Nervous Breakdown Of The Internet, The

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2015120120151206 (R4)Modern life relies on internet security. But cyber-criminals have rocked confidence and revealed shocking complacency. Edward Lucas explores how trust can be restored.|Breaches of computer networks at TalkTalk and Ashley Madison have highlighted the dangers we face on the internet. Cyber-crime will cost the global economy an annual $500bn. And our plight is set to worsen. The internet was never designed to be the central nervous system of modern life. Nobody foresaw its role in the media, e-commerce, e-banking, infrastructure, and entertainment.|The prize for attackers is data - they can steal, degrade or destroy, in order to blackmail, impersonate or bankrupt us.|At every stage of the internet's development, cost and convenience trumped security. Now we have to deal with a legacy of out-of-date systems and ingrained complacency, at a time when our dependence is growing. Our attackers have the advantage - they feed on a huge and lucrative criminal economy, they buy the weapons they need in sophisticated markets and launder their proceeds with anonymous electronic money.|Edward Lucas considers the problem with security experts and shows the shocking ease with which hackers can steal data. He examines where responsibility lies - with the government, companies and individuals - and discusses potential solutions - from Estonian-style biometric identity cards to "bug bounties" for those who find errors in hardware and software.|Legislation, commercial pressure, education and changing social norms can all help secure the internet and, with it, our modern way of life.|Presenter: Edward Lucas|Producer: Kate Dixon|A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.
20151201|Modern life relies on internet security. But cyber-criminals have rocked confidence and revealed shocking complacency. Edward Lucas explores how trust can be restored.|Breaches of computer networks at TalkTalk and Ashley Madison have highlighted the dangers we face on the internet. Cyber-crime is set to cost the global economy an annual $500bn. And our plight is set to worsen. The internet was never designed to be the central nervous system of modern life. Nobody foresaw its role in the media, e-commerce, e-banking, infrastructure, and entertainment.|The prize for attackers is data - they can steal, degrade or destroy, in order to blackmail, impersonate or bankrupt us.|At every stage of the internet's development, cost and convenience trumped security. Now we have to deal with a legacy of out-of-date systems and ingrained complacency, at a time when our dependence is growing. Our attackers have the advantage - they feed on a huge and lucrative criminal economy, they buy the weapons they need in sophisticated markets and launder their proceeds with anonymous electronic money.|Edward Lucas considers the problem with security experts and shows the shocking ease with which hackers can steal data. He examines where responsibility lies - with the government, companies and individuals - and discusses potential solutions - from Estonian-style biometric identity cards to "bug bounties" for those who find errors in hardware and software.|Legislation, commercial pressure, education and changing social norms can all help secure the internet and, with it, our modern way of life.|Presenter: Edward Lucas|Producer: Kate Dixon|A Whistledown production for BBC Radio 4.