One Planet [world Service]

Aylin Bozyap assesses the pros and cons of the Yortanli dam and its effects on Turkey's bid for EU membership.

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments

2007012520070126

Nuts: 2/2.

Euan McIlwraith, contrasts two processes in the Amazon, where nuts are harvested from the rainforest and from plantations.

20070208

2/2.

The second programme about India focuses on genetically modified foods.

20070209
20070211

India Rising.

1/2.

Global Warming: The first of two special programmes in the BBC World Service's India Rising season.

2007021520070216
20070222
20070223
20070301
20070302
2007031520070316
20070322
20070323
20070412
20070413
20070414
20070415
2007041920070420
20070421
20070422
20070426
20070427
20070428
20070429
20070503
20070504
20070505
20070506
2007051020070511
20070512
20070513
20070517

1/3.

Japan and the Whale: Series investigating whaling in Japan.

Part 1 examines the cultural and historical basis for Japan's whaling.

20070518
20070519
20070520
20070524

2/3.

Japan and the Whale: Series investigating whaling in Japan.

Part 2 follows whale carcasses as they come off the factory ship, through the research labs and onto the market.

20070525
20070526
20070527
20070531

3/3.

Japan and the Whale: The future of Japan's whaling programme.

Will its insistence on hunting damage its international standing?

20070601
20070603
20070607

1/2.

Danger Fuels: In this two-part series Mark Whitaker addresses the little-known problem of 'energy poverty' in terms of health and development.

20070608
20070609
20070610

1/2.

Danger Fuels: In this two-part series Mark Whitaker addresses the little-known problem of 'energy poverty' in terms of health and development.

20070615

2/2.

Danger Fuels: In this two-part series Mark Whitaker addresses the little-known problem of 'energy poverty' in terms of health and development.

20070616
20070617
20070621
20070622
20070623
20070624
20070628
20070629
20070630
20070701
20070705
20070706
20070707
20070708
20070712

1/2.

Flower Power: Susie Emmett goes on the flower trail to meet the producers, dealers and breeders in the booming global cut-flower business.

20070713
20070714
20070715
20070719

2/2.

Flower Power: Susie Emmett goes on the flower trail to meet the producers, dealers and breeders in the booming global cut-flower business.

20070720
20070721
20070722
20070727

1/2.

Eating the World: Richard Daniel investigates how Britain has become dependent on the rest of the world to maintain its lifestyle and economy.

20070728
20070729
20070803

2/2.

Eating the World: Richard Daniel investigates how Britain has become dependent on the rest of the world to maintain its lifestyle and economy.

20070804
20070805
20070809

Squeezing Lake Victoria's Curves: Lake Victoria, Africa's largest lake, is shrinking.

Is this due to drought or a dam in Uganda? Ayisha Yahya reports.

20070810
20070812
20070819

GM Rides Again: Susan Watts asks if new GM technology will benefit us, or if these plants might be more risky than the first wave of GM crops.

20070823
20070824
20070825

Richard Hollingham investigates carbon offsetting, and the extent to which it is a sop to consumers' consciences.

20070826

Richard Hollingham investigates carbon offsetting, and the extent to which it is a sop to consumers' consciences.

20070830

Richard Hollingham asks if it's possible to change the terms of the global warming debate.

20070831
20070901

Costing the Earth: Stone is the ideal material for households.

With most of it imported from China and India, should consumers question its price?

20070902

Richard Hollingham asks if it's possible to change the terms of the global-warming debate.

20070906
20070907
20070908
20070909
20070914

Carbon Offsetting: Richard Hollingham investigates carbon offsetting, and the extent to which it is a sop to consumers' consciences.

20070916

Carbon Offsetting: Richard Hollingham investigates carbon offsetting, and the extent to which it is a sop to consumers' consciences.

20070920
20070921
20070922
20070923
20070927
20070928
20070929
20070930
20071004
20071005
20071006
20071007
20071011
20071012
20071013
20071014
20071019

Fish for Life.

1/3: Richard Black looks at the impact of the global fishing industry and asks whether it can be in any way sustainable.

20071020
20071021
20071027

Fish for Life.

2/3: Richard Black looks at the impact of the global fishing industry and asks whether it can be in any way sustainable.

20071028
20071102

Fish for Life.

3/3: Richard Black looks at the impact of the global fishing industry and asks whether it can be in any way sustainable.

20071109

Too Hot to Crop: 1/2.

Sue Broom assesses the impact of climate change and whether it means good or bad news for feeding the world.

20071115

Too Hot to Crop: 2/2.

Sue Broom assesses the impact of climate change and whether it means good or bad news for feeding the world.

20071116
20071122

The programme that explores the big issues in global development and the environment.

20071123
20071129
20071130
20071207

Climate Train: In 1997, 36 scientists went to the Kyoto Climate Convention by train and ship.

The journey was an influential mobile conference.

20071213
20071214
20071220
20071221
20071227
20071228
20080103
20080104
20080111

From the Ground Up: 1/2.

Many of the world's soils are being eroded.

Susie Emmett looks at the dire consequences of 'dirty soil' for people and other forms of life.

20080117

From the Ground Up: 2/2.

Many of the world's soils are being eroded.

Susie Emmett looks at the dire consequences of 'dirty soil' for people and other forms of life.

20080118
20080124
20080125
20080207

Balancing Nature: 2/4.

Most of Earth's species are concentrated into small biodiversity hotspots.

Lynne Malcolm visits some of the most important ones.

20080208
20080214

Balancing Nature: 3/4.

Lynne Malcolm explores how conservation could potentially succeed in balancing nature with threats that could lead to distinction.

20080215
20080221

Balancing Nature: 4/4.

Most of Earth's species are concentrated into small biodiversity hotspots.

Lynne Malcolm visits some of the most important ones.

20080228
20080229
20080306
20080307
20080313
20080314
20080320
20080321
20080327
20080328
20080403
20080404
20080405
20080406
20080412
20080413
20080417
20080418
20080419
20080420
20080424
20080425
20080426
20080427
20080501
20080502
20080503

Dawood Azami investigates the side effects of the extensive use of depleted uranium in Afghanistan.

20080504
20080508

Thomas Fessy asks whether Uganda is putting animals before people, looking at the Batwa people in the south west of the country.

20080509
20080510
20080511
20080517

The Amazon Paradox: One Planet looks at the Amazon Rainforest and the region.

20080518
20080522
20080523
20080524
20080525
20080529

Kevin Mwachiro explores Rwanda's plans to harness methane oozing from the Earth's crust below Lake Kivu for electricity production.

20080530
20080531
20080601
20080605

1/2.

One Planet investigates whether carbon offsetting, the main UN mechanism for dealing with climate change, is riddled with scams and fundamentally flawed.

20080606
20080607
20080608
20080612

2/2.

One Planet investigates whether carbon offsetting, the main UN mechanism for dealing with climate change, is riddled with scams and fundamentally flawed.

20080613
20080614
20080615
20080619
20080620
20080621
20080622
20080626
20080627
20080628
20080629
20080703
20080704
20080705
20080706
20080710
20080711
20080712
20080713
20080731
20080801
20080802
20080803
20080807
20080808
20080809
20080810
20080814
20080815
20080816
20080817
20080821
20080822
20080823
20080824
20080828
20080829
20080830
20080831
20080904
20080905
20080906
20080907
20080911
20080912
20080913
20080914
20080918

Animal Migration in a Climate of Change: 1/4.

A look at animal migration in a challenging world.

In Mexico, millions of Monarch butterflies pour into the trees for the winter.

20080919
20080920
20080921
20080925

Animal Migration in a Climate of Change: 2/4.

A look at animal migration in a challenging world.

In Mexico, millions of Monarch butterflies pour into the trees for the winter.

20080926
20080927
20080928
20081003

Animal Migration in a Climate of Change: 3/4.

A look at animal migration in a changing world.

This week, African elephants' migration in South Africa.

20081004
20081005
20081009

Animal Migration in a Climate of Change: 4/4.

A look at animal migration in a changing world.

In Mexico, millions of Monarch butterflies pour into the trees for the winter.

20081010
20081011
20081012
20081016
20081017
20081018
20081019
20081023
20081024
20081025
20081026
20081030
20081031
20081106
20081107
20081108
20081109
20081113
20081114
20081115
20081116
20081120
20081121
20081127

The programme that explores the biggest issues in global development and the environment.

The programme that explores the big issues in global development and the environment.

20081225

The programme that explores the biggest issues in global development and the environment.

20090108
20090115
20090122
20090129
2009020520090206
2009021220090213
20090219
2009032620090327

Dawood Azam looks at the effects of the depleted uranium used in Afghanistan to weight.

Dawood Azam looks at the effects of the depleted uranium used in Afghanistan to weight shells so that they can pierce armour.

20090409
20090416
20090423
20090430
20090507
20090521
20090528
20090604
20090611
20090618

Investigating global environment issues.

Every Thursday.

20090625
20090702

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

20090709
20090716
20090723
20090730
2009080620090807

In June 2008, 26 dolphins were stranded and died on a beach in England.

Sue Broom inves.

Sue Broom investigates what caused such a tragic event.

20090827

The Danish island of Samso has completely eliminated dependence on fossil fuels, and no.

The Danish island of Samso has completely eliminated dependence on fossil fuels, and now exports electricity to the mainland.

20090903
20090910
20090917
20090924
20091001
20091008
20091015
20091022
20091029
20091105
20091112
20091119
20091126
20091210
2009121720091218
20091224
20091231

One Planet hears a very personal view of how humans exploit other species.

It was 28 years ago that the documentary maker Victor Schonfeld produced 'The Animal Films' about the way humans exploit other species.

He returns to the subject in a two part documentary to give a very personal view on what, if anything, has changed since then.

Mike and the usual One Planet team are currently on a short break to prepare for the next series.

But they'll be back the end of January.

You can keep up to date with developments at One Planet HQ by joining in the conversation on Facebook - the link's below.

Or alternatively, email the team at Oneplanet@bbc.com.

20100107
20100114

One Planet takes a look at genetically modified foods and asks if they are the future.

It's viewed with suspicion by many people, but genetically modified food offers the possibility of higher crop yields - and with a growing population, the world is hungry for more.

This week on One Planet, Richard Hollingham asks whether, in a world where climate change threatens traditional agriculture, GM food is the future.

Mike and the usual One Planet team are currently on a short break to prepare for the next series.

But they'll be back the end of January.

You can keep up to date with developments at One Planet HQ by joining in the conversation on Facebook - the link's below.

Or alternatively, email the team at Oneplanet@bbc.com.

20100121

One Planet reports on geologist fears of another deadly Indian Ocean tsunami.

Five years ago a tsunami devastated coastal communities around the Indian Ocean.

Just three months ago, another destructive earthquake killed more than a thousand people around Padang on the Indonesian Island of Sumatra.

This week on One Planet, Roland Pease reports on how geologists fear another deadly quake could strike the region soon.

Mike and the usual One Planet team are currently on a short break to prepare for the next series.

But they'll be back the end of January.

You can keep up to date with developments at One Planet HQ by joining in the conversation on Facebook - the link's below.

Or alternatively, email the team at Oneplanet@bbc.com.

2010012820100129
20100204
20100211
20100218
20100225
20100304
20100311
20100318
20100325
20100401
20100408
20100415
20100422
2010042920100430
20100430 (WS)

To Liverpool this week. Mike's place of birth, but we won't hold that against it. We go to conduct a rather unscientific experiment and pose a dilemma - given the opportunity to be environmentally good, can we be persuaded to accept a small amount of cash instead?

So in the latest One Planet show, Mike finds himself in the centre of Liverpool's shopping district looking to give away wormeries (excellent for recycling your food waste). But there's a twist, if someone accepts the gift, Mike then offers them cash as an alternative. And as they hold out insisting they want the wormery, Mike raises the cash on offer (and just to make things a bit tastier, he's gambling with the editor's own money - which he seemed to relish doing).

Do people stick with their initial reaction to be environmentally friendly, or do they take the money and run? Have a listen and then let us know what you would do, email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com

Also in the show we have the latest on the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and we find a use for millions of plastic bottles. Hope you enjoy listening to the programme, and remember you can always join the team on Facebook, the link's below.

20100506
20100513
20100520
2010052720100528
20100603
20100610
20100617
20100624
20100701
20100708
20100715
20100722
20100729
20100805
20100812
20100819
20100826
20100902
20100909
20100916
20100923
20100930
20101007
20101014
20101021

20101028
20101104
20101111
20101118
20101125
20101209
20101216
20101223
20110113
20110120
2011012720110128
20110203
20110210

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

20110217
20110224
20110303
20110317
20110324
20110401
20110408
20110415
20110422
20110429
20110506
20110513
20110520
20110527
2011060320110604
20110610
2011061720110618
20110624
20110701
20110708
20110722
20110729
20110805
20110812
20110826
20110902
20110909
20110923
20110930
20111007
20111104
20111111
20111118
20111209
2011121620111218
20111223
20120106
20120113
20120120
20120203
2012021020120211
20120213 (WS)
20120217
20120309
2012031620120319
2012032320120324
20120330
20120406
20120413
20120420

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

2012051820120519
2012051820120520
2012051820120521
2012052520120526
2012061520120616
2012061520120617
2012062920120630
20120701 (WS)
20120702 (WS)
2012070620120707
2012070620120708
01/04/201020100402
01/04/201020100404

We do enjoy challenges on One Planet, so Mike gets one to celebrate the show's first birthday - to brew the team a cup of tea during the programme's recording, but using solar power, rather than mains electricity.

Have a listen to see how he gets on.

The show also sets a challenge for you.

Tell us what you want multinational corporations to do when it comes to being green.

We offer a couple of case studies to get the thoughts flowing.

First we head to the Amazon forest in Peru, where food giant Nestle are funding the planting of hundreds of thousands of trees.

Then we hear from a mountain in America, where a data storage centre is trying to turn their energy hungry business a little greener.

Plus - following all your comments last week on capitalism and the environment - we meet up with a leading venture capitalist who's investing heavily in green tech.

As ever, let us know your thoughts.

Join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

Or email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com.

Alternatively, send us a postcard, they always cheer Mike up.

The address is One Planet, BBC World Service, Bush House, London, UK.

Mike's given a challenge.

Plus we plant trees in the Amazon, and go into a data mountain.

01/04/201120110402
01/04/201120110403
01/04/201120110404

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

01/07/201020100702
01/07/201020100704

School rules One Planet this week as we hand over editorial control to the children of Charter School in south London.

With over two billion people around the world aged under 15, it is this generation who will face tough environmental decisions as they take control of the planet.

Mike popped in to see the students a little while ago to hear what they wanted to talk about, now he returns with a series of reports to play them.

We hear from Kenya where our reporter Peter Greste heads into one of the few remaining patches of rainforest, and Mike goes on a fact finding mission to learn about drought-resistant plants.

The children also debate whether parents should let them play in the woods by themselves, and they confess to a wide range of environmental sins.

Also in the show, we have part three of your big environmental questions series.

Ed Butler considers how we can remove short term political thinking from the long term challenges of environmental planning.

As ever, tune in and have a listen then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or write to us.

A postcard or letter is always appreciated - the address is One Planet, BBC World Service, Bush House, London, UK.

We offer you a wealth of other material across the web, so please do take a look.

There's videos on YouTube, pictures on Flickr, ramblings on Twitter...

The kids take over One Planet to discuss forests, playing in woods and long term planning

01/07/201120110702
01/07/201120110703
01/07/201120110704
01/10/200920091002
02/03/201220120303
02/03/201220120305
02/07/200920090703
02/09/201020100903
02/09/201020100905
02/09/201120110903
02/09/201120110904
03/02/201120110204
03/02/201120110206
03/02/201220120204
03/02/201220120206
03/03/201120110304
03/03/201120110306

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

03/06/201020100604
03/06/201020100606

Ah the glamour.

After months of sending Mike to waste sites, farmers fields and deserted streets, he gets to hang out at a film festival on this week's show.

We're in Turin for the city's annual Environmental Film Festival, and we've taken along our own short animated film to show off to the assembled producers and directors.

At the festival, Mike meets up with Ric O'Barry, star of the Oscar winning documentary The Cove, to debate the power of environmental films.

We also consider how Hollywood uses kids movies to get across it's eco-message.

Plus we meet up with endurance swimmer Lewis Gordon Pugh following his successful swim in a glacial lake on Mount Everest.

He gives a few tips on how to swim at 5,300 meters above sea level - slowly, as if swimming with your mother is the key apparently.

As ever, tune in and then let us know what you think.

There's a host of extra material for you this week - watch our short movie, the link's below.

Don't forget our Flickr album, and remember you can always join the team on our Facebook page.

Mike goes to an eco film festival, meets star of The Cove, and learns to swim on Everest.

03/06/201120110605
03/06/201120110606
03/09/200920090904
04/02/201020100205
04/02/201020100207

Can you hear it? The clanging and clunking.

That's the sound of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's reputation taking a battering.

It's being a torrid few months for an organisation that was established to lead the scientific research on climate change.

A series of gaffes has dented its reputation - most notably the incorrect claim that the Himalayan glaciers will disappear by 2035.

In this week's One Planet, Mike meets up with the IPCC's vice chairman Professor Jean-Pascal van Ypersele to ask if the IPCC is still fit for purpose, and how much damage has been done to the cause of those demanding action on human-induced climate change.

We also investigate the climategate" row that continues to develop after computers were hacked into at the world leading Climatic Research Unit of the University of East Anglia.

Hundreds of emails were stolen, released on the internet and seized on by sceptics who suggest they show deliberate attempts by the CRU to suppress data that does not support the theory of climate change.

The acting head of the unit says it's "unfortunate" that the incident has led to more people questioning the science of climate change.

We also hear from one of the people at the very centre of the row - David Holland - a man who made requests to the CRU to release all of it's data, and is often cited in the emails.

He tells Mike that climate science is too closed and self serving for the public good.

Elsewhere in the show, a listener gives us a reason to be cheerful.

And Mike watches his back garden for an hour.

Plus, if you listen to the show via podcast, you'll get an extra feature.

As ever, tune in and let us know what you think.

Contact Mike and the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

Mike grills the IPCC, hears from both sides of the climategate row, and watches his garden"

04/03/201020100305
04/03/201020100307

Solutions" and "sustainability" seemed to be two words that were everywhere during the recording of this week's show.

Mike went along to one of the biggest eco housing exhibitions in Europe to investigate the latest ideas on making our homes and offices more environmentally friendly.

He finds a plethora of businesses promising to solve our energy woes, from green loos to green roofs.

The UK government was also out in force at the exhibition promoting it's new drive to make millions of homes more energy efficient.

Mike bumps into Ed Miliband, the Secretary of State for Energy, to discuss our future homes - plus he asks Mr Miliband, as the UK's representative at the UN's climate change summit, what happened at Copenhagen.

Also in this week's show, we go for a swim outside on a very cold morning in London - well, Mike opts out, but we hear someone else braving the ice.

Plus we discuss the end of civilisation with the author of the hugely successful The World Without Us, Alan Weisman.

Listen and learn how to destroy a barn, and what the fossils of the future will be.

As ever, tune in or download the podcast and let us know what you think.

You can email Mike and the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the debate on our Facebook page, the link's below.

Mike builds an eco house, considers wild swimming, and chats about the end of civilisation

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives."

04/05/201220120505
04/06/200920090605
04/11/201020101105
04/11/201120111105
04/11/201120111106
05/02/200920090206
05/08/201020100806
05/08/201120110806
05/08/201120110807
05/08/201120110808
05/11/200920091106
05/11/200920091108

The latest stop on our listener tour is Barcelona, which also happens to be the last stop on the UN's merry-go-round of climate change talks.

Thousands of delegates have descended on the Spanish city as negotiators try to build some kind of agreement before that big summit in Copenhagen.

But progress is slow.

Very slow.

In this week's show Mike meets Andres Carlgren, Sweden's Minister for the Environment.

As Sweden currently holds the EU Presidency he's in the thick of it trying to chivvy along countries into some sort of agreement.

And as he admits to Mike, the political machinery turns slowly and even he wishes for more power now and then to push the accelerator pedal to the floor.

But talk of hope" and "aspirations" - the kind of talk that politicians rely on in these situations - remains strong.

Also in this week's show, we meet up with Barcelona resident and One Planet listener Christof Damian.

He persuades Mike to get on his bike and go for a ride - something many of us in the One Planet office have been wanting to tell Mike for a while.

We also hear about cycling in Shanghai and New York.

Thanks to all of you who posted your thoughts and ideas about bicycling on our Facebook page, we tried to weave as many as we could into the show.

There's also talk of brewing burgers and having more sex.

As ever, tune in and let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on Facebook - the link to our page is below.

Mike heads to Barcelona to ask why climate change talks are slow, and he honours the bike

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives."

06/01/201220120107
06/01/201220120108
06/04/201220120407
06/04/201220120408
06/05/201020100508

Have you ever seen your city at 3am in the morning? Perhaps you often wander the streets in the early hours - you may be one of the millions who work when the sun has long since gone down.

On this week's One Planet show, Mike considers how day and night are merging as we demand things right around the clock.

He meets up with author Leon Keitzman to discuss the impact of this 24-hour lifestyle - both on individuals physically, but also on society in general.

Futuristic jet packs, chain smoking and manicures are among the issues that crop up.

We also hear from Delhi, where our reporter Rupa Jha goes for a midnight drive to see what's happening in her home city.

She comes across worshippers, construction workers and joins in a night time feast.

Plus, we go for a stroll around New York's Central Park after dark, and we track bats in London.

There's also the small matter of a giant oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico.

As attempts to minimise the environmental damage continue, we consider the political damage this will cause to President Obama's efforts to push through new bills on energy and climate change.

As ever, it's a packed show, so let us know what you think.

You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on our Facebook page, the link's below.

Mike wanders empty streets, we go to Delhi at 3am, and we get the latest on the oil slick

06/05/201020100509

Mike wanders empty streets, we go to Delhi at 3am, and we get the latest on the oil slick

06/05/201120110507
06/05/201120110508
06/05/201120110509
06/11/201120111107
07/01/201020100108

One Planet hears a very personal view of how humans exploit other species.

07/05/200920090508
07/05/200920090509

The talk these days in the corridors of power is no longer about millions of dollars here, the odd billion there.

It's now about the odd trillion here, there, and billions everywhere.

The amount of cash being found by rich nations to revitalise their sluggish economies is unprecedented.

But in this week's show, we look at the small sums that often get overlooked when we talk about helping the world.

The $20 a week that workers send back to relatives (who often live in some of the world's poorest nations) and which make such a big difference to their daily lives.

Remittances - as they are called - are falling sharply to many countries as the global financial slowdown takes its toll on migrant workers.

Those gifts of $20 a week are being squeezed, sometimes drying up completely.

The World Bank warns the level of remittances may fall by up to 8% in 2009 - that's a big loss of cash for developing countries (we're back to talking about billions of dollars).

For nations such as Jamaica - where remittances make up a huge slice of its economy - a drop off spells pain for many.

Dave Shirley, the manager of a car parts firm in the north of the island, may speak in a breezy laid back fashion, but it can't mask his worry over the drop.

It makes a big difference, because that's what a lot of people rely on to live; to pay bills; pay emergencies.

That source is just not there anymore - it's totally gone.

So now we suffer."

Also in this week's show, we speak to the head of the UN's environmental programme Achim Steiner about his shock at the vast sums of money being used to prop up ailing companies, after spending years fighting for much smaller sums to tackle global poverty and climate change.

He also shares his thoughts on why putting a $5 surcharge on a barrel of oil could be part of the solution to our environmental problems.

Tune in (or download), have a listen, and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com.

And if you can't get enough of us (and you're a Facebook fan) we've now got a page there.

Join us and let's continue the debate.

You'll also find your photos from around the world, your postcards, and pics of the One Planet team at work.

Mike Williams meets the UN environment chief, plus reggae, remittances and Prince Charles

The programme that explores the biggest issues in global development and the environment."

07/10/2010

07/10/201020101008
07/10/201120111008
07/10/201120111009
07/10/201120111010
08/01/200920090109
08/01/200920090110
08/01/200920090111
08/04/201020100409
08/04/201020100410

When this show launched one year ago, we promised to keep a track of our carbon footprint.

We've now hit 35 tonnes of carbon dioxide, but what does that look like? It's hard to visualise the impact of our show on the environment when we just talk about numbers; about kilogrammes and tonnes.

So we asked for some assistance.

Dr Adam Nieman specialises in trying to help people better understand our relationship with the environment by turning statistics into illustrations - so we asked him to do a visual representation of our 35 tonnes of carbon dioxide.

You can see his illustration below.

Also in this week's show, we consider whether environmental journalists are doing enough to engage the public.

We hear from journalists in the UK, America and Africa - who tell us why their news editors fear environmental news is a turn off for readers.

Plus, Mike has another go at his solar challenge, and we hear from listener Ivor Hanson who lives on the Solomon Islands in the Pacific Ocean.

He has a nice tale to tell about efforts on the islands to help residents swap food for solar panels.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page - the link's below.

Remember there's a little extra for you if you download the free podcast.

Mike pictures his carbon footprint, hears about solar for food, and tackles his challenge

08/04/201020100411

Mike pictures his carbon footprint, hears about solar for food, and tackles his challenge

08/04/201120110409

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

08/04/201120110410
08/04/201120110411
08/07/201020100709
08/07/201020100710

One of the Earth's most breathtaking landscapes, the Arctic perches atop of the world, looking down on international borders and human exploitation.

(Well, for now it does) This week on One Planet, Richard Hollingham joins scientists from the British Antarctic Survey on a ship from Svalbard into the Arctic ice.

He investigates tiny life within the ice as scientists try to establish how important these micro-organisms are for absorbing carbon dioxide.

We also hear about the squabbles for the region's vast natural resources, and we try to spot some polar bears (without getting too close).

Plus Richard offers a glimpse into life on an ice breaker vessel.

We've a raft of extra material for you this week, including some beautiful pictures from the Arctic, take a look at our Flickr album.

Plus, we have the fourth part of our Open University series on your big environmental questions - this time asking whether climate change is really a problem for sociologists rather than scientists.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.co.uk, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

One Planet's in the Arctic to examine micro-life, polar bears and the fight for resources

08/07/201020100711

One Planet's in the Arctic to examine micro-life, polar bears and the fight for resources

08/07/201120110709
08/07/201120110710
08/07/201120110711
08/10/200920091009
08/10/200920091010

When One Planet wins a Nobel Peace Prize, I wonder where we'll hang our well deserved award.

I only ask because this week we popped round to see a man who has his hanging in the lounge, underneath a faux candle light bulb.

Professor Sir John Houghton received the award for his part in the setting up of the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

But what's climate change got to do with a peace prize? Well, Sir John tells Mike that it's already causing conflicts, and if we don't tackle the problem, more bloodshed lay ahead.

In the interview, we also hear Sir John's views on those who are sceptical of man made-climate change, and ask how his belief in God has shaped his views on environmental protection.

By the way, if you'd like to see a picture of a Nobel Peace Prize (just so you can ponder whether it goes with the colour scheme in your house), have a look at the photos taken during the production of our latest show.

You can find them on our Flickr album – the link's below.

Also in this week's programme, we take a moment to hear those voices that are unlikely to get heard at the Copenhagen summit in December.

A Kenyan tribesman; a Bolivian farmer; and a resident of Micronesia are among those we speak to.

And there's a very large group of people who won't get directly represented at Copenhagen, but who will feel the effects of any decisions taken far longer than most – the world's two billion people aged 18 and under.

Mike hooks up with some of our high school listeners in New Hampshire, America to ask what they want from the summit.

Many thanks to all of you who sent in ideas of what an electric car should sound like, we've put some of your suggestions into this week's show.

As ever, tune in and let us know what you think – oneplanet@bbc.com.

And you can always join in the debate on our Facebook page, the link's below.

If there's no conversation, Mike's just talking to himself, and that's no good for anyone.

Mike hears quiet voices on climate change, mulls a Nobel Prize and gets down with the kids

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

08/10/200920091011

Mike hears quiet voices on climate change, mulls a Nobel Prize and gets down with the kids

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

09/03/201220120310
09/03/201220120312
09/04/200920090410
09/04/200920090411
09/04/200920090412
09/07/200920090710
09/07/200920090711

It was arguably the greatest event of the 20th Century - man walks on the moon.

The goal was political - an attempt to display superiority by one global superpower over another.

But the ultimate outcome may have been far more profound than the scientists and politicians every thought possible - an appreciation of the remarkable world we live on.

In this week's One Planet, we asked our space expert Richard Hollingham to explore the idea that the Apollo space missions spawned the environmental movement.

By going to the moon, and taking photos of its barren, grey landscape, and then looking back towards our vibrant blue planet, humans were presented with the most striking proof that we have a unique home.

Listen to Richard's piece, and then view our slideshow of pictures taken from the Apollo moon missions.

You've likely seen them before, they are after all, truly iconic images.

But is it possible to ever tire of seeing the Earth from space?

Also in the show, we have an interview with the Nobel Peace Prize winner Wangari Maathai, and we explore the dilemma between securing economic growth and protecting the environment.

As ever, tune in or download, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email us at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join the team on Facebook if you're a member.

There you'll find us debating key environmental and development issues with our listeners throughout the week.

Mike hears from the moon, talks trees, and looks at the economy versus environment dilemma

09/07/200920090712

Mike hears from the moon, talks trees, and looks at the economy versus environment dilemma

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

09/09/201020100910
09/09/201020100912
09/09/201120110910
09/09/201120110911
09/09/201120110912
09/12/201020101210
09/12/201120111210
10/02/201120110211
10/02/201120110212
10/02/201120110213

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

10/06/201020100611
10/06/201020100612

Do you feel the need for speed? Millions of us do, and this week One Planet comes from one of motor racings great spectacles, the TT Races on the Isle of Man.

Mike mingles with the leather wearing pros and avid amateurs as he asks how this gas guzzling sport is driving clean energy technology.

We hear from the inventor of an electric motor, the Island's chief minister, a professional racer, and two French tourists.

There's a host of other elements in this week's programme, we hear one rather interesting eco-friendly idea that involves going up a large mountain with a bucket of paint.

Plus we hear from a group of Buenos Aires workers with advice on how to weather an economic storm.

As ever, tune in and let us know what you think.

Email the team on oneplanet@bbc.com, and remember you can always join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

Mike goes to the TT Races, messes with an electric bike, and hears how to paint a mountain

10/06/201020100613

Mike goes to the TT Races, messes with an electric bike, and hears how to paint a mountain

10/06/201120110611
10/06/201120110612
10/06/201120110613
10/09/200920090911
10/12/200920091211
10/12/200920091213

Catching sight of an alien, laughing with Santa and chatting to a lady with feathers in her hair - Mike's kept busy at Copenhagen as the climate change summit finally kicks off.

In this week's show Mike is found loitering around the corridors of the conference centre that's hosting this global summit - a summit many see as a last chance saloon, some views as a stepping stone, others a cauldron of lies and propaganda.

Whatever your views on climate change you can't help but be inspired by the cosmopolitan mix and lively atmosphere of the place.

Let Mike give you his guided tour of the place.

The centre's supposed to accommodate 15,000 people - instead 34,000 have crammed into it.

World leaders, government negotiators, charity workers, business leaders and that alien.

Mike chats to plenty of them and asks what this fantastic lunacy can actually achieve.

He also takes time out from the conference to visit an alternative summit in the city, and he goes on the trail of some fashionable yet ethical clothes.

As ever, tune in and let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com.

Or if you're on Facebook, join in the conversation on our page, the link's below.

Mike arrives at the Copenhagen summit to meet delegates, laugh with Santa and alien spot.

11/02/201020100212
11/02/201020100214

Albert Einstein, James Bond and the Vulcans - well one at least - are all hot topics on this week's show as Mike heads to the UK's Central Laser Facility to find out whether laser fusion is going to help us meet our future energy needs.

As One Planet Facebook member Mark Gibbs points out, talk of using laser fusion to generate power is nothing new.

But projects in the US and Europe have increased optimism that a breakthrough is in the not-to-distant future.

Let Dr Kate Lancaster explain to you the principles and potential of laser fusion.

Also in the show, our reporter Richard Hollingham heads to Canada to investigate the lure of lithium.

This soft metal is in huge demand at the moment thanks to its use in rechargeable batteries.

Sticking with Canada, we also hear from the Vancouver Winter Olympics, where they've had a bit of a problem with warmer than usual weather.

Throw in a bit of Australian politics and a new Chinese year, and it's a busy show.

As ever, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Remember the podcast has our new Three Commandments section, and you can always join the team on our Facebook page.

Mike talks laser fusion, learns about the new gold rush and hears from the green Olympics.

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

11/03/201020100312
11/03/201020100313

This weekend, representatives from over 170 countries will be meeting in Qatar for the latest CITES conference - the key gathering that occurs every three or four years to discuss global conservation of our most endangered species.

With that in mind, Mike heads to the Zoological Society of London to come face to face with some of the world's rarest animals - and ends up being fascinated by a Sumatran Tiger.

He chats to conservationist Helen Meredith about why biodiversity matters, and we hear from Tokyo about a species of fish that's likely to dominate much of the CITES conference - the Atlantic Bluefin Tuna.

Also in the show, we hear from author Michael Green about why taxing the banks to help global poverty is not a good idea, and we go to America to get an update on environmental stories there.

As ever, tune in or download the podcast and let us know what you think.

You can email Mike and the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the debate on our Facebook page, the link's below.

Mike admires tigers, learns about tuna and we hear from the man who hunts illegal hunters.

11/03/201020100314

Mike admires tigers, learns about tuna and we hear from the man who hunts illegal hunters.

11/05/20122012051120120512
20120513 (WS)
20120514 (WS)

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

11/05/201220120512
11/05/201220120513
11/06/200920090612
11/11/201020101112
11/11/201120111112
11/11/201120111113
12/02/200920090213
12/08/201020100813
12/08/201020100815
12/08/201120110813
12/08/201120110814
12/08/201120110815
12/11/200920091113
12/11/200920091115

Australia is the latest stop for Mike and the One Planet Listener Tour.

The world's largest island offers an interesting contradiction when it comes to the environment.

It's at the front line of climate change with vast areas ravaged by drought.

Yet Australia is also one of the heaviest emitters of greenhouse gases per capita - the mining industry underpins the economy.

In this week's show Mike heads to the coal port at Newcastle, New South Wales, to consider a nation's dilemma when its biggest industries provide wealth and jobs, but stand accused of significantly harming the world's environment.

He also meets up with Australian environmental icon Tim Flannery, and chats with environment minister Peter Garrett - a man who was a rock star eco activist, but is now in suit and tie charged with protecting the nation's unique flora and fauna.

Oh, and he's also got to solve that tricky dilemma we've just mentioned.

Most importantly, Mike sits down with some of you - our beloved One Planet listeners.

In a bar overlooking Sydney harbour you tell us your thoughts on it all - the coal mining, the water shortages, the political squabbles.

Lots of interesting talk, helped along by some fine wine (Australian, of course).

As ever, do tune in or download the podcast, and then let us know what you think.

You can always email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page - the link's below.

Next stop central Scotland, where it's time Mike atoned for some of his recent carbon sins.

Give that man a spade.

Mike visits Australia to ask listeners about mining, droughts and rock star politicians.

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

13/01/201120110114
13/01/201220120114
13/01/201220120115
13/01/201220120116
13/04/201220120414
13/04/201220120415
13/04/201220120416
13/05/201020100514
13/05/201020100516

Britain has just elected it's first Member of Parliament from the Green Party.

Caroline Lucas won her place in the House of Commons thanks to the residents of Brighton, a city on the south coast of England.

In this week's show Mike heads to this seaside resort to find out why this corner of the country has shunned the main political parties and gone green.

There he chats to resident writer Gilly Smith, and catches up with the newly elected MP.

Of course in many other parts of the world, green politicians have been winning elections for decades, so from Brighton beach, Mike - via the magic of satellite - has a chat with our correspondent in Germany about the rising influence of greens across Europe.

And he asks what have they been able to do once in power?"

Also in the show we investigate the detergents being sprayed into the Gulf of Mexico in an effort to limit environmental damage from that oil spill.

And Mike sits down with American property magnate Anthony Malkin to discuss why he's spending tens of millions of dollars to make the Empire State Building more energy efficient - apparently it's all down to Darth Vadar and rather large electricity bills.

Lots to talk about in this week's show.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com or join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

Mike chats to Britain's first Green MP, messes with oil spill detergents and talks retro"

13/05/201120110514
13/05/201120110515
13/05/201120110516
13/08/200920090814

Professor Trevor Cox explores the new wave of 'biomimicry' and meets the people attempt.

Professor Trevor Cox explores the new wave of 'biomimicry' and meets the people attempting to emulate Nature's genius.

In June 2008, 26 dolphins were stranded and died on a beach in England.

Sue Broom inves.

14/01/201020100115

One Planet takes a look at genetically modified foods and asks if they are the future.

14/01/201020100116
14/01/201020100117
14/05/200920090515
14/05/200920090516
14/05/200920090517

Mike talks to an oil boss, hears about diamond mining, and pays homage to graphite.

Have you ever presented your loved one with a lump of carbon? If so, I only hope it sparkled and was wrapped in gold rather than black and sooty.

It greatly enhances your chances of marriage.

It is our love or carbon in all it's forms - from diamond to coal - that we explore in this week's show.

And it's a deep and lasting relationship.

Carbon generates much of our electricity; helps fuel our cars, and even puts the lead in our pencils (it never was lead, but graphite).

Oh, and it also happens to be a key element in humans.

We literally couldn't live without it.

James Smith, the boss of oil giant Shell UK tells us why he thinks the price of carbon is too low, and argues that oil production will soon hit it's peak.

I think we're going towards the point in the next 10 or 15 years were we will see plateau oil.

At the moment, oil production around the world is 85 million barrels a day.

I think it's unlikely we'll get oil production of over 100 million barrels a day because the easy oil has now been found." With global energy demand set to double, change is coming believes the oil boss.

We also investigate illegal diamond mining in Venezuela, and a Beijing taxi driver responds to the London cabbie we spoke to earlier in the series who suggested it was pointless tackling climate change while China was building new power stations every day.

Plus, a columnist from America rallies against what he sees as hypocritic environmentalists who surround him whenever he goes to dinner parties.

As ever, tune in (or download), have a listen and tell us what you agree or disagree with.

Then let us know, contact Mike and the One Planet team at oneplanet@bbc.com.

You can also find us on Facebook if you're a fan - the link's below.

The programme that explores the biggest issues in global development and the environment."

14/10/2010

14/10/201020101015
15/01/200920090116
15/01/200920090118
15/04/201020100416
15/04/201020100417

The disarmament deal signed by America and Russia this week means thousands of nuclear weapons will be heading for the scrap heap in the coming years - few will shed a tear for them.

But what can you do with these unloved massive chunks of metal and electronics?

On this week's One Planet we try to find out how much of a nuclear weapon can be recycled and reused.

We meet nuclear physicist Frank Barnaby, one of the few people left to have witnessed an atomic bomb being detonated, and ask him how these missiles might go on to enjoy a second life.

Also in the show we head to Nairobi to investigate how easy it is to get rid of electronic waste in Kenya's capital city.

Plus we seek out the urban farmers of New York City - there's plenty of chickens, bee hives and cabbage patches among the skyscrapers if you know where to look.

As ever, do have a listen and then let us know what you think.

You can email the team at Oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page.

Send us a message, make our day.

Can you recycle nuclear weapons? Plus we speak to NYC's farmers, and feel pity for trash

15/04/201020100418

Can you recycle nuclear weapons? Plus we speak to NYC's farmers, and feel pity for trash

15/04/201120110416

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

15/04/201120110417
15/04/201120110418
15/07/201020100716
15/07/201120110716
15/07/201120110717
15/07/201120110718
15/10/200920091016
15/10/200920091017

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

What mark would you award us for our stewardship of the Earth so far? B minus according to the Archbishop of Canterbury.

In this week's show, Mike sits down with Dr Rowan Williams to chat about faith and the church's role in helping protect the environment.

In a wide ranging interview, the symbolic head of the Anglican church discusses the world's population and our urge to consume.

He also admits his own organisation must do more to encourage companies to adopt environmentally-aware policies by flexing its considerable financial muscle.

The Church of England has billions of pounds invested in some of the world's largest companies.

Also in the show, we hear from a builder in Cape Town who's constructing upmarket villas and offices out of waste materials destined for landfill, and Mike invites a chemist round to his house to learn about how to turn it into a carbon-eating machine - it's all to do with living" paint.

As ever, tune in and have a listen, then let us know what you think - oneplanet@bbc.com.

And remember, you can always join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

Mike meets the Archbishop of Canterbury, considers rubbish homes and living buildings"

15/10/200920091018

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

Mike meets the Archbishop of Canterbury, considers rubbish homes and living buildings

16/04/200920090417
16/04/200920090418
16/04/200920090419
16/07/200920090717
16/09/201020100917
16/09/201020100919
16/09/201120110917
16/12/201020101217

Andrew Luck-baker spends a day on a motor boat with Tucker the sniffer dog and his team of zoologists in search of killer whale faeces, floating in the waters off the North American Pacific coast.

Tucker is a black Labrador.

He is one of an elite team of detection dogs, trained to find the faeces of threatened animals in the cause of conservation.

A lump of faeces is packed with information about an animal’s stress levels, fertility, nutritional health and exposure to chemical pollution.

There is no other way to reap this information from whales because whales spend most of their lives underwater.

It is impossible to take blood samples from them.

A trained dog’s nose enables researchers to find whale scat in much greater quantities than by relying on their own human senses.

Tucker’s work, currently funded by the Washington Sea Grant, means the scientists from the University of Washington in Seattle can start to piece together an explanation for why a special population of killer whales in North America is in decline and at risk from extinction.

This community of orca lives in the Salish Sea between Vancouver Island and the mainland US Pacific coast.

They number about 90 individuals and in recent years they have suffered some terrible times.

Two years ago, about one in ten died.

Several years earlier, 20% of them were lost.

Tucker the sniffer dog and his human companions join forces to save the whales

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

16/12/201020101218

Tucker the sniffer dog and his human companions join forces to save the whales

16/12/201020101219
16/12/201120111217
17/02/201120110218

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

17/02/201220120218
17/02/201220120220
17/03/201120110318
17/03/201120110320

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

17/06/201020100618
17/06/201020100620

The oil spill that continues to blight large parts of America's southern coastline is not going to go away soon.

In fact, the oil and its environmental effects are not going to disappear for decades.

Politicians, industry leaders and campaigners may be the ones managing the crisis now, but it's the next generation who will have to see the clean-up through to its end.

They will have to win back the tourists, and nurse the fishing stocks back to health.

On this week's One Planet, our reporter Robyn Bresnahan visits a high school in New Orleans to speak with students about how the oil spill has affected their communities, and shaped their views on the environment.

Also in the show, we discuss the merits of eating insects.

High in protein and in plentiful supply, a forthcoming report from the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation is going to outline how insects could make up an increasing part of the world's diet.

And we kick-start our series of five by five minute questions which you asked.

It's all part of a project with the Open University's Creative Climate project - if you want to more, the link's below.

As ever, do tune in and let us know what you think - you can contact the team on oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

If you'd prefer to write, our address is One Planet, BBC World Service, Bush House, London, UK - we always love a letter or a postcard.

Students from Louisiana discuss the oil spill, Mike eats insects and we hear from Malawi.

17/06/201120110619
17/06/201120110620
17/09/200920090918
17/12/200920091220
18/02/201020100219
18/02/201020100220

You asked Mike to investigate transition towns - so we've sent him to one.

This week he's in Totnes in the south of England to meet a key figure in the transition movement, Rob Hopkins.

Over 250 towns have now joined the network, and they're popping up around the world, from Chile to New Zealand.

If you've never heard of transition towns, don't worry, Rob will explain all, but in a nutshell their goal is to focus attention on sustainable living and local economic resilience.

Also this week, we force Mike to do something good.

As in a good deed.

Self-sacrifice is a recurring theme in the show, so we thought about demanding Mike give something up for the next month.

In the end (after rather too much debate) we decided it would be better if we gave him an extra daily chore instead - helping strangers.

Have a listen to Mike starting his good-deed-athon on the streets of London outside One Planet HQ.

Plus, we hear why the world's growing population is not a problem, and we head to China for the latest environmental and development news in the world's most populous nation.

As ever, tune in and let us know what you think.

Remember you can always join the team on our Facebook page - the link's below - or email us at oneplanet@bbc.com.

Mike visits a transition town, does a good deed and hears from China.

18/02/201020100221

Mike visits a transition town, does a good deed and hears from China.

18/03/201020100319
18/03/201020100321

The sustainable intensification of agriculture" is a phrase that might leave you a little cold.

But Britain's national academy of science - The Royal Society - recently used it in a report examining ways to boost the global agricultural output.

With the world's population rapidly rising towards seven billion, food production will have to be boosted if more people aren't going to be left hungry on a daily basis.

On this week's show, Mike examines different solutions to the global food puzzle.

We hear from farmers in Zambia where there's a growing movement to ditch more modern methods of farming involving tractors and artificial fertilisers, and return to more traditional ways.

A movement called conservation farming, and the results have been impressive.

We also speak to the celebrated Indian campaigner Dr Vandana Shiva who disputes the idea that intensive farming has helped the world, and instead urges the whole food industry to be overhauled - large commercial operations replaced by small scale biologically diverse plots.

Plus Mike chats to one of the world's leading crop scientists to ask whether technology can provide some of the answers, or whether it has been part of the problem.

Also in the show, Mike grabs his canoe and takes to the Thames to interview Blue Peter presenter Helen Skelton following her extraordinary kayak trip down the entire Amazon for Sport Relief.

Have a look at our audio slideshow to see some pictures of Mike and Helen on the river.

As ever, tune in or download the podcast and let us know what you think.

You can email Mike and the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the debate on our Facebook page, the link's below.

Mike considers intensive farming, hears ghoulish tales on the river and reads eco fiction"

18/11/201020101119
18/11/201120111119
18/11/201120111120
18/11/201120111121
19/02/200920090220
19/02/200920090221
19/02/200920090222
19/08/201020100820
19/08/201020100822
19/11/200920091120
19/11/200920091122

You told Mike to man up" and get his hands dirty.

So he did.

For the latest stop on the One Planet Listener Tour, Mike's been to a forest in central Scotland to plant some trees - get a bit of dirt under those manicured nails.

During his trip, Mike also pops in to see the father of wave power, Professor Stephen Salter at his lab in the University of Edinburgh.

Thirty years after inventing a way to turn wave power into electricity, the professor fears it's now too late to rely on renewable energies to help cut global carbon emissions and prevent the melting of the arctic caps.

"We've wasted so much time not getting Ducks built when we could have been doing it properly that renewables are going to be too late," he says, looking out across the giant wave tank that dominates his university laboratory.

The first Salter Duck, created in 1973, was a rather simple teardrop design made from balsa wood.

Today, the latest incarnation is a far more complex construction made from steel.

But he warns, "I don't think we have time to get them working in big enough numbers in order to prevent something nasty happening to the arctic ice."

Also in this week's show, we hook up with listener John Penny and take him to meet the Scottish environment minister Roseanna Cunningham.

Have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com.

Or you can always join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

Mike gets dirty hands in Scotland, meets the father of wave power and greets a minister.

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives."

20/01/201120110121
20/01/201120110122
20/01/201120110123
20/01/201220120121
20/01/201220120122
20/01/201220120123
20/04/201220120421
20/04/201220120422
20/04/201220120423
20/05/201020100521
20/05/201020100523

Mike chats to the UN's new climate chief, meets Daryl Hannah and spots pigs in the sky.

More ambition is needed when it comes to international climate change negotiations.

That's according to the UN's new climate chief Christiana Figueres.

One Planet managed to grab a quick chat with the Costa Rican diplomat just hours after her appointment was announced by UN secretary-general Ban Ki-Moon.

It's time to make more effort, it's time to be more ambitious," Ms Figueres told Mike in a telephone conversation.

She will take over the reins from outgoing chief Yvo De Boer in July, and was keen to stress that the Copenhagen summit had not been a failure.

Climate change is now "at the top of every political agenda in every country," Ms Figueres told Mike.

Tune in to the interview and then let us know what you think - email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com.

Also in this week's show we meet up with US actress Daryl Hannah to talk about her life as an environmental campaigner.

Download the free podcast to hear the star of Kill Bill reveal her three commandments to live your life by.

We've also got an interview with one of the world's largest airplane manufacturers, and someone tells us why it's time to rename our home planet.

Plus, Mike goes cloud spotting.

Thanks to all our Facebook fans who sent in pictures of clouds where they live - we loved them all.

If you want to join the One Planet team on Facebook, the link's below.

Hope to see you there."

20/05/201120110521
20/05/201120110522
20/05/201120110523
2050: An Earth Odyssey20101224

In this three-part series, the BBC's environment correspondent Richard Black looks at the predictions and promises being made about the future of the planet over the next few decades and explores some of the solutions being put forward to tackle the biggest issues.

Can geoengineering effectively combat climate change?

2050: An Earth Odyssey20101225

Can geoengineering effectively combat climate change?

2050: An Earth Odyssey20101226
2050: An Earth Odyssey20110106

Is the future of the environment really all down to money?

Is the future of the environment really all down to money? In the final programme Richard Black explores the economic schemes being proposed to save the earth's natural riches and its threatened biodiversity.

Payment for Ecosystem Services (PES) puts an economic value on the earth's resources, its forests, rivers, natural tourist attractions and agricultural land.

It's proposed that users of these ecosystems should pay and be paid to preserve them for the future.

We hear from a scheme in Rwanda which is providing economic incentives for the local population to conserve a National Park, and

Richard visits a Stork Centre in Japan where the local rice farmers are being encouraged to conserve the stork population.

2050: An Earth Odyssey20110107

In this three-part series, the BBC's environment correspondent Richard Black looks at the predictions and promises being made about the future of the planet over the next few decades and explores some of the solutions being put forward to tackle the biggest issues.

Is the future of the environment really all down to money?

2050: An Earth Odyssey20110108

Is the future of the environment really all down to money?

2050: An Earth Odyssey20110109
2050: An Earth Odyssey: Part 220101230

A look at how we plan to deal with huge food shortages and over-fishing

By 2050 it's predicted there will be over 9 billion people on the earth.

Reports have also said that there could be no fish left in the oceans by that year.

Richard Black combines these two issues and looks at how we plan to deal with the huge food shortages and over-fishing through large-scale global aquaculture, the fastest-growing form of food production on earth.

Richard explores some of the biggest advances in fish farming and looks at its likely future.

2050: An Earth Odyssey: Part 220101231

By 2050 it's predicted there will be over 9 billion people on the earth.

Reports have also said that there could be no fish left in the oceans by that year.

Richard Black combines these two issues and looks at how we plan to deal with the huge food shortages and over-fishing through large-scale global aquaculture, the fastest-growing form of food production on earth.

Richard explores some of the biggest advances in fish farming and looks at its likely future.

A look at how we plan to deal with huge food shortages and over-fishing

2050: An Earth Odyssey: Part 220110102

A look at how we plan to deal with huge food shortages and over-fishing

21/01/201020100122
21/01/201020100123

It's 250 years since Port-au-Prince was hit by an earthquake, but to geologists the rapidly growing city has long seemed vulnerable to this most terrifying of natural disasters.

The Haitian capital sits almost on top of a geological fault line that has been steadily stressed for two and a half centuries, and the rocks had to give at some point.

The impossible question was when.

In this special edition of One Planet, the BBC's Roland Pease talks to the geologists who only last year were warning of Haiti's peril, and hears about the lessons not only for Port-au-Prince, but for cities around the world that could be levelled in a moment, with no warning.

Mike and the usual One Planet team are currently on a short break to prepare for the next series.

But they'll be back the end of January.

You can keep up to date with developments at One Planet HQ by joining in the conversation on Facebook - the link's below.

Or alternatively, email the team at Oneplanet@bbc.com.

One Planet investigates the geology behind the earthquake in Haiti.

21/01/201020100124

One Planet investigates the geology behind the earthquake in Haiti.

21/05/200920090522

Hundreds of millions - if not a billion - people live in slums around the world.

We could trot out the cliches about them seeking a better life, but you've heard it all before.

What we haven't heard much of is how to tackle the problem.

Housing ministers and academics from around the world met in a grand stately home in West Sussex, England this week to come up with ideas for solving the crisis.

One Planet presenter Mike Williams was sent along to hear what they had to say; to record the optimism and the warnings; as well as the anger.

Bert Diphoorn from the UN Habitat programme was among those warning of dire consequences if cash doesn't start flowing into these districts.

With lots of young people living in them, and with hope ebbing away, violence is coming up he predicts.

We're already seeing it in Kenya Mr Diphoorn says, they have just broken the railway line - and don't let trains past because they are protesting against the government.

So there are ways for them to exercise this terrible human violence."

In the programme, we make sure we also hear from those who live in shacks made of plywood and plastic - we've reports from the slums of Buenos Aires and Johannesburg.

And we speak to Mumbai shanty town dweller Jockin Arputham who has been flown over for the conference.

Listen out for his analysis of how many shanty town homes could fit into the conference room which delegates met in.

As ever, tune in (or download), have a listen and tell us what you agree or disagree with.

Then let us know, contact Mike and the One Planet team at oneplanet@bbc.com.

You can also find us on Facebook if you're a fan.

Join the debate.

Mike Williams asks officials, academics and residents how we deal with shanty towns.

The programme that explores the biggest issues in global development and the environment."

21/10/2010

21/10/201020101022
21/10/201020101022

21/10/201120111022
22/01/200920090123
22/04/201020100423
22/04/201020100424

Thanks to an Icelandic volcano with a name that everyone's struggling to pronounce, the One Planet team stayed close to home this week.

Mike heads to the heart of London's legal centre to meet up with one of it's most prominent lawyers - Stephen Hockman QC.

We hear about his proposals for an International Court for the Environment - an idea that's gaining support among world leaders.

We also hear from a village in Bolivia, where the residents are keen to be among the first to file a claim in a newly created environmental court.

Locals tell us why the international community should compensate them for damage to their livelihoods.

Plus, Mike considers a world without planes with the help of travel writer Jenny Diski, and we listen in on London's empty skies.

And yes, Mike does have a go at pronouncing the name of that volcano.

Our thanks to Charlotte in Iceland for her help.

As ever, download the free podcast, have a listen, and let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, and remember you can always find us chatting on the Facebook page - the link's below.

Mike considers a world environmental court, hears from the Andes, and enjoys a quiet city

22/04/201020100425

Mike considers a world environmental court, hears from the Andes, and enjoys a quiet city

22/04/201120110423
22/04/201120110424
22/07/201020100723
22/07/201020100725

It's a special One Planet this week as the programme investigates the trade in white asbestos.

The mineral is banned - or its use severely restricted - in over 50 countries.

But in many parts of the developing world demand is rising fast.

Lauded for its cheap and durable nature, white asbestos is an attractive building material when you need to construct large numbers of affordable housing - and few places in the world have a stronger appetite for both cheap housing and the mineral than India.

For the programme, Mike heads to the city of Ahmedabad in the state of Gujarat.

There he visits Kali Gaon, a shanty town close to one of the city's largest asbestos factories.

Walk around Kali, and you quickly realise you're surrounded by broken sheets of asbestos - it's used for roofing; for makeshift walls.

Splinters and shards of it are strewn across the mud roads.

Asbestos is safe when encased in concrete, but when it's cracked and broken, fibres are released into the air that can eventually kill if inhaled.

In the show Mike speaks to the people who live in Kali about the dangers they face, he meets the doctors treating those suffering lung problems, and he tries to get the boss of the nearby factory to talk to him about what safety equipment it gives its workers.

We also hear from state government officials, who initially say there's no asbestos in Gujarat, before changing their mind.

This special One Planet is part of the BBC's Dangers in the Dust series - a joint investigation by the BBC and the ICIJ into the global trade in white asbestos.

To find out more about the investigation, follow the link below.

As ever, tune in and let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on our Facebook page - there's always plenty of comment and conversation to be had there.

Alternatively, it's always nice to receive a letter or postcard, write to One Planet, BBC World Service, Bush House, London.

Building a family home out of broken asbestos, a special report from India's shanty towns

22/07/201120110723
22/07/201120110724
22/07/201120110725
22/10/200920091023
22/10/200920091024

One Planet's gone on tour, and over the next six weeks Mike will be out and about meeting you – the listeners - along the way.

Yes he'll clock up a rather large carbon footprint, but he's going to shine a light on the stories you want illuminating (and we'll try and do something about that footprint in the coming weeks).

First stop Kenya to meet a couple of listeners.

Kipruto Bett from the small town of Kericho takes Mike into the Mau Forest to hear about its importance as a water resource for the whole country.

We also meet some of the people who've lived in the forest for centuries, and consider at what point sacrifices must be made for the greater good.

Later in the show Mike hooks up with Nairobi student and One Planet listener Charles Mucugu to discuss his main concerns.

The two go shopping and hear about food price rises caused by the drought that's ravaged Kenya in recent months.

Along the way Mike will break a spade, and we'll discuss supped up cars and political corruption.

As ever, tune in or download the show, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team on oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

And you can always send us a good old fashioned letter, write to Mike Williams, One Planet, BBC World Service, Bush House, London.

Next week we'll be in London hosting an event just off the Strand, if you're interested in coming along and telling Mike your thoughts, drop us an email.

One Planet visits Kenya to hear from our listeners about forests, fast cars and corruption

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

22/10/200920091025

One Planet visits Kenya to hear from our listeners about forests, fast cars and corruption

23/04/200920090424
23/04/200920090425
23/04/200920090426
23/07/200920090724
23/09/2010

23/09/201020100924
23/09/201120110924
23/09/201120110925
23/09/201120110926
23/12/201020101224
23/12/201120111224
23/12/201120111225
24/02/201120110225
24/02/201120110226
24/02/201120110227

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

24/03/201120110325
24/03/201120110326

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

24/06/201020100625
24/06/201020100627

"Who wants to live forever?" sang Freddy Mercury.

Fair question, though from the discussions on our Facebook site, few people actually do.

Forever seems like, well, such a long time.

One Planet's considering the question thanks to a conference taking place in Barcelona entitled the "Congress on controversies in longevity, health and aging".

In short, scientists will debate age prevention.

In this week's show we catch up with Dr Aubrey de Grey, one of the world's leading thinkers in the field of gerontology (the study of aging).

Before heading off to that conference, Dr Aubrey debates with Mike the ethics and practicalities of age prevention.

Also in the show, Mike pops into an elderly day centre to find out whether your views of death change as you enter your golden years.

Plus we have an exclusive short story from bestselling author Professor David Eagleman, the American neuroscientists famous for his book "Sum: Forty Tales from the Afterlives".

Elsewhere in the show, we hear the second part of our Open University big questions series.

This week we examine whether food miles are bad.

As ever, do tune in and let us know what you think - you can contact the team on oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

If you'd prefer to write, our address is One Planet, BBC World Service, Bush House, London, UK - always nice to get a postcard or letter.

Mike considers living forever.

We hear from elderly and young.

Plus we debate food miles

24/06/201120110625
24/06/201120110626
24/09/200920090925
24/12/200920091225
24/12/200920091226

And then it was over.

The Copenhagen summit lasted longer than expected, half a day longer in fact.

But it's debateable whether those extra few hours helped delivery something meaningful.

World leaders have hailed the Copenhagen Accord as the first time all nations have united and agreed to tackle climate change.

Others have been less positive, arguing the three page Copenhagen Accord contains nothing substantive.

In this week's show Mike gives a quick run through of the Accord - it doesn't take long - and we examine the spin and blame game that's now being played out.

Commentators and experts have been rushing to offer their opinions on the deal, but perhaps the most interesting views come from you - the One Planet listeners.

Mike catches up with a few of you to find out your thoughts.

Also in this week's show we consider why environmental action plans often have unintended consequences, and ask whether we should seek technological solutions rather than diplomatic ones.

All good things must come to an end - well, temporarily at least - and this week's show is the last One Planet before the team take a short break to regroup and prepare for the next series.

During the coming weeks a series of documentaries will be in our usual place, but we'll be back the end of January so don't stray too far away.

You can keep up to date with Mike and the goings on at One Planet HQ by joining the conversation at our Facebook page, the link's below.

A very happy new year to you all.

Mike examines spin and blame in the aftermath of Copenhagen, and hears your views on it.

24/12/200920091227

Mike examines spin and blame in the aftermath of Copenhagen, and hears your views on it.

25/02/201020100226
25/02/201020100227

Mike visits a shrinking city, listens to solar classes, and we go underneath Malaysia.

25/02/201020100228
25/03/201020100326
25/03/201020100328

We're talkin' 'bout a revolution on this week's show.

A revolution that's sweeping across large parts of the world - one that's changing flows of cash, altering the way businesses work, and encouraging people to switch jobs.

It's the green revolution - a rather vague term - but in this week's show Mike considers what it actually means for people and businesses.

He heads to the north east of England - an area once renowned for its heavy industry, but which has declined dramatically in recent decades.

On the River Tees he finds plenty of shipyards, but not many ships being built.

However, you can find evidence of that revolution here, among the giant empty buildings and silted up ship ramps.

Alex Dawson runs TAG Energy Solutions, and they're hoping to transform one of the old shipyards into a manufacturing hub creating hundreds of green jobs.

They want to build wind turbines.

Plenty of other businesses in the region are also hoping to win work from the booming renewable energy sector.

Also in the show, we speak to the Silicon Valley investors looking to fund the many green tech companies sprouting up, and we hear from some of the workers doing one of the toughest green jobs" - the city scavengers of Mumbai.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

Do download the free podcast if you have an MP3 player - you get just a little bit extra of the show.

Mike wonders what the green revolution is.

We hear about eco tech, scavengers and avocados"

25/06/200920090626
25/06/200920090627
25/06/200920090628
25/11/201020101126
25/11/201120111126
25/11/201120111127
25/11/201120111128
25/12/200820081226
25/12/200820081227
26/03/200920090328

Dawood Azam looks at the effects of the depleted uranium used in Afghanistan to weight.

26/03/200920090329
26/08/201020100827
26/08/201020100829
26/08/201120110827
26/11/200920091127
26/11/200920091129

Obama's going to Copenhagen! The announcement came shortly after the One Planet team had finally decided that it too would make an appearance at the upcoming UN climate change summit - a coincidence, perhaps.

Mike was in America when the news broke, on the latest stop of our One Planet Listener Tour.

For this week's show, he takes a road trip from the UN's headquarters in Manhattan, New York City, up through the state of New York, towards the Canadian border on Route 81.

The trip ends in the small rural town of Copenhagen.

Yes, Copenhagen, New York.

No, not Copenhagen the capital of Denmark.

We do make the occasional mistake on One Planet, but this was intentional.

Ultimately, Copenhagen (that's the rural town in America) is just an appropriate end point for the trip - it's the journey that matters.

Along Route 81, Mike stops off to meet plenty of people and discusses everything from how to revolutionise the digital world; which gas hungry cars are going cheap, and why some people just want to help.

Many thanks to everyone who gave five minutes of their time to met up with Mike for a coffee during his journey - in particular, thanks to listeners Doug and Debra who waved him off from Manhattan.

As ever have a listen and let us know what you think.

You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com or join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

Next week One Planet will not be in its usual time slot, instead we'll be holding a special one hour debate on the eve of the UN gathering.

You'll be able to hear that on Saturday 5th and Sunday 6th December.

Do join us.

Mike goes on a US road trip, stopping to meet an inventor, a car dealer and a helpful man

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

27/01/201120110128
27/01/201120110129
27/01/201120110130
27/01/201220120128
27/01/201220120129
27/01/201220120130
27/04/201220120428
27/04/201220120429
27/04/201220120430
27/05/201020100530

I've been trying to find a nice quote about money to introduce this week's One Planet - but after speaking to a whole host of people about cash in recent days, it seems clear that no single quote will do.

Money means many things to many people - oppression, freedom, work, shopping, food.

Mike introduces the show from a currency trading floor in central London - plenty of money there, with dollars, pounds and euros all warmly embraced.

But not everyone appreciates the colour green.

Mike meets up with Mark Boyle - a man who's decide to give up using any money whatsoever.

Watch our YouTube channel to get a video tour of his home.

Also in the show, Mike goes for a stroll along a busy London shopping street with Annie Leonard, narrator of the hugely successful internet film The Story of Stuff".

Hear her argument on why our constant desire to be buying things is wreaking havoc on our planet.

There's plenty more in the show, so do tune in and then let us know what you think - email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com.

Or join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

Mike chats to Annie Leonard about stuff, learns how to live cashless, and talks currencies"

27/05/201120110528
27/05/201120110529
27/08/200920090828

The Danish island of Samso has completely eliminated dependence on fossil fuels, and no.

27/11/200820081128
27/11/200820081129
27/11/200820081130
28/01/201020100130

The earthquake struck Haiti over two weeks ago now, but remarkable stories of people being pulled alive from the rubble have emerged throughout.

Uplifting stories that highlight the huge efforts being made by Haitians themselves, as well as specialist aid workers who have flown in from around the world, to rescue trapped strangers.

Humanity's virtues have also being demonstrated by the hundreds of millions of dollars of aid that has being pledged, not just by governments, but by private individuals.

In this week's One Planet we consider our growing willingness to help one another by digging into our pockets.

During the past decade, private donations from the world's richest nations have risen at over twice the rate of growth seen in official government aid.

We speak to fund raiser Renu Mehta about why the rich - the super-rich - give away large sums of money, and we hear from Africa, as Zambians tell us why they feel compelled to send money to Haiti.

Also in the show we take ecologist Stewart Brand out onto the top of One Planet HQ to look down on London and explain his love of cities.

Plus we hear some scary bedtime stories.

As ever, tune in and let us know what you think.

Email Mike and the team on oneplanet@bbc.com.

Or join in the conversation at our Facebook page - the link's below.

See you there.

Mike considers giving money away, hears from a Zambian church and looks out over London.

28/01/201020100131

Mike considers giving money away, hears from a Zambian church and looks out over London.

28/05/200920090529
28/10/2010

28/10/201020101029
28/10/201120111029
29/01/200920090130
29/01/200920090131
29/01/200920090201
29/04/201020100502

To Liverpool this week.

Mike's place of birth, but we won't hold that against it.

We go to conduct a rather unscientific experiment and pose a dilemma - given the opportunity to be environmentally good, can we be persuaded to accept a small amount of cash instead?

So in the latest One Planet show, Mike finds himself in the centre of Liverpool's shopping district looking to give away wormeries (excellent for recycling your food waste).

But there's a twist, if someone accepts the gift, Mike then offers them cash as an alternative.

And as they hold out insisting they want the wormery, Mike raises the cash on offer (and just to make things a bit tastier, he's gambling with the editor's own money - which he seemed to relish doing).

Do people stick with their initial reaction to be environmentally friendly, or do they take the money and run? Have a listen and then let us know what you would do, email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com

Also in the show we have the latest on the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and we find a use for millions of plastic bottles.

Hope you enjoy listening to the programme, and remember you can always join the team on Facebook, the link's below.

Mike tries to give away cash, hears from America's new oil town and Taiwan's plastic home

29/04/201120110430
29/04/201120110501
29/07/201020100730
29/07/201020100801

One hundred days of grim headlines, of horrid pictures and of politicians scrambling to look angry and concerned.

One hundred days since an explosion on an oil drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico killed eleven workers and ripped a hole in an oil well 5,000 feet beneath the sea surface.

At its worst, the leak was spewing out 19,000 barrels of crude a day.

On this week's One Planet we get the latest from Louisiana from our environment correspondent David Shukman.

Mike then debates the future of global energy production with a panel of guests - three people with very different takes on the BP disaster.

Author Richard Heinberg explains why he's keen to see this incident act as a wake up call for America to wean itself off oil; Thomas Pyle from the Institute for Energy Research fears a knee jerk reaction from law makers that will overburden the industry with regulation; and Mike's also joined by Sarah Emerson, president of Energy Security Analysis, who suspects the incident will be forgotten about by those in Washington come Christmas.

As ever we want to hear your views - email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com.

Or send us a postcard.

Our address is One Planet, BBC World Service, Bush House, London.

Also in this week's show, Mike spring cleans the One Planet office as the team get ready for a short break off air.

And as we shovel piles of paper into the recycling bins, it's time to ask whatever happened to the idea of a paperless office? Jo Fidgen finds out for us.

Finally we look back at some of the most memorable moments from the past series.

The team will be in and out of One Planet HQ over the next few weeks, so if you want to follow events here, remember you can join the team on Facebook, the link's below.

Mike will be back with the usual One Planet from the start of September, do join us then.

Have a happy August.

The curse of black gold - our oil addiction and what BP's spill can teach multinationals

29/07/201120110730
29/07/201120110731
29/07/201120110801
29/10/200920091030
29/10/200920091031

I've stepped in the middle of seven sad forests, I've been out in front of a dozen dead oceans," sang Bob Dylan on A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall.

A song whose lyrics are woven into large parts of this week's show.

That's thanks to a photographic exhibition called the Hard Rain Project.

It's the brainchild of environmental photographer Mark Edwards - make sure you tune into the show if only to hear how he got the idea for the project!

Each of the 44 photographs in the collection accompany one line from Dylan's song.

The pictures are haunting, beautiful, many are difficult to look at, but as Mark explains, they offer a chance to observe shadows from our past, but also glimpse a future world if a more sustainable relationship between mother nature and humans is not achieved.

Watch our You Tube slideshow to see a selection of the photos and hear some of Dylan's music.

Also in this week's show we chat to a couple of our London listeners, we examine the future of food, and we hear from a man who runs one of the largest environmental investment funds.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com.

Or join in the conversation at Facebook, the link to our page is below.

Mike continues his listener tour, chats about Bob Dylan and looks at making green money."

29/10/200920091101

Mike continues his listener tour, chats about Bob Dylan and looks at making green money.

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

30/03/201220120331
30/03/201220120401
30/04/200920090501

The speed with which Swine Flu (and sorry if you're a US pork producer, I know you don't like the name) has swept across international borders and oceans will surprise few.

Air travel has not just revolutionised the way humans and animals move around the world - it's a handy and quick form of transport for infectious diseases too.

What may surprise you is the high number of new pathogens discovered every year that jump from animals to humans.

In this week's show, we sent Mike to Edinburgh to meet up with a leading expert on infectious disease epidemiology (basically an expect on how to stop the spread of horrible diseases).

Professor Mark Woolhouse reminds us the transfer of illnesses from animals is nothing new, but globalisation equals happy days for many diseases.

This is one world, and the pathogens are taking advantage of the opportunities that allow them to spread," he remarks.

Elsewhere in the show, we find out about Afghanistan's latest national park - in fact it's first national park.

After decades of war and political strife, the country is looking to attract tourists with its natural wonders.

We speak to someone who's made the bumpy journey to the site of the park - the fabled lakes of Band-i-Amir.

We also hear from business owners in the Kenyan capital of Nairobi about how they are being hit by the global economic downturn.

And we ask some of the world's leading car designers to tell us why cars will remain our favourite mode of transport for decades to come.

Tune in (or download), have a listen, and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com.

And if you can't get enough of us (and you're a Facebook fan) we've now got a page there.

Join us and let's continue the debate.

You'll also find your photos from around the world, your postcards, and pics of the One Planet team at work.

Mike Williams discusses pandemics, tourism in Afghanistan and the future of cars

The programme that explores the biggest issues in global development and the environment."

30/07/200920090731
30/09/2010

30/09/201020101001
30/09/201120111001
30/09/201120111002
30/09/201120111003
31/12/200920100101
31/12/200920100103
A Global Audience With Sir David Attenborough20120229

Mike Williams of One Planet talks to Sir David Attenborough about his life and work in the natural world.

He also answers questions from listeners all over the world, and those from the live audience.

Mike Williams talks to Sir David Attenborough about his life and work in the natural world

A Global Audience With Sir David Attenborough20120303

Mike Williams of One Planet talks to Sir David Attenborough about his life and work in the natural world, and answers questions from listeners all over the world, and those from the live audience.

Mike Williams talks to Sir David Attenborough about his life and work in the natural world

A Global Audience With Sir David Attenborough20120304

Mike Williams talks to Sir David Attenborough about his life and work in the natural world

A Global Audience With Sir David Attenborough2012080320120804 (WS)
20120805 (WS)
20120806 (WS)

This week on One Planet there's another chance to hear our interview with naturalist and broadcaster Sir David Attenborough.

As part of the World Service's 80th birthday celebrations in February this year, we at One Planet sat down with the world's best known natural history film-maker.

Sir David Attenborough joined Mike Williams and a live audience to discuss how the environment and our lives have been transformed since he first started making documentaries 60 years ago.

(Image: David Attenborough)

Mike Williams talks to Sir David Attenborough about his life and work (repeat)

A Himalayan-sized Data Gap2012052520120527
20120528 (WS)

Some Himalayan glaciers have actually grown during the past decades, according to a report in the journal Nature Geoscience. The impact of climate change on the iconic mountain range is shrouded in controversy - particularly after widespread claims that they would disappear by 2035 were proved false. The area that is showing signs of glacial growth is relatively small - but the news adds to the sense of confusion.

Photographer Klaus Thymann from Project Pressure travelled to the region to document the glaciers, but as well as taking his cameras, he took along a One Planet recorder and met a few of the scientists trying to get better data from the mountains.

Also in the show, another environmental photographer - Mark Edwards - gives us a tour of his latest exhibition. One Planet first met Mark two and a half years ago when his Hard Rain exhibition was touring the world ahead of COP15. We meet again, at the same location, but different pictures, to ask if anything significant has changed since our first meeting.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think. Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link's below.

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

After We're Dead2012070620120709
20120709 (WS)

On One Planet this week, we're looking at the environmental damage caused by humans after death.

There are more than seven billion of us on the planet. We're all well used to hearing that human beings cause potentially dangerous environmental damage by using up precious, limited natural resources. But each year, approximately 55 million of us die and the damage many of us do continues even after we're dead.

We'll hear about 'green funerals' - rituals and practices to honour a life without the use of toxic embalming chemicals.

Also from Australia, we'll hear about a row which has broken out about children and hunting.

(Image: A coffin)

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

Aid Anger In Haiti, Plus Betting On Food20110114

One year on from the earthquake that devastated Haiti, One Planet speaks to an aid worker and an author based in the capital Port-au-Prince about the role of charities in helping rebuild the country.

Thousands of organisations raced to help in the aftermath of the disaster - armed with billions of dollars in donations to spend on vital medical supplies and reconstruction materials.

But many locals and aid workers are frustrated at an effort they see as disjointed and uncoordinated.

Eric Klein, founder of the group Can-Do, and Tim Schwartz, author of the book 'Travesty in Haiti' speak to Mike from Port-au-Prince about the failure of the helpers, and the unhealthy competition that exists between charities on the ground.

Also in the show, we examine the reasons behind the latest sharp rise in food prices; go shopping for rice in Veitnam and Mike has a go at making money on the commodity markets.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or if you're a Facebook fan, join us there - the link's below.

The failure of international aid in Haiti, plus the role of speculators in food prices

Aid Anger In Haiti, Plus Betting On Food2011011520110116

The failure of international aid in Haiti, plus the role of speculators in food prices

Aid, Happiness, And Tiny Vegetarians20120409

Tough times for the global economy mean tougher times for the world's poorest.

Development aid from the rich world to developing countries has fallen in real terms this year for the first time in fifteen years, according to a report out this week - and the poorest nations on the planet are some of the worst hit.

This week on One Planet, we ask how this fall in aid will affect developing countries - and whether aid is even the best way to help.

We speak to Jamie Drummond, one of the founders of the One Campaign on aid and poverty reduction, and also to Onyekachi Wambu from the Africa Foundation for Development.

Also on the show, a radical suggestion for fighting climate change: why not genetically engineer humans to make them more environmentally friendly?

The world would be better off if we were smaller and ate less meat, so should we consider drugs and hormone treatment to make us all tiny vegetarians? Dr S Matthew Liao from the Centre for Bioethics at New York University tells us more.

Plus, we check in with John Helliwell, one of the authors of the UN's new World Happiness Report, and also get the latest on the gas leak in the North Sea.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think. Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook and Twitter, the links are below.

Global aid in the recession, the World Happiness Report, and bioengineering human beings

Airlines United Against Europe20120116

On the first of January this year, the European Union introduced a new tax on carbon emissions from aviation. All airlines flying into European airspace will now be forced to either cut the carbon emissions of their aircraft, or sign up for carbon credits to offset the environmental damage of their planes.

The move has been greeted with a storm of protest from airlines and governments around the world, who claim this will put pressure on airlines at an already difficult time, and lead to price rises for customers. China and India have already said that they will encourage their airlines not to pay the tax.

We speak to Peter Liese, the MEP who guided the legislation through the European Parliament - he tells us why Europe felt the need to take unilateral action on this issue, and that there will be consequences if foreign governments try to ignore the new law.

Also in the show, we find out why environmental laws so often end up watered down by the time they come into force.

Mike speaks to Begonia Filgueria of the Environmental Regulation and Information Centre, who tells us why environmental legislation is so susceptible to loopholes - and we hear from Hong Kong, where a new law designed to protect air quality by making drivers turn off their engines while idling has been undermined by exemptions and special interest groups.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email us at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join the team on our Facebook page - the link's below.

Stormy reaction to the EU's new carbon tax on planes, plus environmental loopholes.

An Interview With Al Gore2011091620110917 (WS)
20110918 (WS)
20110919 (WS)

The Nobel laureate talks false science, oil addiction and why victory is inevitable

It's time to end our absurd addiction to oil and coal according to Al Gore, the former vice president of America and environmental campaigner.

In an interview with One Planet, the Nobel laureate also accuses the fossil fuel industry of disinformation and false science when it comes to climate change.

Five years after his oscar winning documentary 'An Inconvenient Truth' pushed the issue up the political agenda, momentum has faded and the cries from sceptics have - if anything - grown louder.

Launching a 24 hour project aimed at winning over the doubters, Mr Gore tells Mike why victory over sceptics is inevitable.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook - the link's below.

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

Animal Migration In A Climate Of Change - 320081002

A look at animal migration in a changing world.

This week, African elephants' migration in South Africa.

Animals & Us20100109

It was 28 years ago that the documentary maker Victor Schonfeld produced The Animals Film about the way humans exploit other species.

He returns to the subject in a two-part documentary to give a very personal view on what, if anything, has changed since then.

In part two he focuses on the scientific establishment's attachment to using animals, and considers the future.

Might social justice for other species actually benefit humans?

Mike and the usual One Planet team are currently on a short break to prepare for the next series.

But they will be back the end of January.

You can keep up to date with developments at One Planet HQ by joining in the conversation on Facebook - the link's below.

Or alternatively, email the team at Oneplanet@bbc.com.

One Planet hears a very personal view of how humans exploit other species.

Animals & Us20100110
Are Clouds Green?20111225

Clouds in cold climates and the environmental impact of our lives online.

This week One Planet goes in search of the cloud - the digital cloud, where we're increasingly storing our music, pictures and documents.

Cloud computing might sound etheral, but the physical reality of the cloud more mundane.

Our digital files are stored in data centres, giant warehouses around the world full of computer servers.

The IT industry has been criticised by environmental groups for the vast amounts of energy needed to power these sites - every click uses energy somewhere.

But a new breed of data centres is opening up in Northern Europe - cooled by the chilly air and powered by cheap renewable energy.

Facebook became the latest company to move north last month, when it announced plans to build a new data centre in Northern Sweden.

Join One Planet in search of the cloud in Iceland this week. We visit a former Nato air base which now houses the first zero carbon data centre in the world, and speak to Google about what they're doing to reduce the footprint of their operations.

Plus, we find out about the environmental impact of our online activity - is Lady Gaga on a streamed video lower carbon than the same song on a CD?

As ever, tune in and then get in touch to let us know your views.

You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook - the link's below.

Are Clouds Green?20111226

Clouds in cold climates and the environmental impact of our lives online.

Asia - From Saver To Spender20110626

Asia moves from saver to spender - changing the balance of global development

While many countries in the West continue to grapple with heavy debts, many Asian nations boast of healthy balance sheets - thanks to buoyant exports and a history of high national savings.

Now there's evidence that the Asian saver is becoming more comfortable as a spender, helping drive Asia's strong economic growth and lift hundreds of millions of people out of poverty.

This week One Planet travels to Malaysia to find out what this change will mean for all of us.

As part of the BBC's Power of Asia season, we speak to the economists and entrepreneurs of one of Asia's fastest growing economies about Asia's consumer boom.

We visit a car show to hear some remarkable growth figures, and speak to Tony Fernandes of AirAsia, one of the region's biggest entrepreneurs, about the way the Asian markets are changing.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page - the link's below.

Asia - From Saver To Spender20110627
At The Edge Of Capitaliam20110704

Economic growth and environmental protection in the rainforests of Borneo

The rainforests of Borneo are some of the oldest and most biodiverse in the world.

But they also contain massive natural resources, from oil to aluminium, and it's difficult to make a rainforest pay - unless, of course, you cut it down and sell the timber.

The Malaysian government has launched a massive programme of industrialisation on its part of the island, as part of its plans to become an economically-developed nation by 2020.

As part of the BBC's Power of Asia season, One Planet visits Sarawak in northern Borneo to find out what this means for the area.

We speak to developers, tourists and locals about the realities of global capitalism in a nation desperate for economic growth - how can they use their natural resources, and what will be the consequences?

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page - the link's below.

Balancing Nature - 120080131

Most of Earth's species are concentrated into small biodiversity hotspots.

Lynne Malcolm visits some of the most important ones.

Balancing Nature - 120080201
Balancing Nature - 4 Last20080222
Bananas And The Global Food Chain20120312

Fifteen million tonnes of bananas are shipped around the globe every year. Consumers in the developed world have become use to exotic fruit and vegtables at all times - but the UN believes the best way to ensure nine billion people are fed and watered by 2050, is to produce and consume a significantly larger proportion of locally grown food.

On this week's One Planet we consider how resilient our global food chain is. We visit Europe's largest banana ripening warehouse; we hear from the community who are trying to bypass the food chain by growing everything themselves, plus we hear from Liberia - a country that is struggling to rebuild its agricultural sector after years of civil unrest.

As ever, tune in and let us know what you think. Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook and Twitter, the links are below.

Hanging out with millions of bananas to learn about the resilience of our food supplies.

Bananas And The Global Food Chain2012072720120728 (WS)
20120729 (WS)
20120730 (WS)

This week on One Planet, another chance to hear our programme on global food networks from earlier this year.

Fifteen million tonnes of bananas are shipped around the globe every year. Consumers in the developed world have become used to exotic fruit and vegetables at all times - but the UN believes the best way to ensure nine billion people are fed and watered by 2050 is to produce and consume a significantly larger proportion of locally grown food.

On this week's One Planet we consider how resilient our global food chain really is. We visit Europe's largest banana ripening warehouse; we hear from the community who are trying to bypass the food chain by growing everything themselves, plus we hear from Liberia - a country that is struggling to rebuild its agricultural sector after years of civil unrest.

As ever, tune in and let us know what you think. Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook and Twitter, the links are below.

Hanging out with millions of bananas to learn about global food supplies (repeat).

Banking On Life2009082020090821

Richard Scrase looks at the largest seed store in the world.

In this study of the history and future of seed banks across the world, Richard Scrase takes a look at the largest such store in the world, The Millennium Seed Bank in Sussex, as it takes in its billionth seed.

What is the importance of keeping such repositories?

Bordered World2012072020120721
20120722 (WS)
20120723 (WS)

This week on One Planet, another chance to hear our programme from earlier this year on national borders around the world.

The lines we draw on the surface of the world can protect us, oppress us and define us - but do they provide any benefits, or do they hold back development?

Mike reports from the town of Baarle-Nassau in the Netherlands, from the town of Baarle-Hertog in Belgium and then from Baarle-Nassau, and then from Baarle-Hertog.... the border between the two countries criss-crosses the town, running across roads, under homes, and even through a supermarket. Mike speaks to local residents about what it's like to step between one country and another.

But not all borders are so benign. Lucy Williamson visits the demilitarised zone between North and South Korea to find out how South Koreans feel about the possibility of reunification with their estranged relatives, and we speak to Professor Martin Pratt of the International Boundaries Research Unit at the University of Durham, who tells us about the many hostile border conflicts still going on around the world.

Plus, a vision of a world without borders. When the internet was first invented, fans claimed that it represented a new post-national future - but has this utopian vision turned out to be real? Matt McGrath reports.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook and Twitter - the links are below.

How lines on a map shape our lives, our ideology and our development (Repeat).

Building A Nation20110711

Development in a new country, South Sudan.

Plus asking the poor for advice

As South Sudan gets ready to celebrate it's creation as an independent nation, we visit one of the few towns in the country that's got a power plant - a key ingredient for economic development.

Our reporter Nyambura Wambugu talks to the government, and the plant manager about how electricity will power the country's development.

Plus Mike chats to Roger Middleton, a specialist in the region of East Africa, about why it matters that the new country develops into a stable economy as quickly as possible.

Also in the show, we consider whether the best way to beat poverty is to simply ask the poor.

As ever, tune in and have a listen, then let us know what you think.

You can contact the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link's below.

Carbon Offsetting20070913
Carbon Offsetting20070915
Carbon Tax And Right-wing Greens2012071320120714 (WS)
20120715 (WS)
20120716 (WS)

Australia's carbon tax, Germany's right-wing greens and California's geothermal energy.

Australia is the world's largest coal exporter and one of the biggest per capita greenhouse gas emitters. On 1 July 2012 - after years of political wrangling - Prime Minister Julia Gillard introduced a new carbon tax, forcing the country's worst-polluting firms to pay a levy for every tonne of greenhouse gases they produce.

But the new tax is already proving controversial, with opposition and business groups calling it the "toxic tax" and claiming it'll wreck the economy. Phil Mercer in Sydney finds out more.

Also, we discover a new face to environmentalism in Germany - on the far right. Stephen Evans reports from Berlin.

Plus, Alastair Leithead visits the Salton Sea, a strange lake in a desert in southern California - once a tourist destination, and now home to one of the world's largest geothermal energy plants.

As ever, have a listen and let us know what you think. You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, follow us on Twitter, or join us on Facebook - the links are below.

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

Carbon Taxes, Profits And A Packet Of Crisps20110715

Australia has unveiled plans for one of the world's biggest carbon-tax schemes. Prime Minister Gillard intends to slap a $24 tax on every ton of carbon emitted by the nation's companies. But the move has sparked a fierce battle - with many industries taking out newspaper adverts warning the tax will hurt the economy deeply.

And in the UK, the British government has announced it plans to top up the European carbon price so that energy producers are paying a minimum of £16 ($22) per ton. The aim is to drive investment towards low carbon technologies, but there's plenty of critics to the idea too.

On this week's One Planet, we sample the debate in Australia, before speaking to the CBI - the body that represents some of Britain's biggest companies - about business and carbon tax.

Also in the show, we hear about an oil spill cover up in China, and take another look at a city from up above. As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think. Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

Australia ignites the carbon tax debate, and China comes clean on its secret oil spill

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

Carbon Taxes, Profits And A Packet Of Crisps20110716

Australia ignites the carbon tax debate, and China comes clean on its secret oil spill

Carbon Taxes, Profits And A Packet Of Crisps20110718

Australia ignites the carbon tax debate, and China comes clean on its secret oil spill

Australia has unveiled plans for one of the world's biggest carbon-tax schemes.

Prime Minister Gillard intends to slap a $24 tax on every ton of carbon emitted by the nation's companies.

But the move has sparked a fierce battle - with many industries taking out newspaper adverts warning the tax will hurt the economy deeply.

And in the UK, the British government has announced it plans to top up the European carbon price so that energy producers are paying a minimum of £16 ($22) per ton.

The aim is to drive investment towards low carbon technologies, but there's plenty of critics to the idea too.

On this week's One Planet, we sample the debate in Australia, before speaking to the CBI - the body that represents some of Britain's biggest companies - about business and carbon tax.

Also in the show, we hear about an oil spill cover up in China, and take another look at a city from up above.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

China 'green Champion At Home, But Looter Abroad'20110801

Claims that China leads the green revolution at home, but lags behind abroad

Climate change talks have been subdued since the anti-climatic (excuse the pun) ending of the Copenhagen talks in December 2009. But as the Kyoto agreement nears its expiry, fresh talks are needed to strike a new global deal. On this week's One Planet, Mike meets up with one of the UK's longest-serving and distinguished diplomats to ask just how difficult it us to thrash out these kind of agreements.

Sir Crispin Tickell outlines his idea for a range of smaller deals under a broad umbrella agreement as the way forward, but the conversation moves onto China - and his belief that the world's most populous nation is actually leading the way when it comes to green economic growth.

Mike then heads to Oxford, to speak with a number of delegates attending the Green Economics Institute's annual conference. He meets up with Uche Igwe, a research scholar currently at the John Hopkins University, Washington DC. Originally from Nigeria, Mr Igwe has a very different view of China and it's attitude to the environment.

Plus, we speak to Alain Bouquet, who now works at the Green Economics Institute, but previously was part of the University of East Anglia's Climatic Research Unit - the scientific department that was at the heart of the 'climategate' row when thousands of emails where copied from the unit's servers and released on the internet. Many climate sceptics believed the documents showed that global warming was not man made.

As ever, tune in and then get in touch to let us know your views. You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link is below.

Climate change talks have been subdued since the anti-climatic (excuse the pun) ending of the Copenhagen talks in December 2009.

But as the Kyoto agreement nears its expiry, fresh talks are needed to strike a new global deal.

On this week's One Planet, Mike meets up with one of the UK's longest-serving and distinguished diplomats to ask just how difficult it us to thrash out these kind of agreements.

Mike then heads to Oxford, to speak with a number of delegates attending the Green Economics Institute's annual conference.

He meets up with Uche Igwe, a research scholar currently at the John Hopkins University, Washington DC.

Originally from Nigeria, Mr Igwe has a very different view of China and it's attitude to the environment.

Plus, we speak to Alain Bouquet, who now works at the Green Economics Institute, but previously was part of the University of East Anglia's Climatic Research Unit - the scientific department that was at the heart of the 'climategate' row when thousands of emails where copied from the unit's servers and released on the internet.

Many climate sceptics believed the documents showed that global warming was not man made.

As ever, tune in and then get in touch to let us know your views.

You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link is below.

China, Banker To The World20111113

How the world's most populous nation has become the world's favourite banker.

As European leaders have so clearly demonstrated in recent weeks - if you need some cash quick, it's the Chinese you turn to now.

The world's most populous nation has become the world's favourite banker.

Already across the developing world, China has overtaken the World Bank to become the main lender.

Chinese cash is being used to build dams, roads, hospitals and farms from Venezuala to Ghana.

And as the crisis in the eurozone shakes the world economy, Western governments are now keen to attract Chinese loans and investments too - but what will China's rise mean for the rest of the world?

This week on One Planet, we find out more about China's growing power and influence.

We visit Chinese-funded projects in Ecuador and Zambia, hear why campaigners in the West fear Chinese investment could undermine global progress on human rights and development issues, and a Chinese banker tells us why it's time the West realised China has the upper hand.

As ever, tune in and then get in touch to let us know your views.

You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook - the link's below.

China, Banker To The World20111114

How the world's most populous nation has become the world's favourite banker.

Climate change, pot plants and small frogs

Climate Change, Pot Plants And Small Frogs20101001

American atmospheric physicist Richard Lindzen was one of the lead authors for the IPCC's third report on climate change.

But he's not on this week's One Planet show to talk about the need for action on carbon emissions - quite the opposite in fact.

Professor Lindzen believes the impact of human induced climate change has been exaggerated, and is urging political leaders to abandon their pursuit of costly carbon markets.

His views may not be shared by the majority of the world's climate scientists, but Professor Lindzen is undoubtedly a formidable scientist - he's written (or co-authored) well over 200 scientific papers, and has been the recipient of numerous awards for his work on atmospheric physics.

Debate is the foundation of science, so this week Mike questions the professor about why he feels the IPCC has become biased in favour of climate change, and hears his views on how humans have had a marginal impact on global warming.

Also in the show, reporter Richard Hollingham looks to overcome his disdain for office pot plants - and in the process the One Planet plant gets a health check.

Plus we hear about the world's smallest frog found in Malaysia.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

The email address is oneplanet@bbc.com, or join the team - and the conversation - on our Facebook page, the link's below.

Nobel winner Richard Lindzen on being a climate change denier, and why office plants rock

Climate Change, Pot Plants And Small Frogs20101003

Nobel winner Richard Lindzen on being a climate change denier, and why office plants rock

Climate Train20071206

In 1997, 36 scientists went to the Kyoto Climate Convention by train and ship.

The journey was an influential mobile conference.

Common Land And Common Problems20120401

This week on One Planet, some common problems - greed and punishment, shame and the sharing of natural resources.

We're talking about the global commons, one of the key ideas of environmentalism. It first came to public attention in 1968 in an article in Science magazine by ecologist Garrett Hardin entitled "The Tragedy of the Commons".

Hardin described the problem of shared resources through the example of common land in a village. If I put another of my cows on the common land, I get all the benefit, but everyone shares the negative effects of over-grazing and environmental degradation - and if everyone does it, we all end up with skinny cows.

But does it have to be that way?

We speak to celebrated political economist Elinor Ostrom, who won the Nobel prize in 2009 for her work showing that commons management doesn't have to end in tragedy - she believes that communities are smart enough to regulate their own resources.

To test her theory, we go to the New Forest in southern England, where farmer have been commoning since the Middle Ages. Head Agister Jonathan Gerrelli tells us how they manage their common resources.

And Jennifer Jacquet of the University of British Columbia explains how communities can make individuals act less selfishly - by shaming each other into better behaviour.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think. Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook and Twitter, the links are below.

We've been warned about the Tragedy of the Commons - but does it have to be that way?

Common Land And Common Problems20120402

We've been warned about the Tragedy of the Commons - but does it have to be that way?

Corporate Social Responsibility, Australian Climate Change, And Migration In Mali20110220

Corporate Social Responsibility is one of the big corporate trends of recent years, with big companies proclaiming their sustainability credentials.

But what responsibility, if any, do big corporations really have to wider society?

On One Planet this week we talk to John Brock, the head of Coca-Cola Enterprises, which handles production and distribution of Coca-Cola across western Europe, about greenwash, recycling, and whether big corporations are responsible to anyone but their shareholders.

Also on the show, we find out how the climate change debate in Australia has been changed by the recent extreme weather, and we visit the village in Mali being consumed by the desert.

We also hear from Wafalme, a group of young Kenyans who have won this year's international Artists Project Earth Youth Vision Award for their song "Me and My Bike".

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link's below.

Big corporations try to get responsible, plus the Australian climate change debate

Cut-price Fossil Fuels, Snakes On Planes And Cancun Questions20101112

As world leaders gather in Seoul to discuss how to drive forward the global economy (and argue over the value of each others currencies), one topic likely to generate a lot of heat will be the subject of fossil fuel subsidies.

The latest World Energy Outlook report - produced by the International Energy Agency - has just been published, and shows governments spent over $300bn last year making fossil fuels cheaper to use.

These subsidies make it less-expensive to drive cars, heat homes, cook food - tasks that some regard as basic human rights, and others stress are important factors in helping a country develop economically.

Critics suggest the practise leads to wasteful use of energy, and the IEA has estimated that scrapping the subsidies by 2020 would cut global energy demand by 5%.

In this week's One Planet we speak to the IEA's chief economist Fatih Birol, plus we hear from one of Europe's largest energy suppliers - Eon.

And we visit two countries with very large fossil fuel subsidies, but with very different incomes per head - Egypt and the UAE.

Also in the show we've got a round up of environmental news from Malaysia, and we ask if there's any point to the forthcoming UN climate change summit in Cancun.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on our Facebook page.

The $300bn effort to make fossil fuels cheaper, plus snakes on planes and Cancun troubles

Cut-price Fossil Fuels, Snakes On Planes And Cancun Questions20101113

The $300bn effort to make fossil fuels cheaper, plus snakes on planes and Cancun troubles

Cut-price Fossil Fuels, Snakes On Planes And Cancun Questions20101114
Danger Fuels - 2 Last20070614

In this two-part series Mark Whitaker addresses the little-known problem of 'energy poverty' in terms of health and development.

Doomsday Vault2007010420070105

Richard Hollingham journey's to the Arctic to the site of a new seed bank which it is hoped will protect the world's vital seed crops from famine, war and disaster.

Eating The World - 120070726

Richard Daniel investigates how Britain has become dependent on the rest of the world to maintain its lifestyle and economy.

Eating The World - 220070802
Environmental Traffic Lights2012031620120317

The sheer scale of the world's recent economic and population growth has "overwhelmed" efforts to curb environmental degradation - that's according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. The Paris-based group that acts as an economic adviser to governments around the world has published its latest environmental outlook - its first in five years - and warns the trend for ever rising living standards is likely to end as the environment's health falters.

Simon Upton from the OECD sits down with One Planet to discuss the report and its traffic light-based system that assess global environmental policies.

One red light highlighted by the report is our continued reliance on fossil fuels for energy. We hear from Australia where UN officials arrived this week amid fears over the government's plans to dramatically increase coal exports - with much of it to be exported out of the country through waters close to the Great Barrier Reef.

Also on the show, we go for a drive along Dhaka's smog filled streets. Urban pollution is another red light issue, with the report predicting it will be one of the leading causes of premature deaths by 2050.

One of the few areas boasting a green light is our access to safe water. This week the world met one of its Millennium Development Goals - we've halved the number of people who do not have access to clean water. We hear from Kenya on the progress that's been made there to increase access to safe water in slums.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think. Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook and Twitter, the links are below.

A major new report highlights the green, amber and red areas of environmental policy

Environmental Traffic Lights20120319

A major new report highlights the green, amber and red areas of environmental policy

Fish For Life - 120071018

Richard Black looks at the impact of the global fishing industry and asks whether it can be in any way sustainable.

Fish For Life - 220071025
Fish For Life - 220071026
Fish For Life - 3 Last20071101

Richard Black looks at the impact of the global fishing industry and asks whether it can be in any way sustainable.

Forest Fights And Calming Cities20111014

Barbie *hearts* recycled paper.

Mattel, owner of the iconic toy, has this week bowed to pressure from environmental groups and will stop buying any paper or packaging products from its current controversial supplier, Asia Pulp and Paper.

Instead the company has pledged to use recycled packaging.

It's another blow to APP which has been labelled by critics as one of the most environmentally damaging companies on the planet - who accuse it of mass deforestation across Asia.

On the latest One Planet show - rather than interviewing Barbie - we get a rare interview with Aida Greenbury, managing director of APP.

Also in the show, as US supercop Bill Bratton arrives in the UK to advise the government on how to deal with gang culture in the wake of the summer riots, One Planet walks the streets of London with Professor Wouter Vanstiphout to discuss how urban planning could have helped prevent the social unrest.

Plus we get a round up of the environment news - including an update on the cargo ship grounded off New Zealand.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email us at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join the team on our Facebook page - the link's below.

The environmental battles over the paper industry, plus urban design and the London riots

Forest Fights And Calming Cities20111015

The environmental battles over the paper industry, plus urban design and the London riots

Forest Fights And Calming Cities20111016
Forest Fights And Calming Cities20111017
From The Ground Up - 120080110

Many of the world's soils are being eroded.

Susie Emmett looks at the dire consequences of 'dirty soil' for people and other forms of life.

Fuel Fights And Happy Birds20120130

Nigeria is Africa's biggest oil producer, and for years it has subsidised petrol at the pump.

But at the beginning of this year, the government removed the subsidies - and the price of petrol more than doubled. Strikes, riots and protests followed.

This week on One Planet, we find out more about fuel subsidies, worth hundreds of billions of dollars across the world.

We speak to Nigerian economist Bismark Rewane and Emmanuel Doni-Kwame of Ghana's National Chamber of Commerce and Industry about the impact subsidies have on African business and development - and hear from the rallies where ordinary people are feeling the pinch.

Also on the show, Mike is soothed by the sound of birdsong - in an office in Guildford. Researcher Eleanor Ratcliffe at the University of Surrey tells us about her new project, which explores whether birdsong and sounds of nature might have a calming effect on our moods.

And, we discover there are glaciers in Uganda. A new initiative called Project Pressure is visiting the world's vanishing glaciers, from Iceland to Alaska to Argentina - and now to the Rwenzori mountains of Uganda. We check in with project leader Klaus Thymann as he gets ready for the trip.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email us at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join the team on our Facebook page - the link's below.

Fuel protests in Africa, glaciers on the Equator and birdsong in an office.

Global V Local2012062220120623
20120624 (WS)
20120625 (WS)

As the Earth Summit in Rio draws to a close, progress on sustainable development seems as far away as ever. Delegates have complained that the Summit will simply rubber-stamp a negotiating text with few firm commitments. But are international summits like these really the best place to kick-start effective change?

This week on One Planet we ask how best a sustainable future can be delivered on the ground - looking at different tiers of political power - from the local council, to city and state to national government level.

If nation-states at international summits can't agree, is it time to go back to the old green mantra of "think globally, act locally"? We visit Brighton on the UK's south coast, the first town in Britain where the local authority is controlled by the Green Party. One year after taking office, what it is doing to develop a more sustainable future for their city?

Plus, Eileen Claussen at the Centre for Climate and Energy Solutions in Washington DC tells us how governments at a state and regional level are taking the lead on sustainable development in the US; we hear from our correspondent in Seoul in South Korea, where the national government has decided to start their own "green revolution" to take action on climate change; and we ask Dr Matthew Lockwood of the Institute of Development Studies based at the University of Sussex where tangible change can be achieved.

As ever, have a listen and let us know what you think. You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, follow us on Twitter, or join us on Facebook - the links are below.

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

Gm Rides Again20070816

Susan Watts asks if new GM technology will benefit us, or if these plants might be more risky than the first wave of GM crops.

Gm Rides Again20070817

Susan Watts asks if new GM technology will benefit us, or if these plants might be more risky than the first wave of GM crops.

Green Plays, Peruvian Car Chases And Stolen Sand20110213

Why the art world is failing the planet, plus a car chase in Peru and stolen African sand

Two new plays about climate change have just opened in London's West End.

It's the art world's latest attempt to engage with the public on a topic regularly labelled by politicians and scientists as one of the greatest challenges facing humanity.

Yet whether it's plays, movies, books or paintings, the art world has consistently failed to capture the public's imagination when it comes to climate change.

On One Planet this week, we meet one of the country's leading theatre directors to ask why the art world is failing, plus our arts correspondent Vincent Dowd gives his verdict on the new plays.

Also in the show, we go for a rally drive along Peru's recently opened 2,600km long Interoceanic Highway to see how it's impacted communities along the way.

Plus, we get a round up of environmental and development news from West Africa.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link's below.

Green Taxes, Dirty Photos And Air Travel20101105

Times are tough for many governments; sluggish economic growth and hefty debts are all too common.

So the more cynicAl Reader may suggest it's no surprise that green taxes are on the rise.

One Planet couldn't possibly comment, but with the environment a key concern for so many politicians, it's perhaps to be expected that taxes aimed at changing our behaviour in favour of the environment are increasingly popular.

The UK Government has just increased Air Passenger Duty - the tax charged per person flying out of Britain.

Prices are up as much as 55%, and the further you fly, the more tax you have to pay.

On this week's show Mike asks if these green taxes are an effective way of shifting consumers towards actions deemed more eco-friendly.

We hear from James Reynolds of campaign group Plane Stupid, and we chat to tax expert Mark Schofield of PricewaterhouseCoopers.

We also examine the potential impact of the rise in APD on those developing countries that rely on tourists cash to help drive economic growth and provide jobs.

Our reporter in Sri Lanka, Charles Haviland, asks tourism chiefs there what the tax rise means for them.

Plus, in this week's show we visit a photographic exhibition in South Africa to hear from the children who hope to improve their neighbourhoods by taking photos.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook for a chat, the link's below.

Dirty photos that inspire, green taxes that fuel despair and a river that runs dry

Green Taxes, Dirty Photos And Air Travel20101107

Dirty photos that inspire, green taxes that fuel despair and a river that runs dry

Growing Pains For Population2011052920110530 (WS)

Head of UN Population on world's carrying capacity and why control is out of tune

Fifty years ago, the world's population stood at three billion - this year it's expected to pass the seven billion mark.

The statistics are not in dispute, but there's plenty of argument over whether these numbers present difficulties or opportunities.

This week, One Planet attends the year's biggest conference on population, to meet experts from around the world and ask them whether the planet has reached its carrying capacity.

We hear from Africa, India and China, plus Mike sits down with the new head of the United Nations Population Fund, Dr Babatunde Osotimehin.

They discuss the controversial phrase 'population control'; Africa's youth bulge; and the need for some countries to actively promote raising their birth rates.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page - the link's below.

Hills Of Fire And Fields Of Black Gold20110227

A land of fire mountains, grim Soviet legacies and oil booms - One Planet in Azerbaijan

This week we're in Azerbaijan by the Caspian Sea exploring how this small country is becoming increasingly influential in the global energy markets.

We speak to the country's deputy energy minister, plus the state oil company about their ambitious plans.

Also in the show, we visit Sumgayit - a city once labelled the most polluted in the world - to explore the social cost of our hydrocarbon era.

Plus we visit a mountain on fire, the stunning Yanar Dag.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think - the email address is oneplanet@bbc.com.

Or join the team on Facebook, the link's below.

How Kyoto Failed Africa20111202

This week, One Planet comes from Durban in South Africa, where delegates from around the world have gathered for the seventeenth Conference of the Parties - the latest UN summit trying to find global agreement on how to tackle climate change.

But it's slow going - and even some of the projects agreed at previous summits are coming under fire.

One attempt to address the issue has been under way since the Kyoto protocol came into force -- the Clean Development Mechanism, designed to push investment towards green projects in developing countries.

As Africa is the poorest continent on the planet, and is the region most vulnerable to climate change, the scheme should have proved a boon to Africa.

It hasn't - of over three thousand projects around the world, only seventy-seven are in Africa.

This week, One Planet this week comes from the Mariannhill landfill site on the outskirts of Durban, one of many African sites trying to become part of the Clean Development Mechanism.

Mike Williams find out where the money is going, and meets those in Africa trying to get a greater share of the carbon credit bonanza.

As ever, tune in and then get in touch to let us know your views.

You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook - the link's below.

Why isn’t Africa benefiting from the Clean Development Mechanism?

How Kyoto Failed Africa20111203

Why isn’t Africa benefiting from the Clean Development Mechanism?

How Kyoto Failed Africa20111204
How Kyoto Failed Africa20111205
Hungary's Toxic Spill20110808

We visit western Hungary and find out how the area hit by toxic sludge is recovering

The Hungarian government has met its self imposed deadline to re-house hundreds of people whose homes were destroyed by last year's "red sludge" disaster when 35 million cubic feet of toxic waste was released from an aluminium plant.

Ten people were killed and hundreds injured, ten months on and the social and environmental consequences of that accident continue to be felt.

This week on One Planet, we travel to the region, to drive through the forty square kilometres of land swamped by the sludge and meet some of the people trying to rebuild their lives.

We hear how the arguments still continue over the cause of the leak and exactly who was responsible - with criminal and civil cases against the Aluminium company which owned the reservoir, MAL Zrt, still ongoing.

So far the redevelopment programme has cost the government $150m - but the Minister of the Environment tells us that they hope to recoup that money from the company.

We also meet the family who lost a baby as the sludge swept into their home, from the man responsible for the clean-up programme - which is still ongoing - and from the mayor of one of the town's affected, Devescar who tells us his plans for a new light industrial park specialising in renewable energy.

As ever, tune in and then get in touch to let us know your views.

You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link is below.

India Rising - 12007020120070202

The first of two programmes about India.

Indian Road Trip20100718

Rajasthan in northwestern India, is the site of one of the world's oldest civilisations and is known as the desert state.

This week's One Planet comes from here, and Mike Williams meets the original tree-huggers - the Bishnoi people who sacrificed themselves 500 years ago by hugging their trees as the King's men chopped them down.

We also explore why land prices in the Tahr desert are soaring and Mike has a cup of tea with one of India's wealthiest businessmen to discuss the country's strong economic growth and its environmental responsibilities.

And we have the final part of our Open University series on your big environmental questions, this time asking just how many carrots would One Planet's carbon emissions produce?

Have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.co.uk, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

One Planet meets the original tree-huggers in India's desert state of Rajasthan.

Inspired By Nature20090813

Prof Trevor Cox explores a new wave of biomimicry - where science copies nature.

The natural word has had 3.8 billion years to perfect some of its designs – from self-cleaning lotus leaves, to the Namibian fog-basking beetle, which can harvest moisture from the dry desert air.

We humans are running to catch up, so why not copy how nature solves its design problems?

Engineer Trevor Cox explores the new wave of ‘biomimicry' and meets the people attempting to emulate nature's genius.

Their goal isn't just to copy nature's structures, but to recreate the processes and systems that evolution has taken billions of years to perfect.

In June 2008, 26 dolphins were stranded and died on a beach in England.

Sue Broom inves.

Sue Broom investigates what caused such a tragic event.

International Aid For National Security, Plus Lions For Sale20110310

The UK's Development Secretary argues giving to the poor is in our national interests

Rich countries give to the poor because it's morally right - but also because it serves their national interests.

That's according to the UK's International Development Secretary who has just announced significant changes to the country's aid programme.

Secretary of State Andrew Mitchell sits down with Mike in this week's One Planet to explain his thinking behind a rise in his budget, but a cut in the number of countries receiving that aid.

The minister also debates with Mike why countries like India should receive financial help and whether the coalition government will fulfil its promise to spend 0.7% of the country's national income on aid.

Also in the show, following a campaign by environmental groups in America to get the lion put on the endangered species list, we speak to a man who's spent 40 years working with big cats.

Plus we find out how easy it is to buy lion trophies shipped out of Africa.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link's below.

International Aid For National Security, Plus Lions For Sale20110311

Rich countries give to the poor because it's morally right - but also because it serves their national interests.

That's according to the UK's International Development Secretary who has just announced significant changes to the country's aid programme.

Secretary of State Andrew Mitchell sits down with Mike in this week's One Planet to explain his thinking behind a rise in his budget, but a cut in the number of countries receiving that aid.

The minister also debates with Mike why countries like India should receive financial help and whether the coalition government will fulfil its promise to spend 0.7% of the country's national income on aid.

Also in the show, following a campaign by environmental groups in America to get the lion put on the endangered species list, we speak to a man who's spent 40 years working with big cats.

Plus we find out how easy it is to buy lion trophies shipped out of Africa.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link's below.

The UK's Development Secretary argues giving to the poor is in our national interests

International Aid For National Security, Plus Lions For Sale20110313

The UK's Development Secretary argues giving to the poor is in our national interests

Is It Time To Embrace Our Slums?20110827

For the second part of his series on slums, Paul Mason asks if they are here forever.

For the second part of his series on slums, Paul Mason asks if they are here forever.

One billion people now live in slums - and the number continues to rise rapidly.

These unplanned, sprawling neighbourhoods quickly take root in cities and then boom in size.

For a special two-part series on One Planet, Paul Mason is sent into one of the biggest slums in the world, Manila's Estero de San Miguel, to find out what slums can teach us about capitalism and community.

Paul takes a helicopter ride with the lady charged with cleaning up parts of the Estero de San Miguel, and meets the residents ready to resist the clearance.

Plus we hear why the UN now believes city planners must embrace slums.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think, email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link's below.

For the second part of his series on slums, Paul Mason asks if they are here forever.

Japan And The Whale - 3 Last20070602

The future of Japan's whaling programme.

Will its insistence on hunting damage its international standing?

Kofi Annan on broken promises and social unrest

Kofi Annan On Broken Promises And Social Unrest20100926

Ten years in progress, five years to go - time is running out for the world to achieve its Millennium Development Goals.

This week leaders gathered in New York to discuss the final push, but One Planet headed to another global city - Geneva - to meet one of the original architects of the MDGs, Kofi Annan.

In a wide ranging interview, the former UN chief tells Mike about the success of the MDGs, but also his frustrations at governments who fail to deliver on their promises.

"Governments go public with amounts that they are giving, they get lots of publicity in the press, but the money never really comes through," he says.

Mr Annan also touches on population, the need for the UN to reform, and his fears of further social unrest if the gulf between the rich and the poor is not narrowed.

"We cannot expect to live in a world where some people have immense wealth and you have extreme poverty living side by side and not expect some sort of a reaction."

Also in the show, we hear from Italy, a country with one of the poorest records on overseas aid, plus we have a reason to be cheerful from Ghana.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email the team on oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link's below.

Former UN chief Kofi Annan slams broken government promises and fears rising social unrest

Life Under The Balkans20110903

The Dinaric Arc is a vast network of underground caves, lakes and rivers that runs throughout the Balkans.

The labyrinth may be dark and largely devoid of light, but it is full of life - containing the richest variety of subterranean fauna in the world.

This week One Planet heads down into the Arc, to meet some of the creatures that live down there, and also chat to locals about the persistent dumping of waste into the caves, and plans to build a hydroelectric power plant in the underground network.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link's below.

Three kilometres underground, the Dinaric Arc has been called Europe's Amazon forest

Life Under The Balkans20110904

Three kilometres underground, the Dinaric Arc has been called Europe's Amazon forest

The Dinaric Arc is a vast network of underground caves, lakes and rivers that runs throughout the Balkans.

The labyrinth may be dark and largely devoid of light, but it is full of life - containing the richest variety of subterranean fauna in the world.

This week One Planet heads down into the Arc, to meet some of the creatures that live down there, and also chat to locals about the persistent dumping of waste into the caves, and plans to build a hydroelectric power plant in the underground network.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link's below.

Life Under The Balkans20110905

Three kilometres underground, the Dinaric Arc has been called Europe's Amazon forest

Mining metals, Hungary sludge and toxic tankers

Mining Metals, Hungary Sludge And Toxic Tankers20101015

Jubilant scenes in Chile this week as the 33 miners emerged from their underground tomb.

They were there of course because of our thirst for metals.

The world wants more copper, zinc, tin and all the other natural resources needed to construct our modern lifestyles.

On this week's One Planet we take a look at our obsession with metals, and consider the development and environmental implications of mining them.

Mike gets sent to a windswept hillside overlooking a quarry to chat with mining expert Andrew Bloodworth, who explains why finding a rich supply of metals is not always a path to riches for a country.

Plus we hear from a mining community in South Africa.

Also in the show, we head to Hungary to get an update on the toxic sludge spill, and Mike finds out how industrial waste is dealt with at the UK's largest processing plant.

Throw into the mix some news from India and it's a packed programme.

As ever, let us know your thoughts, email the One Planet team at oneplanet@bbc.com.

Or join us on Facebook, the link's below.

Exploring our need to mine metals, and the latest on the Hungary toxic sludge disaster

Mining metals, Hungary sludge and toxic tankers20101017

Mining Metals, Hungary Sludge And Toxic Tankers20101017

Exploring our need to mine metals, and the latest on the Hungary toxic sludge disaster

Mining The Floor Of Our Oceans2012060120120602

Mineral companies get ready to harvest our seabed, plus we hear an animal orchestra.

Mining The Floor Of Our Oceans2012060120120603
20120603 (WS)

Mineral companies get ready to harvest our seabed, plus we hear an animal orchestra.

Last month, ambitious plans to mine asteroids were unveiled to the world's media. But there's an equally alien landscape closer to home which is set to be mined much sooner - the bottom of our oceans. A number of proposals are under consideration, many in the South Pacific. Papua New Guinea has already became the first country to grant a licence for deep sea mining off its coast.

On this week's One Planet we hear from Australia, where a number of companies interested in mining the sea bed have based their operations. Plus we speak to the International Seabed Authority - the body set up to monitor exploration of the sea floor.

Also on the show we chat to musician Bernard Krause who has travelled the world recording the sounds of nature. He explains why what you can hear, rather than what you can see, tells you more about the health of a habitat.

As ever, have a listen and let us know what you think, email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook - the link is below.

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

Mining The Floor Of Our Oceans2012060120120604

Last month, ambitious plans to mine asteroids were unveiled to the world's media. But there's an equally alien landscape closer to home which is set to be mined much sooner - the bottom of our oceans. A number of proposals are under consideration, many in the South Pacific. Papua New Guinea has already became the first country to grant a licence for deep sea mining off its coast.

On this week's One Planet we hear from Australia, where a number of companies interested in mining the sea bed have based their operations. Plus we speak to the International Seabed Authority - the body set up to monitor exploration of the sea floor.

Also on the show we chat to musician Bernard Krause who has travelled the world recording the sounds of nature. He explains why what you can hear, rather than what you can see, tells you more about the health of a habitat.

As ever, have a listen and let us know what you think, email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook - the link is below.

Mineral companies get ready to harvest our seabed, plus we hear an animal orchestra.

Nuclear Fears Go Global, Plus Anger In The Gulf20110318

As the world's eyes remain fixed on Japan, and in particularly developments at Fukushima nuclear power plant, One Planet considers the impact the disaster will have on an industry that many touted as the answer to climate change.

In recent years governments around the world had begun to talk boldly of constructing a new wave of nuclear reactors.

There are currently 443 reactors around the world - with another 62 under construction and a further 324 planned.

But political leaders are now scrambling to reassure residents about the safety of their own domestic nuclear programmes.

We speak to Tony Juniper, the former head of Friends of the Earth, and Stephen Tyndale, former head of Greenpeace UK.

Both have been heavily involved in researching nuclear power over the past two decades - and they've come to sharply different conclusions on whether we need it or not.

We also hear from Germany, India and Australia as the governments there make big decisions on their nuclear industries.

Plus we travel back to the Gulf of Mexico, to return to the site of a man-made disaster - the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Laura Sheeter hears the anger from many residents who feel the clean up operations are failing them and their environment.

The global impact of Japan's nuclear crisis on an energy source that was making a comeback

Nuclear Fears Go Global, Plus Anger In The Gulf20110320

As the world's eyes remain fixed on Japan, and in particularly developments at Fukushima nuclear power plant, One Planet considers the impact the disaster will have on an industry that many touted as the answer to climate change.

In recent years governments around the world had begun to talk boldly of constructing a new wave of nuclear reactors.

There are currently 443 reactors around the world - with another 62 under construction and a further 324 planned.

But political leaders are now scrambling to reassure residents about the safety of their own domestic nuclear programmes.

We speak to Tony Juniper, the former head of Friends of the Earth, and Stephen Tyndale, former head of Greenpeace UK.

Both have been heavily involved in researching nuclear power over the past two decades - and they've come to sharply different conclusions on whether we need it or not.

We also hear from Germany, India and Australia as the governments there make big decisions on their nuclear industries.

Plus we travel back to the Gulf of Mexico, to return to the site of a man-made disaster - the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Laura Sheeter hears the anger from many residents who feel the clean up operations are failing them and their environment.

The global impact of Japan's nuclear crisis on an energy source that was making a comeback

Nuclear Fusion2007030820070309
Nuts - 220070118

Euan McIlwraith, contrasts two processes in the Amazon, where nuts are harvested from the rainforest and from plantations.

Nuts - 220070119
Rare Metals And Smart Lizards20120206

This week on One Planet we look at some precious metals - not silver and gold, but rare elements such as tungsten, cadmium and lithium.

The Royal Society has warned that inefficient use of these scarce metals could cause us serious problems in the future - and urgent action is needed to preserve them. That's because these elements are essential for the electronic components which make up the modern wired world.

And while the Royal Society warns of a global shortage of the metals, the World Trade Organisation met this week to talk about China's trade in them. There's concern that China is developing a monopoly in their production, and distorting the market.

On the show we speak to Professor Robert Ayres of the business school INSEAD who explains the problem, plus we visit the lab of Dr Julian Allwood at Cambridge University who is working on ways to recycle these rare metals much more efficiently.

He also explains to Mike about their research into ways to get more out of the materials we have, from reusing steel girders, to the un-photocopier, which removes the ink from printed pages so the paper can be reused.

And, Dr Allwood reveals his musical tribute to the work of industrial carbon abatement.

Also on the programme, we hear from Australia, where researchers have discovered a potential upside of climate change - if you're a lizard. The University of Sydney team discovered that skinks incubated at higher temperatures grow up to be bigger and smarter than their colder siblings.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email us at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join the team on our Facebook page - the link's below.

Global pressure on rare metal supplies, plus smarter lizards through climate change.

Richard Branson, uranium and algae

Richard Branson, Uranium And Algae20100919

Sir Richard Branson, founder of the Virgin business empire, sits down with Mike this week to talk about how a soothing bath cost him billions of dollars.

In 2006, while scrubbing himself down, the entrepreneur decided to invest $3billion in clean energy projects.

He tells Mike why progress on developing clean fuels has been slower than he hoped, and explains that - despite being the owner of airline Virgin Atlantic - he wants strong oil prices.

We also ask him about the celebrity climate change bandwagon, and the social responsibility of the world's billionaires.

Plus we play him a report on turning urine and algae into electricity - sources of clean energy to tempt the business mogul.

We also hear from Arizona as debate rages over whether to allow uranium mining to continue there.

The area is rich with the mineral, and as global interest in nuclear power rises, so too does the world's appetite for uranium.

Last year, global production was up 15%.

But many locals blame the mines for contaminating water supplies and causing the rapid rise in cancer rates which their communities have suffered in recent decades.

As ever, tune in, listen and let us know your thoughts.

You can always email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook - Mike can usually be found reading through your comments there.

Richard Branson tells us about clean fuels, the need for nuclear and a life changing bath

Rio+20 - The Future We Want?2012060820120609

The challenges facing the upcoming Earth Summit, according to the UN's man in charge.

Rio+20 - The Future We Want?2012060820120610
20120610 (WS)

The challenges facing the upcoming Earth Summit, according to the UN's man in charge.

The Rio +20 summit starts on June 20 - it's meant to provide a blueprint for global sustainable development under the banner "The Future We Want", covering everything from youth unemployment to ocean acidification to greener cities.

But with only two weeks to go, negotiations are going badly. Everyone has a different vision of what the future looks like, and developed and developing countries are struggling to agree. How can the world switch to a greener economy? How can we ensure sustainable development for the future? And who should pay?

As the negotiating team behind the summit go into another week of emergency preparation time, One Planet speaks to Sha Zukang, the man in charge on behalf of the UN. He tells us how it's going, what the summit might be able to achieve - and that this could be the last chance to ensure a sustainable future.

As ever, have a listen and let us know what you think. You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, follow us on Twitter, or join us on Facebook - the links are below.

(Image: Fortune teller gazing into a crystal ball. Credit: Creatas)

Rio+20 - The Future We Want?2012060820120611
20120611 (WS)

The challenges facing the upcoming Earth Summit, according to the UN's man in charge.

Seven Billion People20111028

Early next week, the world's population will hit the seven billion mark.

For some, this is cause for concern, with competition for space and resources threatening global security; for others, it's a cause for joy, as it means lower infant mortality and longer life expectancy.

One Planet heads to the House of Parliament to meet Baroness Tonge, the head of the UK parliamentary population committee, to discuss birth rates and development.

We put some of our listeners' questions to the head of the UN's Population Fund, Dr Babatunde Osotimehin, who says there's room for all of us and more.

Also on the show, we hear from a selection of 84 year olds around the world.

When they were born in 1927, the world population stood at just two billion - they tell us what it's like to live in a world that's grown by five billion people since they were born.

As ever, tune in, and get in touch to let us know your views.

You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook - the link's below.

The world's population is due to hit seven billion next week - cause for joy or concern?

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

Seven Billion People20111029

The world's population is due to hit seven billion next week - cause for joy or concern?

Seven Billion People20111030
Seven Billion People20111031
Squeezing Lake Victoria's Curves20070811

Lake Victoria, Africa's largest lake, is shrinking.

Is this due to drought or a dam in Uganda? Ayisha Yahya reports.

Strong Warnings And Long Tunnels20101210

As the latest international summit on climate change comes to an end, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon has warned that the "longer we delay the more we will have to pay economically, environmentally and in human lives."

If that warning sounds familiar - it's probably because we've been hearing it for years now - in fact, for decades.

In this week's One Planet we speak to the man who first corralled the international community into gathering for a summit focused entirely on the environment - that was held in Stockholm in 1972.

Maurice Strong was the driving force behind that conference, though it was his 1992 Earth Summit in Rio that really planted sustainability and the environment into political rhetoric.

Mike sits down with him to ask what kind of progress has been made since his speech in 1972 warned governments they must come together to help better protect and manage the planet's resources.

They also discuss whether China - a country where Mr Strong lectures at the Peking University - is leading the world when it comes to the environment.

Also in the show, we get a round up of environmental news from China, plus Mike gets lost underneath the city of Toronto.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think - email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com.

Don't forget you can always join us on Facebook - Mike's usually found there exchanging posts with listeners.

Maurice Strong talks environmental inertia and Chinese progress - plus lost under a city

Strong Warnings And Long Tunnels20101211

Maurice Strong talks environmental inertia and Chinese progress - plus lost under a city

Strong Warnings And Long Tunnels20101212
Sustainability On The High Seas2012050420120505

Shipping, trade and the environment on board one of the world's biggest ships.

This week, One Planet broadcasts from the deck of a huge cargo ship - the Ebba Maersk.

This is one of eight container vessels that are the largest ever built, and she's a key part of the global shipping industry - a business that transports more than 90% of the planet's bulk cargo.

Look around you, most of the man-made products you see will have been transported by shipping container at some point during their life cycle. All of that transportation means a lot of fuel is burnt - but shipping currently only contributes 3% of our total annual greenhouse gas emissions.

That figure is rising as global trade increases, and some experts predict it could quadruple by 2050.

On this week's show, we follow the Ebba on the first leg of her journey to China - from Aarhus in Denmark to Gothenburg in Sweden. She's laden down with thousands of containers carrying everything from pork to cotton.

We visit the bridge as the captain steers us out of harbour, and head down to the engine room to learn about about new fuels being explored as an alternative to the 200 tonnes of oil the Ebba burns every day. Plus we speak to the CEO of Maersk Line, Soren Skou, about the threat of pirates off the east coast of Africa.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook and Twitter, the links are below.

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

Sustainability On The High Seas2012050420120506
Sustainability On The High Seas2012050420120507
Sustainability On The High Seas20120505

Shipping, trade and the environment on board one of the world's biggest ships.

This week, One Planet broadcasts from the deck of a huge cargo ship - the Ebba Maersk.

This is one of eight container vessels that are the largest ever built, and she's a key part of the global shipping industry - a business that transports more than 90% of the planet's bulk cargo.

Look around you, most of the man-made products you see will have been transported by shipping container at some point during their life cycle. All of that transportation means a lot of fuel is burnt - but shipping currently only contributes 3% of our total annual greenhouse gas emissions.

That figure is rising as global trade increases, and some experts predict it could quadruple by 2050.

On this week's show, we follow the Ebba on the first leg of her journey to China - from Aarhus in Denmark to Gothenburg in Sweden. She's laden down with thousands of containers carrying everything from pork to cotton.

We visit the bridge as the captain steers us out of harbour, and head down to the engine room to learn about about new fuels being explored as an alternative to the 200 tonnes of oil the Ebba burns every day. Plus we speak to the CEO of Maersk Line, Soren Skou, about the threat of pirates off the east coast of Africa.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook and Twitter, the links are below.

Sustainability On The High Seas20120506
Sustainability On The High Seas20120507

Shipping, trade and the environment on board one of the world's biggest ships.

Taking Back The La River20120109

Los Angeles wants its river back.

For years, the river at the heart of the City of Angels has been more like a concrete storm drain than a natural river environment - the backdrop to Hollywood movies from Grease to Terminator 2, but tightly controlled for flood prevention and overlooked by most of the city's residents.

But now, after years of planning, the city administration has finally approved plans to start ripping up the distinctive concrete slopes of the river basin to allow the river to flow more freely - and encourage wildlife, plants and nature enthusiasts back to the area.

This week on One Planet, we travel the length of the Los Angeles river to find out more about its transformation. Alastair Leithead meets the fishermen, canoeists and engineers working along the river, dismantling a project that began in the 1930s.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email us at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join the team on our Facebook page - the link's below.

The campaign to revive the Los Angeles river - from concrete stormdrain to natural habitat

The $100bn Fundraiser20111210

Vulnerable nations were promised $100bn to help adapt to climate change - where is it?

One of the few achievements of the UN climate negotiations in Copenhagen two years ago was the announcement of the Green Climate Fund - a pledge to raise $100bn a year to help the most vulnerable countries adapt to climate change.

And as this year's conference in Durban comes to a close with the prospect of a binding treaty on emissions reduction seeming ever further out of reach, details on the Green Climate Fund will be one of the few signs of progress from the summit.

But ever since Copenhagen, arguments over terms and conditions have dogged efforts to get the fund off the ground.

There's been fierce debate over how the money should be raised, and how its proceeds are distributed - and whether it's enough to make a difference.

In the second of two programmes from the UN climate conference in Durban, One Planet investigates at the Green Climate Fund.

We speak to the World Bank's climate enjoy Andrew Steer, the UN's Achim Steiner and to the campaigners who say that the fund is simply reparations for the damage vulnerable countries will suffer through climate change.

Is funding for climate change adaptation simply a question of climate justice?

As ever, tune in and then get in touch to let us know your views.

You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook - the link's below.

The $100bn Fundraiser20111211

Vulnerable nations were promised $100bn to help adapt to climate change - where is it?

The $100bn Fundraiser20111212
The Amazon Paradox20080515

One Planet looks at the Amazon Rainforest and the region.

The Amazon Paradox20080516
The Battle Over Welsh Wind Farms20110725

Turbines are popping up around the world, but in the Welsh valleys, locals have had enough

The UK Government has unveiled its latest roadmap to renewable energy, setting a target of 15% by 2020.

Some nations have been more ambitious, others haven't set a specific target at all - but it you want to switch to clean green energy, you can expect challenges - financial, technological and political.

Some challenges will be local, and we explore these in this week's One Planet.

Mike heads to central Wales - a place of hills and valleys, and also of wind farms.

Hundreds of turbines can be found across Wales, with many others are planned.

But opposition from locals is strong.

It's no surprise - recent research by the law firm McGrigors found almost half of all applications to build wind farms in England and Wales were rejected last year.

Travelling through Wales, Mike meets the residents fighting to stop the march of the turbines, and interviews Welsh environment minister John Griffiths who must overcome local opposition to implement national goals for a low carbon economy.

We also hear from Morocco, another country rapidly expanding it's onshore wind power, but with far less opposition to overcome.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page, the link's below.

The Best Of One Planet2012081020120811 (WS)
20120812 (WS)
20120813 (WS)

This week's programme will be the last edition of One Planet - so we've put together a rather nostalgic look back at the last few years.

We've been on air in various forms since 1997, covering environmental news and international development, looking at the way we live our lives on this planet and the consequences.

We've been all over the world, from the rainforests of Borneo to the roof of the Vatican to the Fire Mountains of Azerbaijan.

We've spoken to some fascinating people - not just big names like David Attenborough or Kofi Annan - but also to the ordinary people whose real lives have been affected by the issues we cover.

We've talked about everything from climate change to bioengineering to the wonders of the mushroom. It's been great fun for us, and we hope that you've also enjoyed the ride.

But don't worry - Mike will be back in September with his new show The Why Factor. Watch this space for more details.

Thanks to everyone who's spoken to us on One Planet over the years - and also to everyone who's helped us out by fixing interviews, driving us around, feeding us, translating for us, and so on. And most of all, thanks to you for listening.

Goodbye!

For the final edition of One Planet, we look back at some of our greatest hits.

The Calm Before Cancun20101119

With less than two weeks to go before climate change negotiators meet once more to try and thrash out an international deal on cutting carbon emissions, One Planet travels to Bonn to meet the woman who will be at the very heart of the talks: Christiana Figueres, the new head of the UNFCCC.

After disappointment at Copenhagen, we ask Ms Figueres what realistically can be achieved in Cancun, Mexico, whether focusing on a global agreement is the right path to follow and how much sleep she's getting ahead of the talks.

Also in the show we explore the architectural promise of bamboo and meet the Colombian who's wooing the world with this carbon absorbing resource.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on our Facebook page.

'I haven't had much sleep in 15 years'.

One Planet speaks to the new head of the UNFCCC.

The Calm Before Cancun20101120

'I haven't had much sleep in 15 years'.

One Planet speaks to the new head of the UNFCCC.

The Calm Before Cancun20101121
The Carbon Detectives20100808

In a special edition of One Planet, Richard Hollingham meets the scientists trying to track our carbon emissions.

International climate treaties are entirely based on national declarations of greenhouse-gas emissions.

But there is at present no independent way of testing those declarations.

National carbon accounts are carefully audited - but so were the financial accounts of Greece, one expert notes, wryly.

On the other hand, once exhaust fumes have gone into the atmosphere, who knows where they go.

Richard Hollingham meets the researchers who are trying to develop a network of tracking stations that can monitor greenhouse emissions, using a suite of chemical fingerprints.

They have already shown that one key gas is on the increase, when national reports said it was being controlled.

And although much of the expertise is in Britain, the UK government is dragging its heels some say, in supporting the network.

Richard Hollingham meets the scientists trying to track our carbon emissions

The Deepwater Disaster In Numbers20110425

A look at the stats behind the Deepwater Horizon disaster, plus an update from the Arctic

The Deepwater Horizon disaster generated a lot of grim statistics.

Twelve months on, we ask those involved in the clean up operation, and those impacted by it, to reveal the number that matters most to them.

Our reporter Laura Sheeter meets with the US Coast Guard, scientists and oystermen to learn the statistics which sum up America's worst environmental disaster.

Also in the show, following recent reports that ice loss in the Arctic is faster than predicted, we put a call into scientists at the Arctic to ask why we are repeatedly underestimating ice melt.

Plus, Mike spends the show in a London book shop to celebrate UNESCO's World Book Day - thanks to all who suggested their favourite book on our Facebook page.

If you haven't joined the team there yet, do come along, the link's below.

And finally, we head up the tallest building in Quito - which happens to be a church - to take a fresh perspective on the capital of Ecuador.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com.

The Deepwater Horizon disaster

The Dry Lands Of Texas20120123

The state of Texas in the southern United States is experiencing the worst drought in its history.

There are arguments over the causes - natural variation, La Nina, climate change - but the reality on the ground remains: more than 95% of the state is affected, half a billion trees have died, and the cost of lost agricultural output is already running into billions of dollars.

We speak to the cattle ranchers and farmers threatened by the drought, and the planners and politicians trying to combat it.

Also in the US, we talk conservation and conservatism with David Jenkins of Republicans for Environmental Protection.

As the Republican primary race heats up, we discuss why so many of the candidates are so hostile to environmental issues - and whether environmentalism is compatible with conservative values.

Plus, we hear from Denmark, where the world's biggest manufacturers of wind turbines has just announced large layoffs.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email us at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join the team on our Facebook page - the link's below.

Texas suffers its worst drought ever, plus conservative conservation and renewable layoffs

The father of GM foods, bolivian seeds and wildebeest

The Father Of Gm Foods, Bolivian Seeds And Wildebeest20101008

Dr Roger Beachy is an expert on plant viruses and the biotechnology of plants.

But if you recognise his name, a different phrase is likely to jump into your mind: genetically modified foods.

Two decades ago, his research - in collaboration with Monsanto - helped develop the world's first genetically modified crop (a tomato).

In this week's show, Mike sits down with him to discuss his work and the world's attitudes to his creation.

Scientific ignorance is a major obstacle according to Dr Beachy, who argues the public's understanding of cutting edge science has deteriorated over the past 50 years - and this is leading to misunderstandings when it comes to GM crops.

He also passionately urges nations to share their knowledge and research to help the world's growing population feed itself; with GM crops central to that goal.

Also in the show, we hear from another genetic engineer - but one with very different views to Dr Beachy.

Dr Michael Antoniou uses the same methods for genetic engineering as those who produce GM crops, however, he focuses on producing GM bacteria to tackle viruses.

He argues the methods used for genetic engineering are too crude when it comes altering the DNA sequence of plants.

In this week's programme we also hear from Bolivia and Africa, there's lots to catch up on.

As ever, tune in and then let us know your thoughts.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook - the link's below.

The father of GM foods on scientific ignorance and our moral obligations

The Father Of Gm Foods, Bolivian Seeds And Wildebeest20101010

The father of GM foods on scientific ignorance and our moral obligations

The Floating Frontier - Sea Cities20110502

How architects are planning to conquer the open ocean, plus a look around a floating town

Some 70 percent of the world's surface area is covered by water - so it's no surprise that architects and urban planners are looking down from their high rise towers and considering new horizons to build on: namely the world's vast oceans.

On this week's One Planet, Richard heads to the Hague in Holland to look around a building site, one that's going to be deliberately flooded allowing a community of 600 homes to rise to the top of the flood waters.

Dutch architect Koen Olthuis, a specialist in floating buildings, outlines his vision for the community and explains why - as more people go urban - the pressure on our cities means it's a logical step to take to the water.

Also in the show we visit a floating home - now built and occupied - that sits in the waterways of Amsterdam.

Take a look at our Flickr album to see pictures of the water house, the link's below.

Plus, we hear from Patri Friedman, the head of the Seasteading Institute - an organisation promoting the construction of entirely new sovereign states on the open sea that will allow alternative types of government to be tested and developed.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on our Facebook page, the link's below.

The Metal That May Save The World20110411

In search of a mineral that could solve the world's energy puzzle

There's some good news from Japan finally - they've plugged the crack at the Fukushima nuclear plant that was leaking highly radioactive water into the Pacific Ocean.

The emergency at Fukushima has once again raised the safety of the industry to the front of many minds.

We debated it recently on One Planet - many listeners got in touch, and several of you asked about a radioactive element called Thorium.

This abundant mineral was discovered in 1828 - was named after the Norse god of thunder - Thor - and has an atomic number of 90.

But that's not why we're interested.

What makes this mineral interesting is that it's an element some believe can help power the nuclear reactors of the future.

On this week's One Planet, we chat to Professor Carol Rubbia, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist who has long believed Thorium - instead of Uranium and Plutonium -offers the promise of safe, abundant atomic energy.

Hear him explain why.

Also in the show, we go inside Bolivia's rich mountain - an iconic peak that is collapsing in on itself following centuries of mining.

Plus we look down on the world, this time from the Sydney Tower.

As ever, tune in, listen and let us know what you think - email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link's below.

The New Species Dilemma20120302

After a string of examples where rare animals have been plundered by pet collectors as soon as their discovery is revealed in biological journals, scientists are now starting to censor their own work - withholding details of their new find for fear of people outside the scientific community using the information for financial gain.

On One Planet this week, we hear from South East Asia where the discovery of a new species of salamander attracted the pet collectors who smuggled hundreds out of the country. Plus we chat to one of the world's leading biologists, a professor who's found 27 new species of frogs, newts and snakes, but now wonders if his work has actually brought great harm to them.

Also on the show we tour abandoned building sites in New York, and hear from Sir David Attenborough about his 60 years making wildlife documentaries.

As ever, get in touch - email us at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link's below.

The race between pet collectors and conservationists when a new species is discovered.

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

The New Species Dilemma20120303

The race between pet collectors and conservationists when a new species is discovered.

The Nuclear Future20120324

A year on from the disaster at Fukushima, what's the future for nuclear power?

A year ago, the world watched in horror as the nuclear power station at Fukushima threatened meltdown.

Popular concern about the safety of nuclear power pressed governments around the world to review their energy policies - the rest of Japan's nuclear power stations have gradually closed for testing over the year, and Germany announced that it would close its nuclear power stations altogether by 2022.

But as the memory of Fukushima has faded, the debate over nuclear power has re-ignited.

Without nuclear, can the world meet its energy needs? Has the industry learned from Fukushima? Can nuclear power ever be safe?

This week One Planet hears from all sides of the debate. At a discussion organised by the University of Birmingham, we speak to leading voices from the nuclear industry, anti-nuclear campaigners, academics and policymakers, all trying to figure out the future for nuclear power.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think. Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook and Twitter, the links are below.

The Nuclear Future20120326

A year on from the disaster at Fukushima, what's the future for nuclear power?

The Population Debate

The Population Debate20101022

The number of people living on the planet is rising and we are approaching the seven billion inhabitants mark.

That is probably one of the few facts associated with the global population which people can agree on.

Everything else is up for debate - and that debate can get very heated.

No other topic leads to such a wide range of strongly held views expressed in the One Planet inbox on an almost daily basis.

This week, the UN published its latest projections for the world's population, so One Planet's taken the opportunity to take another look at the topic of humanity's numbers.

Three guests from around the world join Mike to discuss the issue.

In London we have John Guillebaud from the Optimum Population Trust; from New York Matthew Connelly, author of Fatal Misconception; and from Calcutta, the social demographer Alaka Basu.

Plus we hear reports from Uganda - a country with one of the fastest birth rates in the world - and from Japan, a country that is suffering a decline in its population.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on our Facebook page, there's usually a strong debate going on there.

Fierce debate as the latest world population figures are released

The Population Debate20101023

Fierce debate as the latest world population figures are released

The Population Debate20101024
The Real Wealth Of Nations20101126

A country does not develop through economic growth alone - it comes from a host of other welfare factors.

That's the stark message in the latest United Nations annual development report, which has assessed global progress over the past 40 years.

The report finds many countries have grown wealthier without improving the fortunes of those at the bottom.

On this week's One Planet we ask the head of the United Nations Development Programme - and former Prime Minister of New Zealand - Helen Clark what makes a country rich.

Also in the show we'll head to Afghanistan to find out how skateboarding is being used to drive development, and as a raft of global leaders meet in Moscow for a summit on saving the world's tiger, we'll hear from the US - home to more tigers than anywhere else on earth (and they're all in backgardens).

When should we stop giving aid? We ask the Head of the UN Development Programme.

The Real Wealth Of Nations20101128

When should we stop giving aid? We ask the Head of the UN Development Programme.

The Search For Kyoto's Successor20111021

With two months to go before the 17th UN climate conference in Durban, the French ambassador to the UK invites One Planet into his house to join a mini-gathering of diplomats, academics and negotiators debating the future of climate change action.

We speak to Lord Nicholas Stern, author of the influential Stern Review on climate change, who tells us why the costs of non-action have swelled significantly since the publication of his report five years ago this month.

One of the EU's lead negotiators explains why a successor to the Kyoto Protocol - which expires next year - is not going to come into force until 2020, and amid the clinking of champagne glasses at the lavish gathering, the former chair of the IPCC tells us why a heavy dose of realism is needed, and the world must acknowledge that the idea we're going to keep temperature rises to under 2 degrees is misguided.

As ever, tune in and then get in touch to let us know your views.

You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook - the link's below.

Why we might not see a new deal on climate change until 2020

One Planet looks at how we use our planet, and how what we do affects our lives.

The Search For Kyoto's Successor20111022

Why we might not see a new deal on climate change until 2020

The Search For Kyoto's Successor20111023
The Search For Kyoto's Successor20111024
The Vatican20110604

has published a report calling for mankind to take "decisive action" on climate change.

In a new report on glacier melt, the Vatican's Pontifical Academy of Sciences appeals to all nations to reduce their impact on the environment, as "we all live in the same home".

But will the faithful listen, and will the Catholic church be able to rouse humanity to action on climate change where so many other international leaders have struggled? One Planet goes behind the scenes at the Vatican to talk to Marcelo Sanchez Sorondo, chancellor of the Academy of Sciences, about the report.

Also on the show, we ask whether science and religion can ever be compatible - we get opposing views from Professor Richard Dawkins and Chancellor Sanchez Sorondo.

Plus, we check out the Vatican's solar panels, talk to the pilgrims on St Peter's Square, and check out the view from the tallest building in the world's smallest state.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page - the link's below.

The Vatican's new report on climate change, faith and science, and the Pope's solar panels

The Vatican20110605

has published a report calling for mankind to take "decisive action" on climate change.

In a new report on glacier melt, the Vatican's Pontifical Academy of Sciences appeals to all nations to reduce their impact on the environment, as "we all live in the same home".

But will the faithful listen, and will the Catholic church be able to rouse humanity to action on climate change where so many other international leaders have struggled? One Planet goes behind the scenes at the Vatican to talk to Marcelo Sanchez Sorondo, chancellor of the Academy of Sciences, about the report.

Also on the show, we ask whether science and religion can ever be compatible - we get opposing views from Professor Richard Dawkins and Chancellor Sanchez Sorondo.

Plus, we check out the Vatican's solar panels, talk to the pilgrims on St Peter's Square, and check out the view from the tallest building in the world's smallest state.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page - the link's below.

The Vatican's new report on climate change, faith and science, and the Pope's solar panels

's new report on climate change, faith and science, and the Pope's solar panels

The Vatican20110606

's new report on climate change, faith and science, and the Pope's solar panels

The Vatican has published a report calling for mankind to take "decisive action" on climate change.

In a new report on glacier melt, the Vatican's Pontifical Academy of Sciences appeals to all nations to reduce their impact on the environment, as "we all live in the same home".

But will the faithful listen, and will the Catholic church be able to rouse humanity to action on climate change where so many other international leaders have struggled? One Planet goes behind the scenes at the Vatican to talk to Marcelo Sanchez Sorondo, chancellor of the Academy of Sciences, about the report.

Also on the show, we ask whether science and religion can ever be compatible - we get opposing views from Professor Richard Dawkins and Chancellor Sanchez Sorondo.

Plus, we check out the Vatican's solar panels, talk to the pilgrims on St Peter's Square, and check out the view from the tallest building in the world's smallest state.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join in the conversation on our Facebook page - the link's below.

has published a report calling for mankind to take "decisive action" on climate change.

The World Of The Activist2012061520120618

As non-governmental organisations descend on Rio for next week's Earth Summit, they bring with them environmental activists from around the world, pressing for attention for a huge range of issues.

This week on One Planet we're looking at the role of the activist. Who are they? What do they do? What can they really achieve? And where do they draw the line?

We speak to people from all over the activist spectrum, from celebrities to environmental campaigners to protesters who advocate breaking the law in support of their cause.

We visit the new Occupy encampment on Hampstead Heath in London; talk to campaigner Mel Evans about whether direct action is the best way to get an issue noticed; and speak to environmentalist Lo Sze Ping about the challenges of activism in China.

Plus, campaigning journalist Andrew Revkin tells what happens when reporters join the debates they're meant to be covering; and we ask celebrity campaigner Bianca Jagger why famous faces so often want to attach themselves to a cause.

As ever, have a listen and let us know what you think. You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, follow us on Twitter, or join us on Facebook - the links are below.

The Yortanli Dam20080410
The Yortanli Dam20080411
Too Hot To Crop - 120071108

Sue Broom assesses the impact of climate change and whether it means good or bad news for feeding the world.

Un Enviro Chief, Urban Biodiversity And Rapid Evolution20101029

We've had plenty in the past, we'll certainly have more in the future: large international summits designed to rally global support for environmental action.

This time it's Japan and a conference aimed at tackling the rapid loss of biodiversity the world is currently experiencing.

Many blame us - humans - for the extinctions, and are urging quick action to better manage our resources.

On this week's One Planet, we speak to the man at the centre of the action in Japan, Achim Steiner, the UN's environmental chief.

Mr Steiner tells Mike why biodiversity matters, and why no species - even those that appear to offer little direct benefit to humans - must be preserved.

But he stresses that these conferences are never a finishing line, and we must be realistic about what can be achieved.

Also in the programme, Mike looks away from the rainforests and oceans to consider biodiversity in our cities.

Over half the world's population now lives in urban areas - and that figure will continue to rise.

We visit Professor Nobert Muller in the German city of Erfurt to ask him why city wildlife may hold the key to better preserving all of the world's biodiversity.

In a packed show, we also ask how long it takes for a species to evolve - can some animals and plants adapt quickly enough to the rapidly changing environment? And we have a poem extolling the virtues of city wildlife.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think.

Contact the team on oneplanet@bbc.com, or do join us on our Facebook page, the link's below.

You'll usually find us reading through your comments on Facebook.

See you there.

The UN enviro chief defends the panda, plus urban biodiversity and the birth of a species

Un Enviro Chief, Urban Biodiversity And Rapid Evolution20101030

The UN enviro chief defends the panda, plus urban biodiversity and the birth of a species

Un Enviro Chief, Urban Biodiversity And Rapid Evolution20101031
Unexplored Planet20111230

It's 100 years this month since Amundsen - and then Scott - first reached the South Pole. It was one of the great achievements of the golden age of exploration - and it seemed that mankind would go on to reach every corner of the globe.

But despite another 100 years of exploration, there are still vast swathes of our planet which remain uncharted, unknown to the map makers, the geologists and the botanists.

So where's left to explore?

This week on One Planet we speak to three modern-day adventurers to discuss the parts of the world still unknown to science - and what will happen to us when we’ve been everywhere.

Polar explorer and broadcaster Paul Rose, marine biologist Katrin Linse and botanist Alex Monro join Richard Hollingham at London's Natural History Museum.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email us at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join the team on our Facebook page - the link's below.

100 years after Amundsen reached the South Pole, is there anywhere left to explore?

Unexplored Planet20111231

100 years after Amundsen reached the South Pole, is there anywhere left to explore?

Unexplored Planet20120101
Unexplored Planet20120102

It's 100 years this month since Amundsen - and then Scott - first reached the South Pole.

It was one of the great achievements of the golden age of exploration - and it seemed that mankind would go on to reach every corner of the globe.

But despite another 100 years of exploration, there are still vast swathes of our planet which remain uncharted, unknown to the map makers, the geologists and the botanists.

So where's left to explore?

This week on One Planet we speak to three modern-day adventurers to discuss the parts of the world still unknown to science - and what will happen to us when we've been everywhere.

Polar explorer and broadcaster Paul Rose, marine biologist Katrin Linse and botanist Alex Monro join Richard Hollingham at London's Natural History Museum.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.

Email us at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join the team on our Facebook page - the link's below.

A hundred years after Amundsen reached the South Pole, is there anywhere left to explore?

What Did Durban Achieve?20111218

The ups and downs of the Durban summit, plus empty homes and the great beaver audit.

The 17th UN climate change summit staggered to a close in Durban in the early hours of Sunday morning last week, a day and a half into extra time.

Negotiators finally managed to reach an agreement to continue talks next year, aiming for a new legal deal by 2015 - and any treaty agreed will come into force in 2020.

After the fraught final hours of the conference, any kind of deal was an achievement.

But deep rifts still remain between the different sides - and will any action taken in eight years time be too little, too late?

We hear from some of those involved - and from some of you, too - about what the conference achieved.

Also in this week's show, we tag along on the great beaver audit at Gatineau National Park in Canada.

Every five year, park rangers take to the skies and to the forest trails to monitor beaver activity - because although beavers might be cute, their intricate dams and big square teeth can have a major impact on human property.

Plus, we hear from Sao Paolo in Brazil, where hundreds of thousands of homes lie empty - while hundreds of thousands of people live in sub-standard housing and slums.

As ever, tune in and then get in touch to let us know your views.

You can email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook - the link's below.

What Did Durban Achieve?20111219

The ups and downs of the Durban summit, plus empty homes and the great beaver audit.

What Slums Can Teach Us20110819

One billion people now live in slums - and the number continues to rise rapidly.

These unplanned, sprawling neighbourhoods quickly take root in cities and then boom in size.

For a special two part series on One Planet, Paul Mason is sent into one of the biggest slums in the world, Manila's Estero de San Miguel, to find out what slums can teach us about capitalism and community.

In part one, Paul meets some of the millions who live in the slum, and then heads into the countryside to find out what's luring people to these makeshift towns.

Next week, he takes a helicopter ride with the lady charged with cleaning up parts of the Estero de San Miguel, and meets the residents ready to resist the clearance.

Plus we hear why the UN now believes city planners must embrace slums.

As ever, tune in, have a listen and then let us know what you think, email the team at oneplanet@bbc.com, or join us on Facebook, the link's below.

The world's slums are booming - so what can they teach us about enterprise and community?

What Slums Can Teach Us20110820

The world's slums are booming - so what can they teach us about enterprise and community?

What Slums Can Teach Us20110821
What Slums Can Teach Us20110822
01Powering Africa's Future20081204

Africa is searching for future sources of energy.

Vera Kwakofi looks at whether Africa.

Vera Kwakofi looks at whether Africa should go nuclear or use the sun.

01Powering Africa's Future20081205

Africa is searching for future sources of energy.

Vera Kwakofi looks at whether Africa.

01Return Of The Nomad2009022620090227

Susie Emmett discovers why ancient nomadic ways are still relevant with the Maasai in Kenya and Raika in Rajasthan.

01 LASTThe Battle Against Blue Tongue20081218

Blue tongue: a deadly virus transmitted to animals.

Susie Emmett looks at attempts to c.

Susie Emmett looks at attempts to control it and the race to develop a vaccine

01 LASTThe Battle Against Blue Tongue20081219

Blue tongue: a deadly virus transmitted to animals.

Susie Emmett looks at attempts to c.

01 LASTThe Battle Against Blue Tongue20081220

Blue tongue: a deadly virus transmitted to animals.

Susie Emmett looks at attempts to c.

01 LASTThe Battle Against Blue Tongue20081221
01 LASTThe Yortanli Dam20090312

Aylin Bozyap looks at Yortanli dam in Turkey.

The plan has divided locals and led to a.

The plan has divided locals and led to a dispute between Ankara and Brussels.

01 LASTThe Yortanli Dam20090313

Aylin Bozyap looks at Yortanli dam in Turkey.

The plan has divided locals and led to a.

01 LASTThe Yortanli Dam20090314
01 LASTThe Yortanli Dam20090315
01 LASTWildlife Conservation In Nepal20090319

Navin Singh Khadka travels to Nepal�s borders with India and China to investigate the t.

Navin Singh Khadka travels to Nepal�s borders with India and China to investigate the trade in illegal wildlife products.

01 LASTWildlife Conservation In Nepal20090320

Navin Singh Khadka travels to Nepal�s borders with India and China to investigate the t.

02 LASTPowering Africa's Future20081211
02 LASTPowering Africa's Future20081212
02 LASTPowering Africa's Future20081213

Africa is searching for future sources of energy.

Vera Kwakofi looks at whether Africa should go nuclear or use the sun.

Vera Kwakofi looks at whether Africa.

02 LASTPowering Africa's Future20081214
02 LASTReturn Of The Nomad20090305

Susie Emmett discovers why ancient nomadic ways are still relevant with the Maasai in K.

Susie Emmett discovers why ancient nomadic ways are still relevant with the Maasai in Kenya and Raika in Rajasthan.

02 LASTReturn Of The Nomad20090306

Susie Emmett discovers why ancient nomadic ways are still relevant with the Maasai in K.

1The Deepwater Horizon disaster

4Richard Branson, uranium and algae