New Generation Thinkers, 2011

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Episodes

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01The Entrepreneur20120116

A week of essays from five of the BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers begins with a look at 'the entrepreneur'.

The entrepreneur is a cultural figure and policy fix, the trope of the lone hero who conquers the world and saves the economy. Steve Jobs epitomised this figure. But how much can one person do, and does the myth of the entrepreneur have dangerous repercussions for the rest of us?

Philip Roscoe, lecturer at St Andrews University School of Management and one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, examines the changing role of the entrepreneur and argues that the myths surrounding these men and women are too simplistic; that thinkers from Tolstoy to Schumpeter to Hayek have long debated the role of the entrepreneur and what society can expect them to achieve.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run the BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

In subsequent programmes this week, Shahidha Bari reassess the legacy of Edward Said and Daniel Barenboim's account of the West Eastern Divan Youth Orchestra; Alexandra Harris explores the history of artificial light; Zoe Norridge examines the power of photographic images of the Rwandan genocide and Jon Adams questions how modern day writers are borrowing skills from the theologians of old.

Philip Roscoe asks whether our expectations of the lone entrepreneur are unrealistic.

02Parallels And Paradoxes20120117

A week of essays from five of the BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers continues with a reappraisal of the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, founded by literary critic Edward Said and musician Daniel Barenboim.

Ten years after the first publication of 'Parallels and Paradoxes' - a collection of conversations between Said and Barenboim - New Generation Thinker and lecturer in romanticism at Queen Mary University Shahidha Bari reexamines the ideas behind the founding of the 'West-Eastern Divan Youth Orchestra', which brings together young Arab and Israeli musicians in musical harmony. Bari dissects how Said's politicised conception of the musical 'contrapuntal' might bear upon the Arab Spring and Occupy protest movements today.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run the BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

In subsequent programmes this week, Alexandra Harris explores the history of artificial light; Zoe Norridge examines the power of photographic images of the Rwandan genocide and Jon Adams questions how modern day writers are borrowing skills from the theologians of old.

Shahidha Bari examines the ideas behind the founding of the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra.

03Light In The Dark20120118

A week of essays from five of the BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers continues with a look at light.

Alexandra Harris one of Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers explores the history of artificial light through literary sources. From from early oil lamps, to rushlights, to the illustrious candle - Harris shows how it has changed our lives and focused our thoughts.

Alexandra Harris won the 2010 Guardian First Book Award with Romantic Moderns. Her most recent work is a short biography of Virginia Woolf.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run the BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

In subsequent programmes this week, Zoe Norridge questions the power of images of Africa in the West and Jon Adams examines how modern day writers are borrowing skills from the theologians of old.

Alexandra Harris explores the history of artificial light through literary sources.

04Looking Beyond The Dead20120119

A week of essays from five of the BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers continues with an examination of the images of the Rwandan genocide.

Zoe Norridge, lecturer in literature at the University of York, questions why photographs of Africa tend to fix our perceptions of the continent at its worst moments of destruction and despair. New Generation Thinker Zoe Norridge examines how some photographers working in Rwanda confirm international expectations whilst others are beginning to look beyond the genocide.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run the BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

In the final programme tomorrow Jon Adams questions how modern day writers are borrowing skills from the theologians of old.

Producer Jennifer Chevalier.

Zoe Norridge ask why photos of Africa fix perceptions of the continent at its worst times.

05 LASTThe Canon Of Comics20120120

A week of essays from five of the BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers concludes with a look at the canon of comic books.

Trying to choose the canonical account from a contradictory collection of multiply authored narratives collated over extended periods of time used to be the business of biblical scholars, whose arguments for what should be included in the Book and what should be left out laid down strategies of persuasion that formed the spinal axis of what became the humanities.

New Generation Thinker Jon Adams argues that this kind of work is still being done today - except this time, it's being done by comic book fans, who - faced with contradictory, competing storylines must decide which are worthy of inclusion within any official backstory. Compared to the theologians of old, how are they faring?

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run the BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

Jon Adams compares the work of modern comic book enthusiasts to ancient biblical scholars.