No Abiding City

Roderick Swanston investigates the theology and context of Brahms's German Requiem, also known as the Human Requiem.

Brahms's Protestant opening Biblical text "Blessed are the dead" put a wide gap between his religious views and those of his Catholic contemporaries Verdi and Fauré.

Resignation rather than terror in the face of death saturates not only this work, but goes much deeper into his attitude to life and music in general.

Composed in the 1860s, this work re-assessed contemporary values by evoking such long past Protestant predecessors as Schütz and Bach.

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20031216

Roderick Swanston investigates the theology and context of Brahms's German Requiem, also known as the Human Requiem.

Brahms's Protestant opening Biblical text "Blessed are the dead" put a wide gap between his religious views and those of his Catholic contemporaries Verdi and Fauré.

Resignation rather than terror in the face of death saturates not only this work, but goes much deeper into his attitude to life and music in general.

Composed in the 1860s, this work re-assessed contemporary values by evoking such long past Protestant predecessors as Schütz and Bach.