Off The Page

New writing and discussion, featuring a mix of fresh talent and established names; hosted first by Chris Bigsby, from 20020809 Matthew Parris, 20060127 onwards Dominic Arkwright.

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Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
0101City Life20000730

With Jonathan Meades, A L Kennedy and Sukhdev Sandhu

0102Caught In The Web - Information20000806

With Susan Blackmore, Sarah Lefanu and Simon Ings

0103An Honest Day20000813

With John Lanchester, Jeremy Clarke and Joanna Traynor

0104Displacement20000820

David Dabydeen, Maya Jaggi and Tim Parks discuss the disorientation and exhilaration involved in drifting between cultures, experiences and languages.

0105A Foreign Country? Writing The Past20000827

Lawrence Norfolk, Lesley Chamberlain and Joanna Bourke visit a foreign country and present back their very different reports.

0106Education20000903

With Dr Mary Beard, Ardashir Vakil and Geoff Dyer

0107Neighbourhoods20000910

and the idea of community.

With Ike Eze-Anyika, Peter Reading and Tim Lott

0108Celebrity20000917

With Elaine Showalter, David Edgar and Paul Morley

0109The Great American Microcosm20000924

The first of two special editions from New York, with Rick Moody, George Sanders and AM Homes.

0110The Price Of Everything, The Value Of Nothing20001001

With Jonathan Ree, Toby Litt and Susannah Clapp

0111New York Village20001008

In a second special edition from New York, Chris asks three of its writers to define and explain the essence of this most dynamic of cities.

With Colum Mccann, Lynne Tillman and Geoffrey O'Brien.

0112Confession20001015

Why is confessional writing all the rage? With Paul Bailey, Ronan Bennett and Lavinia Greenlaw

0201The Pram In The Hall20010218

Chris Bigsby introduces a series of programmes featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

He asks Liz Jensen, Nicholas Lezard and Lucretia Stewart if children are the enemies of artistic promise.

0202Ageing20010225

Chris Bigsby introduces a series of programmes featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

He asks Victoria Glendinning, Jeremy Lewis and Linda Grant if ageing is a good idea.

0203Animal Magic?20010304

Chris Bigsby introduces a series of programmes featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

He asks Maggie Gee, Mark Cocter and Shena Mackay if our love of animals has gone too far.

0204Friendship V Love20010311

He asks Zinovy Zinik, Harriett Gilbert and Justin Cartwright if we have lost the art of just being friends.

0205Heroes And Villains20010318

He asks Sara Wheeler, Roshan Doug and John Upton how they define their particular heroes and villains.

0206The Art Of Travel20010325

Chris Bigsby introduces a series featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

With Maggie O'Kane, Stephen Smith and Catherine Merridale, he discusses changing attitudes to getting from A to B.

0301Grief20010629

Chris Bigsby introduces a series of programmes in which three writers discuss a topic which affects us all.

This week, his guests are Ian Mcmillan and Laura Thompson

0302Clothes20010706

Chris Bigsby introduces a series of programmes in which three writers discuss a topic which affects us all.

This week, his guests are Julia Blackburn and Ruth Padel

0303Paradise20010713

Chris Bigsby introduces a series of programmes in which three writers discuss a topic which affects us all.

This week, his guests are Helen Dunmore, Jo Shapcott and Iain Sinclair

0304Exercise And Laziness20010720

Chris Bigsby introduces a series of programmes in which three writers discuss a topic that affects us all.

His guests are David Craig, Robert Irwin and Blake Morrison

0305Transport20010727

Chris Bigsby introduces a series of programmes in which three writers discuss a topic that affects us all.

Chris is joined by Alain De Botton, Kate Clanchy and Alexander Frater.

0306Secrets2001080320141217 (BBC7)
20141218 (BBC7)

Chris Bigsby introduces a series of programmes in which three writers discuss a topic that affects us all.

Chris is joined by Anthony Thwaite, Penelope Lively and Alan Judd.

Writers Alice Jolly, Kris Kenway and Duncan Fallowell reveal all on matters undisclosed.

Writers Alice Jolly, Kris Kenway and Duncan Fallowell reveal all on matters undisclosed to Matthew Parris.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0307God20010810

Chris Bigsby introduces a series of programmes in which three writers discuss a topic that affects us all.

Chris is joined by Andy Martin, David Owen Norris and Nicholas Spice.

0308Fathers20010817

Chris is joined by Michael Holroyd, Patricia Duncker, Simon Armitage and Tom Leonard.

0401Rewriting The Past2002020820140507 (BBC7)
20140508 (BBC7)

With novelist Louis De Bernieres and historian Lucy Moore.

Chris Bigsby discusses historical writing - are fact and fiction dangerous bedfellows?

Chris Bigsby discusses historical writing with Louis de Bernières and Lucy Moore. Are fact and fiction dangerous bedfellows?

In each programme, Professor Bigsby introduces a duo of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

0402Taboos: Who Needs Them?2002021520140514 (BBC7)
20140515 (BBC7)

With Adam Mars-Jones and Daisy Sampson.

Chris Bigsby chairs a debate about taboo. Is there anything still forbidden these days?

Chris Bigsby chairs a debate about taboo with Adam Mars-Jones and Daisy Sampson. Is there anything still forbidden these days?

In each programme, Professor Bigsby introduces a duo of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2002.

0403Siblings2002022220140521 (BBC7)
20140522 (BBC7)

With Liz Bond, Martin Newell and Misha Glenny

Misha Glennie, Martin Newell and Elizabeth Bond explore family ties and blood relations.

Misha Glennie, Martin Newell and Elizabeth Bond join Chris Bigsby to explore family ties and blood relation.

In each programme, Professor Bigsby introduces a duo of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2002.

0404Being Alone2002030120140528 (BBC7)
20140529 (BBC7)

Chris Bigsby introduces a series of programmes featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

4: `Being Alone'.

With Jenny Diski and Francis Spufford.

Jenny Ditski and Francis Spufford join Chris Bigsby to discuss solitude versus loneliness.

Three's a crowd? Jenny Ditski and Francis Spufford join Chris Bigsby to discuss solitude versus loneliness. From March 2002.

0405Is Youth Wasted On The Young?2002030820140604 (BBC7)
20140605 (BBC7)
20140612 (BBC7)

Chris Bigsby chairs a stimulating discussion as veteran historian Corelli Barnett clashes with young writer Decca Aikenhead to debate the question `Is youth wasted on the young?'.

Correlli Barnett and Decca Aitkenhead exchange views in a clash of the generations.

Veteran historian Correlli Barnett and youngster Decca Aitkenhead exchange views in a clash of the generations. From March 2002.

Veteran historian Correlli Barnett and youngster Decca Aitkenhead exchange views in a clash of the generations.

In each programme, Professor Bigsby introduces a duo of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2002.

0407On The Run2002032220140618 (BBC7)
20140619 (BBC7)

Chris Bigsby with a series featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

Poet Carole Satyamurti and humourist Guy Browning discuss this week's topic - `On the Run'.

Poet Carole Satyamurti and humourist Guy Browning make unlikely fugitives.

Poet Carole Satyamurti and humourist Guy Browning make unlikely fugitives, but the theme is what it means to flee.

In each programme, Professor Bigsby introduces a duo of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2002.

0501Masculinity2002080920140716 (BBC7)
20140717 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris presents a series featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

This week's guests are Lindsey Davis, Nick Walker and Neil Rollinson, who talk about masculinity.

Writers Nick Walker, Lindsey Davis and Neil Rollinson discuss what makes a man's man.

Writers Nick Walker, Lindsey Davis and Neil Rollinson join Matthew Parris to discuss what makes a man's man.

Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2002.

0503Paranoia2002082320140730 (BBC7)
20140731 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris introduces a series featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

Authors Mil Millington, Louise Welsh and journalist Malachi O'Doherty discuss paranoia.

Authors Mil Millington, Louise Welsh and Belfast journalist Malachi O'Doherty discuss paranoia with Matthew Parris.

Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2002.

0505Motherhood2002090620140813 (BBC7)
20140814 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris introduces a series featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

Guests are comedy writer Carole Matthews, novelist Carl Tighe and playwright Alan Mcdonald

Carole Matthews, Carl Tighe and Alan McDonald celebrate and criticise mothers.

Comedy writer Carole Matthews, novelist Carl Tighe and playwright Alan McDonald celebrate and criticise mothers. From September 2002.

0506Cancer2002091320140820 (BBC7)
20140821 (BBC7)

This week's guests are Tony Cassidy, Helen Whitehead and Jed Mercurio, who talk about cancer.

Tony Cassidy, Helen Whitehead and Jed Mercurio discuss cancer.

Writer and soul singer Tony Cassidy, biochemist Helen Whitehead and television writer Jed Mercurio discuss cancer. From September 2002.

0509Stand Up2002100420140910 (BBC7)
20140911 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris with a series featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

`Stand Up'.

With poet Matthew Harvey, storyteller Joolz Denby and New York comic Lewis Shaffer.

Poet Matthew Harvey, storyteller Joolz Denby and comic Lewis Shaffer on solo performing.

Poet Matthew Harvey, storyteller Joolz Denby and US comic Lewis Shaffer discuss solo performing. With Matthew Parris. From October 2002.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2002.

0510Gambling2002101120140917 (BBC7)
20140918 (BBC7)

Victoria Coren, Henry Peevers and Jude Collins discuss the appeal of Lady Luck.

Victoria Coren, Henry Peevers and Jude Collins discuss the eternal appeal of Lady Luck.

Poker player Victoria Coren, trader Henry Peevers and writer Jude Collins discuss the eternal appeal of Lady Luck with Matthew Parris. From October 2002.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2002.

0601Treachery2003020720140924 (BBC7)
20140925 (BBC7)
20141001 (BBC7)

With Ann Widdecombe, Guy Browning and Stephanie Merritt.

Matthew Parris discusses treachery with Ann Widdecombe, Guy Browning and Stephanie Merritt

Matthew Parris invites Ann Widdecombe MP, Guy Browning and Stephanie Merritt to discuss acts of treachery.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0602Marriage2003021420141002 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris introduces a series featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

2: Marriage.

With Shazia Mirza, Lewis Schaffer and David Matthews.

Comedians Shazia Mirza and Lewis Schaffer join writer David Matthews to discuss matrimony.

Comedians Shazia Mirza and Lewis Schaffer join writer David Matthews to discuss matrimony with Matthew Parris. From February 2003.

0603Rules2003022120141008 (BBC7)
20141009 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris introduces a series featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

3: Rules.

With Pauline Melville, Matthew Syed and Hugh Collins.

Matthew Parris and his guests discuss rules and how to break them.

Rules and how to break them. Matthew Parris joins Pauline Melville, journalist Matthew Syed and writer Hugh Collins. From 2003.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0604The Voice2003022820141015 (BBC7)
20141016 (BBC7)

With Maggie O'Farrell, Niall Griffiths and Lana Citron.

Matthew Parris hosts discussion with Maggie O'Farrell, Niall Griffiths and Lana Citron.

Writers Maggie O'Farrell, Niall Griffiths and Lana Citron talk to Matthew Parris about how they found their voice.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0605Crowds2003030720141022 (BBC7)
20141023 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris introduces a series featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

5: Crowds.

With Peter Finch, Zoe Strachan and Ian Sansom

Peter Finch, Zoe Strachan and Ian Sansom lose themselves in the theme of crowds.

John Cooper Clarke, Kathryn Flett and Owen Shears are the writers with Matthew Parris for a bout of intense interest.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0606Recovery2003031420141029 (BBC7)
20141030 (BBC7)

: This week's Off the Page explores three different experiences of recovery.

Robert McCrum, biographer, novelist and the literary editor of The Observer, writes and talks about his recovery from the devastating stroke he suffered aged only forty-two; Laura Thompson, greyhound enthusiast and biographer of Nancy Mitford, describes how she came to terms with the death of her father; and the poet laureate of the Independent and sometime member of cult 80s band The Cleaners from Venus Martin Newell describes how he recovered from emotional, financial and professional meltdown.

Writers Robert McCrum and Laura Thompson join poet Martin Newell to talk about healing.

Writers Robert McCrum and Laura Thompson join poet Martin Newell and host Matthew Parris to talk about healing.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0607Gossip2003032120141105 (BBC7)
20141106 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris introduces a series featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

With poet Jean Binta Breeze, Guardian diarist Marina Hyde and writer Roy Foster.

Matthew Parris chinwags about trivia with Jean Binta Breeze, Marina Hyde and Roy Foster.

Matthew Parris chinwags about trivia with poet Jean Binta Breeze, regular diarist Marina Hyde and writer Roy Foster. From March 2003.

0608Obsession2003032820141112 (BBC7)
20141113 (BBC7)

This week Matthew and his guests will be wrestling with obsession.

John Cooper Clarke, Kathryn Flett and Owen Shears join Matthew for some intense interest.

John Cooper Clarke, Kathryn Flett and Owen Shears are the writers with Matthew Parris for a bout of intense interest.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0701Superstition2003072520141119 (BBC7)
20141120 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris invites sportswriter George Dobell, journalist Lilian Pizzichini and soul singer Tony Cassidy to confess and discuss some of their more absurd beliefs.

Matthew Parris talks to two journalists and a singer about absurd beliefs.

Matthew Parris talks to journalists George Dobell Lilian Pizzichini and singer Tony Cassidy about absurd beliefs.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0702America2003080120141126 (BBC7)
20141127 (BBC7)

2/10.

America: Matthew Parris invites Toby Young, Emma Richler and playwright Tamsin Oglesby to consider the oddness of America.

/ Matthew Parris invites Toby Young, Emma Richler and playwright Tamsin Oglesby to consider the oddness of America.

Writers Toby Young, Emma Richler and Tamsin Oglesby consider the oddness of America.

Matthew Parris invites writers Toby Young, Emma Richler and Tamsin Oglesby to consider the oddness of the United States of America.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0703Drugs2003080820141203 (BBC7)
20141204 (BBC7)

Martin Booth, Zoe Lewis and Susie Boyt discuss the issues surrounding drugs.

Writers Martin Booth, Zoe Lewis and Susie Boyt ponder the pros and cons of highs and lows.

Matthew Parris joins writers Martin Booth, Zoe Lewis and Susie Boyt to ponder the pros and cons of highs and lows.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0704Wickedness2003081520141210 (BBC7)
20141211 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris invites TV producer Philip Burley, novelist Mimi Thebo and playwright Richard Morton Jack to search their souls and discuss the questions surrounding the evil that men (and women) do.

Writers Philip Burley, Mimi Thebo and Richard Morton Jack on the nature of good and evil.

Matthew Parris talks to writers Philip Burley, Mimi Thebo and Richard Morton Jack about the nature of good and evil. From August 2003.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0705Secrets20030822

Radio 4's showcase for new writing and fresh conversation.

5.

Secrets Novelist Alice Jolly confesses a secret affair, traveller and author Kris Kenway describes a land full of secrets, while writer and reporter Duncan Fallowell discusses the secret of what was under Tina Turner's wig.

With Matthew Parris

0706Nostalgia2003082920141224 (BBC7)
20141225 (BBC7)

Top-scoring cricketer Ed Smith is nostalgic about Cambridge.

His father Jonathan Smith (author of 'The Learning Game') is nostalgic about Wales.

For the historical novelist Sarah Harrison, nostalgia is her granny's green jug, but for Off The Page presenter Matthew Parris, it's the smell of mildewed books.

Cricketer Ed Smith, his father Jonathan Smith and writer Sarah Harrison get all nostalgic.

Cricketer Ed Smith, his father Jonathan Smith and novelist Sarah Harrison get all nostalgic with Matthew Parris.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0707Irritation2003090520141231 (BBC7)
20150101 (BBC7)

The novelist Patrick Neate muses about whether irritation is a peculiarly middle-England, middle-aged, middle-class sort of emotion.

Ros Taylor of the Guardian believes it's a particularly female feeling.

Devon-based journalist Martin Freeman argues that nothing is more irritating than his size-ten feet.

Patrick Neate and journalists Ros Taylor and Martin Freeman on the causes of irritation.

Novelist Patrick Neate, journalists Ros Taylor and Martin Freeman on the causes of irritation. With Matthew Parris.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0708Sensuality2003091220150107 (BBC7)
20150108 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris invites soprano Catherine Bott, Arabic dancer Wendy Buonaventura, and celebrity chef Raymond Blanc to discuss the five kingdoms of the senses: ears, eyes, body, tongue and nose, and to see if they can disentangle sensuality from sex.

Catherine Bott, Wendy Buonaventura and Raymond Blanc discuss the five senses.

First broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in January 2005

Soprano Catherine Bott, dancer Wendy Buonaventura, and chef Raymond Blanc discuss the five kingdoms of the senses.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0709African Childhoods2003091920150114 (BBC7)
20150115 (BBC7)

Africa Matthew Parris grew up in Africa, and his three guests, Peter Godwin, Aminatta Forna and Aidan Hartley, have all published their own memoirs of African childhood.

They discuss whether Europe and Africa seem destined to misunderstand each other.

Are Europe and Africa destined to misunderstand each other?

Are Europe and Africa destined to misunderstand each other? Matthew Parris chats to three authors of African memoirs. From September 2003.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0710 LASTWinning Prizes2003092620150121 (BBC7)
20150122 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris's guests are Martin Isherwood, whose song 'Cry Baby' garnered nul Eurovision points, physicist Len Fisher who won an Ignobel Prize 'for research that could not or should not be repeated'; and journalist Lucy Cavendish, who very nearly won the Magazine of the Year award.

Martin Isherwood, Len Fisher and Lucy Cavendish, who nearly won an award, talk to Matthew.

Musician Martin Isherwood, physicist Len Fisher and journalist Lucy Cavendish discuss the winning of prizes and awards.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2003.

0801Middle Age2004012320150128 (BBC7)
20150129 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris invites novelist Carol Clewlow (A Woman's Guide To Adultery), television writer and novelist Davis Nicholls (Cold Feet, Starter For Ten) and ageing soul singer Tony Cassidy to face up to the fact that they're not as young as they used to be.

Carol Clewlow, David Nicholls and Tony Cassidy face up to not being as young as they were.

Novelist Carol Clewlow, TV writer and novelist David Nicholls and veteran soul singer Tony Cassidy discuss 'middle age'.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2004.

0802Rogues2004013020150204 (BBC7)
20150205 (BBC7)

Jake Arnott, Katie Hickman and Michael Dobbs dissect the cliche about rogues being lovable.

Jake Arnott, Katie Hickman, Michael Dobbs dissect the cliché about rogues being loveable.

Jake Arnott, Katie Hickman and Michael Dobbs dissect the cliché about rogues being 'lovable'. With Mathew Parris.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2004.

0803The Paranormal2004020620150211 (BBC7)
20150212 (BBC7)

Strange goings-on in the studio when Matthew Parris welcomes three writers who span the range from psychic to sceptic.

Performance poet Matt Harvey writes a regular column on weird phenomena and Candida Clark is the author of 'Ghost Music', but her fellow-novelist Tibor Fischer once stayed in a haunted castle and slept like a log.

Matthew Parris invites Matt Harvey, Candida Clark and Tibor Fischer to make their unseen presence felt by talking.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2004.

Matthew Parris invites his guests to make their unseen presence felt by talking.

Matthew Parris invites Matt Harvey, Candida Clark and Tibor Fischer to make their unseen presence felt by talking. From February 2004.

0804Multicultural Britain2004021320150218 (BBC7)
20150219 (BBC7)

4/10.

Multicultural Britain: Matthew Parris features new writing and stimulating discussion.

Is 'multicultural' just a buzz-word? Guests are writers Reshma S Ruia, Archie Markham and Leone Ross.

Matthew Parris welcomes Reshma S Ruia, Archie Markham and Leone Ross to a frank discussion

Matthew Parris welcomes writers Reshma S Ruia, Archie Markham and Leone Ross to a frank discussion. From February 2004.

0805Idealism2004022020150225 (BBC7)
20150226 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris welcomes Peter Flannery, Mimi Khalvati and JEmma Kennedy, three writers who believe that idealism should be valued more highly than it is.

Matthew Parris with writers Peter Flannery, Mimi Khalvati and JEmma Kennedy.

Matthew Parris and writers Peter Flannery, Mimi Khalvati and JEmma Kennedy discuss hope versus cynicism. From February 2004.

0806Risk2004022720150304 (BBC7)
20150305 (BBC7)

Are we becoming so risk-aware that we live dull and frightened lives? Matthew Parris welcomes three writers with different views.

David Tremayne, the biographer of speed-king Donald Campbell, was himself nearly killed riding a rocket-dragster.

Journalist Melissa Kite says the riskiest things she's done are those she most values.

But novelist Geoff Dyer says his neurotic risk-avoidance makes every day a dangerous adventure.

Matthew Parris takes a gamble on David Tremayne, Melissa Kite and Geoff Dyer.

Matthew Parris takes a gamble on writer David Tremayne, journalist Melissa Kite and neurotic novelist Geoff Dyer.

Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2004.

0807The Great British Public2004030520150311 (BBC7)
20150312 (BBC7)

Politicians defer to it, journalists flatter it and market researchers study it in depth, but is the Great British Public really just a stupid, emotionally incontinent bully? Matthew Parris welcomes three writers who worry about the public.

Giles Coren thinks that it is wrong about everything, Terence Blacker believes that it is getting too big for its boots, and Julia Darling has a weird feeling that she may actually be a member of it.

Matthew Parris and his guests discuss how they feel about the public.

Matthew Parris welcomes Giles Coren, Terence Blacker and Julia Darling to discuss how they feel about the public.

In each programme, Matthew Parris introduces a group of writers of fact and fiction: new talent and established names. In the context of a discussion of one of the ideas and pre-occupations of our times, each presents a piece on this week's topic.

The best new writing and the freshest conversation from 2004.

0808Alter Egos2004031220150318 (BBC7)
20150319 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris is joined by his customary three guests, except this week it sounds like there are more.

Instructed to write about his alter ego, John Fortune brings along the John who grew up in Bristol, and the John who performs with John Bird.

Martin Newell morphs himself into an Essex gardener called Ted Jarvis, a character with whom he's obsessed.

And the Pauline Black who's best known as lead singer with The Selector explains why her real name is Belinda, even though she yearned to be those famous black goddesses of the sixties, Angela Davies and Marsha Hunt, rolled into one.

Matthew Parris welcomes three guests. Or is it more? He and his guests explore identity.

Matthew Parris welcomes three guests. Or is it more? John Fortune, Martin Newell and Pauline Black explore identity. From March 2004.

0809Hitch-hiking2004031920150325 (BBC7)
20150326 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris features new writing and stimulating discussion on the subject of hitch-hiking.

With studio guests Dominic Arkwright, Decca Aitkenhead and Benedict Allen

Matthew Parris, Dominic Arkwright, Decca Aitkenhead and Benedict Allen thumb a lift.

Where are all the hitchers? Matthew Parris, Dominic Arkwright, Decca Aitkenhead and Benedict Allen thumb a lift. From March 2004.

0810 LASTObsessive Compulsives2004032620150401 (BBC7)
20150402 (BBC7)

Every office has one, homes are cleaner with one installed.

Obsessive compulsives are all about us, but do we recognise the condition in ourselves? Matthew Parris invites three writers to bare their souls about compulsions they all possess - shopping, cleaning, and travelling four hundred miles to watch a failing football team.

Matthew Parris hosts with Franca Davenport, Stephen Foster and Dominic Holland.

Matthew Parris repeatedly quizzes Franca Davenport, Stephen Foster and Dominic Holland about ceaseless compulsion. From March 2004.

0901England, Their England2004072320150610 (BBC7)
20150611 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris returns for another series of late night discussion and the freshest new writing.

This week's subject is 'England, their England', the title of a popular mid-war book written, appropriately enough, by a Scot.

Joining Matthew in the studio to write about the current state of Englishness are Sukhdev Sandhu, Jude Collins, and James Delingpole

Sukhdev Sandhu, Jude Collins and James Delingpope join Matthew Parris.

Sukhdev Sandhu, Jude Collins and James Delingpope join Matthew Parris for a debate about what makes a nation. From July 2004.

0902Smoking2004073020150408 (BBC7)
20150409 (BBC7)

Amanda Mitchison, Maureen Freely and Lewis Schaffer discuss a burning issue.

Amanda Mitchison, Maureen Freely and Lewis Schaffer join Matthew Parris to discuss smoking

Journalist Amanda Mitchison, novelist Maureen Freely and American comic Lewis Schaffer join Matthew Parris to discuss smoking.

0903Pomp And Circumstance2004080620150415 (BBC7)
20150416 (BBC7)

With Mary Ann Sieghart, Mihir Bose and Tom Mitchelson

Formalised radio ritual with Mary Ann Sieghart, Mihir Bose and Tom Mitchelson.

Matthew Parris performs his formalised radio ritual with Times editor Mary Ann Sieghart, sports writer Mihir Bose and actor Tom Mitchelson. From August 2004.

0904Anger2004081320150513 (BBC7)
20150514 (BBC7)

What are the underlying causes of anger? One thing that all three of Matthew Parris' guests agree on is that frustration and powerlessness contribute directly to anger, be it expressed as road rage in the UK, or in the form of political protest on the streets of Baghdad or the West Bank.

However, that's the only thing his guests agree on.

He's joined by columnist and broadcaster Shyama Perera, Cristina Odone, who's Deputy Editor of the New Statesman, and Rouzbeh Pirouz, founder of Civility, an organisation that promotes greater understanding of the politics of the Middle East.

Their discussion ranges from a close-focus on anger as experienced by children in the family home, to the role of anger in the new reality of geo-politics since the destruction of New York's Twin Towers in September 2001.

Matthew Parris talks about rage with Shyama Perera, Cristina Odone and Rouzbeh Pirouz.

Matthew Parris talks about rage with broadcaster Shyama Perera, journalist Cristina Odone and Rouzbeh Pirouz. From August 2004.

0905Boredom2004082020150429 (BBC7)
20150430 (BBC7)

In this week's edition of Off the Page, Matthew Parris and his guests draw inspiration from an unlikely source, 'boredom'.

With Brian Dooley, Matthew Sharpe and Susan Elderkin.

Matthew Parris and his guests are inspired by boredom.

Matthew Parris and his guests are inspired by boredom. With writers Brian Dooley, Matthew Sharpe and Susan Elderkin. From August 2004.

0906Competitiveness2004082720150506 (BBC7)
20150507 (BBC7)

With Amanda Brookfield, Hugh Rycroft and Hannah McDonald.

Matthew Parris with guests Amanda Brookfield, Hugh Rycroft and Hannah McDonald.

Matthew Parris struggles to cross the finish line ahead of Amanda Brookfield, Hugh Rycroft and Hannah McDonald. From August 2004.

0907Redemption2004090320150422 (BBC7)
20150423 (BBC7)

For some, the term redemption has a thoroughly old testament ring to it.

However Matthew Parris's three guests reveal how vital the idea of taking responsibility for ones mistakes is to them.

Novelist Gillian Slovo relates it to South Africa's truth and reconciliation commission, poet Dannie Abse recalls childhood guilt, while writer Paul Burke just says sorry for everything hes ever done.

Matthew Parris and guests Gillian Slovo, Dannie Abse and Paul Burke discuss atonement.

Matthew Parris knows what he did, and so do Gillian Slovo, Dannie Abse and Paul Burke. They all discuss atonement. From September 2004.

0908The Good Life2004091020150520 (BBC7)
20150521 (BBC7)

What makes for good living, a life of leisure, or one of selfless charitable deeds? Indeed, is the good life the same as a good life? That's the topic hotly debated by Matthew Parris three guests, pianist Simon Townley, broadcaster Anita Robinson, and academic Rogan Taylor.

Not surprisingly, they cant even agree as to what goodness itself is.

Matthew Parris decides between worthy and satisfying. With pianist Simon Townley, broadcaster Anita Robinson and academic Rogan Taylor. From September 2004.

Matthew Parris and guests decide between worthy and satisfying.

0909Malingering2004091720150527 (BBC7)
20150528 (BBC7)

The sickie is a treasured part of working life, and costs british business an estimated £11 billion every year.

Professional malingerer, and writer, Patrick Neate joins Guy Browning (motto: deadlines are for those who wait) and Dr Len Fisher, author of How to Dunk a Doughnut, to write about and discuss malingering.

Matthew Parris is in the chair.

Matthew Parris pulls a sickie with guests Patrick Neate, Guy Browning and Dr Len Fisher.

Matthew Parris pulls a sickie with guests Patrick Neate, Guy Browning and Dr Len Fisher. From September 2004.

0910 LASTLiar, Liar2004092420150603 (BBC7)
20150604 (BBC7)

Are you economical with the truth? Or do you just tell big fat Porkie pies? Ann Leslie of the Daily Mail claims to be an amateur Liar, for a real pro recalls the lies hes told.

Anne Atkins son has aspergers, and therefore cannot tell a lie, while Martin Short recalls the most famous fibber in showbiz, but is he telling the truth?

Our whiter-than-white presenter, Matthew Parris, tries to tow the honest line.

Matthew Parris, Ann Leslie, Martin Short and Anne Atkins discuss the complexities of lying

Economical with the truth? Matthew Parris, Ann Leslie, Martin Short and Anne Atkins discuss the complexities of lying. From September 2004.

1002Flirting2005012820150624 (BBC7)
20150625 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris is joined by Margi Clarke, Peggy Reynolds and Martin Newell to discuss the misunderstandings caused by the body language of love.

Peggy Reynolds, Margi Clarke and Martin Newell discuss the art of flirting.

Fun or risky? Peggy Reynolds, Margi Clarke and Martin Newell join Matthew Parris to discuss the art of flirting. From January 2005.

1003Bringing Up Baby2005020420150701 (BBC7)
20150702 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris and his guests consider the fraught contemporary question of bringing up baby.

With writers Mary Loudon and Katie Baxendale, and comic Lewis Schaffer

Matthew Parris on the impact of babies with Mary Loudon, Katie Baxendale, Lewis Schaffer.

Chairman Matthew Parris discusses the impact of babies with writers Mary Loudon and Katie Baxendale and comic, Lewis Schaffer.

1004The King Is Dead2005021120150708 (BBC7)
20150709 (BBC7)

Misha Glenny, Richard Gott and Daisy Sampson join Matthew Parris.

Serbia, Cuba, and the Tory Party all feature heavily in their thoughts.

The king is dead, long live the king.

Matthew Parris discusses succession with Misha Glenny, Richard Gott and Daisy Sampson.

Chairman Matthew Parris discusses succession with journalists Misha Glenny and Richard Gott and broadcaster Daisy Sampson. From February 2005.

1005Animal Lovers2005021820150715 (BBC7)
20150716 (BBC7)

Guests include Manda Scott, Hugh Thomson and Gerard Baker

Matthew Parris with guests Gerard Baker, Manda Scott and Hugh Thomson.

Matthew Parris, Gerard Baker, Manda Scott and Hugh Thomson discuss our relationship with animals. From February 2005.

1006Too Clever By Half2005022520150722 (BBC7)
20150723 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris is joined by the comic and writer Arabella Weir, the novelist, Louise Welsh and the critic, Toby Young to write and talk about the dangers of being "Too Clever by Half".

Matthew Parris and his guests discuss the dangers of being a smarty-pants.

Matthew Parris, Toby Young, Louise Welsh and Arabella Weir discuss the dangers of being a smarty-pants. From February 2005.

1007Hell Hath No Fury Like A Woman Scorned2005030420150729 (BBC7)
20150730 (BBC7)

Joining Matthew Parris in the studio are a woman who did the wreaking, a man upon whom vengeance was wreaked, and a woman getting married soon.

Matthew Parris, Rachel Royce and Libby Potter discuss the dangers of a woman scorned.

Matthew Parris, Rachel Royce, Harry Thompson and Libby Potter discuss the dangers of a woman scorned. From March 2005.

1008How Long Is A Piece Of String?2005031120150805 (BBC7)
20150806 (BBC7)

Or should we be asking how thick it is? Joining Matthew to describe a world gone mad on measuring are novelist Susannah Jowett, financial journalist Jasmine Birtles and David Boyle, author of The Tyranny of Numbers.

Matthew Parris and his guests discuss the influence and importance of numbers.

Matthew Parris, Susannah Jowitt, Jasmine Birtles and David Boyle discuss the influence and importance of numbers. From March 2005.

1009Lost Opportunities2005031820150812 (BBC7)
20150813 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris presents the series featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

Guests include Patrick Neate, Ros Taylor, and Zinovy Zinik

Matthew Parrisand his guests chew over the one that got away.

Matthew Parris chews over the one that got away with writers Patrick Neate, Ros Taylor and Zinovy Zinik. From March 2005.

1010 LASTSuspicion2005032520150819 (BBC7)
20150820 (BBC7)

Ever feel they're out to get you? Matthew Parris mines his deep suspicions about the world we live in.

As a man who enjoys tunnelling under his own Derbyshire garden, Matthew suspects guests Julian Baggini, Will Pavia and Anthony MacGowan won't exactly share the same paranoias.

Matthew Parris, Julian Baggini, Will Pavia and Anthony McGowan discuss suspicious thoughts

Matthew Parris, Julian Baggini, Will Pavia and Anthony McGowan discuss the impact of suspicious thoughts. From March 2005.

1101All About Me2005072220150826 (BBC7)
20150827 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris returns to celebrate the Cult of Me, the explosion of memoirs, autobiographies and frank interviewees.

Talking frankly all about me are the celebrity reporter, Libby Potter; sports writer Les Scott; and actor Paul Barber, who reads from the memoirs he wrote as therapy.

Matthew Parris and guests talk about the art of biography.

Matthew Parris talks about the art of biography, with Lesley Scott, Libby Potter and Paul Barber. From July 2005.

1102Nowt So Queer As Folk2005072920150909 (BBC7)
20150910 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris considers what is normal, and what is not.

His guests are Amanda Mitchison, once a judge at a transvestite beauty contest; Belfast columnist Jude Collins; and actor Mat Fraser, who is currently at work on Thalidomide, the musical.

Matthew Parris considers what is and what is not normal. With Amanda Mitchison, Jude Collins and actor Mat Fraser. From July 2005.

Matthew Parris considers what is and what is not normal.

1103The Power Of The Voice2005080520150916 (BBC7)
20150917 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris asks singer Pauline Black of The Selector, writer Peggy Reynolds, and Stewart Pearce, master of voice at the Globe, to write about the power of the voice.

Matthew Parris and his guests discuss how your voice can shape your everyday life.

Matthew Parris and his guests Peggy Reynolds, Pauline Black and Stewart Pearce discuss how your voice can shape your everyday life. From August 2005.

1104The Sum Is Greater Than The Parts2005081220150923 (BBC7)
20150924 (BBC7)

Are you obsessed by the small print, or is the bigger picture all you see?

Matthew Parris invites philosopher Julian Baggini, critic Judith Palmer and author David Boyle to write about and debate whether the sum is greater than the parts.

Expect jigsaw puzzles, gardening, and the Sorites Paradox all to take a bow.

Are Matthew Parris, Julian Baggini, Judith Palmer and David Boyle obsessed by small print?

Are Matthew Parris, Julian Baggini, Judith Palmer and David Boyle obsessed by small print or just the bigger picture? From August 2005.

1105A Nudge And A Wink2005081920150930 (BBC7)
20151001 (BBC7)

Is there too much frivolity in our lives, or is having a laugh the only way to survive? Matthew Parris makes a plea for more gravity in public life, in the company of Arabella Weir, Martin Newell and Dave Cohen.

As all three make a living from poking fun at whatever targets they can find, his request is likely to fall on deaf ears.

Matthew Parris pleas for more gravity in public life with Arabella Weir and Martin Newell.

Matthew Parris pleas for more gravity in public life in the company of Arabella Weir, Martin Newell and Dave Cohen. From August 2005.

1106The Road To Hell2005082620151007 (BBC7)
20151008 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris brings together an actor, an author and a performance poet to write and talk about the Road to Hell.

Matthew Parris asks Helen Walsh and Jay Benedict about the sulphurous road to hell.

Matthew Parris asks Helen Walsh, Jay Benedict and poet Attila the Stockbroker about the sulphurous road to hell. From August 2005.

1107The Book By Its Cover2005090220151014 (BBC7)
20151015 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris wonders why we care what we wear.

With Robert Elms, the louche James Delingpole and the body modified Joolz Denby

Matthew Parris wonders why we care about what we wear.

Matthew Parris wonders why we care about what we wear. With Robert Elms, James Delingpole and Joolz Denby. From September 2005.

1108Common As Muck2005090920151021 (BBC7)
20151022 (BBC7)

Commoners Geoff Dyer, Michael Collins and Ian Duhig write and speak about class, brass and manure.

Presented by Matthew Parris

Matthew Parris talks class, brass and manure with Geoff Dyer, Michael Collins, Ian Duhig.

Matthew Parris talks class, brass and manure with commoners Geoff Dyer, Michael Collins and Ian Duhig. From September 2005.

1109Your Inner Child2005091620151028 (BBC7)
20151029 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris' inner child meets Pat Kane (of Hue and Cry), novelist Hilary Mantel (whose inner child is a boy) and Matt Harvey, the poet.

They discuss being young at heart.

Matthew Parris, Pat Kane, Matt Harvey and Hilary Mantel discuss being young at heart.

Matthew Parris, Pat Kane, Matt Harvey and Hilary Mantel discuss the idea of being young at heart. From September 2005.

1110It's Not What You Know2005092320151104 (BBC7)
20151105 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris asks three people who were born into famous cultural dynasties about nepotism, and hears from Alexander Waugh (Son of Bron, grandson of Evelyn) about why fathers should favour their offspring and why egalitarianism is its own tyranny.

From Emma Richler (daughter of Canada's eminent author, Mordechai) how crazy it made her not to follow in her father's footsteps but to try to be something else for a while.

And from Susie Boyt, a Freud.

Do people think they know who they are before they've met them, because they've read about their families? Are there artistic genes they inherit? What if talent were to leapfrog a generation and leave you writing drivel when your family has been writing since the 19th century? How did Susie answer when a journalist asked her if her child, like her father Lucien, was good at painting?

Matthew Parris and guests reflect on the pervasive power of nepotism.

Matthew Parris, Alexander Waugh, Emma Richler and Susie Boyt reflect on the pervasive power of nepotism. From September 2005.

1111 LASTLiving On The Edge2005093020151111 (BBC7)
20151112 (BBC7)

Matthew Parris considers a life lived on the margins: with Marjorie Wallace - at the edge of sanity; Bernie Hare - on the edge of society; and Dermot Healy, on a cliff at the edge of Europe.

Erosion, invisibility, morbidity in the last of this series of Off the Page.

Matthew Parris ponders life lived on the margins, with Marjorie Wallace and Bernie Hare.

Matthew Parris considers a life lived on the margins, with Marjorie Wallace, Bernie Hare and Dermot Healy. From September 2005.

1201Kissing Arse2006012720090402 (BBC7)
20151118 (BBC7)
20151119 (BBC7)

Dominic Arkwright takes a spin in the presenter's chair for the programme with fresh new writing and late night chat.

With Guy Browning, Amanda Mitchison and Wilfred Emmanuel Jones.

New series 1/10. Kissing Arse. Dominic Arkwright takes a turn in the presenter's chair for the programme with fresh new writing and late-night chat. Guy Browning , Amanda Mitchison and Wilfred Emmanuel Jones take on the sycophants and lickspittles of the corporate world in a special edition devoted to "kissing arse". Producer Miles Warde

Dominic Arkwright and guests discuss the brown-nosers of the corporate world.

Dominic Arkwright presents the series featuring new writing and stimulating discussion. Guy Browning, Amanda Mitchison and Wilfred Emmanuel Jones take on the brown-nosers and lickspittles of the corporate world.

1202Am I My Brother's Keeper?2006020320151125 (BBC7)
20151126 (BBC7)

Dominic Arkwright is joined by the authors Mary Loudon and Morag Joss, and playwright and performer Pip Utton, to write and talk about sibling rights and responsibilities.

Dominic Arkwright with guests Mary Loudon, Morag Joss and Pip Utton.

Dominic Arkwright and guests Mary Loudon, Morag Joss and Pip Utton discuss brothers, sisters and sibling rivalry. From February 2006.

1203Crime Sells2006021020151202 (BBC7)
20151203 (BBC7)

Mobsters, fraudsters, villains, thugs and thieves - why are we so obsessed with the dealings of the underworld? Victoria Coren is joined by three writers who have all made a living from 'peddling' crime.

Will Self is the literary agent for a bank robber currently serving time.

Martin Short has written about and filmed the mafia, pornographers and corrupt cops; and Maxim Jakubowski is the owner of the Murder One bookshop.

Victoria Coren discusses the morality of crime writing with Will Self and Martin Short.

Victoria Coren discusses the morality of crime writing with guests Will Self, Martin Short and Maxim Jakubowski. From February 2006.

1204It's Not You, It's Me2006021720151209 (BBC7)
20151210 (BBC7)

The phrase is often used to hide uncomfortable moments, such as leaving a lover.

Victoria Coren encourages a writer, a poet and a psychiatrist to divulge such moments.

Victoria Coren on how we avoid uncomfortable moments.

Victoria Coren on how we avoid uncomfortable moments, with Martin Newell, Dr Cosmo Hallstrom and Susannah Jowett. From February 2006.

1205Money2006022420151216 (BBC7)
20151217 (BBC7)

Victoria Coren hosts discussion about money - with a journalist who's started up a magazine for the filthy rich, an agony aunt who's signed on for the jobseekers' allowance and an actor who's been the voice of a biscuit.

Guests William Cash, Anna Raeburn and Jay Benedict reveal how much is enough, and what they will do to get it.

Victoria Coren discusses filthy lucre with the aptly named William Cash.

Victoria Coren discusses filthy lucre with the aptly named William Cash, Anna Raeburn and actor Jay Benedict. From February 2006.

1207Ignorance Is Bliss20060310

Is it ever better not to know? With Virginia Ironside, Ben Goldacre and Sarah Winkless.

1208All By Myself2006031720160106 (BBC7)
20160107 (BBC7)

Dominic and his guests consider the joys of the solitary life.

Dominic Arkwright asks guests to consider the joys of the solitary life.

Dominic Arkwright asks Lucy Mangan, Lance Workman and David Blandy to consider the joys of the solitary life. From March 2006.

1209Mustn't Grumble2006032420160113 (BBC7)
20160114 (BBC7)

Dominic Arkwright invites his guests to write and talk about the art of complaining.

With the former rail regulator Tom Winsor and Neil Herron from the People's No Campaign.

Dominic Arkwright discusses the art of complaining with Tom Winsor and Neil Herron.

Dominic Arkwright discusses the art of complaining with Tom Winsor, Neil Herron and comic Mark Little. From March 2006.

1210Something Sensational2006033120160120 (BBC7)
20160121 (BBC7)

Dominic Arkwright invites his guests to discuss the dos and don'ts of diary writing.

Dominic Arkwright discusses the pitfalls of writing a diary with Ion Trewin, Graham Dietz.

Dominic Arkwright discusses the pitfalls of writing a diary with Ion Trewin, Graham Dietz and Kirsty Crawford. From March 2006.

1301My Brilliant Baby2006071620160127 (BBC7)
20160128 (BBC7)

Are you a hothouse parent? Or do you believe in benign neglect? Tom Hodgkinson, editor of Idler magazine and author of a recent guide to lazy parenting, tackles the modern parents' obsession with Gymboree, Tumbletots and Baby Einstein tapes.

Amanda Mitchison and Caroline Oulton square up in general opposition, while presenter Dominic Arkwright owns up to being a competitive dad.

Dominic Arkwright discusses the joys of parenting with Amanda Mitchison, Tom Hodgkinson.

4 Extra Debut. Dominic Arkwright discusses the joys of parenting with Amanda Mitchison, Tom Hodgkinson and Caroline Oulton. From July 2006.

1302Blonde Moments2006072320160203 (BBC7)
20160204 (BBC7)

Dolly Parton once said that dumb blonde jokes didn't offend her because she was neither blonde nor dumb.

Should we take her at her word?

Toby Young, Pauline Black and Libby Potter get to the bottom of our varying obsessions with the flaxen-haired - whether as sex symbols, cunning manipulators, or simply dizzy blondes.

Dominic Arkwright presents.

Dominic Arkwright asks how blonde hair evolved.

Dominic Arkwright asks how blonde hair evolved with Toby Young, Pauline Black and Libby Potter. From July 2006.

1303Schadenfreude2006073020160210 (BBC7)
20160211 (BBC7)

Envy does have one sweet consequence - schadenfreude, the joy of seeing your rivals fail.

Joining presenter Dominic Arkwright are Anna Raeburn, who's been listening to other people's misfortunes all her life; economist Andrew Oswald, who has conducted experiments that prove schadenfreude really exists; and stand up comedian Simon Evans who claims 'sex and drugs and schadenfreude, that's all my body needs'.

Dominic Arkwright discusses the joy of seeing your rivals fail.

Dominic Arkwright discusses the joy of seeing your rivals fail with Anna Raeburn, Andrew Oswald and Simon Evans. From July 2006.

1304Bitching2006080620160217 (BBC7)
20160218 (BBC7)

While complaining might be a national pastime, what elevates bitching about other people over mere grouching, whingeing and having a beef? Kathy Lette, Kate Figes and Tom Mitchelson join Dominic Arkwright to revel in a deep pool of dissatisfaction and resentment, discussing one of life's great pleasures.

Kathy Lette, Kate Figes and Tom Mitchelson join Dominic Arkwright to discuss the motives for bitching. From August 2006.

Kathy Lette, Kate Figes and Tom Mitchelson join Dominic Arkwright.

1305The Generation Game2006081320160224 (BBC7)
20160225 (BBC7)

With young adults enjoying a prolonged post-adolescence, and the Baby Boomer generation simply refusing to get old, what exactly has happened to the generation gap? Dominic Arkwright finds out with the help of self-confessed kidult Lucy Mangan, 'Grumpy Old Woman' Dillie Keane, and teacher Francis Gilbert.

With Dominic Arkwright, Lucy Mangan, Dillie Kean and Francis Gilbert.

Dominic Arkwright, Lucy Mangan, Dillie Kean and Francis Gilbert discuss adults enjoying prolonged post-adolescence. From August 2006.

1306Stand By Your Man2006082020160302 (BBC7)
20160303 (BBC7)

Loyalty and fidelity are put under the spotlight by Dominic Arkwright, with the help of Christine Hamilton who really did stand by her man, Neil.

Psychologist Linda Blair speculates on the evolutionary advantages of fidelity while novelist Kirsty Crawford wonders what might have happened if her parents had stayed together.

Christine Hamilton, Linda Blair and Kirsty Crawford discuss loyalty in marriage.

Christine Hamilton, Linda Blair and Kirsty Crawford join Dominic Arkwright to discuss loyalty in marriage. From August 2006.

1307 LASTPutting Your Foot In It2006082720160309 (BBC7)
20160310 (BBC7)

Dominic Arkwright confesses to some of the occasions when he has put his foot in it, in the company of fellow penitents Melissa Kite, Dominic Holland and Annie Nightingale

7/7. Dominic Arkwright confesses to some of the occasions when he has put his foot in it, in the company of fellow penitents Melissa Kite , Dominic Holland and Annie Nightingale. Producer Peter Everett

Contributors

Unknown: Dominic Arkwright

Unknown: Melissa Kite

Unknown: Dominic Holland

Unknown: Annie Nightingale.

Producer: Peter Everett

Dominic Arkwright with guests Melissa Kite, Dominic Holland and Annie Nightingale.

Dominic Arkwright discusses putting your foot in it, with Melissa Kite, Dominic Holland and Annie Nightingale. From August 2006.

1401The Snip2006111920160316 (BBC7)
20160317 (BBC7)

Guests Toby Young, Anna Raeburn and Rory Clements discuss the pros and cons of vasectomy.

Dominic Arkwright discusses vasectomy with Toby Young, Rory Clements and Anna Raeburn.

4 Extra Debut. Dominic Arkwright discusses the pros and cons of vasectomy with Toby Young, Rory Clements and Anna Raeburn. From November 2006.

1402Telephones2006112620160323 (BBC7)
20160324 (BBC7)

Ben Goldacre tells a sinister tale about a mobile-phone stalking.

Dominic Arkwright, Ben Goldacre, Sophie Borland and Joe Queenan discuss the telephone.

4 Extra Debut. Dominic Arkwright, Ben Goldacre, Sophie Borland and Joe Queenan discuss the cultural impact of the telephone. From November 2006.

1403Got A Secret To Tell?20061203

Reporter Fran Abrams, PopBitch editor Camilla Wright and stand-up Simon Evans debate if journalists are just tell-tales and sneaks.

1404Grudges2006121020160406 (BBC7)
20160407 (BBC7)

The adult, mature thing is to forgive and forget.

So why is there a peculiar satisfaction to be held in holding a grudge, and why do so many politicians seem to nurture them?

Jude Collins, Laura Blumenfeld and Marcel Berlins, all expert grudge-holders, explore why truth and reconciliation sometimes seem inadequate.

With Dominic Arkwright, Jude Collins, Laura Blumenfeld and Marcel Berlins.

The adult, mature thing is to forgive and forget. So why is there a peculiar satisfaction to be held in holding a grudge, and why do so many politicians seem to nurture them?

1405The Power Of Positive Thinking2006121720160413 (BBC7)
20160414 (BBC7)

Does looking on the bright side bring you good luck? Is 'Seize the Day' the proper motto for a satisfying life? Or should we accept our limitations and embrace negativity?

Psychologist Richard Wiseman, philosopher Julian Baggini and journalist Lucy Cavendish explore whether the glass is half full or half empty.

Dominic Arkwright chairs the discussion.

Does looking on the bright side bring you good luck?

The Power of Positive Thinking

Psychologist Richard Wiseman, philosopher Julian Baggini and journalist Lucy Cavendish explore whether the glass is half full or half empty. Dominic Arkwright chairs the discussion.

1406Lying To Children20061224

It's that night of the year when parents tell a certain tall tale to small kids.

But is it ever acceptable to lie to children? Philosopher Stephen Law, writer Libby Brookes and humorist Lewis Schaffer chew over the thorny ethical dilemma.

1501Zeitgeist2007071820070722
20160420 (BBC7)
20160421 (BBC7)

Joe Queenan, Pauline Black and Toby Young discuss one of the few German words to find a secure place in the English language.

Though adored by fashion writers and political columnists alike, Queenan says: 'If you used words like zeitgeist where I grew up, they'd break your legs'.

Dominic Arkwright presents.

Dominic Arkwright chairs a discussion beteween Joe Queenan, Pauline Black and Toby Young.

1502Keeping Up Appearances2007072520070729
20160504 (BBC7)
20160505 (BBC7)

With Attila the Stockbroker, Susannah Jowitt and James Delingpole

Dominic Arkwright chairs the lively discussion series.

2/7. Keeping Up Appearances

1503I'm A Lady2007080120070805

With Fiona Maccarthy, Shazia Mirza and Grayson Perry

1504Lunch Is For Wimps2007080820070812
20160511 (BBC7)
20160512 (BBC7)

With Giles Coren, Martin Rowson and Lucy Kellaway.

Dominic Arkwright discusses whether we should enjoy a good lunch.

4 Extra Debut. Dominic Arkwright discusses whether we should enjoy a good lunch, with Giles Coren, Lucy Kellaway and Martin Rowson. From August 2007.

1505Act Your Age2007081520070819
20160518 (BBC7)
20160519 (BBC7)

With Katherine Whitehorn, Martin Newell and Lucy Mangan.

Dominic Arkwright chairs the lively discussion series.

Dominic Arkwright wonders if we are refusing to grow up.

5/7. Act Your Age

1506Neither A Borrower Nor A Lender Be2007082220070826
20160525 (BBC7)
20160526 (BBC7)

With William Leith, Rosie Millard and Terence Blacker.

Dominic Arkwright chairs the lively discussion series.

6/7. Neither a Borrower Nor a Lender Be

1507 LASTKnow Your Place2007082920070902

With Peregrine Worsthorne, Joolz Denby and Francis Gilbert.

1601Failure2007120520071209
20160608 (BBC7)
20160609 (BBC7)

Musician John Otway, journalist Amanda Platell and sports writer Jim White talk about an uncomfortable subject.

Dominic Arkwright chairs the lively discussion series.

Dominic Arkwright and his guests talk about an uncomfortable subject.

1/6. Failure

1602A Little Of What You Fancy Does You Good2007121220071216
20160615 (BBC7)
20160616 (BBC7)

Journalist Nick Cohen, green campaigner Sian Berry and broadcaster Charlie Lee-Potter talk about the so-called New Puritans, intent on clamping down on pleasure.

Dominic Arkwright, Nick Cohen, Sian Berry and Charlie Lee-Potter discuss indulgence.

4 Extra Debut. Dominic Arkwright, Nick Cohen, Sian Berry and Charlie Lee-Potter discuss whether indulgence is allowed anymore. From December 2007.

1603Anything But Shy2007121920071223
20160622 (BBC7)
20160623 (BBC7)

Why has shyness, once considered to be a virtue, become increasingly stigmatised.

With Susie Scott, who has written a sociology of the condition, and writers Carl Honore and Olivia Stewart-Liberty.

The panel discuss why shyness is now a social stigma.

4 Extra Debut. Dominic Arkwright, Susie Scott, Carl Honoré and Olivia Stewart-Liberty discuss why shyness is now a social stigma. From December 2007.

1604When Will You Ever Learn2007122620071230
20160629 (BBC7)
20160630 (BBC7)

Dominic discusses our attitudes to errors slight and serious with historian Dominic Sandbrook, performer Dillie Keane and writer Isabel Losada.

With historian Dominic Sandbrook, performer Dillie Keane and writer Isabel Losada.

Dominic Arkwright chairs the lively discussion series.

4/6. When Will You Ever Learn

1605Fatherhood2008010220080106
20160706 (BBC7)
20160707 (BBC7)

BBC World Affairs Editor John Simpson became a father for the third time at the age of 61.

He joins writer Will Cohu, a self-confessed middle-class would-be super dad, and charity worker Shaun Bailey, determined to defy the negative stereotype of a black father, to discuss the challenges of modern fatherhood.

Dominic Arkwright chairs the lively discussion series.

5/6. Fatherhood

BBC World Affairs Editor John Simpson became a father for the third time at the age of 61. He joins writer Will Cohu, a self-confessed middle-class would-be super dad, and charity worker Shaun Bailey, determined to defy the negative stereotype of a black father, to discuss the challenges of modern fatherhood.

Dominic Arkwright, John Simpson, Will Cohu and Shaun Bailey discuss the role of fatherhood

1606 LAST* Now Wash Your Hands2008010920080113

Is the current obsession with personal hygiene a good thing or are we turning ourselves into feeble creatures with no defences against the real world? Nicky Taylor gave up washing altogether for six weeks as part of a social experiment.

Val Curtis is an expert on disgust and its place in the evolution of human behaviour and hygiene.

Comedian Phil Hammond is a GP with scathingly frank views on the nation's health.

16SPECIALLuvvies20080529

Dominic Arkwright chairs a special edition of the programme from the Hay-on-Wye Festival.

Up for discussion is the word 'Luvvies', originally a theatrical term but nowadays applied to a variety of groups in politics and ther media.

1701Nanny Wouldn't Like It2008070220090525
20160720 (BBC7)
20160721 (BBC7)

Dominic Arkwright presents a discussion on nannies, with columnist Guy Browning; author of The Victorian Governess, Kathryn Hughes; and Anna Raeburn.

Browning considers the nanny as the queen of arrested development, while Hughes volunteers a long list of men who have fallen for the nanny's charms.

Dominic Arkwright presents a discussion on nannies.

Browning considers the nanny the queen of arrested development, while Hughes volunteers a long list of men who have fallen for the nanny's charms.

Guy Browning, Kathryn Hughes and Anna Raeburn discuss the changing role of the nanny.

Dominic Arkwright presents a discussion on nannies, with columnist Guy Browning; author of The Victorian Governess, Kathryn Hughes; and Anna Raeburn. Browning considers the nanny as the queen of arrested development, while Hughes volunteers a long list of men who have fallen for the nanny's charms.

1702Groupthink2008070920160727 (BBC7)
20160728 (BBC7)

Dominic Arkwright is joined for a discussion on the concept of groupthink, a condition that afflicts many governments and corporations, by author of Suckers Rose Shapiro, Irish broadcaster Malachi O'Doherty and Tobias Jones

Tobias Jones, Rose Shapiro and Malachi O'Doherty on the consequences of thinking alike.

1703Boasting2008071620160803 (BBC7)
20160804 (BBC7)

He is joined by Toby Young, author of How to Lose Friends and Alienate People, and Camilla Wright, aka Popbitch, to consider whether it is possible to be successful in the modern era without a great deal of self-promotion.

With Dominic Arkwright, Toby Young, Camilla Wright and Tina Lamb.

Dominic Arkwright chairs the lively discussion series.

1704Fifty Ways To Leave Your Lover2008072320090601
20160810 (BBC7)
20160811 (BBC7)

Studio guests are Catherine Townsend, author of the Sleeping Around column in the Independent, the Telegraph's music critic Neil McCormick and Australian novelist Kathy Lette, author of How to Kill Your Husband and Other Handy Household Hints.

They discuss all aspects of relationship heartache and liberation.

Dominic Arkwright chairs the lively discussion series.

Catherine Townsend, Neil McCormick and Kathy Lette talk about heartache and liberation.

Studio guests are Catherine Townsend, author of the Sleeping Around column in the Independent, the Telegraph's music critic Neil McCormick and Australian novelist Kathy Lette, author of How to Kill Your Husband and Other Handy Household Hints. They discuss all aspects of relationship heartache and liberation.

1705Winning Ugly2008073020160817 (BBC7)
20160818 (BBC7)

Dominic is joined by prospective MP Wilfred Emmanuel Jones, writer Susannah Jowitt and former rugby international BrIan Moore, who played on the losing side in the World Cup Final in 1991 and remains haunted by the event.

Dominic Arkwright with Wilfred Emmanuel Jones, Susannah Jowitt and Brian Moore.

Dominic Arkwright chairs the lively discussion series.

He is joined by prospective MP Wilfred Emmanuel Jones, writer Susannah Jowitt and former rugby international Brian Moore, who played on the losing side in the World Cup Final in 1991 and remains haunted by the event.

1706Making Your Mind Up2008080620160831 (BBC7)
20160901 (BBC7)

How and why do we make decisions? Dominic is joined by a neuroscientist, a life coach and a numbers expert.

Dominic Arkwright and guests discuss our decision-making process.

4 Extra Debut. Dominic Arkwright, Dr David Lewis, Christine Webber and Michael Blastland discuss our decision-making process. From June 2008.

1707 LASTCon-fusion * *20080813

Is the real thing always the best, or could it be true that all we need is a big melting pot? Dominic talks to lovers and haters of the fashion for fusion, including record producer Joe Boyd, Telegraph cookery writer Xanthe Clay and Guardian writer Aditya Chakrabortty.

1801Organisation2009021920090223
20160907 (BBC7)
20160908 (BBC7)

Dominic Arkwright chairs a discussion on the word 'organisation' with former director general of the British Council Sir David Green, punk poet Attila the Stockbroker and writer Jay Griffiths.

Dominic Arkwright chairs a discussion on the word 'organisation' with writer Jay Griffiths.

New series 1/6. The former director general of the British Council David Green, poet Attilla the Stockbroker, and writer

Jay Griff iths join presenter Dominic Arkwright to discuss the word "organisation". Producer Miles Warde

Contributors

Unknown: Jay Griff

Presenter: Dominic Arkwright

Producer: Miles Warde

1802Meeting A Star2009022620090302
20160914 (BBC7)
20160915 (BBC7)

Dominic Arkwright chairs a discussion on fame in all its forms.

Guests James Delingpole, Agnes Poirier and Michael Simkins reveal the agony and ecstasy of meeting a star.

Dominic Arkwright chairs a discussion on stardom and our reaction to fame.

4 Extra Debut. Dominic Arkwright, James Delingpole, Agnes Poirier and Michael Simkins discuss stardom and our reaction to fame. From February 2009.

180320090305

Dominic Arkwright chairs a discussion on the theme of ambition, with guests Terence Blacker, Tina Lamb and Shaun Bailey.

Dominic Arkwright chairs a discussion on the theme of ambition.

18042009031220090316

Dominic Arkwright chairs a discussion on the theme of feeling like an impostor.

Dominic Arkwright chairs a discussion on the theme of feeling like an impostor, with guests including philosopher Julian Baggini

18052009031920090323

Dominic Arkwright discusses bad taste and guilty pleasures with Bidisha, Toby Young and Sarfraz Manzoor.

Dominic Arkwright and guests discuss bad taste and guilty pleasures.

18062009032620090330

Dominic Arkwright discusses modern family life and how it matches up to the ideal with John O'farrell, Kathryn Flett and Andi Oliver.

Dominic Arkwright discusses modern family life and how it matches up to the ideal.

1807 LASTKissing Arse *2009040220090406

Dominic Arkwright presents the series featuring new writing and stimulating discussion.

Guy Browning, Amanda Mitchison and Wilfred Emmanuel Jones take on the brown-nosers and lickspittles of the corporate world.

Dominic Arkwright and guests discuss the lickspittles of the corporate world.

1901Welcome To The Real World *2009060420090608

Dominic Arkwright is joined by clinical psychologist Oliver James, author of The Selfish Capitalist and Britain on the Couch; French journalist Agnes Poirier; and Annie Caulfield, creator of the Radio 4 series Reasons to be Cheerful, to discuss why people avoid confronting reality, and what happens when they do.

1902Stripping Off * *2009061120090615

Dominic Arkwright is joined by life model Zoe Simon and writers Catherine Blyth and Phil Hilton to discuss the naked body.

Is it art or obscenity? Self-expression or perversion? Titilation or a turn-off?

1903Trivia2009061820090622

What turns a fact into knowledge, and did you know that Pete Conrad was the first man to dance on the moon?

Dominic Arkwright debates elitism in education with Kathryn Hughes, Francis Gilbert and Mark Mason, author or The Importance of Being Trivial.

Dominic Arkwright debates elitism in education.

1904Vegas *2009062520090629

Michael Simkins, American satirist Joe Queenan and Karen Marchbank, author of A Brit's Guide to Vegas, discuss Las Vegas.

Michael Simkins, US satirist Joe Queenan and author Karen Marchbank discuss Las Vegas.

1905Falling On Your Sword *2009070220090706

Has something happened to the ideas of honour, dignity, duty and virtue? Are people less willing to fall on their swords than they used to do? Is it admirable, anyway, to admit defeat?

Political journalist Anthony Howard, author and broadcaster Anne Atkins and journalist Toby Young join Dominic Arkwright to explore the subject through their writing.

Dominic Arkwright and guests explore the subject of the dignity in admitting defeat.

1906You're Fired! * *2009070920090713

Whether it is dressed up as 'downsizing', 'delayering', 'realigning the business' or simply having to 'let people go', firing or being fired is still a painful process.

Broadcaster Anna Raeburn, writer Jeremy Clarke and psychologist Linda Blair join Dominic Arkwright to discuss the consequences of being sacked.

1907 LASTTurn That Down *20090716

Musician Andrea Oliver and comedian Simon Evans join Dominic Arkwright to talk about noise and how loud or quiet we all ought to be.

Father Tom Cullinan, a monk who has lived for many years in complete silence, breaks it to talk about the reality of the solitary life.

2001Leaving The Comfort Zone2009110520100125

Is leaving your comfort zone a form of masochism, or the only way to develop in life? Dominic Arkwright is joined by comedian Rhona Cameron, mountaineer Andy Cave and journalist Agnes Poirier to write about and discuss comfort and pain.

Dominic Arkwright and guests question the merit of leaving one's comfort zone.

2002I'm H.a.p.p.y.2009111220100201

From absolute euphoria to a state of contentment, positive psychologist Miriam Akhtar, Dr Phil Hammond and writer Lucy Mangan describe what makes them H.A.P.P.Y.

Miriam Akhtar, Dr Phil Hammond and Lucy Mangan describe what makes them H.A.P.P.Y.

2003Porky Pies2009111920100208

According to a recent survey we live in a world full of lies - concluding that most people tell at least two important lies a day, a third of conversations involve some sort of deception and 60 per cent of the population have cheated on their partners at least once.

To debate this and seek out the truth about lies are Professor Richard Wiseman, who has spent a lifetime trying to discover the clues that give away deception, writer Ian Leslie, who described the search for the perfect lie detector, and columnist Michele Hanson, whose mother was only ever able to tell the truth.

Richard Wiseman, Ian Leslie and Michele Hanson seek out the truth about lies.

2004Last Orders2009112620100406

With pubs all over Britain closing at a rate of 52 per week, the role of the public house is called in to question by three writers who have spent many hours propping up the bar.

Ian Marchant went on a nationwide pub crawl and wrote a book about his adventures, Simon Fanshawe remembers winding up the locals in 1970s Brighton, and Melissa Cole, who is also a professional beer taster, deconstructs one of the key phrases in drinking culture: 'fancy a pint?' Presented by Dominic Arkwright.

With increasing numbers of British pubs closing, Dominic Arkwright considers their demise.

2005Everyone's A Critic2009120320100215

Are you worried about the future of criticism? You should be.

When newspaper editors are forced to make cutbacks, it is critics who are the first in the firing line.

But do we really need critics and criticism? Critic and journalist Toby Young is joined by blogger Lynne Hatwell and occupational psychologist Clive Fletcher to write about and discuss criticism and the critics.

Dominic Arkwright presents.

Dominic Arkwright and guests discuss criticism and the critics.

But do we really need critics and criticism? Critic and journalist Toby Young is joined by blogger Lynne Hartwell and occupational psychologist Clive Fletcher to write about and discuss criticism and the critics.

2006Me Time2009121020100222

Having it all is no longer enough; if you haven't factored some 'me time' into your diary you're missing out.

Dominic Arkwright asks journalist Anna Raeburn, clinical psychologist Oliver James and writer Phoebe Gibson to explain how it works.

Dominic Arkwright asks his guests to explain how 'me time' works.

2007 LASTHow's My Driving? *2009121720100301

Having a driving licence used to be proof you'd grown up and could move about on your own; now it is almost a guilty pleasure.

Dominic Arkwright borrowed a car to get to the studio to meet entrepreneur Alison Larkman (who walked), broadcaster Chris Serle (on his motor scooter) and actor Patrick Field (bike, train and bike) to consider the point of driving in the 21st century.

Dominic Arkwright considers the point of driving in the 21st century.

2101Shoulda Put A Ring On It2010060320100607

In the first programme of the new series Bidisha, Stella Duffy and Harry Benson each arrive in studio with 400 words entitled Shoulda Put A Ring On It." The title comes from a Beyonce single, and provokes each of our guests in a different way.

"Marriage, I am not tempted, writes Bidisha, "it is like all other things I am not tempted by, such as golf, crochet and pole jumping."

Bidisha is the author of three novels, and first signed a publishing deal aged 16.

Harry Benson runs marriage courses for the Bristol Community Family Trust, and is author of Let's Stick Together.

Playwright and novelist Stella Duffy's book "Theodora: Actress, Empress, Whore is published later this summer.".".

2102Entitlement2010061020100614

When did what we desire become what we feel we deserve ? In an age when foreign holidays have become routine and over 25,000 public sector workers earn £100,000 a year and more, we tackle this mood of relentless entitlement with Heather Brooke, whose tireless use of the Freedom of Information act helped to break the MPs expenses scandal; stand up Simon Evans, whose routine includes a description of his accent as exotic 'and that's because it is educated'; and Naomi Alderman whose first novel Disobedience won the Orange Award for Young Writers and who feels our sense of entitlement should be replaced by a purer feeling of gratitude.

The presenter is Dominic Arkwright and the producer is Miles Warde

2103Poetry Schmoetry2010061720100621

Provocative and thoughtful new writing and discussion, presented by Dominic Arkwright.

The title for this week's programme is 'Poetry Schmoetry.' The guests are the former Poet Laureate, Andrew Motion, the writer Guy Browning and performance poet, Rachel Pantechnicon.

Andrew talks about the elemental power of poetry; 'Poetry is for the most humane, as well as the most humanising aspect of the self.' Guy describes poetry as a 'tattered umbrella between you and the sun', and Rachel tells of her doomed attempt to retrace the wanderings of the Ancient Mariner.

Andrew also indulges us with a reading from a contender for the 'worst poem ever written' award.

Dominic Arkwright discusses poetry with Andrew Motion, Guy Browning and Rachel Pantechnicon.

2104Le Tour De France2010062420100628

is the world's biggest annual sports event, bathed in history and controversy.

It began as a publicity stunt organised by a struggling French newspaper, and now millions line the route every year.

Academics claim the race taught the French what their country actually looked like.

Contributors to the programme include Johnny Green, former road manager of The Clash and cycling nut, who sees the participants as rock and roll gods; Agnes Poirier who remembers being dragged to watch the race every year and wonders if the French will ever win again; and Michael Simkins, author of Detour de France, a journey in search of sophistication.

The presenter is Dominic Arkwright, the producer Miles Warde.

Dominic Arkwright presents new writing on cycling and debate on Le Tour de France.

2105Lost20100701

Provocative and thoughtful new writing and discussion, presented by Dominic Arkwright.

British backpacker, Jamie Neale, was given up for dead when he was lost for two weeks in the Australian bush last year.

He joins Louise Doughty and Hugh Thomson as all three write about and share their experiences of being Lost.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.

Dominic Arkwright presents new writing and discussion on the subject of being lost.

2106Blinded By Science20100708

Provocative and thoughtful new writing and discussion, presented by Dominic Arkwright.

This week's subject is Blinded By Science.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.

2107 LASTWorking Mums2010071520100719

Provocative and thoughtful new writing and discussion, presented by Dominic Arkwright.

This week Arabella Weir, Deborah Orr and Oliver James join Dominic in the studio to write about and debate their experiences of Working Mums.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.

2201Living Cheap2010110420101108

"My name is David Collins.

I'm 69 years old and I live in an almshouse."

Everyone tells us we are living in tough times, so three guests explain what that means for them.

David Collins is an actor who has found a medieval sounding solution - an almshouse - to the big squeeze.

Laurie Penny is a 23 year-old recent graduate who writes for free on her blog Penny Red, and until recently was living in a house she described as a scene from 'Withnail and I.' And Pauline Black, the lead singer of the Selector, resists the charge that it was her baby boomer generation that has spent all the money and messed up the economy for everyone else.

Fresh, provocative writing and fiery debate.

The presenter is Dominic Arkwright, the producer Miles Warde.

Everyone tell us we are living in tough times.

Can we re-learn how to live on the cheap?

2202On The Road2010111120101115

"The facts are that four out of five male children start life predisposed in favour of adventure," wrote Peter Fleming in 1933.

"They do it because they want to.

It suits them.

It is their cup of tea."

In a travel themed edition of Off The Page, Dominic Arkwright asks domestic obsessive Lucy Mangan and Johnny Green, the former road manager of the Clash, if this is really the case.

Writer Justin Marozzi weighs in with a compelling account of a mercury drinker he met in Uzbekistan, while debate centres on whether the nomadic urge is innate.

"When I first went out On The Road with punk rock terrors the Clash," write Johnny Green, "it was madly exciting, beyond my considerable wildest dreams." To which Lucy Mangan replies, who was feeding the cat ?

An explorer, a domestic obsessive and a former road manager of the Clash debate The Road.

2203Luck2010111820101122

Are some people just born lucky, or can we control our fate ? Professor Richard Wiseman claims to have begun scientifically to investigate the concept of luck.

In Off The Page he writes about his interviews with over a thousand so-called lucky and unlucky people, and reveals why resilience and not the supernatural is what affects us all.

Playwright Annie Caulfield describes a brush with voodoo in west Africa; while sports writer Matthew Syed explains why his own sporting success was due in part to growing up in a lucky Reading postcode.

Dominic Akwright presents, and the producer is Miles Warde.

Are some people just born lucky, or can we control our fate?

2204Favourite Child2010112520101129

Who was it in your family, and do you have one amongst your own children? It's the great taboo.

Dominic Arkwright is joined by Rebecca Abrams, who bravely admits that she found it hard to love her first child after her second child was born.

David Akinsanya grew up in care, aware that he was nobody's favourite child.

And Bidisha has always known she is the most favoured.

Why is it that even as adults it matters so much? New writing and honest, revealing talk in Off The Page.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Who was it in your family, and do you have one amongst your own children?

2205My Own Private Utopia2010120220101206

How, and where, and with whom, do you want to lead your life ? Most of us don't ask ourselves this very often, preferring instead to slide along, taking what may be acceptable and conventional as enough.

But what if you do pursue an answer, as one of our guests, Tobias Jones, is trying to do, in a ten acre wood ?

The full title of Thomas More's work Utopia included the words, "A truly golden little book, no less beneficial than entertaining, of a republic's best state...." But has Utopia ever been achieved ? Rob Penn and Amanda Mitchison think definitely not.

The problem is the presence of other people, and so a private Utopia is the best that can ever be achieved.

Rob Penn, presenter of a recent tv documentary about building the perfect bike, outlines very clearly what it means to him.

But Tobias Jones, author of the Dark Heart of Italy and Utopian Dreams, argues very clearly that the woodland life he is now establishing with his family and guests should not be so easily dismissed.

As Kurt Vonnegut said, "Human beings will be happier not when they cure cancer or get to Mars...

but when they find ways to inhabit primitive communities again."

Dominic Arkwright presents.

The producer is Miles Warde.

Fresh writing and debate on My Own Private Utopia.

2206Never Trust A Writer2010120920101213

- or you'll end up in their book, and you might not like what you read.

Is everything fair game in the artistic process? Three writers who have all either dished on their loved ones or been dished on - Antonia Quirke, Terence Blacker and Bill Coles, battle it out, refereed by presenter Dominic Arkwright.

New writing and heated debate in Off the Page.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

Never Trust a Writer - they'll use even their nearest and dearest for material.

2207 LASTI Don't Know2010121620101220

"I don't know" - three little words so hard to say nowadays.

Doubt and uncertainty are out, confident assertions are in.

Opinions, even received ones, are the order of the day.

The temptation is always to bluff our way with some kind of response, however little we know about the subject in hand.

Phil Hammond is a doctor and Kathy Sykes is a science professor.

John Harris is a journalist whose job is to express opinions.

Are they able simply to admit: "I don't know"? Dominic Arkwright presides over new writing and straight-to-the-point discussion.

Producer Beth O'Dea.

'I don't know' - three words very hard to say nowadays.

But why is certainty so prized?

2301Foreign2011060220110606

When did you first notice that not everyone was like you ? For American satirist Joe Queenan, growing up in an Irish American neighbourhood of Philadelphia, it was the moment he walked into an Italian cheese shop.

Poet Elvis MacGonagall, sole resident of the Graceland caravan park outside Dundee, dodges the question by writing a brilliant poem that rhymes foreign with sporran.

And Amanda Mitchison recounts an episode in a Cairo market where she was continually shortchanged in her efforts to buy chicken breast.

In short she says, to be foreign is always to be the fool, unsure how to dress, to speak, and to buy a decent piece of chicken.

New writing and discussion on the subject of Foreign, what it means and why it matters, chaired by Dominic Arkwright.

The programme is produced by Miles Warde.

Where does foreign begin and end?

2302Terrible Food2011060920110613

Road kill, fried chicken and string cheese.

Dominic Arkwright discusses Terrible Food.

What's the worst thing that could be served to you for lunch? Fox lasagne? Tripe? Raw seal blubber? Dominic Arkwright joins three guests for new writing and stimulating discussion on the subject of Terrible Food.

His first guest Jonathan McGowan explains how liver turns his stomach, but doesn't think anything of eating dead rats - as long as they're rats from the countryside.

Johann Hari reveals how for many years he's had a culinary addiction that now makes him shudder, and Stephanie Calman describes what definitely not to serve at a dinner party.

Produced by Beatrice Fenton.

2303Instant Gratification2011061620110620

Cheap credit and immediate online access to infinite availability have contributed to one of the defining characteristics of our time - the 'have it all' culture of being able to instantly gratify our wants and needs.

But at what cost?

Dominic Arkwright explores the pleasures and pitfalls of instant gratification in the company of three speakers from very different walks of life.

Representing the complete antithesis of the quick hit, tapestry weaver Jane Freear-Wyld shows Dominic a textile the size of a paperback, explaining how it takes 250 hours, or six working weeks, to make.

Hers is a world away from the work of advertising creative director Matt Beaumont who arguably fuels our lust for not only jam today, but yesterday and tomorrow too.

Meanwhile, Times columnist and writer Sathnam Sanghera, recently returned from a holiday in Mumbai, argues that it's the recent shift towards instant gratification that is fuelling India's rapidly rising standard of living, very different to an ethos that promises fulfilment neither now nor in in this life at all, but in the next one.

Producer Mark Smalley

2304Pleasure And Pain Of Public Transport2011062320110627

The three contributors to this edition of Off the Page are all seasoned travellers who know very well both the pleasures and the pain of public transport.

Ian Marchant wanted to write a book about inland waterways but was persuaded to write about trains instead and while researching that he fell in love with the idea of the railway; poet Lavinia Greenlaw has been making a sound installation based on comments overheard at a station; and writer and broadcaster Simon Fanshawe has never owned a car.

But presenter Dominic Arkwright throws a spanner in the works when he reveals a loathing for public transport and that he will go to any length to avoid it.

Producer Paul Dodgson.

Dominic Arkwright and guests in topical conversation tackle the joys of public transport.

2305Always On2011063020110704

Mobile phones, laptops and tablet computers give us the opportunity to be constantly deluged by information wherever we are in the world.

And if we have one of these devices and don't turn it off then we can be reached, wherever we are.

So is being always on a good thing? Here with new writing and discussion are the Financial Times Slow Lane columnist Harry Eyres, Guardian digital media correspondent Jemima Kiss and the best selling author William Powers who has written a guide book on how to live wisely and happily in a connected world.

Producer Paul Dodgson.

Always On.

The consequences of hyper-connectivity.

2306The Games People Play2011070720110711

George Bernard Shaw reckoned that we don't stop playing because we're old, but we grow old because we forget to play.

Putting that idea to test are David Goldblatt, author of The Ball is Round; Helen Bentley, one of the organisers of Igfest in Bristol - the Interesting Games Festival; and the man behind The Importance of Being Trivial, Mark Mason.

Are we really as playful as we like to think, and what does our choice of game say about us ? The presenter is Dominic Arkwright, and the producer Miles Warde.

We're only alive when we're playing.

2307 LASTNeighbours2011071420110718

When Guy Browning decided to make a film, he roped in his entire village to help keep the costs down.

Which makes you wonder - is this the Big Society finally at work ? Also joining presenter Dominic Arkwright to discuss the support network of neighbours, both nasty and nice, are Laurie Penny the writer of the Penny Red blog; and Dr Edson Burton, who recalls when living in bedsits didn't just mean your neighbours were in the same street, but under the same roof.

The producer is Miles Warde.

How nice are your neighbours?

2401Away With The Fairies2011110320111107

Dominic Arkwright asks why fairies, once threatening and scary meddlers in human affairs, have become innocent, pink and fluffy.

He's joined by Irish storyteller Eddie Lenihan, fairy illustrator and writer Faye Durston, and folklorist Juliette Wood.

We hear how Eddie successfully campaigned to save an ancient hawthorn near Shannon Airport which was threatened by a new bypass.

It was, he argued, the portal to the other world of the fairies of Munster.

The tree still stands, though surrounded by cars on three sides.

Future editions include programmes on Glut, Japan, and Follow the Yellow Brick Road.

Producer: Mark Smalley.

Dominic Arkwright asks why fairies, once so very scary, have become pink and innocent.

2402Glut2011110820111114

Dominic Arkwright invites his three guests to debate excess and gluttony - what exactly is enough? Cityboy Geraint Anderson explains why he retired in his mid 30s with £2.5M.

That, argues punk poet Attila the Stockbroker, is an obscene amount, as he recalls former East Germany in the late '80s before the introduction of advertising and mass consumerism.

Meanwhile, it's the consumption of her autumn glut of apples and quinces that motivates food writer Xanthe Clay to waste not a single piece of fruit.

Producer: Mark Smalley.

Dominic Arkwright asks his guests to debate excess and gluttony - what exactly is enough?

2403Follow The Yellow Brick Road2011111520111121

Stuart Heritage, Dee Caffari and Neil McCormick discuss heart, courage and brains.

- three writers discuss heart, courage and brains.

With Guardian blogger, Stuart Heritage; Yachtswoman, Dee Caffari, and journalist Neil McCormick.

Stuart hates personal contact so much he moved to South Korea where they're "not huggers.

They're not really handshakers.

They're not even that fond of eye contact, the travel guide said.

Brilliant."

Dee Caffari has solo circumnavigated the globe, braving icebergs in the Southern Ocean along the way: "We surf down huge waves on the edge of control at breakneck speeds - any collision would be the end of the race.

Rescue is often days away and our closest chance of survival is a fellow competitor."

Neil talks about how intelligence may be over-rated and that sometimes it's better just to let your mind make itself up.

Producer: Toby Field.

2404Japan2011112220111128

: Hiroko Kawanami, Richard Lloyd Parry and Imran Yusuf explore the idea of Japan.

What is it really like, and how does it match up to people's preconceptions?

Hiroko Kawanami is a Japanese lecturer in Buddhism who prefers living in the UK.

Richard Lloyd Parry is Asia Editor of The Times and has lived in Tokyo for sixteen years.

British stand-up comedian Imran Yusuf has visited Japan and loved it.

All three write and talk about the Japan they know, with presenter Dominic Arkwright - who has never been to Japan and freely admits he knows little about it..

Producer: Beth O'Dea.

2405Imaginary Friends2011112920111205

Did you have any as a child, or do you in fact have some now? Poet Matt Harvey, biographer Sarah Churchwell and writer Paul B Davies tell all about the imaginary relationships we have both as children and adults, to presenter Dominic Arkwright.

Producer Beth O'dea

2406The Making Of You2011120620111212

Dominic Arkwright talks to three guests about their formative years: The Making of You.

Sports writer Julie Welch recalls boarding school days of innocence, lusting after her Games Captain.

Social entrepreneur, Gwilym Gibbons, remembers growing up in a commune, feeling an outsider from the mainstream world.

Psychotherapist Paul Welcomme, whose schooldays were far from halcyon, argues that the decisions adults make for their children can have a devastating and lasting affect on their lives.

Producer: Sarah Langan.

Dominic Arkwright talks to three guests about their school years.

2407 LASTBirmingham2011121320111219

Dominic Arkwright and guests Adrian Goldberg, Shazia Mirza and Luke Bainbridge discuss Birmingham; its flaws and its fabulousness.

According to a recent survey, the majority of the population believe that Manchester is the UK's second city and not Birmingham.

Lord Digby Jones added further fuel to that debate when he suggested earlier this year that Manchester has a more legitimate claim to that crown.

But is there anything to be gained from being classified as second? Is it a title that either cities want?

Brummies Adrian Goldberg and Shazia Mirza and Mancunian Luke Bainridge join Dominic Arkwright to discuss why coolness is the one adjective that has eluded the city of a thousand trades.

Blighted by dialectic prejudice and the stereotypes borne of Crossroads and the like, Birmingham is about to embark on another architectural city revamp.

Is Birmingham happy with itself?

Producer: Sarah Langan.

Dominic Arkwright and guests discuss Birmingham, its flaws and its fabulousness.

2501No Country For Old Men2012052920120604

"That is no country for old men," wrote Yeats in the opening line of his poem Sailing to Byzantium. "I am trying to write about the state of my soul," he later explained. Since when the phrase has been picked up in a novel by Cormac McCarthy, and a Coen brothers film based on the same book. But are we any closer to understanding what this phrase means, beyond realising something poignant is at work ?

Tibor Fischer, Katharine Whitehorn and Guy Browning all approach the subject with three very different columns about age, experience, and youth. For Guy Browing this is no longer a country for old men because they've decided that staying young is more to their taste. Katharine Whitehorn, agony aunt at Saga, argues for the creation of a fourth age of man, while Tibor Fischer worries about what has changed more, his world or him.

Dominic Arkwright presents.

2502The Garden Of Eden20120605

"And the Lord God planted a garden eastward in Eden; and there he put the man whom he had formed." The story of the Garden of Eden in Genesis is perhaps the most influential tale ever told. Its chief components of God, Adam and Eve and the snake, temptation, and a paradise lost still exert a hold on western thinking. Children understand it almost immediately, but this ancient story has not always been benign in its effects.

Joining presenter Dominic Arkwright are the novelist Zina Rohan, who talks about her own investigations into what this story has meant, particularly to women in the west; Sean Thomas writes about his search for where the real garden might have been; and Brook Wilensky-Lanford, whose book Paradise Lust is published in the UK later this year, describes the events of the Scopes trial of 1925. This famous clash between Darwinists and creationists featured an American presidential candidate who declared his belief that Eve was literally made from one of Adam's rib.

The producer is Miles Warde

2503What It Says On The Tin2012061220120618

There is a well known advert for woodstain with the modest boast, "It does what it says on the tin." This is the theme for our trio of writers - actor Michael Simkins, psychologist Dr Funke Baffour, and journalist Tom Mitchelson. Truth and lies in everyday life, and how honest are we with those we love, including ourselves.

Tom Mitchelson reveals a sideline as an investigative journalist - infiltrating a male bonding cult, posing as a playboy, pretending to be a foreign language teacher - to get at a higher truth. "I find it exhilarating," he confesses. Not everything is as it seems in Off The Page, presented by Dominic Arkwright

2504Bone Idle2012061920120625

As politicians seem to endlessly bang on about their passion for protecting 'hard working' families, Dominic Arkwright discusses the merits of idleness with Hardeep Singh Kohli, Stephanie Calman and Oliver Burkeman.

Every week there seems to be a new report about how lazy we're becoming. Recent headlines have included "Lazy Brits Spend 36 Years sitting on their bottoms," and "Teenagers are too lazy to babysit." As Dominic wonders who has the time to know all of this, Hardeep Singh Kohli tells us how he's not had a week off in over ten years, Stephanie Calman extols the joys of being a slattern and Oliver Burkeman tells us why it's really important for us to step back and just stop.

Producer: Sarah Langan.

2505Tomorrow's World2012062620120702

Dominic Arkwright and guests boldly venture into Tomorrow's World.

Dominic Arkwright and writers Bidisha, Mark Mason and Mark C Newton boldly go where no Off the Page has been before - into Tomorrow's World.

Dominic Arkwright and writers Bidisha, Mark Mason and Mark C Newton boldly go where no Off the Page has been before: to explore our fascination with Tomorrow's World. From biblical prophecy to the predictions of Nostradamus, we have a fascination with possibility of what the future might hold, and of the wonders of time travel. In our new venture, Mark C Newton writes a science fiction piece set in the City of London 100 years from now. Sci-fi nut Bidisha takes us back a century to the same place, and there she dreams of what life might be like a hundred years hence, i.e. now. And Mark Mason offers his sage thoughts on the great predictions that didn't make the grade, such as Edison's assertion that gold would one day be as commonplace as steel. With the rate of advancement in technological progress, is science fiction now just fantasy, or does it serve a broader purpose?

Producer: Sarah Langan.

2506Bohemians2012070320120709

Dominic Arkwright and guests discuss bohemians.

Bohemians - love them or loathe them, we've all met them. Dominic Arkwright and guests discuss avant-garde free spirits, or pretentious, posing pseudo-intellectuals, depending on your point of view.

Dominic is joined by an original free spirit; the writer Hanja Kochansky,writer and critic Cosmo Landesman, whose parents' eccentric behaviour caused the young Cosmo much embarrassment; and by the journalist who declares in his blog that he is 'right about everything', James Delingpole.

Has the British bohemian spirit - if there ever was one - disappeared? Now boho is mainstream, desirable even, what is there to rebel against?

Producer: Sarah Langan.

- love them or loathe them, we've all met them. Dominic Arkwright and guests discuss avant-garde free spirits, or pretentious, posing pseudo-intellectuals, depending on your point of view.

2507The Dark Side2012071020120716

Dominic Arkwright and guests wrangle with inner demons and consider the benefits of embracing The Dark Side.

The novelist and film critic Kim Newman tells how the nightmares that beset him through childhood were alleviated when he began to watch horror films. The psychologist Linda Blair considers whether people who embrace their dark side are more likely to be creative, and the writer Ian Marchant tells us how the dark forces of punk enlightened him.

Producer: Sarah Langan.