their lives. It was this that led him onto his career in facial surgery, and to the establishment of a charity that researches the prevention and treatment of facial diseases and injuries.

Next week Anita speaks to Mathew Waddington, a partner in a law firm who chose to specialise in children's law following the death of his daughter.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Professor Iain Hutchison20140121

Anita Anand knew she was meant to be a journalist from the moment she covered her first news story. An instinct she followed proved to be correct, and convinced her that she should pursue journalism.

In this series of interviews for 'One to One', Anita discovers what drives people to pursue certain careers. Was there an epiphany, something in their very core, or a series of events that motivated them?

This week's guest is world-renowned facial surgeon, Professor Iain Hutchison. In the very early part of his career he spent a year working in casualty. He treated many young men with facial injuries sustained in car accidents. He realised that - simply by stitching them up under local anaesthetic - he could make not just a medical, but an emotional difference to their lives. It was this that led him onto his career in facial surgery, and to the establishment of a charity that researches the prevention and treatment of facial diseases and injuries.

Next week Anita speaks to Mathew Waddington, a partner in a law firm who chose to specialise in children's law following the death of his daughter.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Rachel Johnson Meets Al Kennedy20140603

Rachel Johnson is struggling with writing her latest novel and talks to writer A.L. Kennedy. They compare distraction techniques, discuss setting rules on how many words you write before checking the Internet, and the benefits of having a special chair to do your writing. They also talk about how to make time to write, when the writing itself doesn't earn your living.

Producer: Sara Conkey.

Rachel Johnson Meets Al Kennedy20140603

Rachel Johnson is struggling with writing her latest novel and talks to writer A.L. Kennedy. They compare distraction techniques, discuss setting rules on how many words you write before checking the Internet, and the benefits of having a special chair to do your writing. They also talk about how to make time to write, when the writing itself doesn't earn your living.

Producer: Sara Conkey.

Rachel Johnson Meets Al Kennedy20170424

Rachel Johnson talks to writer AL Kennedy about the struggles of writing fiction.

Rachel Johnson is struggling with writing her latest novel and talks to writer A.L. Kennedy. They compare distraction techniques, discuss setting rules on how many words you write before checking the Internet, and the benefits of having a special chair to do your writing. They also talk about how to make time to write, when the writing itself doesn't earn your living.
Producer: Sara Conkey.

Rachel Johnson Meets Al Kennedy20170424

Rachel Johnson talks to writer AL Kennedy about the struggles of writing fiction.

Rachel Johnson is struggling with writing her latest novel and talks to writer A.L. Kennedy. They compare distraction techniques, discuss setting rules on how many words you write before checking the Internet, and the benefits of having a special chair to do your writing. They also talk about how to make time to write, when the writing itself doesn't earn your living.
Producer: Sara Conkey.

Rachel Johnson Meets Michael Frayn20140610

In the second of two programmes about the art of writing, Rachel Johnson confesses to struggling with her latest book which is 'supposed to be funny'. In this programme, she meets novelist and playwright Michael Frayn to find out how he organises his writing day, how he gets an audience laughing, and his thoughts on the art of writing farce.

Producer: Sara Conkey.

Rachel Johnson Meets Michael Frayn20140610

In the second of two programmes about the art of writing, Rachel Johnson confesses to struggling with her latest book which is 'supposed to be funny'. In this programme, she meets novelist and playwright Michael Frayn to find out how he organises his writing day, how he gets an audience laughing, and his thoughts on the art of writing farce.

Producer: Sara Conkey.

Rachel Johnson Meets Michael Frayn20170425

Rachel Johnson talks to author Michael Frayn about the struggles of writing fiction.

In the second of two programmes about the art of writing, Rachel Johnson confesses to struggling with her latest book which is 'supposed to be funny'. In this programme, she meets novelist and playwright Michael Frayn to find out how he organises his writing day, how he gets an audience laughing, and his thoughts on the art of writing farce.
Producer: Sara Conkey.

Rachel Johnson Meets Michael Frayn20170425

Rachel Johnson talks to author Michael Frayn about the struggles of writing fiction.

In the second of two programmes about the art of writing, Rachel Johnson confesses to struggling with her latest book which is 'supposed to be funny'. In this programme, she meets novelist and playwright Michael Frayn to find out how he organises his writing day, how he gets an audience laughing, and his thoughts on the art of writing farce.
Producer: Sara Conkey.

Razia Iqbal Talks To Hanif Qadir20120807

who helps Muslim children in danger of being radicalised.

Razia Iqbal takes the One to One chair for the next three weeks to try to discover what it means to be a Muslim in Europe in the 21st century. She talks to three people, in three countries, about their identity as Muslims where they live against a context of prejudice and misunderstandings about their faith.

This week she talks to Hanif Qadir who decided to reject fighting in Afghanistan on the side of the Taliban and chose to help young people in the UK who were in danger of becoming radicalised. In Walthamstow, East London, he set up the Active Change Foundation to encourage young people to a positive future. He explains to Razia about what motivated him to become involved with the Taliban and why he ultimately chose to turn his back on them.

Razia says, 'There are fifteen million Muslims in Europe. The continent looks completely different now compared to how it looked two decades ago. I want to talk to people for whom navigating that change is almost a daily challenge'

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Razia Iqbal Talks To Hanif Qadir20120807

who helps Muslim children in danger of being radicalised.

Razia Iqbal takes the One to One chair for the next three weeks to try to discover what it means to be a Muslim in Europe in the 21st century. She talks to three people, in three countries, about their identity as Muslims where they live against a context of prejudice and misunderstandings about their faith.

This week she talks to Hanif Qadir who decided to reject fighting in Afghanistan on the side of the Taliban and chose to help young people in the UK who were in danger of becoming radicalised. In Walthamstow, East London, he set up the Active Change Foundation to encourage young people to a positive future. He explains to Razia about what motivated him to become involved with the Taliban and why he ultimately chose to turn his back on them.

Razia says, 'There are fifteen million Muslims in Europe. The continent looks completely different now compared to how it looked two decades ago. I want to talk to people for whom navigating that change is almost a daily challenge'

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Razia Iqbal talks to Hanif Qadir who helps Muslim children in danger of being radicalised.

Razia Iqbal takes the One to One chair for the next three weeks to try to discover what it means to be a Muslim in Europe in the 21st century. She talks to three people, in three countries, about their identity as Muslims where they live against a context of prejudice and misunderstandings about their faith.

This week she talks to Hanif Qadir who decided to reject fighting in Afghanistan on the side of the Taliban and chose to help young people in the UK who were in danger of becoming radicalised. In Walthamstow, East London, he set up the Active Change Foundation to encourage young people to a positive future. He explains to Razia about what motivated him to become involved with the Taliban and why he ultimately chose to turn his back on them.

Razia says, 'There are fifteen million Muslims in Europe. The continent looks completely different now compared to how it looked two decades ago. I want to talk to people for whom navigating that change is almost a daily challenge'

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Razia Iqbal Talks To Hilal Sezgin20120814

about what it means to a Muslim in modern Germany.

Razia Iqbal explores what it means to be a Muslim in modern Europe. Here she talks to the German writer and journalist, Hilal Sezgin, at her small farm just outside Hamburg.

Razia Iqbal Talks To Hilal Sezgin20120814

Razia Iqbal talks to Hilal Sezgin about what it means to a Muslim in modern Germany.

Razia Iqbal explores what it means to be a Muslim in modern Europe. Here she talks to the German writer and journalist, Hilal Sezgin, at her small farm just outside Hamburg.

about what it means to a Muslim in modern Germany.

Razia Iqbal explores what it means to be a Muslim in modern Europe. Here she talks to the German writer and journalist, Hilal Sezgin, at her small farm just outside Hamburg.

Razia Iqbal Talks To Sonia20120821

Razia Iqbal explores what it means to be a Muslim in modern Europe.

Sonia is a young Frenchwoman working for a private investment bank in Paris. Two years ago she decided to wear the hijab to work, an action that has been deeply frowned upon by her employers. She talks to Razia about the importance the headscarf has for her and why she's determined to fight against the discrimination she feels it engenders.

Producer: Anne Marie Bullock.

A young French woman talks about what it means to be a Muslim in modern Europe.

Razia Iqbal Talks To Sonia20120821

Razia Iqbal explores what it means to be a Muslim in modern Europe.

Sonia is a young Frenchwoman working for a private investment bank in Paris. Two years ago she decided to wear the hijab to work, an action that has been deeply frowned upon by her employers. She talks to Razia about the importance the headscarf has for her and why she's determined to fight against the discrimination she feels it engenders.

Producer: Anne Marie Bullock.

A young French woman talks about what it means to be a Muslim in modern Europe.

Reeta Chakrabarti Meets Andrew Old20140617

Reeta Chakrabarti, the BBC's UK affairs' correspondent, speaks to people who have found a voice outside the mainstream media, through the medium of blogging.

In this programme Reeta meets Andrew Old, whose blog 'Scenes from the Battleground' charts his thoughts and experiences of working in education. He's a teacher who says he is 'utterly dissatisfied with how the education system is run'. He has attracted a large following, has been quoted by Michael Gove, and until recently maintained his online anonymity.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Reeta Chakrabarti Meets Andrew Old20140617

Reeta Chakrabarti, the BBC's UK affairs' correspondent, speaks to people who have found a voice outside the mainstream media, through the medium of blogging.

In this programme Reeta meets Andrew Old, whose blog 'Scenes from the Battleground' charts his thoughts and experiences of working in education. He's a teacher who says he is 'utterly dissatisfied with how the education system is run'. He has attracted a large following, has been quoted by Michael Gove, and until recently maintained his online anonymity.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Reeta Chakrabarti Meets Iram Ramzan20140624

Reeta Chakrabarti, the BBC's UK affairs' correspondent, speaks to people who have found a voice outside the mainstream media, through the medium of blogging.

Today Reeta meets Iram Ramzan, whose blog reflects her life, as what she calls a 'progressive Muslim woman'. She started blogging as a journalism student because it was expected of her, but some of her opinions have begun to attract a wider audience: she's been interviewed by the Sun and quoted by mainstream journalists. However Iram has also been the subject of twitter-abuse. Reeta asks her if she's taking a risk by blogging so openly - anonymity was something she never considered.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Reeta Chakrabarti Meets Iram Ramzan20140624

Reeta Chakrabarti, the BBC's UK affairs' correspondent, speaks to people who have found a voice outside the mainstream media, through the medium of blogging.

Today Reeta meets Iram Ramzan, whose blog reflects her life, as what she calls a 'progressive Muslim woman'. She started blogging as a journalism student because it was expected of her, but some of her opinions have begun to attract a wider audience: she's been interviewed by the Sun and quoted by mainstream journalists. However Iram has also been the subject of twitter-abuse. Reeta asks her if she's taking a risk by blogging so openly - anonymity was something she never considered.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Ritula Shah Talks To Dr Michael Irwin20130521

In the third of her interviews on the concept of renunciation, Ritula Shah talks to Dr Michael Irwin about the idea of renouncing life in old age or when faced with a terminal illness. Dr Irwin is a retired GP who campaigns for voluntary euthanasia and has accompanied people to the Swiss clinic Dignitas when they have chosen to end their lives. He talks to Ritula about his belief that people should have a choice as to when and how to die and about his thoughts on the end of his own life.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Ritula Shah Talks To Dr Michael Irwin20130521

In the third of her interviews on the concept of renunciation, Ritula Shah talks to Dr Michael Irwin about the idea of renouncing life in old age or when faced with a terminal illness. Dr Irwin is a retired GP who campaigns for voluntary euthanasia and has accompanied people to the Swiss clinic Dignitas when they have chosen to end their lives. He talks to Ritula about his belief that people should have a choice as to when and how to die and about his thoughts on the end of his own life.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Ritula Shah Talks To Mark Boyle20130514

Ritula Shah was brought up as a Jain, which has renunciation as one of its central tenets. Ritula has always been fascinated by this idea and in this series she wants to explore what it means to give up something that still has value to those around you. Why do it? Where does it leave your relationships with those people whose choices you will have contradicted or undermined by your own? What happens when you waver (as surely you must)?

In this second episode in a series of three programmes, she talks to Mark Boyle who lived without money for almost three years. What did he think it could achieve?

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Ritula Shah Talks To Mark Boyle20130514

Ritula Shah was brought up as a Jain, which has renunciation as one of its central tenets. Ritula has always been fascinated by this idea and in this series she wants to explore what it means to give up something that still has value to those around you. Why do it? Where does it leave your relationships with those people whose choices you will have contradicted or undermined by your own? What happens when you waver (as surely you must)?

In this second episode in a series of three programmes, she talks to Mark Boyle who lived without money for almost three years. What did he think it could achieve?

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Ritula Shah Talks To Satish Kumar20130507

Ritula Shah was brought up as a Jain, which has renunciation as one of its central tenets. Ritula has always been fascinated by this idea and in this series she wants to explore what it means to give up something that still has value to those around you. Why do it? Where does it leave your relationships with those people whose choices you will have contradicted or undermined by your own? What happens when you waver (as surely you must)?

In this first programme she explores the theory with ex-Jain monk, Satish Kumar. He explains his own personal journey to renunciation of both the material and the spiritual while still a young man and why he ultimately rejected it as a way of improving the world.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Ritula Shah Talks To Satish Kumar20130507

Ritula Shah was brought up as a Jain, which has renunciation as one of its central tenets. Ritula has always been fascinated by this idea and in this series she wants to explore what it means to give up something that still has value to those around you. Why do it? Where does it leave your relationships with those people whose choices you will have contradicted or undermined by your own? What happens when you waver (as surely you must)?

In this first programme she explores the theory with ex-Jain monk, Satish Kumar. He explains his own personal journey to renunciation of both the material and the spiritual while still a young man and why he ultimately rejected it as a way of improving the world.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Samira Ahmed With Konstanty Gebert20120320

The journalist and broadcaster Samira Ahmed explores some missing angles for One to One:

Samira has spent 20 years reporting breaking news at home and abroad from Britain to Los Angeles to Berlin. Born to Hindu and Muslim parents and educated at a Catholic school, Samira married into a Northern Irish family. As a result, she's aware of the way news coverage can make sweeping assumptions about stories and tries to seek out the missing angles behind the headlines.

Programme 2: From Poland to the Arab Spring

Samira meets Konstanty Gebert one of Poland's best-known and most respected journalists. During Poland's Communist dictatorship, he operated underground; laboriously hand-printing documents which were secretly distributed; avoiding the police who would constantly follow his movements. In One to One he recalls those years, and describes what it was like when he and his colleagues were eventually able to join a free press. He makes comparisons with journalists in Arab spring countries, and discusses what they could possibly glean from his experiences.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Konstanty Gebert tells Samira Ahmed about life during Poland's communist dictatorship.

Samira Ahmed With Konstanty Gebert20120320

The journalist and broadcaster Samira Ahmed explores some missing angles for One to One:

Samira has spent 20 years reporting breaking news at home and abroad from Britain to Los Angeles to Berlin. Born to Hindu and Muslim parents and educated at a Catholic school, Samira married into a Northern Irish family. As a result, she's aware of the way news coverage can make sweeping assumptions about stories and tries to seek out the missing angles behind the headlines.

Programme 2: From Poland to the Arab Spring

Samira meets Konstanty Gebert one of Poland's best-known and most respected journalists. During Poland's Communist dictatorship, he operated underground; laboriously hand-printing documents which were secretly distributed; avoiding the police who would constantly follow his movements. In One to One he recalls those years, and describes what it was like when he and his colleagues were eventually able to join a free press. He makes comparisons with journalists in Arab spring countries, and discusses what they could possibly glean from his experiences.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Konstanty Gebert tells Samira Ahmed about life during Poland's communist dictatorship.

Samira Ahmed With Lucy Mathen20120313

The journalist and broadcaster Samira Ahmed is taking over the One to One interviewer's microphone for the next three weeks.

Samira has spent 20 years reporting breaking news at home and abroad from Britain to Los Angeles to Berlin. Born to Hindu and Muslim parents and educated at a Catholic school, Samira married into a Northern Irish family. As a result, she's aware of the way news coverage can make sweeping assumptions about stories and tries to seek out the missing angles behind the headlines.

With that in mind, her first guest, Lucy Mathen, tells a tale of charitable endeavour, with a surprising twist.

Lucy Mathen joined John Craven's Newsround in 1976, becoming the BBC's first female British Asian to present a major TV programme. Several years later, after interviewing a local doctor in Afghanistan, she decided she could achieve a great deal more in a warzone by working as a doctor, not as a journalist. So she retrained as an ophthalmologist, and in 2000 launched the charity Second Sight which runs eye hospitals in northern India helping to cure cataracts for thousands of people.

But the story we're telling in One to One is about football - Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lucy Mathen tells Samira Ahmed about a tale of charitable endeavour, with a twist.

Samira Ahmed With Lucy Mathen20120313

The journalist and broadcaster Samira Ahmed is taking over the One to One interviewer's microphone for the next three weeks.

Samira has spent 20 years reporting breaking news at home and abroad from Britain to Los Angeles to Berlin. Born to Hindu and Muslim parents and educated at a Catholic school, Samira married into a Northern Irish family. As a result, she's aware of the way news coverage can make sweeping assumptions about stories and tries to seek out the missing angles behind the headlines.

With that in mind, her first guest, Lucy Mathen, tells a tale of charitable endeavour, with a surprising twist.

Lucy Mathen joined John Craven's Newsround in 1976, becoming the BBC's first female British Asian to present a major TV programme. Several years later, after interviewing a local doctor in Afghanistan, she decided she could achieve a great deal more in a warzone by working as a doctor, not as a journalist. So she retrained as an ophthalmologist, and in 2000 launched the charity Second Sight which runs eye hospitals in northern India helping to cure cataracts for thousands of people.

But the story we're telling in One to One is about football - Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lucy Mathen tells Samira Ahmed about a tale of charitable endeavour, with a twist.

Samira Ahmed With Murray Melvin20120327

Journalist Samira Ahmed meets celebrated actor, Murray Melvin, best known for his role in A Taste of Honey.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Samira Ahmed meets actor Murray Melvin, best known for his role in A Taste of Honey.

Samira Ahmed With Murray Melvin20120327

Journalist Samira Ahmed meets celebrated actor, Murray Melvin, best known for his role in A Taste of Honey.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Samira Ahmed meets actor Murray Melvin, best known for his role in A Taste of Honey.

Journalist Samira Ahmed meets celebrated actor, Murray Melvin, best known for his role in A Taste of Honey.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Samira Ahmed meets actor Murray Melvin, best known for his role in A Taste of Honey.

Sarah Montague Talks To A Mum With A Son In Prison20140722

Radio 4's Today presenter Sarah Montague, in the second of two interviews with people who have a family member in prison. This week she talks to a mum whose job it was to help deal with troubled families, often taking them into prison. But, then she discovered that her own son was in such trouble, that she would now be visiting him inside.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Sarah Montague Talks To A Mum With A Son In Prison20140722

Radio 4's Today presenter Sarah Montague, in the second of two interviews with people who have a family member in prison. This week she talks to a mum whose job it was to help deal with troubled families, often taking them into prison. But, then she discovered that her own son was in such trouble, that she would now be visiting him inside.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Sarah Montague Talks To Cassie20140715

In the first of two interviews for One to One, Sarah Montague, presenter of the Today programme on Radio 4, gets an insight into the life of those coping on the outside while a family member is in prison.

Cassie's life changed forever when her sister was charged with manslaughter and subsequently imprisoned.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Sarah Montague Talks To Cassie20140715

In the first of two interviews for One to One, Sarah Montague, presenter of the Today programme on Radio 4, gets an insight into the life of those coping on the outside while a family member is in prison.

Cassie's life changed forever when her sister was charged with manslaughter and subsequently imprisoned.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Sarfraz Manzoor Talks To Liz Jones20120925

Journalist and broadcaster Sarfraz Manzoor explores the risks and rewards of taking a personal story and making it public. This is something he's done in his book ' Greetings from Bury Park' and within his journalism where he's written - amongst other topics - about his mixed-marriage and the experience of being a new father. He's intrigued by both the process and the ramifications of revealing private thoughts and experiences: How do people react to you? Do they see it as a betrayal? Do you risk hurting friends and family? Is it worth the risk if you achieve something that truly resonates with your audience?

As he prepares to adapt his memoir into a screenplay, Sarfraz Manzoor speaks to others who have mined their own lives for creative purposes. This week he meets the best known of all the confessional columnists, Liz Jones, from The Mail on Sunday's 'You' Magazine.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Sarfraz Manzoor Talks To Liz Jones20120925

Journalist and broadcaster Sarfraz Manzoor explores the risks and rewards of taking a personal story and making it public. This is something he's done in his book ' Greetings from Bury Park' and within his journalism where he's written - amongst other topics - about his mixed-marriage and the experience of being a new father. He's intrigued by both the process and the ramifications of revealing private thoughts and experiences: How do people react to you? Do they see it as a betrayal? Do you risk hurting friends and family? Is it worth the risk if you achieve something that truly resonates with your audience?

As he prepares to adapt his memoir into a screenplay, Sarfraz Manzoor speaks to others who have mined their own lives for creative purposes. This week he meets the best known of all the confessional columnists, Liz Jones, from The Mail on Sunday's 'You' Magazine.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Sathnam Sanghera Speaks To Alpesh Chauhan20160419

Sathnam Sanghera feels he has come a long way from his working class Wolverhampton background and now regards himself as firmly middle class.

In this second programme for One to One, he meets Alpesh Chauhan, an Asian Brummie from a working class background, who has become an Assistant Conductor with the CBSO (City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra).

As someone who has broken through so many social barriers, has Alpesh's ethnic background proved to be a bigger hurdle than his social class?

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Sathnam Sanghera Speaks To Alpesh Chauhan20160419

Sathnam Sanghera feels he has come a long way from his working class Wolverhampton background and now regards himself as firmly middle class.

In this second programme for One to One, he meets Alpesh Chauhan, an Asian Brummie from a working class background, who has become an Assistant Conductor with the CBSO (City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra).

As someone who has broken through so many social barriers, has Alpesh's ethnic background proved to be a bigger hurdle than his social class?

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Sathnam Sanghera Speaks To Alpesh Chauhan20170428

Sathnam Sanghera regards himself as middle class. Others do not. He explores why.

Sathnam Sanghera feels he has come a long way from his working class Wolverhampton background and now regards himself as firmly middle class.
In this second programme for One to One, he meets Alpesh Chauhan, an Asian Brummie from a working class background, who has become an Assistant Conductor with the CBSO (City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra).
As someone who has broken through so many social barriers, has Alpesh's ethnic background proved to be a bigger hurdle than his social class?
Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Sathnam Sanghera Speaks To Alpesh Chauhan20170428

Sathnam Sanghera regards himself as middle class. Others do not. He explores why.

Sathnam Sanghera feels he has come a long way from his working class Wolverhampton background and now regards himself as firmly middle class.
In this second programme for One to One, he meets Alpesh Chauhan, an Asian Brummie from a working class background, who has become an Assistant Conductor with the CBSO (City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra).
As someone who has broken through so many social barriers, has Alpesh's ethnic background proved to be a bigger hurdle than his social class?
Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Sathnam Sanghera Talks To Janice Turner20160322

Sathnam Sanghera explores class. As the son of an illiterate factory worker who ended up going to Cambridge and working for The Times, he now regards himself as firmly middle class.

In the first of his two programmes for One to One, he interviews Janice Turner, a fellow journalist from The Times, at her home in South London. She had a similar journey to Sathnam; she moved from working class Doncaster to the London media establishment, but she feels very differently about which class she belongs to.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Sathnam Sanghera Talks To Janice Turner20160322

Sathnam Sanghera explores class. As the son of an illiterate factory worker who ended up going to Cambridge and working for The Times, he now regards himself as firmly middle class.

In the first of his two programmes for One to One, he interviews Janice Turner, a fellow journalist from The Times, at her home in South London. She had a similar journey to Sathnam; she moved from working class Doncaster to the London media establishment, but she feels very differently about which class she belongs to.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Sathnam Sanghera Talks To Janice Turner20170427

Sathnam Sanghera regards himself as firmly middle class. Others do not. He explores why.

Sathnam Sanghera explores class. As the son of an illiterate factory worker who ended up going to Cambridge and working for The Times, he now regards himself as firmly middle class.
In the first of his two programmes for One to One, he interviews Janice Turner, a fellow journalist from The Times, at her home in South London. She had a similar journey to Sathnam; she moved from working class Doncaster to the London media establishment, but she feels very differently about which class she belongs to.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Sathnam Sanghera Talks To Janice Turner20170427

Sathnam Sanghera regards himself as firmly middle class. Others do not. He explores why.

Sathnam Sanghera explores class. As the son of an illiterate factory worker who ended up going to Cambridge and working for The Times, he now regards himself as firmly middle class.
In the first of his two programmes for One to One, he interviews Janice Turner, a fellow journalist from The Times, at her home in South London. She had a similar journey to Sathnam; she moved from working class Doncaster to the London media establishment, but she feels very differently about which class she belongs to.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Selina Scott Speaks To Canon Paul Greenwell20150707

Selina Scott was recently involved in buying, at an auction in America, a rare edition of one of the most famous ghost stories in the world, Charles Dickens' 'A Christmas Carol'. The book was subsequently returned to its home town of Malton in North Yorkshire which was the inspiration for the novel.

Thus, with ghosts very much on Selina's mind and a suspicion that there is a ghost in her own home, Selina finds out more about the paranormal in this series of One to One.

In the first of her three programmes Selina talks to Canon Paul Greenwell from Ripon Cathedral who carries out 'home blessings' for people who think they have encountered a ghost or spirit.

He joins Selina in her home, a 15th century farm house in North Yorkshire, to try and get to the bottom of the presence in her kitchen.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Selina Scott Speaks To Canon Paul Greenwell20150707

Selina Scott was recently involved in buying, at an auction in America, a rare edition of one of the most famous ghost stories in the world, Charles Dickens' 'A Christmas Carol'. The book was subsequently returned to its home town of Malton in North Yorkshire which was the inspiration for the novel.

Thus, with ghosts very much on Selina's mind and a suspicion that there is a ghost in her own home, Selina finds out more about the paranormal in this series of One to One.

In the first of her three programmes Selina talks to Canon Paul Greenwell from Ripon Cathedral who carries out 'home blessings' for people who think they have encountered a ghost or spirit.

He joins Selina in her home, a 15th century farm house in North Yorkshire, to try and get to the bottom of the presence in her kitchen.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Selina Scott Talks To Ghostbuster Hayley Stevens20150721

Selina Scott is intrigued and fascinated by ghosts and believes she has one of her own, which resides in the kitchen of her home, an 15th century farmhouse in rural North Yorkshire.

In the final of her three programmes for One to One, Selina talks to ghostbuster Hayley Stevens who doesn't believe in ghosts.

She offers Selina a rational explanation for the ghostly presence in her house.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Selina Scott Talks To Ghostbuster Hayley Stevens20150721

Selina Scott is intrigued and fascinated by ghosts and believes she has one of her own, which resides in the kitchen of her home, an 15th century farmhouse in rural North Yorkshire.

In the final of her three programmes for One to One, Selina talks to ghostbuster Hayley Stevens who doesn't believe in ghosts.

She offers Selina a rational explanation for the ghostly presence in her house.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Selina Scott Talks To Yasmin Ishaq20150714

Selina Scott is intrigued and fascinated by the ghost stories she hears living in a rural community. She thinks she has her own ghost in her kitchen,an old 15th century farmhouse in North Yorkshire.

In the second of her three programmes for One to One, Selina talks to spiritual healer, Yasmin Ishaq who doesn't believe in ghosts but in Jinn, supernatural creatures in Islamic tradition. She explains this phenomena to Selina and the devastating impact it can have on Muslim communities.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Selina Scott Talks To Yasmin Ishaq20150714

Selina Scott is intrigued and fascinated by the ghost stories she hears living in a rural community. She thinks she has her own ghost in her kitchen,an old 15th century farmhouse in North Yorkshire.

In the second of her three programmes for One to One, Selina talks to spiritual healer, Yasmin Ishaq who doesn't believe in ghosts but in Jinn, supernatural creatures in Islamic tradition. She explains this phenomena to Selina and the devastating impact it can have on Muslim communities.

Producer: Perminder Khatkar.

Steve Backshall And Ed Stafford20151006

Steve Backshall is one of our leading natural history broadcasters; he's also an extreme sportsman who has conquered some of the world's most dangerous mountains. Despite suffering a severe rock-climbing injury in 2008, he continues to set himself extraordinary challenges.

For One to One Steve meets two other extreme adventurers to discover what drives them to significant levels of danger and physical discomfort in order to complete challenges that are almost superhuman.

In this first programme he meets Ed Stafford. Ed was the first person to walk the entire length of the Amazon River - 6000 miles over two and a half years. Ed acknowledges that explorers have a 'chink in their armour, an insecurity, a fear of something in life... Doing something tangible, something remarkable, enables you to prove yourself'.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Steve Backshall And Ed Stafford20151006

Steve Backshall is one of our leading natural history broadcasters; he's also an extreme sportsman who has conquered some of the world's most dangerous mountains. Despite suffering a severe rock-climbing injury in 2008, he continues to set himself extraordinary challenges.

For One to One Steve meets two other extreme adventurers to discover what drives them to significant levels of danger and physical discomfort in order to complete challenges that are almost superhuman.

In this first programme he meets Ed Stafford. Ed was the first person to walk the entire length of the Amazon River - 6000 miles over two and a half years. Ed acknowledges that explorers have a 'chink in their armour, an insecurity, a fear of something in life... Doing something tangible, something remarkable, enables you to prove yourself'.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Steve Backshall Meets Leo Houlding20151013

Steve Backshall is one of our leading natural history broadcasters, he's also an extreme sportsman who has conquered some of the world's most dangerous mountains. Despite suffering a severe rock-climbing injury in 2008 he continues to set himself extraordinary challenges.

For One to One Steve meets two other extreme adventurers to try and discover what drives them to significant levels of danger and physical discomfort in order to complete challenges that are almost superhuman.

In this programme, he meets Leo Houlding. Leo is one of our greatest rock-climbers. He has free-climbed the world's most challenging peaks and is an experienced base-jumper. One of his greatest achievements was a successful expedition to tackle an unclimbed route on Ulvetanna - a fearsome tower of granite in eastern Antarctica.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Steve Backshall Meets Leo Houlding20151013

Steve Backshall is one of our leading natural history broadcasters, he's also an extreme sportsman who has conquered some of the world's most dangerous mountains. Despite suffering a severe rock-climbing injury in 2008 he continues to set himself extraordinary challenges.

For One to One Steve meets two other extreme adventurers to try and discover what drives them to significant levels of danger and physical discomfort in order to complete challenges that are almost superhuman.

In this programme, he meets Leo Houlding. Leo is one of our greatest rock-climbers. He has free-climbed the world's most challenging peaks and is an experienced base-jumper. One of his greatest achievements was a successful expedition to tackle an unclimbed route on Ulvetanna - a fearsome tower of granite in eastern Antarctica.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Tim Dowling Talks To David Thomas20140701

Tim Dowling fell into journalism by mistake; he is not an ambitious man, never was, never will be, but he's fascinated by what it means to be desperately driven to succeed.

In his two editions of One to One, he talks to those who have ambition searing through their veins.

Today he meets fellow journalist and author, David Thomas. Once the UK's Young Journalist of the Year and the youngest-ever editor of Punch, David believes his Eton/Cambridge education made him feel obliged to succeed.

Both now in their fifties, they discuss the merits and drawbacks of ambition: does it lead to happiness and fulfilment or a never-ending nagging discontent and anxiety?

Producer: Lucy Lunt

Tim Dowling Talks To David Thomas20140701

Tim Dowling fell into journalism by mistake; he is not an ambitious man, never was, never will be, but he's fascinated by what it means to be desperately driven to succeed.

In his two editions of One to One, he talks to those who have ambition searing through their veins.

Today he meets fellow journalist and author, David Thomas. Once the UK's Young Journalist of the Year and the youngest-ever editor of Punch, David believes his Eton/Cambridge education made him feel obliged to succeed.

Both now in their fifties, they discuss the merits and drawbacks of ambition: does it lead to happiness and fulfilment or a never-ending nagging discontent and anxiety?

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Tim Dowling Talks To Saira Khan20140708

Tim Dowling fell into journalism by mistake; he is not an ambitious man, never was, never will be, but he's fascinated by what it means to be desperately driven to succeed.

He talks to those who have ambition searing through their veins.

Today he meets Saira Khan, business woman and runner-up in the tv show The Apprentice, who claims to have been ambitious since she was a small child. Growing up in Long Eaton, Derbyshire, the oldest of four children of Pakistani immigrants, she set her heart on doing better than her parents, having financial security and learning the confidence to do whatever she wanted. Starting out as a town planner, she found her natural place in the sales team of a biscuit manufacturer. Since her appearance on 'The Apprentice', she went on to run her own business, and is now also a TV presenter and motivational speaker.

Saira's also a mother. She talks candidly about wishing not to be a pushy parent and about her need to curb her ambitious streak where her children are concerned.

Saira and Tim discuss the merits and drawbacks of ambition: does it lead to happiness and fulfilment or a never-ending nagging discontent and anxiety?

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Tim Dowling Talks To Saira Khan20140708

Tim Dowling fell into journalism by mistake; he is not an ambitious man, never was, never will be, but he's fascinated by what it means to be desperately driven to succeed.

He talks to those who have ambition searing through their veins.

Today he meets Saira Khan, business woman and runner-up in the tv show The Apprentice, who claims to have been ambitious since she was a small child. Growing up in Long Eaton, Derbyshire, the oldest of four children of Pakistani immigrants, she set her heart on doing better than her parents, having financial security and learning the confidence to do whatever she wanted. Starting out as a town planner, she found her natural place in the sales team of a biscuit manufacturer. Since her appearance on 'The Apprentice', she went on to run her own business, and is now also a TV presenter and motivational speaker.

Saira's also a mother. She talks candidly about wishing not to be a pushy parent and about her need to curb her ambitious streak where her children are concerned.

Saira and Tim discuss the merits and drawbacks of ambition: does it lead to happiness and fulfilment or a never-ending nagging discontent and anxiety?

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Tim Samuels Meets Helen Croydon20160628

Tim Samuels goes in search of alternative relationships and meets women who have ditched traditional monogamy. He meets those making their own rules in a world less constrained by religion and gender norms and where we are evolving and adapting to changing times.

For Tim the idea of getting married and settling down with one person for the rest of your life brings him out in a cold sweat and he is not alone. In his last programme for One to One, he meets Helen Croydon who has been expounding the idea of part-time love for ten years. So is this the best model for loving and living? And is it viable in practice?

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Tim Samuels Meets Helen Croydon20160628

Tim Samuels goes in search of alternative relationships and meets women who have ditched traditional monogamy. He meets those making their own rules in a world less constrained by religion and gender norms and where we are evolving and adapting to changing times.

For Tim the idea of getting married and settling down with one person for the rest of your life brings him out in a cold sweat and he is not alone. In his last programme for One to One, he meets Helen Croydon who has been expounding the idea of part-time love for ten years. So is this the best model for loving and living? And is it viable in practice?

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Tim Samuels Talks To Helen20160614

Tim Samuels goes in search of alternative relationships and meets women who have ditched traditional monogamy in favour of part-time, polygamous and pragmatic love.

Tim recently wrote about the challenges of being a 21st century man, including how monogamy can be a struggle. He's not the first man to feel it could run counter to men's biological make-up. And these days, in heterosexual couple break ups, female infidelity is just as likely to be cited as a cause for divorce as the male half of the partnership straying.

Tim says we are now living in a world where religion has lost its grip, women are freer than ever before to express their sexuality without male diktats, and we are continually evolving and adapting to changing times. He's long been interested in alternatives to monogamy, and now he wants to hear about some actual examples.

In the first of his three programmes for One to One, Tim meets Helen who has ripped up the relationship rules to find a model that works for her. She is a mother of two, but partner of none.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Tim Samuels Talks To Helen20160614

Tim Samuels goes in search of alternative relationships and meets women who have ditched traditional monogamy in favour of part-time, polygamous and pragmatic love.

Tim recently wrote about the challenges of being a 21st century man, including how monogamy can be a struggle. He's not the first man to feel it could run counter to men's biological make-up. And these days, in heterosexual couple break ups, female infidelity is just as likely to be cited as a cause for divorce as the male half of the partnership straying.

Tim says we are now living in a world where religion has lost its grip, women are freer than ever before to express their sexuality without male diktats, and we are continually evolving and adapting to changing times. He's long been interested in alternatives to monogamy, and now he wants to hear about some actual examples.

In the first of his three programmes for One to One, Tim meets Helen who has ripped up the relationship rules to find a model that works for her. She is a mother of two, but partner of none.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Tim Samuels Talks To Salma20160621

Tim Samuels goes in search of alternative relationships and meets women who have ditched traditional monogamy. He meets those making their own rules in a world less constrained by religion and gender norms and where we are evolving and adapting to changing times.

For the second of his three programmes for One to One, Tim travels to Birmingham to meet Salma (not her real name) who chose to become the second wife in a polygamous relationship. She tells Tim why she wanted to share a husband and talks about the benefits.

However, there are downsides to every relationship.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Tim Samuels Talks To Salma20160621

Tim Samuels goes in search of alternative relationships and meets women who have ditched traditional monogamy. He meets those making their own rules in a world less constrained by religion and gender norms and where we are evolving and adapting to changing times.

For the second of his three programmes for One to One, Tim travels to Birmingham to meet Salma (not her real name) who chose to become the second wife in a polygamous relationship. She tells Tim why she wanted to share a husband and talks about the benefits.

However, there are downsides to every relationship.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Trevor Mcdonald On Redemption20161004

Sir Trevor McDonald asks former armed robber John McAvoy how he found redemption.

For his One to One series, Sir Trevor McDonald explores the idea of redemption, talking to two very different people with very different ideas on what it means.

This week a former maximum security prisoner talks about finding redemption through sport. Former armed robber John McAvoy once shared a wing with convicted terrorist Abu Hamza in Belmarsh Prison. His life was going nowhere but then he discovered rowing in the prison gym and went on to break the world record for indoor rowing. Now he's a semi professional tri-athlete seeking to inspire other young people who risk becoming offenders.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Trevor Mcdonald On Redemption20161004

Sir Trevor McDonald asks former armed robber John McAvoy how he found redemption.

For his One to One series, Sir Trevor McDonald explores the idea of redemption, talking to two very different people with very different ideas on what it means.

This week a former maximum security prisoner talks about finding redemption through sport. Former armed robber John McAvoy once shared a wing with convicted terrorist Abu Hamza in Belmarsh Prison. His life was going nowhere but then he discovered rowing in the prison gym and went on to break the world record for indoor rowing. Now he's a semi professional tri-athlete seeking to inspire other young people who risk becoming offenders.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Trevor Mcdonald On Redemption20161011

In this series of One to One, Sir Trevor McDonald explores the idea of redemption, talking to two very different people with very different ideas on what it means.

This week he meets Madeleine Black who was violently attacked and raped when she was just 13, yet has found redemption through forgiving the men who did this to her.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Trevor Mcdonald On Redemption20161011

In this series of One to One, Sir Trevor McDonald explores the idea of redemption, talking to two very different people with very different ideas on what it means.

This week he meets Madeleine Black who was violently attacked and raped when she was just 13, yet has found redemption through forgiving the men who did this to her.

Producer: Maggie Ayre.

Trevor Nelson and half siblings 1/320171003

"DJ Trevor Nelson uncovers what it is like to discover you have got half-siblings.

DJ and radio presenter Trevor Nelson grew up in London and came to find out he had half siblings on the Caribbean island of St Lucia. However, for Trevor and his three sisters who were raised by his parents in the UK, this was something that didn't really have an impact on his family life until much later when Trevor finally met his half siblings.

It's something that has fascinated Trevor all his life, and now in this series of One to One, he meets people to uncover what it's like to have, or to find out you have, half siblings.

In the first of his three programmes, he meets Adrienne who has eight half siblings but no full brothers and sisters. She tells Trevor that that there is no jealousy and rivalry and that they really are one big happy family. Really?

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

"

Trevor Nelson And Half Siblings 1/320171003

DJ Trevor Nelson uncovers what it is like to discover you have got half-siblings.

DJ and radio presenter Trevor Nelson grew up in London and came to find out he had half siblings on the Caribbean island of St Lucia. However, for Trevor and his three sisters who were raised by his parents in the UK, this was something that didn't really have an impact on his family life until much later when Trevor finally met his half siblings.

It's something that has fascinated Trevor all his life, and now in this series of One to One, he meets people to uncover what it's like to have, or to find out you have, half siblings.

In the first of his three programmes, he meets Adrienne who has eight half siblings but no full brothers and sisters. She tells Trevor that that there is no jealousy and rivalry and that they really are one big happy family. Really?

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Trevor Nelson and half siblings 1/320171003

DJ Trevor Nelson uncovers what it is like to discover you have got half-siblings.

DJ and radio presenter Trevor Nelson grew up in London and came to find out he had half siblings on the Caribbean island of St Lucia. However, for Trevor and his three sisters who were raised by his parents in the UK, this was something that didn't really have an impact on his family life until much later when Trevor finally met his half siblings.

It's something that has fascinated Trevor all his life, and now in this series of One to One, he meets people to uncover what it's like to have, or to find out you have, half siblings.

In the first of his three programmes, he meets Adrienne who has eight half siblings but no full brothers and sisters. She tells Trevor that that there is no jealousy and rivalry and that they really are one big happy family. Really?

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Trevor Nelson and half siblings 1/320171003

DJ Trevor Nelson uncovers what it is like to discover you have got half-siblings.

DJ and radio presenter Trevor Nelson grew up in London and came to find out he had half siblings on the Caribbean island of St Lucia. However, for Trevor and his three sisters who were raised by his parents in the UK, this was something that didn't really have an impact on his family life until much later when Trevor finally met his half siblings.

It's something that has fascinated Trevor all his life, and now in this series of One to One, he meets people to uncover what it's like to have, or to find out you have, half siblings.

In the first of his three programmes, he meets Adrienne who has eight half siblings but no full brothers and sisters. She tells Trevor that that there is no jealousy and rivalry and that they really are one big happy family. Really?

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Trevor Nelson And Half Siblings 1/320171003

DJ Trevor Nelson uncovers what it is like to discover you have got half-siblings.

DJ and radio presenter Trevor Nelson grew up in London and came to find out he had half siblings on the Caribbean island of St Lucia. However, for Trevor and his three sisters who were raised by his parents in the UK, this was something that didn't really have an impact on his family life until much later when Trevor finally met his half siblings.

It's something that has fascinated Trevor all his life, and now in this series of One to One, he meets people to uncover what it's like to have, or to find out you have, half siblings.

In the first of his three programmes, he meets Adrienne who has eight half siblings but no full brothers and sisters. She tells Trevor that that there is no jealousy and rivalry and that they really are one big happy family. Really?

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Trevor Nelson And Half Siblings 1/320171003

DJ Trevor Nelson uncovers what it is like to discover you have got half-siblings.

DJ and radio presenter Trevor Nelson grew up in London and came to find out he had half siblings on the Caribbean island of St Lucia. However, for Trevor and his three sisters who were raised by his parents in the UK, this was something that didn't really have an impact on his family life until much later when Trevor finally met his half siblings.

It's something that has fascinated Trevor all his life, and now in this series of One to One, he meets people to uncover what it's like to have, or to find out you have, half siblings.

In the first of his three programmes, he meets Adrienne who has eight half siblings but no full brothers and sisters. She tells Trevor that that there is no jealousy and rivalry and that they really are one big happy family. Really?

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Trevor Nelson meets 'Janet'20171010

"What is it like to discover you have got half-siblings?

Trevor Nelson, DJ and radio presenter, grew up in London knowing he had half siblings on St Lucia in the Caribbean. Growing up in London with his parents and full brothers and sisters, it was never something that impacted much on his life.

But he's always been fascinated about the complexities and dynamics of family life with half siblings. And for this series of One to One, he meets different people with different stories to tell about their own half siblings.

Here he meets 'Janet' (not her real name) who has fallen out with her half siblings and now has no contact with them.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

"

Trevor Nelson Meets 'janet'20171010

What is it like to discover you have got half-siblings?

Trevor Nelson, DJ and radio presenter, grew up in London knowing he had half siblings on St Lucia in the Caribbean. Growing up in London with his parents and full brothers and sisters, it was never something that impacted much on his life.

But he's always been fascinated about the complexities and dynamics of family life with half siblings. And for this series of One to One, he meets different people with different stories to tell about their own half siblings.

Here he meets 'Janet' (not her real name) who has fallen out with her half siblings and now has no contact with them.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Trevor Nelson meets 'Janet'20171010

What is it like to discover you have got half-siblings?

Trevor Nelson, DJ and radio presenter, grew up in London knowing he had half siblings on St Lucia in the Caribbean. Growing up in London with his parents and full brothers and sisters, it was never something that impacted much on his life.

But he's always been fascinated about the complexities and dynamics of family life with half siblings. And for this series of One to One, he meets different people with different stories to tell about their own half siblings.

Here he meets 'Janet' (not her real name) who has fallen out with her half siblings and now has no contact with them.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Trevor Nelson meets 'Janet'20171010

What is it like to discover you have got half-siblings?

Trevor Nelson, DJ and radio presenter, grew up in London knowing he had half siblings on St Lucia in the Caribbean. Growing up in London with his parents and full brothers and sisters, it was never something that impacted much on his life.

But he's always been fascinated about the complexities and dynamics of family life with half siblings. And for this series of One to One, he meets different people with different stories to tell about their own half siblings.

Here he meets 'Janet' (not her real name) who has fallen out with her half siblings and now has no contact with them.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Trevor Nelson Meets 'janet'20171010

What is it like to discover you have got half-siblings?

Trevor Nelson, DJ and radio presenter, grew up in London knowing he had half siblings on St Lucia in the Caribbean. Growing up in London with his parents and full brothers and sisters, it was never something that impacted much on his life.

But he's always been fascinated about the complexities and dynamics of family life with half siblings. And for this series of One to One, he meets different people with different stories to tell about their own half siblings.

Here he meets 'Janet' (not her real name) who has fallen out with her half siblings and now has no contact with them.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Trevor Nelson Meets 'janet'20171010

What is it like to discover you have got half-siblings?

Trevor Nelson, DJ and radio presenter, grew up in London knowing he had half siblings on St Lucia in the Caribbean. Growing up in London with his parents and full brothers and sisters, it was never something that impacted much on his life.

But he's always been fascinated about the complexities and dynamics of family life with half siblings. And for this series of One to One, he meets different people with different stories to tell about their own half siblings.

Here he meets 'Janet' (not her real name) who has fallen out with her half siblings and now has no contact with them.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Trevor Nelson meets 'Pip'20171017

"What is it like finding out you have got half-siblings? Does it change your life?

DJ and radio presenter Trevor Nelson grew up in London knowing he had half siblings on the Caribbean island of St Lucia. However for Trevor and his three sisters, who were raised by his parents in the UK, it didn't impact much on his family life until later in his life when he finally met his half siblings.

He's been fascinated all his life by half siblings. And now, in One to One, he has the chance to meet three people who tell him their personal stories.

Here he meets 'Pip' (not her real name) whose life has been changed by her half sibling.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

"

Trevor Nelson Meets 'pip'20171017

What is it like finding out you have got half-siblings? Does it change your life?

DJ and radio presenter Trevor Nelson grew up in London knowing he had half siblings on the Caribbean island of St Lucia. However for Trevor and his three sisters, who were raised by his parents in the UK, it didn't impact much on his family life until later in his life when he finally met his half siblings.

He's been fascinated all his life by half siblings. And now, in One to One, he has the chance to meet three people who tell him their personal stories.

Here he meets 'Pip' (not her real name) whose life has been changed by her half sibling.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Trevor Nelson meets 'Pip'20171017

What is it like finding out you have got half-siblings? Does it change your life?

DJ and radio presenter Trevor Nelson grew up in London knowing he had half siblings on the Caribbean island of St Lucia. However for Trevor and his three sisters, who were raised by his parents in the UK, it didn't impact much on his family life until later in his life when he finally met his half siblings.

He's been fascinated all his life by half siblings. And now, in One to One, he has the chance to meet three people who tell him their personal stories.

Here he meets 'Pip' (not her real name) whose life has been changed by her half sibling.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Trevor Nelson meets 'Pip'20171017

What is it like finding out you have got half-siblings? Does it change your life?

DJ and radio presenter Trevor Nelson grew up in London knowing he had half siblings on the Caribbean island of St Lucia. However for Trevor and his three sisters, who were raised by his parents in the UK, it didn't impact much on his family life until later in his life when he finally met his half siblings.

He's been fascinated all his life by half siblings. And now, in One to One, he has the chance to meet three people who tell him their personal stories.

Here he meets 'Pip' (not her real name) whose life has been changed by her half sibling.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Trevor Nelson Meets 'pip'20171017

What is it like finding out you have got half-siblings? Does it change your life?

DJ and radio presenter Trevor Nelson grew up in London knowing he had half siblings on the Caribbean island of St Lucia. However for Trevor and his three sisters, who were raised by his parents in the UK, it didn't impact much on his family life until later in his life when he finally met his half siblings.

He's been fascinated all his life by half siblings. And now, in One to One, he has the chance to meet three people who tell him their personal stories.

Here he meets 'Pip' (not her real name) whose life has been changed by her half sibling.

The producer is Perminder Khatkar.

Victoria Derbyshire Talks To Fraser Harrison20141014

In the second of two interviews about diaries, the broadcaster Victoria Derbyshire, who has kept a diary since she was a child, talks to the writer, Fraser Harrison.

He once published the record he kept of a year in the life of his young children but now believes that such accounts are best kept private. A diarist who doesn't publish?

Producer: Isobel Eaton.

Victoria Derbyshire Talks To Fraser Harrison20141014

In the second of two interviews about diaries, the broadcaster Victoria Derbyshire, who has kept a diary since she was a child, talks to the writer, Fraser Harrison.

He once published the record he kept of a year in the life of his young children but now believes that such accounts are best kept private. A diarist who doesn't publish?

Producer: Isobel Eaton.

Yasmin Alibhai-brown With Anon20120221

For the next three weeks, the 'One to One' interviewer's microphone belongs to journalist and broadcaster Yasmin Alibhai-Brown who - for personal reasons - has chosen to explore the impact of divorce on families.

Yasmin divorced over twenty years ago, and - although happily re-married - often contemplates the fall-out of divorce, and the resulting emotional ripples which inevitably reach further than the separating couple. In these programmes she's hearing the stories of a grandparent, a parent and a young person who have all lived through a family break-up

In this, the first programme, she speaks to Jane, a grandparent who hasn't seen her 11 year old granddaughter for four years. When her son divorced he maintained a relationship with his ex-wife which allowed contact with his daughter - Jane's granddaughter. But eventually that contact was withdrawn, resulting in what Jane describes as a living bereavement.

Jane has now set up a support group for grandparents who find themselves in the same situation www.bristolgranddparentssupportgroup.co.uk) and runs a blog (www.bristolgrandparentssupport.blogspot.com).

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown explores the impact of divorce on families.

Yasmin Alibhai-brown With Anon20120221

For the next three weeks, the 'One to One' interviewer's microphone belongs to journalist and broadcaster Yasmin Alibhai-Brown who - for personal reasons - has chosen to explore the impact of divorce on families.

Yasmin divorced over twenty years ago, and - although happily re-married - often contemplates the fall-out of divorce, and the resulting emotional ripples which inevitably reach further than the separating couple. In these programmes she's hearing the stories of a grandparent, a parent and a young person who have all lived through a family break-up

In this, the first programme, she speaks to Jane, a grandparent who hasn't seen her 11 year old granddaughter for four years. When her son divorced he maintained a relationship with his ex-wife which allowed contact with his daughter - Jane's granddaughter. But eventually that contact was withdrawn, resulting in what Jane describes as a living bereavement.

Jane has now set up a support group for grandparents who find themselves in the same situation www.bristolgranddparentssupportgroup.co.uk) and runs a blog (www.bristolgrandparentssupport.blogspot.com).

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown explores the impact of divorce on families.

Yasmin Alibhai-brown With Louis De Bernieres20120228

For personal reasons, the journalist and broadcaster Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, has chosen to explore the impact of family breakdown for 'One to One'.

Yasmin divorced over twenty years ago, and - although happily re-married - often contemplates the fall-out of divorce, and the resulting emotional ripples which inevitably reach further than the separating couple. In these programmes she's hearing the stories of a grandparent, a parent and a young person who have all lived through a family break-up.

Last week Yasmin spoke to a grandmother who hasn't seen her granddaughter for four years, and this week she speaks to the author Louis de Bernieres. He talks from the position he holds as patron of the charity Families Need Fathers, but also from the very personal point of view of a father of two children, who has now separated from their mother.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown talks to Louis de Bernieres about the impact of family breakdown.

Yasmin Alibhai-brown With Louis De Bernieres20120228

For personal reasons, the journalist and broadcaster Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, has chosen to explore the impact of family breakdown for 'One to One'.

Yasmin divorced over twenty years ago, and - although happily re-married - often contemplates the fall-out of divorce, and the resulting emotional ripples which inevitably reach further than the separating couple. In these programmes she's hearing the stories of a grandparent, a parent and a young person who have all lived through a family break-up.

Last week Yasmin spoke to a grandmother who hasn't seen her granddaughter for four years, and this week she speaks to the author Louis de Bernieres. He talks from the position he holds as patron of the charity Families Need Fathers, but also from the very personal point of view of a father of two children, who has now separated from their mother.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown talks to Louis de Bernieres about the impact of family breakdown.

Yasmin Alibhai-brown With Megan20120306

For personal reasons, the journalist and broadcaster Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, has chosen to explore the impact of divorce on families for 'One to One'.

Yasmin divorced over twenty years ago, and - although happily re-married - often contemplates the fall-out of divorce, and the resulting emotional ripples which inevitably reach further than the separating couple. In these programmes she's hearing the stories of a grandparent, a parent and a young person who have all lived through a family break-up

So far Yasmin has spoken to a grandmother who hasn't seen her granddaughter for four years, and to the author, Louis de Bernieres, who is patron of Families Need Fathers.

This week she speaks to 18 year old Megan, who describes the experience of living through her parents' divorce.

The charity Young Minds put us in touch with Megan. Their website is www.youngminds.org.uk and Megan is part of the Young Minds VIK (Very Important Kids) project.

Young Minds has a Parents' Helpline which is for any adult who is concerned about the mental health or wellbeing of any child or young adult. It's free to call and the number is 0808 802 5544 (Monday to Friday 9.30am-4pm)

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown talks to 18-year-old Megan about her parents' divorce.

Yasmin Alibhai-brown With Megan20120306

For personal reasons, the journalist and broadcaster Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, has chosen to explore the impact of divorce on families for 'One to One'.

Yasmin divorced over twenty years ago, and - although happily re-married - often contemplates the fall-out of divorce, and the resulting emotional ripples which inevitably reach further than the separating couple. In these programmes she's hearing the stories of a grandparent, a parent and a young person who have all lived through a family break-up

So far Yasmin has spoken to a grandmother who hasn't seen her granddaughter for four years, and to the author, Louis de Bernieres, who is patron of Families Need Fathers.

This week she speaks to 18 year old Megan, who describes the experience of living through her parents' divorce.

The charity Young Minds put us in touch with Megan. Their website is www.youngminds.org.uk and Megan is part of the Young Minds VIK (Very Important Kids) project.

Young Minds has a Parents' Helpline which is for any adult who is concerned about the mental health or wellbeing of any child or young adult. It's free to call and the number is 0808 802 5544 (Monday to Friday 9.30am-4pm)

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown talks to 18-year-old Megan about her parents' divorce.

Zubeida Malik Meets Raja Tahir Masood20150303
Zubeida Malik Meets Raja Tahir Masood20150303

Zubeida Malik is a journalist who works mostly as a reporter for the Today programme. For two weeks she's taken over the One to One microphone to explore the nature of Britain's changing communities.

Today's interview is with Raja Tahir Masood, a chronicler of Peterborough's Pakistani community. Originally from Pakistan, Masood has lived in Peterborough for forty years. In that time he's worked closely with the Pakistani community and has seen it grow and change. He's also seen new immigrants arrive in Peterborough, from southern and eastern Europe.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Zubeida Malik Meets Raja Tahir Masood20150310
Zubeida Malik Meets Raja Tahir Masood20150310

Zubeida Malik is a journalist who works mostly as a reporter for the Today programme. For two weeks she's taken over the One to One microphone to explore the nature of Britain's changing communities.

Today's interview is with Raja Tahir Masood, a chronicler of Peterborough's Pakistani community. Originally from Pakistan, Masood has lived in Peterborough for forty years. In that time he's worked closely with the Pakistani community and has seen it grow and change. He's also seen new immigrants arrive in Peterborough, from southern and eastern Europe.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Zubeida Malik Meets Sister Christine Frost20150317

Zubeida Malik is a journalist who works mostly as a reporter for the Today programme. For the next two weeks she's taking over the One to One microphone to explore the nature of Britain's changing communities. In this first programme she meets Sister Christine Frost, a Roman Catholic nun who has lived and worked in east London for over forty years. Based at the St Matthias Community Centre on the Will Crooks Estate in Tower Hamlets, Sister Christine has seen huge changes in the four decades she's worked there: an estate that was mostly white British and black Caribbean is now predominantly Bengali. Zubeida asks how this 77 year old nun from Ireland has adapted, and what challenges these changes have brought to her life and work.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Zubeida Malik Meets Sister Christine Frost20150317

Zubeida Malik is a journalist who works mostly as a reporter for the Today programme. For the next two weeks she's taking over the One to One microphone to explore the nature of Britain's changing communities. In this first programme she meets Sister Christine Frost, a Roman Catholic nun who has lived and worked in east London for over forty years. Based at the St Matthias Community Centre on the Will Crooks Estate in Tower Hamlets, Sister Christine has seen huge changes in the four decades she's worked there: an estate that was mostly white British and black Caribbean is now predominantly Bengali. Zubeida asks how this 77 year old nun from Ireland has adapted, and what challenges these changes have brought to her life and work.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

0120111011

One to One is a new series of interviews on Radio 4 in which well respected broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most.

The first set of interviews will be presented by Lyse Doucet.

Lyse Doucet has a long-standing connection to the country and people of Afghanistan; she's reported from there for over 20 years.

Over the next four weeks Lyse will be in conversation with Afghans - young and old, living at home and abroad - to hear their remarkable stories. This month marks the 10th anniversary of the American-led invasion of Afghanistan, a good time to reflect on recent history and consider the future.

Masood Khalili is Afghanistan's Ambassador to Spain, but he's also a poet who says his life is "10% about politics and 90% about culture".

On the 9th of September 2001, he was the only survivor of an Al Qaeda suicide bomb attack which killed his friend and legendary military leader, Ahmad Shah Masood. An attack which is regarded as a pre-cursor to 9/11.

Khalili's injuries were so severe that he was lucky to live and can no longer endure the dry, dusty conditions of his homeland. Lyse Doucet went to see him in Madrid where he described the bomb blast and the impact it has had on him.

He also talked about his occasional visits to, and memories of, his beloved garden near Kabul. That garden is a metaphor for the way he regards his country -

"I see a flower there and it's blossoming and I say my country will be ok. my country will be like that flower".

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet speaks to Masood Khalili, Afghanistan's Ambassador to Spain.

One to One is a new series of interviews on Radio 4 in which well respected broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most.

The first set of interviews will be presented by Lyse Doucet.

Lyse Doucet has a long-standing connection to the country and people of Afghanistan; she's reported from there for over 20 years.

Over the next four weeks Lyse will be in conversation with Afghans - young and old, living at home and abroad - to hear their remarkable stories.

This month marks the 10th anniversary of the American-led invasion of Afghanistan, a good time to reflect on recent history and consider the future.

Masood Khalili is Afghanistan's Ambassador to Spain, but he's also a poet who says his life is "10% about politics and 90% about culture".

On the 9th of September 2001, he was the only survivor of an Al Qaeda suicide bomb attack which killed his friend and legendary military leader, Ahmad Shah Masood.

An attack which is regarded as a pre-cursor to 9/11.

Khalili's injuries were so severe that he was lucky to live and can no longer endure the dry, dusty conditions of his homeland.

Lyse Doucet went to see him in Madrid where he described the bomb blast and the impact it has had on him.

He also talked about his occasional visits to, and memories of, his beloved garden near Kabul.

That garden is a metaphor for the way he regards his country -

"I see a flower there and it's blossoming and I say my country will be ok.

my country will be like that flower".

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet speaks to Masood Khalili, Afghanistan's Ambassador to Spain.

0120111011

One to One is a new series of interviews on Radio 4 in which well respected broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most.

The first set of interviews will be presented by Lyse Doucet.

Lyse Doucet has a long-standing connection to the country and people of Afghanistan; she's reported from there for over 20 years.

Over the next four weeks Lyse will be in conversation with Afghans - young and old, living at home and abroad - to hear their remarkable stories.

This month marks the 10th anniversary of the American-led invasion of Afghanistan, a good time to reflect on recent history and consider the future.

Masood Khalili is Afghanistan's Ambassador to Spain, but he's also a poet who says his life is "10% about politics and 90% about culture".

On the 9th of September 2001, he was the only survivor of an Al Qaeda suicide bomb attack which killed his friend and legendary military leader, Ahmad Shah Masood.

An attack which is regarded as a pre-cursor to 9/11.

Khalili's injuries were so severe that he was lucky to live and can no longer endure the dry, dusty conditions of his homeland.

Lyse Doucet went to see him in Madrid where he described the bomb blast and the impact it has had on him.

He also talked about his occasional visits to, and memories of, his beloved garden near Kabul.

That garden is a metaphor for the way he regards his country -

"I see a flower there and it's blossoming and I say my country will be ok.

my country will be like that flower".

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet speaks to Masood Khalili, Afghanistan's Ambassador to Spain.

01Olivia O'leary With Vladimir Ashkenazy20121204

In a new series of One to One, Olivia O'Leary speaks to people who've reached the peak of their careers about how growing older affects their approach to work.

In this first programme, Olivia speaks to one of her heroes - the great Russian-Icelandic pianist, Vladimir Ashkenazy. He left the Soviet union in the sixties, and has played a vast repertoire of the greatest piano music on stages all over the world. Ashkenazy is now conductor laureate with the Philharmonia Orchestra in London and Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor to the Sydney Symphony Orchestra.

At 75 he is still jetting around the world to engagements so we were lucky to catch up with him in a hotel at Heathrow as he was leaving after a brief visit to the UK.

In a candid discussion, Ashkenazy discussed the arthrosis (not arthritis as has been reported) in his hands which occasionally means his fingers cannot fit between the black keys; he talks about not wanting to become the kind of 'older' conductor, with failing physical capacity, that orchestras respond to purely out of respect.

He also talks more widely - about his decision to leave Russia in the 1960s; about the pianists he holds in great respect and about his decision to concentrate on conducting rather than live performance.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

01Olivia O'leary With Vladimir Ashkenazy20121204

In a new series of One to One, Olivia O'Leary speaks to people who've reached the peak of their careers about how growing older affects their approach to work.

In this first programme, Olivia speaks to one of her heroes - the great Russian-Icelandic pianist, Vladimir Ashkenazy. He left the Soviet union in the sixties, and has played a vast repertoire of the greatest piano music on stages all over the world. Ashkenazy is now conductor laureate with the Philharmonia Orchestra in London and Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor to the Sydney Symphony Orchestra.

At 75 he is still jetting around the world to engagements so we were lucky to catch up with him in a hotel at Heathrow as he was leaving after a brief visit to the UK.

In a candid discussion, Ashkenazy discussed the arthrosis (not arthritis as has been reported) in his hands which occasionally means his fingers cannot fit between the black keys; he talks about not wanting to become the kind of 'older' conductor, with failing physical capacity, that orchestras respond to purely out of respect.

He also talks more widely - about his decision to leave Russia in the 1960s; about the pianists he holds in great respect and about his decision to concentrate on conducting rather than live performance.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

0220111018

Lyse Doucet presents the second in Radio 4's new interview series where respected broadcasters follow their passions by speaking to the people whose stories interest them most.

Lyse has a long-standing connection to the country and people of Afghanistan, having reported from there for over 20 years. This month marks the 10th anniversary of the American led invasion, a good time to reflect on recent history and consider the future. This week she's talking to a media mogul who's changed the face of popular culture in a country where, until recently, TV was banned:

Saad Mohseni has become known as Afghanistan's answer to Rupert Murdoch. Until recently he would have accepted that as a huge compliment, perhaps no longer. But, either way, Mohseni is a big player. Running his media empire out of offices in Dubai and Kabul, he's revolutionised TV and Radio broadcasting in Afghanistan by

introducing local versions of international hits like Afghan Star (a singing competition in the X-Factor mould) and controversial radio programmes where male and female broadcasters are in studio together.

His father was an Afghan diplomat who moved his family around the world - London, Tokyo, Kabul, with a long period in Australia. where, eventually, Saad became an investment banker.

But shortly after the fall of the Taliban, Saad Mohseni returned to Afghanistan and, long fascinated with the media, established a hugely successful media empire.

Join Lyse as she speaks to Saad Mohseni for One to One.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet speaks to Afghan media mogul Saad Mohseni.

Lyse Doucet presents the second in Radio 4's new interview series where respected broadcasters follow their passions by speaking to the people whose stories interest them most.

Lyse has a long-standing connection to the country and people of Afghanistan, having reported from there for over 20 years.

This month marks the 10th anniversary of the American led invasion, a good time to reflect on recent history and consider the future.

This week she's talking to a media mogul who's changed the face of popular culture in a country where, until recently, TV was banned:

Saad Mohseni has become known as Afghanistan's answer to Rupert Murdoch.

Until recently he would have accepted that as a huge compliment, perhaps no longer.

But, either way, Mohseni is a big player.

Running his media empire out of offices in Dubai and Kabul, he's revolutionised TV and Radio broadcasting in Afghanistan by

introducing local versions of international hits like Afghan Star (a singing competition in the X-Factor mould) and controversial radio programmes where male and female broadcasters are in studio together.

His father was an Afghan diplomat who moved his family around the world - London, Tokyo, Kabul, with a long period in Australia.

where, eventually, Saad became an investment banker.

But shortly after the fall of the Taliban, Saad Mohseni returned to Afghanistan and, long fascinated with the media, established a hugely successful media empire.

Join Lyse as she speaks to Saad Mohseni for One to One.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet speaks to Afghan media mogul Saad Mohseni.

0220111018

Lyse Doucet presents the second in Radio 4's new interview series where respected broadcasters follow their passions by speaking to the people whose stories interest them most.

Lyse has a long-standing connection to the country and people of Afghanistan, having reported from there for over 20 years.

This month marks the 10th anniversary of the American led invasion, a good time to reflect on recent history and consider the future.

This week she's talking to a media mogul who's changed the face of popular culture in a country where, until recently, TV was banned:

Saad Mohseni has become known as Afghanistan's answer to Rupert Murdoch.

Until recently he would have accepted that as a huge compliment, perhaps no longer.

But, either way, Mohseni is a big player.

Running his media empire out of offices in Dubai and Kabul, he's revolutionised TV and Radio broadcasting in Afghanistan by

introducing local versions of international hits like Afghan Star (a singing competition in the X-Factor mould) and controversial radio programmes where male and female broadcasters are in studio together.

His father was an Afghan diplomat who moved his family around the world - London, Tokyo, Kabul, with a long period in Australia.

where, eventually, Saad became an investment banker.

But shortly after the fall of the Taliban, Saad Mohseni returned to Afghanistan and, long fascinated with the media, established a hugely successful media empire.

Join Lyse as she speaks to Saad Mohseni for One to One.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet speaks to Afghan media mogul Saad Mohseni.

02Olivia O'leary With John Banville20121211

For 'One to One' Olivia O'Leary is interviewing three people at the peak of their profession about growing older. This week she meets the Booker Prize winning author, John Banville, who also writes crime fiction under the pseudonym Benjamin Black.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

0320111025

For this week's edition of 'One to One' Lyse Doucet has travelled to Kabul to speak to Nader Nadery, a human rights campaigner who, despite living under direct threat from the Taliban, continues to work for the future of his country.

He's in his thirties, which means that in his lifetime his country has never been at peace. When he was eight his primary school was destroyed by the Mujahideen and, in his twenties, he was arrested and tortured by the Taliban. Highly educated and able to live abroad should he want to, he's chosen to remain in Kabul and now works for a human rights organisation. His inspiration is Ghandi - his telephone screensaver bears his image - yet he must travel in an armoured car for his own protection.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet in conversation with Nader Nadery, a human rights campaigner in Kabul.

For this week's edition of 'One to One' Lyse Doucet has travelled to Kabul to speak to Nader Nadery, a human rights campaigner who, despite living under direct threat from the Taliban, continues to work for the future of his country.

He's in his thirties, which means that in his lifetime his country has never been at peace.

When he was eight his primary school was destroyed by the Mujahideen and, in his twenties, he was arrested and tortured by the Taliban.

Highly educated and able to live abroad should he want to, he's chosen to remain in Kabul and now works for a human rights organisation.

His inspiration is Ghandi - his telephone screensaver bears his image - yet he must travel in an armoured car for his own protection.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet in conversation with Nader Nadery, a human rights campaigner in Kabul.

0320111025

For this week's edition of 'One to One' Lyse Doucet has travelled to Kabul to speak to Nader Nadery, a human rights campaigner who, despite living under direct threat from the Taliban, continues to work for the future of his country.

He's in his thirties, which means that in his lifetime his country has never been at peace.

When he was eight his primary school was destroyed by the Mujahideen and, in his twenties, he was arrested and tortured by the Taliban.

Highly educated and able to live abroad should he want to, he's chosen to remain in Kabul and now works for a human rights organisation.

His inspiration is Ghandi - his telephone screensaver bears his image - yet he must travel in an armoured car for his own protection.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet in conversation with Nader Nadery, a human rights campaigner in Kabul.

03Olivia O'leary With Mick Fitzgerald20121218

For 'One to One' Olivia O'Leary is speaking to people, who have reached the peak of their profession, about growing older.

This week she meets one of the greatest ever jump-jockeys, Mick Fitzgerald. He was forced to retire in 2008 after a very serious fall in the Grand National.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

0420111101

Lyse Doucet is in Kabul to talk to Rangina Hamidi who runs a successful company which gives women economic independence. However she's now 'given up' on Afghanistan following the murder of her father who - at the time of his death - was the Mayor of Kandahar.

In 1981, at the age of three, Rangina Hamidi's family escaped their native Afghanistan during the Soviet occupation. They spent seven years in Pakistan before moving to the United States and settling in Virginia.

But in 2003 (following the fall of the Taliban) Rangina returned to Afghanistan and set up Kandahar Treasure; a private company run by women, it makes and sells traditionally embroidered fabric.

However, Rangina is now packing up and leaving, returning to the United States. The reason is the recent murder of her father, Ghulam Haider Hamidi, who was killed in a suicide bomb attack in July. His death has left her feeling 'negative' and 'pessimistic' , and although her decision to leave makes her feel as if she has failed, she says she needs the space to heal.

One day she may return, and hopes it will be to a more peaceful country.

Join Lyse Doucet as she speaks to Rangina Hamidi for this week's One to One.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet is in Kabul to talk to Rangina Hamidi a campaigner for women's rights.

Lyse Doucet is in Kabul to talk to Rangina Hamidi who runs a successful company which gives women economic independence.

However she's now 'given up' on Afghanistan following the murder of her father who - at the time of his death - was the Mayor of Kandahar.

In 1981, at the age of three, Rangina Hamidi's family escaped their native Afghanistan during the Soviet occupation.

They spent seven years in Pakistan before moving to the United States and settling in Virginia.

But in 2003 (following the fall of the Taliban) Rangina returned to Afghanistan and set up Kandahar Treasure; a private company run by women, it makes and sells traditionally embroidered fabric.

However, Rangina is now packing up and leaving, returning to the United States.

The reason is the recent murder of her father, Ghulam Haider Hamidi, who was killed in a suicide bomb attack in July.

His death has left her feeling 'negative' and 'pessimistic' , and although her decision to leave makes her feel as if she has failed, she says she needs the space to heal.

One day she may return, and hopes it will be to a more peaceful country.

Join Lyse Doucet as she speaks to Rangina Hamidi for this week's One to One.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet is in Kabul to talk to Rangina Hamidi a campaigner for women's rights.

0420111101

Lyse Doucet is in Kabul to talk to Rangina Hamidi who runs a successful company which gives women economic independence.

However she's now 'given up' on Afghanistan following the murder of her father who - at the time of his death - was the Mayor of Kandahar.

In 1981, at the age of three, Rangina Hamidi's family escaped their native Afghanistan during the Soviet occupation.

They spent seven years in Pakistan before moving to the United States and settling in Virginia.

But in 2003 (following the fall of the Taliban) Rangina returned to Afghanistan and set up Kandahar Treasure; a private company run by women, it makes and sells traditionally embroidered fabric.

However, Rangina is now packing up and leaving, returning to the United States.

The reason is the recent murder of her father, Ghulam Haider Hamidi, who was killed in a suicide bomb attack in July.

His death has left her feeling 'negative' and 'pessimistic' , and although her decision to leave makes her feel as if she has failed, she says she needs the space to heal.

One day she may return, and hopes it will be to a more peaceful country.

Join Lyse Doucet as she speaks to Rangina Hamidi for this week's One to One.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet is in Kabul to talk to Rangina Hamidi a campaigner for women's rights.

0520111108

Evan Davis explores the issue of deception by talking to those who have had cause to be economical with the truth. From doctors, guilty of well intentioned obfuscation, to ex-fraudsters skilled at outright lies, over the next four weeks, as Evan takes over the One to One chair, he discusses the complicated truth about lying with those, for whom the truth is rarely plain and never simple.

In the first programme he talks to Rob George, Consultant in Palliative Care who explains why complete honesty is not always in the best interest of the patient and his need to second guess what information the terminally ill need and when.

A palliative care consultant discusses the place of honesty in matters of life and death.

Evan Davis explores the issue of deception by talking to those who have had cause to be economical with the truth.

From doctors, guilty of well intentioned obfuscation, to ex-fraudsters skilled at outright lies, over the next four weeks, as Evan takes over the One to One chair, he discusses the complicated truth about lying with those, for whom the truth is rarely plain and never simple.

In the first programme he talks to Rob George, Consultant in Palliative Care who explains why complete honesty is not always in the best interest of the patient and his need to second guess what information the terminally ill need and when.

A palliative care consultant discusses the place of honesty in matters of life and death.

0520111108

Evan Davis explores the issue of deception by talking to those who have had cause to be economical with the truth.

From doctors, guilty of well intentioned obfuscation, to ex-fraudsters skilled at outright lies, over the next four weeks, as Evan takes over the One to One chair, he discusses the complicated truth about lying with those, for whom the truth is rarely plain and never simple.

In the first programme he talks to Rob George, Consultant in Palliative Care who explains why complete honesty is not always in the best interest of the patient and his need to second guess what information the terminally ill need and when.

A palliative care consultant discusses the place of honesty in matters of life and death.

06Evan Davis With Penny Gadd20111115

Evan Davis continues his exploration into deception by talking to those who've had cause to be economical with the truth.

We think of truth and falsehood as simple binary concepts.

Statements surely have to be one or the other.

Well not quite.

In these interviews Evan meets people who've found themselves on the fuzzy boundary between truth and falsehood.

This week he meets Penny Gadd who lead life as a married man but who became more and more aware that she needed to change sex.

She'd concealed her feelings for years and as in so many deceptions she'd concealed them from herself too.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis talks to Penny, who for decades concealed her true self.

06Evan Davis With Penny Gadd20111115

Evan Davis continues his exploration into deception by talking to those who've had cause to be economical with the truth.

We think of truth and falsehood as simple binary concepts.

Statements surely have to be one or the other.

Well not quite.

In these interviews Evan meets people who've found themselves on the fuzzy boundary between truth and falsehood.

This week he meets Penny Gadd who lead life as a married man but who became more and more aware that she needed to change sex.

She'd concealed her feelings for years and as in so many deceptions she'd concealed them from herself too.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis talks to Penny, who for decades concealed her true self.

07Evan Davis With Steve Henry20111122

Evan Davis continues his exploration into deception by talking to those who've had cause to be economical with the truth.

Everyday we're bombarded with messages from people who are trying to sell us things , objects to buy, political messages or even just themselves.

But how far should they go in putting a positive gloss on things, manipulating the truth to persuade us that mutton is lamb, sub-prime is prime or recession is recovery? In this programme Evan talks to a top advertiser who'll share his thoughts on some tricks of the trade but also the limits to those tricks, how to deceive and when not to.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis talks to advertising executive Steve Henry about deception.

07Evan Davis With Steve Henry20111122

Evan Davis continues his exploration into deception by talking to those who've had cause to be economical with the truth.

Everyday we're bombarded with messages from people who are trying to sell us things , objects to buy, political messages or even just themselves.

But how far should they go in putting a positive gloss on things, manipulating the truth to persuade us that mutton is lamb, sub-prime is prime or recession is recovery? In this programme Evan talks to a top advertiser who'll share his thoughts on some tricks of the trade but also the limits to those tricks, how to deceive and when not to.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis talks to advertising executive Steve Henry about deception.

08Evan Davis With Elliot Castro20111129

Evan Davis continues his exploration into deception by talking to those who've had cause to be economical with the truth.

Today he talks to convicted fraudster Elliot Castro.

Elliot was a teenage credit-card thief who found the buzz he got from lying about his identity was truly addictive.Yet when he was finally caught six years later, it was a relief.

He talks to Evan about why he started lying and how it overtook his life, bringing material comfort and excitement but also social isolation.

He says his career in fraud lasted so long because he often managed to lie to himself as well as others.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis talks to convicted fraudster Elliot Castro.

08Evan Davis With Elliot Castro20111129

Evan Davis continues his exploration into deception by talking to those who've had cause to be economical with the truth.

Today he talks to convicted fraudster Elliot Castro.

Elliot was a teenage credit-card thief who found the buzz he got from lying about his identity was truly addictive.Yet when he was finally caught six years later, it was a relief.

He talks to Evan about why he started lying and how it overtook his life, bringing material comfort and excitement but also social isolation.

He says his career in fraud lasted so long because he often managed to lie to himself as well as others.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis talks to convicted fraudster Elliot Castro.

09Lucy Kellaway With Anon2011120620120504

Lucy Kellaway of The Financial Times, explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking to the super rich. For Ann (she wishes to remain anonymous) the day her company was floated on the stock market and became a multi millionaire, she was paralysed by fear.

'I had always believed that rich people were not nice people. I was terrified my money would taint and destroy my relationships with friends and loved ones'.

A decade on, she has come to terms with her position, becoming a member of The Network for Social Change, ' for people who want to do more than sign a cheque' and having worked out how she wants to spend her money and who she wants to give it to.

She talks honestly to Lucy about how she maintains boundaries on her spending and whether she now feels it's possible to be rich and nice.

http://thenetworkforsocialchange.org.uk/

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Lucy Kellaway explores the complexities of personal wealth with the super rich.

Lucy Kellaway of The Financial Times, explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking to the super rich.

For Anne (she wishes to remain anonymous) the day her company was floated on the stock market and became a multi millionaire, she was paralysed by fear.

'I had always believed that rich people were not nice people.

I was terrified my money would taint and destroy my relationships with friends and loved ones'.

09Lucy Kellaway With Anon2011120620120504

Lucy Kellaway of The Financial Times, explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking to the super rich. For Ann (she wishes to remain anonymous) the day her company was floated on the stock market and became a multi millionaire, she was paralysed by fear.

'I had always believed that rich people were not nice people. I was terrified my money would taint and destroy my relationships with friends and loved ones'.

A decade on, she has come to terms with her position, becoming a member of The Network for Social Change, ' for people who want to do more than sign a cheque' and having worked out how she wants to spend her money and who she wants to give it to.

She talks honestly to Lucy about how she maintains boundaries on her spending and whether she now feels it's possible to be rich and nice.

http://thenetworkforsocialchange.org.uk/

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Lucy Kellaway explores the complexities of personal wealth with the super rich.

Lucy Kellaway of The Financial Times, explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking to the super rich.

For Anne (she wishes to remain anonymous) the day her company was floated on the stock market and became a multi millionaire, she was paralysed by fear.

'I had always believed that rich people were not nice people.

I was terrified my money would taint and destroy my relationships with friends and loved ones'.

10Lucy Kellaway With Jeremy Middleton20111213

Lucy Kellaway of The Financial Times, explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking to the super rich.

Twenty five year ago Jeremy Middleton set out to make money.

He wasn't sure how he was going to do it but he wanted the freedom and autonomy he felt it would bring.

When Homeserve, the company he'd co-founded, was floated on the stock market, he achieved his goal and made the Rich list.

So did it bring him the freedom he wanted? Lucy talks to him about the trappings of wealth and what they mean, the problems of lending money to friends and if he still gets a buzz from business.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Lucy Kellaway explores the complexities of making it onto the rich list.

10Lucy Kellaway With Jeremy Middleton20111213

Lucy Kellaway of The Financial Times, explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking to the super rich.

Twenty five year ago Jeremy Middleton set out to make money.

He wasn't sure how he was going to do it but he wanted the freedom and autonomy he felt it would bring.

When Homeserve, the company he'd co-founded, was floated on the stock market, he achieved his goal and made the Rich list.

So did it bring him the freedom he wanted? Lucy talks to him about the trappings of wealth and what they mean, the problems of lending money to friends and if he still gets a buzz from business.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Lucy Kellaway explores the complexities of making it onto the rich list.

11Lucy Kellaway With Sir Peter Moores20111220

Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times concludes her exploration into the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking Sir Peter Moores.

Son of John Moores, founder of the Littlewoods company, Sir Peter is now eighty and starting to wind up his foundation that has given an estimated ninety three million pounds to charity.

He talks to Lucy about how he's used the money he inherited and earned, the things he's still stingy about and why he trusts no one to run his foundation after he has gone.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Lucy Kellaway explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth.

11Lucy Kellaway With Sir Peter Moores20111220

Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times concludes her exploration into the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking Sir Peter Moores.

Son of John Moores, founder of the Littlewoods company, Sir Peter is now eighty and starting to wind up his foundation that has given an estimated ninety three million pounds to charity.

He talks to Lucy about how he's used the money he inherited and earned, the things he's still stingy about and why he trusts no one to run his foundation after he has gone.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Lucy Kellaway explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth.

12Bridget Kendall With Archbishop Rowan Williams20111227

Bridget Kendall takes over the One to One chair and talks to those who are well known in one field but have another compelling area of expertise. Before becoming the BBC's diplomatic correspondent, like her first interviewee, Bridget too was a Russian scholar. She talks to Archbishop Rowan Williams about his fascination with Dostoyevsky and why he finds the author's work so helpful in his own.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Bridget Kendall talks to Archbishop Rowan Williams about his fascination with Dostoyevsky.

12Bridget Kendall With Archbishop Rowan Williams20111227

Bridget Kendall takes over the One to One chair and talks to those who are well known in one field but have another compelling area of expertise. Before becoming the BBC's diplomatic correspondent, like her first interviewee, Bridget too was a Russian scholar. She talks to Archbishop Rowan Williams about his fascination with Dostoyevsky and why he finds the author's work so helpful in his own.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Bridget Kendall talks to Archbishop Rowan Williams about his fascination with Dostoyevsky.