One To One

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20120828

Paddy O'Connell talks to Chantal, widowed and left to bring up three children alone.

Paddy O'Connell has taken over the One to One interviewer's microphone to explore a subject that reflects his own experience: the effect of great emotional upheaval on family life. When Paddy was 11 his father died which, of course, meant that his mother was widowed.

In the first of three programmes, Paddy meets Chantal who was widowed in 1995 and left to bring up three children alone. They discuss the initial reactions; the process of gradually moving on with your life; when - if ever - is it the right time to remove your wedding rings; and - if you do meet someone new - what role does the memory of your first partner play in your new relationship.

Next week Paddy meets the former Children's Commissioner, Sir Al Aynsley-Green, whose decision to become a doctor was directly linked to the experience, at the age of 10, of losing his father.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

20120904

Paddy O'Connell meets Sir Al Aynsley-Green who has forged a career helping children.

Paddy O'Connell has taken over the One to One interviewer's microphone to explore a subject that reflects his own experience: the effect of great emotional upheaval on family life.

When Paddy was 11 his father died, and in this week's programme -- in order to explore what impact this can have -- he meets Sir Al Aynsley-Green who, at the age of 10, lost his own father. Almost immediately he decided that, when he grew up, he would become a doctor so that other children "didn't have to lose their mummies and daddies".

This passion for helping children has continued throughout his career: Sir Al was the first Children's Commissioner for England (2005-2010), having been involved in the political arena of Children's Services since 2000. He was appointed Chair of the NHS Taskforce for Children and then the first National Clinical Director for Children in government.

He believes strongly that the topic of childhood bereavement should be spoken about more openly. He recalls watching an event on a television programme about Winston's Wish (a bereavement charity) where children were encouraged to write messages to those they had lost, attach them to balloons, and release them. Sir Al describes how he broke down in tears; even at 55 the pain of not having had the chance to say goodbye to his own father still felt fresh.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

20120911

Paddy O'Connell has taken over the One to One interviewer's microphone to explore a subject that reflects his own experience: the effect of great emotional upheaval on family life.

Paddy lost his father when he was 11, and in last week's programme he met Sir Al Aynsley-Green whose career was shaped by the early loss of his own father.

This week's programme takes a slightly different tack as Paddy meets Lisa Cherry, whose childhood was spent in the Care System.

Born in a home for unmarried mothers, her childhood was spent moving from foster home to care home and a spell of homelessness. Eventually Lisa managed to get control of her spiralling life - giving up drinking and getting an education was the making of her.

producer: Karen Gregor.

20120918

Journalist and broadcaster Sarfraz Manzoor explores the risks and rewards of taking a personal story and making it public. This is something he's done in his book ' Greetings from Bury Park' and within his journalism where he's written - amongst other topics - about his mixed-marriage and the experience of being a new father. He's intrigued by both the process and the ramifications of revealing private thoughts and experiences: How do people react to you? Do they see it as a betrayal? Do you risk hurting friends and family? Is it worth the risk if you achieve something that truly resonates with your audience?

As he prepares to adapt his memoir into a screenplay Sarfraz Manzoor speaks to others who have mined their own lives for creative purposes..This week he is in conversation with children's author, Judith Kerr, whose famous children's book 'When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit' was based on her own experience of escaping the Nazis in the 1930s.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

20121002

Sarfraz Manzoor meets author, Elizabeth Wurtzel, to discuss her book 'Prozac Nation'.

In 'One to One' the journalist and broadcaster, Sarfraz Manzoor, has been exploring the risks and rewards of taking a personal story and making it public. This is something he's done in his book 'Greetings from Bury Park' and within his journalism where he's written - amongst other topics - about his mixed-marriage and the experience of being a new father. He's intrigued by both the process and the ramifications of revealing private thoughts and experiences: How do people react to you? Do they see it as a betrayal? Do you risk hurting friends and family? Is it worth the risk if you achieve something that truly resonates with your audience?

In this, the last of his three interviews, Sarfraz Manzoor speaks to the author of 'Prozac Nation', Elizabeth Wurtzel. Published in the mid-1990s, it was considered the first in the 'misery memoir' genre and was a huge success. But how does Wurtzel feel about what she wrote now, almost 20 years on?

Producer: Karen Gregor.

20121009

Kate Silverton wanted desperately to be a journalist from the age of 12. In her teens she travelled extensively - hitch-hiking across Israel and visiting the Palestinian territories in an attempt to better understand the conflict there, she stayed in a Bedouin in the desert and at nineteen went to Zimbabwe for four months armed with just a dictaphone to capture the stories of the people she met along the way. Despite her natural curiosity about the world and her desire to report stories of people living in conflict she didn't follow her heart because she feared she might fail. As the first in her family to go to university much depended on her and her career choice and she opted to enter the City as a Corporate Financier - a demanding job but one that diverted from her doing the one thing she wanted to do - because she feared she might not be good enough.It took the death of her best friend to convince her to change her mind. In the first of this two part series for One to One Kate talks to composer Raymond Yiu who despite his love for music at an early age, his strict parental upbringing stopped him from pursuing this as a career as he thought he wasn't good enough.

Presenter: Kate Silverton

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

20121016

Kate Silverton wanted desperately to be a journalist from the age of 12. In her teens she travelled extensively - hitch-hiking across Israel and visiting the Palestinian territories in an attempt to better understand the conflict there, she stayed with Bedouin in the desert and at nineteen went to Zimbabwe for four months armed with just a Dictaphone to capture the stories of the people she met along the way. Despite her natural curiosity about the world and her desire to report stories of people living in conflict she didn't follow her heart because. she feared she might fail. As the first in her family to go to university much depended on her and her career choice and she opted to enter the City as a Corporate Financier - a demanding job but one that diverted from her doing the one thing she wanted to do - because she feared she might not be good enough. It took the death of her best friend to convince her to change her mind.

Presenter: Kate Silverton

Producer : Perminder Khatkar.

Bridget Kendall With Alexander Mccall Smith20120207

Bridget Kendall talks to those who are well known in one field but are experts in another. She talks to the prolific author Alexander McCall Smith, best known for The No 1 Ladies Detective Agency who's also an Emeritus Professor of Medical Law. They discuss how his academic interest in the legal and philosophical aspects of responsibility feed into his work as a novelist.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Bridget Kendall talks to author Alexander McCall Smith about his work as an academic.

Bridget Kendall With Prof Dianna Bowles20120214

Bridget Kendall has never liked to pigeon hole people and in her series of One to One she talks to those who are known in one particular field but have a second string to their bow, an expertise in a very different field. As a special treat, for today's programme Bridget's out in the Yorkshire Dales near Middlesmoor to meet Prof Dianna Bowles, an eminent plant biochemist who's spent much of her career investigating how biology can benefit society. She's also an enthusiastic owner of an expanding flock of Herdwick sheep and when Foot and Mouth struck in 2001, her two passions came together as she fought, with other breeders, to protect the future of the breed. While science, in some ways connects the two interests, it is above all the joy Dianna finds in both activities that unites them.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Bridget Kendall talks to plant biochemist Dianna Bowles about her joy for work and sheep.

Evan Davis Talks To Penny Gadd20120501

Evan Davis continues his exploration into deception by talking to those who've had cause to be economical with the truth. We think of truth and falsehood as simple binary concepts. Statements surely have to be one or the other. Well not quite. In these interviews Evan meets people who've found themselves on the fuzzy boundary between truth and falsehood. This week he meets Penny Gadd who lead life as a married man but who became more and more aware that she needed to change sex. She'd concealed her feelings for years and as in so many deceptions she'd concealed them from herself too.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis talks to Penny, who for decades concealed her true self.

Evan Davis Talks To Rob George20120424

Evan Davis explores the issue of deception by talking to those who have had cause to be economical with the truth. From doctors, guilty of well intentioned obfuscation, to ex-fraudsters skilled at outright lies, over the next four weeks, as Evan takes over the One to One chair, he discusses the complicated truth about lying with those, for whom the truth is rarely plain and never simple.

In the first programme he talks to Rob George, Consultant in Palliative Care who explains why complete honesty is not always in the best interest of the patient and his need to second guess what information the terminally ill need and when.

Fi Glover Talks To Alice Taylor20120515
Fi Glover Talks To Dan Crow20120508

In the new series of One to One, in which some of our most respected broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most, Fi Glover meets some of the men and women who've founded new tech companies that are putting Silicon Roundabout in East London on the map.

Living locally, Fi's been fascinated by the way this area of Hackney has rapidly become the third most important technical start up centre in the world.- after Silicon Valley and New York. As a magnet to some of the most enterprising and innovative internet companies, Old Street Roundabout has been renamed, Silicon Roundabout. This generation of entrepreneurs are bringing back some old British business values ; inventive, risk taking and barrier breaking. In the first programme she meets a veteran of Silicon Valley, Dan Crowe. Now the chief technology officer at Songkick, he's had the expected triumphs and disasters in internet start-ups but feels this quiet revolution, that's happening now in Hackney, may have a real impact in changing the economic fortunes of Britain.

He explains to Fi why this should make us cheerful, a survey from the Boston Consulting Group recently put the UK as the leader of the G20 nations in our internet economy - so we are top at something after all.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Fi Glover talks to the founders of the new tech companies in Silicone Roundabout, Hackney.

Fi Glover Talks To Tom Allason20120522

As a resident of Hackney, Fi Glover has been fascinated by the way her home patch is being turned into one of the world's most important internet start up centres. Old Street Roundabout has been renamed Silicon Roundabout. In this series of One to One she talks to the men and women responsible for this boom. She wants to know more about this generation of tech gurus, as part of our economic future lies in their hands and in their dreams. In this final programme in her series she talks to Tom Allason, chief executive of Shutl, a courier business that's grown 50% month on month since it started two years ago. Tom explains that it's his past failures that have led to his present success. Fi begs an invite to his exit event.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Lyse Doucet With Masood Khalili20120406

One to One is a new series of interviews on Radio 4 in which well respected broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most.

The first set of interviews will be presented by Lyse Doucet.

Lyse Doucet has a long-standing connection to the country and people of Afghanistan; she's reported from there for over 20 years.

Over the next four weeks Lyse will be in conversation with Afghans - young and old, living at home and abroad - to hear their remarkable stories. This month marks the 10th anniversary of the American-led invasion of Afghanistan, a good time to reflect on recent history and consider the future.

Masood Khalili is Afghanistan's Ambassador to Spain, but he's also a poet who says his life is "10% about politics and 90% about culture".

On the 9th of September 2001, he was the only survivor of an Al Qaeda suicide bomb attack which killed his friend and legendary military leader, Ahmad Shah Masood. An attack which is regarded as a pre-cursor to 9/11.

Khalili's injuries were so severe that he was lucky to live and can no longer endure the dry, dusty conditions of his homeland. Lyse Doucet went to see him in Madrid where he described the bomb blast and the impact it has had on him.

He also talked about his occasional visits to, and memories of, his beloved garden near Kabul. That garden is a metaphor for the way he regards his country -

"I see a flower there and it's blossoming and I say my country will be ok. my country will be like that flower".

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet speaks to Masood Khalili, Afghanistan's Ambassador to Spain.

Mary Ann Sieghart Talks To Andrew2012060520120605 (R4)

Killing another person is humanity's greatest taboo. Mary Ann Sieghart continues her series of conversations with those who've been responsible for taking another life. Andrew knocked down and killed a young mother in a road traffic accident in 1989. He was given eighteen months despite the victim's family asking for a non custodial sentence. These events have always haunted him and they've shaped the rest of his life. He now works with young male drivers teaching them about speed awareness and safe driving.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Mary Ann Sieghart Talks To Charles Hanson20120612

Mary Ann Sieghart concludes her series of interviews with people who've taken another life.

Here she talks to Charles Hanson who was convicted for the murder of his third wife, Julie, seventeen years ago.

Now in his sixties, Charles has spent over half his life in prison for a string of violence related crimes; violence being the only way he knew, to resolve conflict. When Julie ran off with his son from his first marriage,Charles decided the only course of action left open to him, was to resort to murder. He explains to Mary Ann why he came to this conclusion, why even the threat of the death penalty would not have deterred him, how it took him eight years to feel remorse and how the event still haunts him.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Razia Iqbal Talks To Hanif Qadir20120807

who helps Muslim children in danger of being radicalised.

Razia Iqbal takes the One to One chair for the next three weeks to try to discover what it means to be a Muslim in Europe in the 21st century. She talks to three people, in three countries, about their identity as Muslims where they live against a context of prejudice and misunderstandings about their faith.

This week she talks to Hanif Qadir who decided to reject fighting in Afghanistan on the side of the Taliban and chose to help young people in the UK who were in danger of becoming radicalised. In Walthamstow, East London, he set up the Active Change Foundation to encourage young people to a positive future. He explains to Razia about what motivated him to become involved with the Taliban and why he ultimately chose to turn his back on them.

Razia says, 'There are fifteen million Muslims in Europe. The continent looks completely different now compared to how it looked two decades ago. I want to talk to people for whom navigating that change is almost a daily challenge'

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Razia Iqbal Talks To Hilal Sezgin20120814

about what it means to a Muslim in modern Germany.

Razia Iqbal explores what it means to be a Muslim in modern Europe. Here she talks to the German writer and journalist, Hilal Sezgin, at her small farm just outside Hamburg.

Razia Iqbal Talks To Sonia20120821

Razia Iqbal explores what it means to be a Muslim in modern Europe.

Sonia is a young Frenchwoman working for a private investment bank in Paris. Two years ago she decided to wear the hijab to work, an action that has been deeply frowned upon by her employers. She talks to Razia about the importance the headscarf has for her and why she's determined to fight against the discrimination she feels it engenders.

Producer: Anne Marie Bullock.

A young French woman talks about what it means to be a Muslim in modern Europe.

Samira Ahmed With Konstanty Gebert20120320

The journalist and broadcaster Samira Ahmed explores some missing angles for One to One:

Samira has spent 20 years reporting breaking news at home and abroad from Britain to Los Angeles to Berlin. Born to Hindu and Muslim parents and educated at a Catholic school, Samira married into a Northern Irish family. As a result, she's aware of the way news coverage can make sweeping assumptions about stories and tries to seek out the missing angles behind the headlines.

Programme 2: From Poland to the Arab Spring

Samira meets Konstanty Gebert one of Poland's best-known and most respected journalists. During Poland's Communist dictatorship, he operated underground; laboriously hand-printing documents which were secretly distributed; avoiding the police who would constantly follow his movements. In One to One he recalls those years, and describes what it was like when he and his colleagues were eventually able to join a free press. He makes comparisons with journalists in Arab spring countries, and discusses what they could possibly glean from his experiences.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Konstanty Gebert tells Samira Ahmed about life during Poland's communist dictatorship.

Samira Ahmed With Lucy Mathen20120313

The journalist and broadcaster Samira Ahmed is taking over the One to One interviewer's microphone for the next three weeks.

Samira has spent 20 years reporting breaking news at home and abroad from Britain to Los Angeles to Berlin. Born to Hindu and Muslim parents and educated at a Catholic school, Samira married into a Northern Irish family. As a result, she's aware of the way news coverage can make sweeping assumptions about stories and tries to seek out the missing angles behind the headlines.

With that in mind, her first guest, Lucy Mathen, tells a tale of charitable endeavour, with a surprising twist.

Lucy Mathen joined John Craven's Newsround in 1976, becoming the BBC's first female British Asian to present a major TV programme. Several years later, after interviewing a local doctor in Afghanistan, she decided she could achieve a great deal more in a warzone by working as a doctor, not as a journalist. So she retrained as an ophthalmologist, and in 2000 launched the charity Second Sight which runs eye hospitals in northern India helping to cure cataracts for thousands of people.

But the story we're telling in One to One is about football - Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lucy Mathen tells Samira Ahmed about a tale of charitable endeavour, with a twist.

Samira Ahmed With Murray Melvin20120327

Journalist Samira Ahmed meets celebrated actor, Murray Melvin, best known for his role in A Taste of Honey.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Samira Ahmed meets actor Murray Melvin, best known for his role in A Taste of Honey.

Sarfraz Manzoor Talks To Liz Jones20120925

Journalist and broadcaster Sarfraz Manzoor explores the risks and rewards of taking a personal story and making it public. This is something he's done in his book ' Greetings from Bury Park' and within his journalism where he's written - amongst other topics - about his mixed-marriage and the experience of being a new father. He's intrigued by both the process and the ramifications of revealing private thoughts and experiences: How do people react to you? Do they see it as a betrayal? Do you risk hurting friends and family? Is it worth the risk if you achieve something that truly resonates with your audience?

As he prepares to adapt his memoir into a screenplay, Sarfraz Manzoor speaks to others who have mined their own lives for creative purposes. This week he meets the best known of all the confessional columnists, Liz Jones, from The Mail on Sunday's 'You' Magazine.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Yasmin Alibhai-brown With Anon20120221

For the next three weeks, the 'One to One' interviewer's microphone belongs to journalist and broadcaster Yasmin Alibhai-Brown who - for personal reasons - has chosen to explore the impact of divorce on families.

Yasmin divorced over twenty years ago, and - although happily re-married - often contemplates the fall-out of divorce, and the resulting emotional ripples which inevitably reach further than the separating couple. In these programmes she's hearing the stories of a grandparent, a parent and a young person who have all lived through a family break-up

In this, the first programme, she speaks to Jane, a grandparent who hasn't seen her 11 year old granddaughter for four years. When her son divorced he maintained a relationship with his ex-wife which allowed contact with his daughter - Jane's granddaughter. But eventually that contact was withdrawn, resulting in what Jane describes as a living bereavement.

Jane has now set up a support group for grandparents who find themselves in the same situation www.bristolgranddparentssupportgroup.co.uk) and runs a blog (www.bristolgrandparentssupport.blogspot.com).

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown explores the impact of divorce on families.

Yasmin Alibhai-brown With Louis De Bernieres20120228

For personal reasons, the journalist and broadcaster Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, has chosen to explore the impact of family breakdown for 'One to One'.

Yasmin divorced over twenty years ago, and - although happily re-married - often contemplates the fall-out of divorce, and the resulting emotional ripples which inevitably reach further than the separating couple. In these programmes she's hearing the stories of a grandparent, a parent and a young person who have all lived through a family break-up.

Last week Yasmin spoke to a grandmother who hasn't seen her granddaughter for four years, and this week she speaks to the author Louis de Bernieres. He talks from the position he holds as patron of the charity Families Need Fathers, but also from the very personal point of view of a father of two children, who has now separated from their mother.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown talks to Louis de Bernieres about the impact of family breakdown.

Yasmin Alibhai-brown With Megan20120306

For personal reasons, the journalist and broadcaster Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, has chosen to explore the impact of divorce on families for 'One to One'.

Yasmin divorced over twenty years ago, and - although happily re-married - often contemplates the fall-out of divorce, and the resulting emotional ripples which inevitably reach further than the separating couple. In these programmes she's hearing the stories of a grandparent, a parent and a young person who have all lived through a family break-up

So far Yasmin has spoken to a grandmother who hasn't seen her granddaughter for four years, and to the author, Louis de Bernieres, who is patron of Families Need Fathers.

This week she speaks to 18 year old Megan, who describes the experience of living through her parents' divorce.

The charity Young Minds put us in touch with Megan. Their website is www.youngminds.org.uk and Megan is part of the Young Minds VIK (Very Important Kids) project.

Young Minds has a Parents' Helpline which is for any adult who is concerned about the mental health or wellbeing of any child or young adult. It's free to call and the number is 0808 802 5544 (Monday to Friday 9.30am-4pm)

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown talks to 18-year-old Megan about her parents' divorce.

0120111011

One to One is a new series of interviews on Radio 4 in which well respected broadcasters follow their personal passions by talking to the people whose stories interest them most.

The first set of interviews will be presented by Lyse Doucet.

Lyse Doucet has a long-standing connection to the country and people of Afghanistan; she's reported from there for over 20 years.

Over the next four weeks Lyse will be in conversation with Afghans - young and old, living at home and abroad - to hear their remarkable stories.

This month marks the 10th anniversary of the American-led invasion of Afghanistan, a good time to reflect on recent history and consider the future.

Masood Khalili is Afghanistan's Ambassador to Spain, but he's also a poet who says his life is "10% about politics and 90% about culture".

On the 9th of September 2001, he was the only survivor of an Al Qaeda suicide bomb attack which killed his friend and legendary military leader, Ahmad Shah Masood.

An attack which is regarded as a pre-cursor to 9/11.

Khalili's injuries were so severe that he was lucky to live and can no longer endure the dry, dusty conditions of his homeland.

Lyse Doucet went to see him in Madrid where he described the bomb blast and the impact it has had on him.

He also talked about his occasional visits to, and memories of, his beloved garden near Kabul.

That garden is a metaphor for the way he regards his country -

"I see a flower there and it's blossoming and I say my country will be ok.

my country will be like that flower".

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet speaks to Masood Khalili, Afghanistan's Ambassador to Spain.

01Olivia O'leary With Vladimir Ashkenazy20121204

In a new series of One to One, Olivia O'Leary speaks to people who've reached the peak of their careers about how growing older affects their approach to work.

In this first programme, Olivia speaks to one of her heroes - the great Russian-Icelandic pianist, Vladimir Ashkenazy. He left the Soviet union in the sixties, and has played a vast repertoire of the greatest piano music on stages all over the world. Ashkenazy is now conductor laureate with the Philharmonia Orchestra in London and Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor to the Sydney Symphony Orchestra.

At 75 he is still jetting around the world to engagements so we were lucky to catch up with him in a hotel at Heathrow as he was leaving after a brief visit to the UK.

In a candid discussion, Ashkenazy discussed the arthrosis (not arthritis as has been reported) in his hands which occasionally means his fingers cannot fit between the black keys; he talks about not wanting to become the kind of 'older' conductor, with failing physical capacity, that orchestras respond to purely out of respect.

He also talks more widely - about his decision to leave Russia in the 1960s; about the pianists he holds in great respect and about his decision to concentrate on conducting rather than live performance.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

0220111018

Lyse Doucet presents the second in Radio 4's new interview series where respected broadcasters follow their passions by speaking to the people whose stories interest them most.

Lyse has a long-standing connection to the country and people of Afghanistan, having reported from there for over 20 years.

This month marks the 10th anniversary of the American led invasion, a good time to reflect on recent history and consider the future.

This week she's talking to a media mogul who's changed the face of popular culture in a country where, until recently, TV was banned:

Saad Mohseni has become known as Afghanistan's answer to Rupert Murdoch.

Until recently he would have accepted that as a huge compliment, perhaps no longer.

But, either way, Mohseni is a big player.

Running his media empire out of offices in Dubai and Kabul, he's revolutionised TV and Radio broadcasting in Afghanistan by

introducing local versions of international hits like Afghan Star (a singing competition in the X-Factor mould) and controversial radio programmes where male and female broadcasters are in studio together.

His father was an Afghan diplomat who moved his family around the world - London, Tokyo, Kabul, with a long period in Australia.

where, eventually, Saad became an investment banker.

But shortly after the fall of the Taliban, Saad Mohseni returned to Afghanistan and, long fascinated with the media, established a hugely successful media empire.

Join Lyse as she speaks to Saad Mohseni for One to One.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet speaks to Afghan media mogul Saad Mohseni.

02Olivia O'leary With John Banville20121211

For 'One to One' Olivia O'Leary is interviewing three people at the peak of their profession about growing older. This week she meets the Booker Prize winning author, John Banville, who also writes crime fiction under the pseudonym Benjamin Black.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

0320111025

For this week's edition of 'One to One' Lyse Doucet has travelled to Kabul to speak to Nader Nadery, a human rights campaigner who, despite living under direct threat from the Taliban, continues to work for the future of his country.

He's in his thirties, which means that in his lifetime his country has never been at peace.

When he was eight his primary school was destroyed by the Mujahideen and, in his twenties, he was arrested and tortured by the Taliban.

Highly educated and able to live abroad should he want to, he's chosen to remain in Kabul and now works for a human rights organisation.

His inspiration is Ghandi - his telephone screensaver bears his image - yet he must travel in an armoured car for his own protection.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet in conversation with Nader Nadery, a human rights campaigner in Kabul.

03Olivia O'leary With Mick Fitzgerald20121218

For 'One to One' Olivia O'Leary is speaking to people, who have reached the peak of their profession, about growing older.

This week she meets one of the greatest ever jump-jockeys, Mick Fitzgerald. He was forced to retire in 2008 after a very serious fall in the Grand National.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

0420111101

Lyse Doucet is in Kabul to talk to Rangina Hamidi who runs a successful company which gives women economic independence.

However she's now 'given up' on Afghanistan following the murder of her father who - at the time of his death - was the Mayor of Kandahar.

In 1981, at the age of three, Rangina Hamidi's family escaped their native Afghanistan during the Soviet occupation.

They spent seven years in Pakistan before moving to the United States and settling in Virginia.

But in 2003 (following the fall of the Taliban) Rangina returned to Afghanistan and set up Kandahar Treasure; a private company run by women, it makes and sells traditionally embroidered fabric.

However, Rangina is now packing up and leaving, returning to the United States.

The reason is the recent murder of her father, Ghulam Haider Hamidi, who was killed in a suicide bomb attack in July.

His death has left her feeling 'negative' and 'pessimistic' , and although her decision to leave makes her feel as if she has failed, she says she needs the space to heal.

One day she may return, and hopes it will be to a more peaceful country.

Join Lyse Doucet as she speaks to Rangina Hamidi for this week's One to One.

Producer: Karen Gregor.

Lyse Doucet is in Kabul to talk to Rangina Hamidi a campaigner for women's rights.

0520111108

Evan Davis explores the issue of deception by talking to those who have had cause to be economical with the truth.

From doctors, guilty of well intentioned obfuscation, to ex-fraudsters skilled at outright lies, over the next four weeks, as Evan takes over the One to One chair, he discusses the complicated truth about lying with those, for whom the truth is rarely plain and never simple.

In the first programme he talks to Rob George, Consultant in Palliative Care who explains why complete honesty is not always in the best interest of the patient and his need to second guess what information the terminally ill need and when.

A palliative care consultant discusses the place of honesty in matters of life and death.

06Evan Davis With Penny Gadd20111115

Evan Davis continues his exploration into deception by talking to those who've had cause to be economical with the truth.

We think of truth and falsehood as simple binary concepts.

Statements surely have to be one or the other.

Well not quite.

In these interviews Evan meets people who've found themselves on the fuzzy boundary between truth and falsehood.

This week he meets Penny Gadd who lead life as a married man but who became more and more aware that she needed to change sex.

She'd concealed her feelings for years and as in so many deceptions she'd concealed them from herself too.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis talks to Penny, who for decades concealed her true self.

07Evan Davis With Steve Henry20111122

Evan Davis continues his exploration into deception by talking to those who've had cause to be economical with the truth.

Everyday we're bombarded with messages from people who are trying to sell us things , objects to buy, political messages or even just themselves.

But how far should they go in putting a positive gloss on things, manipulating the truth to persuade us that mutton is lamb, sub-prime is prime or recession is recovery? In this programme Evan talks to a top advertiser who'll share his thoughts on some tricks of the trade but also the limits to those tricks, how to deceive and when not to.

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis talks to advertising executive Steve Henry about deception.

08Evan Davis With Elliot Castro20111129

Evan Davis continues his exploration into deception by talking to those who've had cause to be economical with the truth.

Today he talks to convicted fraudster Elliot Castro.

Elliot was a teenage credit-card thief who found the buzz he got from lying about his identity was truly addictive.Yet when he was finally caught six years later, it was a relief.

He talks to Evan about why he started lying and how it overtook his life, bringing material comfort and excitement but also social isolation.

He says his career in fraud lasted so long because he often managed to lie to himself as well as others.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Evan Davis talks to convicted fraudster Elliot Castro.

09Lucy Kellaway With Anon2011120620120504

Lucy Kellaway of The Financial Times, explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking to the super rich. For Ann (she wishes to remain anonymous) the day her company was floated on the stock market and became a multi millionaire, she was paralysed by fear.

'I had always believed that rich people were not nice people. I was terrified my money would taint and destroy my relationships with friends and loved ones'.

A decade on, she has come to terms with her position, becoming a member of The Network for Social Change, ' for people who want to do more than sign a cheque' and having worked out how she wants to spend her money and who she wants to give it to.

She talks honestly to Lucy about how she maintains boundaries on her spending and whether she now feels it's possible to be rich and nice.

http://thenetworkforsocialchange.org.uk/

Producer Lucy Lunt.

Lucy Kellaway explores the complexities of personal wealth with the super rich.

Lucy Kellaway of The Financial Times, explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking to the super rich.

For Anne (she wishes to remain anonymous) the day her company was floated on the stock market and became a multi millionaire, she was paralysed by fear.

'I had always believed that rich people were not nice people.

I was terrified my money would taint and destroy my relationships with friends and loved ones'.

10Lucy Kellaway With Jeremy Middleton20111213

Lucy Kellaway of The Financial Times, explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking to the super rich.

Twenty five year ago Jeremy Middleton set out to make money.

He wasn't sure how he was going to do it but he wanted the freedom and autonomy he felt it would bring.

When Homeserve, the company he'd co-founded, was floated on the stock market, he achieved his goal and made the Rich list.

So did it bring him the freedom he wanted? Lucy talks to him about the trappings of wealth and what they mean, the problems of lending money to friends and if he still gets a buzz from business.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Lucy Kellaway explores the complexities of making it onto the rich list.

11Lucy Kellaway With Sir Peter Moores20111220

Lucy Kellaway of the Financial Times concludes her exploration into the complexities of having considerable personal wealth by talking Sir Peter Moores.

Son of John Moores, founder of the Littlewoods company, Sir Peter is now eighty and starting to wind up his foundation that has given an estimated ninety three million pounds to charity.

He talks to Lucy about how he's used the money he inherited and earned, the things he's still stingy about and why he trusts no one to run his foundation after he has gone.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Lucy Kellaway explores the complexities of having considerable personal wealth.

12Bridget Kendall With Archbishop Rowan Williams20111227

Bridget Kendall takes over the One to One chair and talks to those who are well known in one field but have another compelling area of expertise. Before becoming the BBC's diplomatic correspondent, like her first interviewee, Bridget too was a Russian scholar. She talks to Archbishop Rowan Williams about his fascination with Dostoyevsky and why he finds the author's work so helpful in his own.

Producer: Lucy Lunt.

Bridget Kendall talks to Archbishop Rowan Williams about his fascination with Dostoyevsky.