Musical Outsiders

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AO30120100125

AO30120100125

2pm: Afternoon on 3: Musical Outsiders

Elgar is often seen as the embodiment of the Edwardian Establishment - Pomp and Circumstance, Crown of India - plus fours and bicycle clips - which is a mark of Elgar's achievement as that is what he always craved. Born the son of a Catholic Music Dealer, Elgar was always haunted by his modest social origins as he longed for a place in the "establishment". In this week's programmes Katie Derham takes the "Outsider" theme a stage further, using performances of Elgar's music by non-British ensembles and asking the question - do you have to be British to get something from this music?

Other "outsiders" over the week are Beethoven - increasingly isolated in his deafness; Kurt Weill - hounded out of Nazi Germany; Shostakovich - the focus of Stalinist criticism in 1930's Soviet Union, and Rued Langgaard, a Danish composer very much in the shadow of his elder contemporary Carl Nielsen, and who did not get the recognition he perhaps deserved at the time.

In today's programme, Katie Derham introduces Elgar's stirring "Cockaigne" overture, and Walton's youthful first symphony conducted by Sir Roger Norrington. Beethoven's isolation comes across in one of his late quartets, and songs by Kurt Weill which were such a corrosive commentary on 1930's Berlin that he was hounded out of Nazi Germany.

Elgar: Cockaigne Overture

Walton: Symphony No.1

Leipzig Gewandhaus orchestra

Sir Roger Norrington (conductor)

Geirr Tveitt: Piano Concerto No.1 in F (Op.5)

Norwegian Radio Orchestra

Ole Kristian Ruud (conductor)

Beethoven: Quartet for Strings in Eb (Op.127)

Brentano Quartet

Weill: 5 Songs:

Youkali; Complainte de Seine; Je ne t'aime pas; Le grand Lustruscu & J'attends un navire both from "Marie Galante"

Renata Poklupic (mezzo-soprano)

Roger Vignoles (piano)

Copland: Clarinet Concerto

Michael Collins (clarinet)

Limburg Symphony Orchestra

Kynons John (conductor).

Handel: Semele Act 2; Where'er you walk

Mark Padmore - (tenor)

The English Concert

Andrew Manze (conductor)

AO30220100126

AO30220100126

2pm: Afternoon on 3: Musical Outsiders

Elgar is often seen as the embodiment of the Edwardian Establishment - Pomp and Circumstance, Crown of India - plus fours and bicycle clips - which is a mark of Elgar's achievement as that is what he always craved. Born the son of a Catholic Music Dealer, Elgar was always haunted by his modest social origins as he longed for a place in the "establishment". In this week's programmes Katie Derham (joining the Afternoon on 3 team this week for the first time) takes the "Outsider" theme a stage further, using performances of Elgar's music by non-British ensembles and asking the question - do you have to be British to get something from this music?

Other "outsiders" over the week are Beethoven - increasingly isolated in his deafness; Kurt Weill - hounded out of Nazi Germany; Shostakovich - the focus of Stalinist criticism in 1930's Soviet Union, and Rued Langgaard, a Danish composer very much in the shadow of his elder contemporary Carl Nielsen, and who did not get the recognition he perhaps deserved at the time.

In today's programme, Katie Derham introduces Elgar's great statement of faith "The Dream of Gerontius", written to a text by fellow Catholic Cardinal Newman, and was "the best of me" according to Elgar himself. Despite a comfortable upbringing and early success Samuel Barber became more isolated as depression increasingly prevented him from composing. Charles Koechlin was a gifted and popular teacher, but never managed to get the official posts in the musical establishment which he wanted and probably deserved.

Elgar: Dream of Gerontius

Allan Clayton (tenor)

Jonathan Lemalu (bass-baritone)

Jane Irwin (mezzo-soprano)

Witold Lutoslawski Philharmonic Chorus,

Polish Radio Chorus

Halle Choir

Witold Lutoslawski Philharmonic Orchestra

Jacek Kaspszyk (conductor)

Barber: Violin Concerto (Op.14)

Joshua Bell (violin)

Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra

Marin Alsop (conductor)

Debussy (orch. Koechlin): Khamma

Koechlin: Les Bandar-log

Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra

Heinz Holliger (conductor).

AO30320100127

AO30320100127

2pm: Afternoon on 3: Musical Outsiders

Katie Derham continues a week Elgar performances from non-British performers and looks at the Outsider in music.

In today's programme, she introduces music by Carl Nielsen who became the most popular composer in Denmark during his own lifetime. Those that followed were measured against him. Rued Langgaard, a fellow Dane, suffered throughout his career as his style was not considered sufficiently Nielsen-like, with few performances and no real champions of his work. Only in recent years is Langgaard's music beginning to achieve the recognition it deserves.

For Elgar, a symphony was essential to a successful composing career, and a few years after the "Dream of Gerontius" (heard in yesterday's programme) he produced his first symphony, which was later described as "the greatest symphony of modern times" by Shostakovich - no mean symphonist himself.

Nielsen: Helios Overture (Op.17)

Dresden Staatskapelle

Sakari Oramo (conductor)

Rued Langgaard: Sfaerernes musik (Music of the spheres)

Katarina Dalayman, Nanna Hovmand & Henriette Elimar (sopranos)

Danish National Symphony Orchestra and Chorus

Thomas Dausgaard (conductor)

Bruckner: Vexilla Regis

WDR Radio Chorus

Rupert Huber (conductor)

Elgar:Symphony No.1

Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra

Marin Alsop (conductor).

AO30420100128

AO30420100128

2pm Afternoon on 3: Musical Outsiders.

Katie Derham presents a week of Elgar performances from non-British performers and looks at the Outsider in music

Hector Berlioz was fascinated all his life by Shakespeare and wrote the music and the libretto for "Beatrice and Benedict", a 2 Act Comic Opera that roughly follows Shakespeare's "Much Ado about Nothing" and in which the 2 protagonists use their wits to spar with each other. Joyce di Donato is Beatrice and Charles Workman is Benedict in this performance from Paris, conducted by Berlioz specialist Sir Colin Davis.

The Elgar today is his overture Alassio "in the South", in a performance from Poland.

Much like Elgar, Sibelius craved official recognition in his musical career, and like Elgar achieved it in the end, forging an enduring Finnish character in music.

Berlioz: Beatice et Benedict Opera in 2 Acts (Op.27)

Joyce Di Donato, soprano, Béatrice;

Charles Workman, tenor, Bénédict;

Christophe Fel, bass, spoken role, Leonato;

Nicolas Cavallier, bass, Don Pedro;

Nathalie Manfrino, soprano, Hero;

Jean-François Lapointe, baritone, Claudio;

Jean-Philippe Laffont, baritone, Somarone;

Elodie Méchain, soprano, Ursula;

Radio France Chorus; Orchestre National de France;

Sir Colin Davis (conductor

Sibelius: Symphony No.7 in C (Op.105)

Britten: Cello Symphony (Op.68)

Lausanne Chamber Orchestra

Leif Segerstam (conductor)

Elgar: Alassio In the South (Op.50)

National Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Katowice

Jacek Kaspszyk (conductor).

AO305 LAST20100129

AO305 LAST20100129

2pm: Afternoon on 3: Musical Outsiders

Katie Derham concludes a week of Elgar performances from non-British performers and looks at the Outsider in music

Britten and Elgar from Australia today, both with a theme of the Sea. Then, to Schubert, and his expression of the artist as outsider in his "Wanderer" Fantasy. Geirr Tveitt started out as an outsider on the periphery of Europe, born in rural Norway, in the Hardanger valley, but was educated in Leipzig (just like Elgar) before continuing his studies in Paris in the 1920's where he met the great and the good, before returning to his home in Norway and developing his individual musical voice there.

When the Stalin-backed criticism of Shostakovich appeared in the late 1930's, in response to his 4th Symphony and his opera "Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk" it was a bitter blow to the composer. Criticism like this from the Soviet "establishment" could have life threatening consequences, and for a while Shostakovich was definitely an "Outsider" in Soviet society. Shostakovich's return to the fold came with his 5th Symphony, written in 1937. As Shostakovich wrote at the time " A Soviet artist's response to justified criticism."

Britten: 4 Sea Interludes from Peter Grimes

Elgar: Sea Pictures

Christianne Stotijn (mezzo)

Melbourne Symphony Orchestra

Tadaaki Otaka (conductor)

Schubert: Fantasy in C (D.760) "Wanderer Fantasy"

Alexander Melnikov

Jon Leifs: Organ Concerto (Op.7)

Michael Schonheit (organ)

Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra

Osmo Vanska (conductor)

Geirr Tveitt: Hundrad Hardingtonar, Suite No. 4 ('Brudlaups-suiten' (Wedding Suite)

Bergen Philharmonic

Bjarte Engeset (conductor)

Shostakovich: Symphony No.5 in D minor (Op.47)

National Orchestra of France

Tatjana Vassiljeva (conductor).