No Fixed Abode, Cricklewood

Comedian and self-proclaimed Goodies afficionado Phill Jupitus talks to Graeme Garden, Tim Brooke-taylor and Bill Oddie about their early days as comedy writers and performers, and about their 1970s cult series The Goodies.

Fondly remembered by fans, The Goodies was mostly ignored by critics who were more impressed by its equally zany contemporary, Monty Python.

More than twenty years after the last episode was made, The Goodies still enjoys a hugely popular following, with regular Goodies conventions being staged all over the world, despite few of the programmes being commercially available.

By the mid-1970s, zany TV comedy series 'The Goodies' had gained a huge and loyal following.

It appealed to an extraordinarily wide range of viewers - from young children who loved the cartoon-style jokes, to older viewers who appreciated the often strongly satirical elements of the show.

Ironically it was this wide-ranging appeal which caused scheduling problems for BBC bosses, who couldn't decide whether The Goodies was a kids' show or adult entertainment.

Ironically it was this wide-ranging appeal which caused scheduling problems for BBC bosses, who couldn't decide whether The Goodies was a kids' show or adult entertainment.

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Comedian and self-proclaimed Goodies afficionado Phill Jupitus talks to Graeme Garden, Tim Brooke-taylor and Bill Oddie about their early days as comedy writers and performers, and about their 1970s cult series The Goodies.

Fondly remembered by fans, The Goodies was mostly ignored by critics who were more impressed by its equally zany contemporary, Monty Python.

More than twenty years after the last episode was made, The Goodies still enjoys a hugely popular following, with regular Goodies conventions being staged all over the world, despite few of the programmes being commercially available.

By the mid-1970s, zany TV comedy series 'The Goodies' had gained a huge and loyal following.

It appealed to an extraordinarily wide range of viewers - from young children who loved the cartoon-style jokes, to older viewers who appreciated the often strongly satirical elements of the show.

Ironically it was this wide-ranging appeal which caused scheduling problems for BBC bosses, who couldn't decide whether The Goodies was a kids' show or adult entertainment.

Ironically it was this wide-ranging appeal which caused scheduling problems for BBC bosses, who couldn't decide whether The Goodies was a kids' show or adult entertainment.

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