Naming Nature

We know that in September Hurricane Ivan and Tropical Storm Jeanne caused devastation in the Caribbean. But how did they get their names? And why, buried beneath the Atlantic Ocean, is there a Peak Deep and a Frean Deep - not to mention a Sea Mount called Crumb?

Ian Mcmillan gets to grips with the protocol surrounding the naming of natural phenomena and discovers that, where he'd expected poetry, it's more frequently a case of scientific one-up-manship.

Hurricane Katrina's name will not be forgotten in the Southern United States for years to come. But why Katrina? Also, why are stars called Vega, Sirius, Polaris, Regulus, or microscopic beings on the sea bed named after the Sex Pistols?

Ian Mcmillan gets to grips with the protocol surrounding the naming of natural phenomena and discovers that, where he'd expected poetry, it's frequently more a case of scientific one-up-manship.

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We know that in September Hurricane Ivan and Tropical Storm Jeanne caused devastation in the Caribbean. But how did they get their names? And why, buried beneath the Atlantic Ocean, is there a Peak Deep and a Frean Deep - not to mention a Sea Mount called Crumb?

Ian Mcmillan gets to grips with the protocol surrounding the naming of natural phenomena and discovers that, where he'd expected poetry, it's more frequently a case of scientific one-up-manship.

Hurricane Katrina's name will not be forgotten in the Southern United States for years to come. But why Katrina? Also, why are stars called Vega, Sirius, Polaris, Regulus, or microscopic beings on the sea bed named after the Sex Pistols?

Ian Mcmillan gets to grips with the protocol surrounding the naming of natural phenomena and discovers that, where he'd expected poetry, it's frequently more a case of scientific one-up-manship.