Music On The Brink

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AO30120140106

Katie Derham this week explores some ravishing music from Renaissance and Baroque Spain. Today Musica Reservata of Barcelona are heard in a controversial and harmonically daring mass by the once-famous Catalan Baroque master Francisco Valls as well as three masterpieces from the Spanish Golden Age.

Also today, as part of Music on the Brink week, there's a chance to compare two major works performed in Vienna on the eve of the First World War. Joseph Matthias Hauer's short Apocalyptic Fantasy traces the way in which twelve shadings on a musical colour circle reveal themselves to a blind listener whilst Schmidt's mighty Second Symphony makes subtle use of a vast orchestra in an unusually structured work which consisitng of a Prelude, a Theme and Variations and Finale. This symphony has remained controversial ever since its premiere by the Vienna Philharmonic in December 1913.

Victoria Vexila regis 'more hispano'

Guerrero Maria Magdalena et altera Maria

Guerrero Et introeuntes ad monumentum

Musica Reservata de Barcelona, Peter Phillips (conductor)

recorded at St Anne's Church, Barcelona

c. 2.15pm

As part Music on the Brink week, today featuring major works performed in Vienna on the eve of the First World War.

Joseph Matthias Hauer Apocalyptic Fantasy op 5

Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, Gottfried Rabl (conductor)

c. 2.30pm

Franz Schmidt Symphony no 2

Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Neeme Jarvi (conductor)

c. 3.15pm

Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 23 in F minor, op. 57 'Appassionata'

Alexandre Tharaud (piano)

recorded at the Oriol Martorell Hall, Auditori, Barcelona

c. 3.40pm

Francisco Valls (c.1671-1747) Kyrie, Gloria and Credo from Missa Scala aretina

La Grande Chapelle, Albert Recassens (director)

recorded at Santa Maria Cathedral, La Seu d'Urgell as part of the Pyrenees Music Festival.

Modernist Moment: Vienna

Tom Service introduces a Modernist Moment from Vienna, with Webern's Three Little Pieces for Cello and Piano Op.11

Followed by music which would have been heard at a concert in Vienna with the Konzertverein orchestra in February 1914.

Robert Fuchs: Serenade No.1

Schumann: Piano Concerto in A minor.

AO30220140107

Katie Derham today introduces more music from a daring and controversial mass for three choirs and instruments by the Catalan Baroque composer, Francisco Valls. And, as part Music on the Brink week, today explores three important works first performed in Paris on the eve of the First World War.

Francisco Valls Sanctus and Agnus Dei from Missa Scala Aretina

La Grande Chapelle, Albert Recassens (director)

c. 2.35pm

Debussy Jeux - 'poème dansé'

BBC National Orchestra of Wales, Thierry Fischer (conductor)

c. 2.55pm

Charles Koechlin Études Antiques op.46 op 46 movts 2-4

Soir au bord du lac

Le Cortège d'Amphitrite

Épitaphe d'une jeune femme

Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra, Heinz Holliger (conductor)

c. 3.10pm

Richard Strauss Josephs-Legende op 63

Staatskapelle Dresden, Giuseppe Sinopoli (conductor)

c. 4.15pm

Mahler arr Tharaud Adagietto from Symphony no. 5.

AO30320140108

Katie Derham introduces two works first performed in Berlin on the eve of the First World War. Strauss's motet for sixteen voices owes much to his Alpine symphony and contains the ominous words by Rückert: 'Let not the powers of darkness, dread night, gain inward light.' Strauss's motet is followed by a major work by his contemporary and rival, Emil Nikolaus von Reznicek. His fifty minute symphonic satire, 'The Winner, The Loser,' traces the journey of a man from success to failure.

Richard Strauss Deutsche motette, op.62

BBC Singers, Stephen Cleobury (conductor)

c. 2.20pm

Reznicek Der Sieger

Beate Koepp (alto),

Choir and Symphony Orchestra of WDR Cologne

Michail Jurowski (conductor)

c. 3.10pm

Schumann Kinderszenen op.15

Alexandre Tharaud (piano).

AO30420140109

Katie Derham continues her exploration of some of the vocal riches of the Iberian Baroque with motets by the Basque, de Salazar and de Nebra's 1743 Madrid zarzuela, 'The Wind is the Messenger of Love.'

And, as part of Music on the Brink week, there are two major works premiered on the eve of the First World War in St Petersburg.

Juan Garcia de Salazar (1639-1710) 3 Motets

Mater Dei memor esto mei a 5,

Sancta Maria sucurre miseris a 5,

Maria Magdalena a 4

La Grande Chapelle, Albert Recasens (director)

recorded in the Virgin of Ribera Church, La Pobla de Segur

c. 2.15pm

Prokofiev Piano Concerto no 2

Vladimir Ashkenazy (piano),

London Symphony Orchestra, Andre Previn (conductor)

c. 2.45pm

Glazunov The King of the Jews

Russian State Symphonic Cappella, Russian State Symphony Orchestra,

Valeri Polyansky (conductor)

3.40pm

José de Nebra (1702-1768)

Viento es la dicha de amor, 'The Wind Is the Messenger of Love.' Act 1 (to be continued tomorrow)

Amor....Beatriz Díaz (soprano),

Céfiro....Clara Mouriz (mezzo-soprano),

Liríope....Yolanda Auyanet (soprano)

Delfa....Ruth González (soprano),

Marsia....Gustavo de Gennaro (tenor),

Ninfa....Mercedes Arcuri (soprano), Teatro de la Zarzuela Chorus

Seville Baroque Orchestra

Alan Curtis (conductor)

recorded live at the Teatro de la Zarzuela, Madrid.

AO305 LAST20140110

Katie Derham concludes her week-long exploration of the Iberian Baroque with the second part of de Nebra's zarzuela, 'Wind is the Happiness of Love.' And Holst and Vaughan-Williams's London is the featured city on the Brink in today's look at music premiered on the eve of the First World War. The symphony is heard here in the original version which includes a haunting nocturne in the scherzo which the composer later deleted.

Scarlatti Sonata in D minor, K. 141

Alexandre Tharaud (piano)

Bach arr. Berio Contrapunctus XIX, from 'The Art of Fugue', arr. For 23 players

RTVE Symphony Orchestra, Carlos Kalmar (conductor)

c. 2.10pm

Holst Choral Hymns from the Rig Veda (set 4) op 26

Hymn to Agni

Hymn to Soma

Hymn to Manas.

Hymn to Indra

Hispania Ensemble, Omar-Jonatás Sánchez (piano ),

Carmelo Cordón (director)

recorded at the Teatro Monumental, Madrid

c.2.25pm

14:22:32 Vaughan-Williams (original 1913 version)

A London Symphony

London Symphony Orchestra, Richard Hickox (conductor)

c. 3.15pm

Grieg Lyric Pieces

Arietta, op. 12/1

Fedrelandssang, op. 12/8 (National Song)

Berceuse, op. 38/1

Waltz, op. 38/7

Elegy, op. 47/7

Melody, op. 47/3

Sommerfugl, op. 43/1 (Butterfly)

Klokkeklang, op. 54/6 (Bell Ringing)

Bryllupsdag pa Trooldhaugen, op. 65/6 (Wedding

Day at Troldhaugen)

c.3.40pm

José de Nebra (1702-1768) Viento es la dicha de amor, 'Wind is the Happiness of Love'

Act 2

Amor....Beatriz Díaz (soprano),

Céfiro....Clara Mouriz (mezzo-soprano),

Liríope....Yolanda Auyanet (soprano)

Delfa....Ruth González (soprano),

Marsia....Gustavo de Gennaro (tenor),

Ninfa....Mercedes Arcuri (soprano), Teatro de la Zarzuela Chorus

Seville Baroque Orchestra

Alan Curtis (conductor)

recorded live at the Teatro de la Zarzuela, Madrid.

ESSAY01Vienna20140106

As part of the Music on the Brink season, each programme in this series of "The Essay" considers the special character of Vienna, Paris, Berlin, St. Petersburg and London.

Stepping back exactly a hundred years, five BBC News correspondents present personal perspectives on the capital cities of the major European powers that, later in 1914, would face each other in the Great War. We start in the capital of the Habsburg Empire and the rich multiculturalism of Mitteleuropa.

In this programme, Bethany Bell, the BBC's Vienna Correspondent, evokes both the public face of Austria-Hungary's capital and the simmering tensions which underlay its multi-national empire on the eve of the greatest conflagration the world had yet seen. Taking us on a richly evocative tour of the embodiment of Mitteleuropa, she tells us about a world that was soon to be torn asunder but of which telling - and not always attractive - elements remain.

It is all too easy to forget, she reminds us, that within months Vienna was home to Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin, Leon Trotsky, Siegmund Freud and Josef Broz (later Marshal Tito) - all figures who defined the twentieth century. She also discusses the critic and satirist Karl Kraus and the controversial pre-World War One mayor of Vienna Karl Lueger.

For the multiple nationalities of 1914 Vienna, the chronic tensions which bedevilled this polyglot empire were painfully familiar. The programme reveals what has survived to this day of the compromised nature of Vienna from the era of Zemlinsky and Schreker and of Schoenberg, Webern and Berg.

Producer Simon Coates.

ESSAY02Paris20140107

Stepping back in time exactly a century, five BBC News correspondents present their personal perspectives on the principal cities of the major European powers that, later in 1914, would fight the Great War.

The programmes continue with Hugh Schofield reimagining the chic French capital of Maurice Ravel, the Ballets Russes and Henri Matisse - but which politically suffered continuing angst over its neighbour across the Rhine: Germany.

For many, the wounds of the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-1 had still not healed. And the assassination in Paris of the leading French pacifist and socialist, Jean Jaurès, in late July 1914 convulsed the city and crystallised the diverging views about France's relations with her European neighbours. Hugh Schofield tells the story of why this event provoked such turmoil at the time and why it still resonates powerfully today in the politics and culture of France.

Producer Simon Coates.

ESSAY03Berlin20140108

Stepping back in time exactly a century, five BBC News correspondents present their personal perspectives on the capital cities of the major European powers that, later in 1914, would fight the Great War.

The programmes now reach the epicentre of turmoil on the eve of conflagration: Berlin, the capital of Kaiser Wilhelm II's empire. Stephen Evans, the BBC's Berlin Correspondent, reminds us that the German capital on the eve of war was the world's most innovative technological centre. Einstein was here, the director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physics from 1914. Mark Twain called Berlin the "German Chicago" because of its dizzying sense of modernity and progress. Immigrants were sucked in by industry. In 1895, 20,000 Berliners worked in the factories being built on the outskirts of the city, living cheek-by-jowl in new blocks which became known as "rental barracks".

But all this industrial energy and the wealth it created - which we still associate with today's Germany - came at a price. Both male and female workers felt alienated in their work, likening themselves to machines. As women grew in importance to the economy, so did the loudness of the criticism of their alleged neglect of traditional home virtues. The image of Germany united in war that was to be orchestrated later in the year was already belied by the reality of daily life in the capital itself.

As part of the Music on the Brink season, each programme in this series of "The Essay" considers the special character of the main European capitals on the eve of war in 1914.

Producer Simon Coates.

ESSAY04St Petersburg20140109

Stepping back in time exactly a century, five BBC News correspondents present their personal perspectives on the capital cities of the major European powers that, later in 1914, would fight the Great War.

The series continues with the remarkable city which would - uniquely - soon be renamed amidst bloody regicide and revolution: St Petersburg.

The BBC's Moscow correspondent, Steve Rosenberg, finds a revealing connection, however, between the St. Petersburg of 1914 and its counterpart of today.

Foreshadowing the appalling conflict to come across the European continent, he tells the remarkable story of the Grand International Masters' Chess Tournament of 1914, with its starring cast of Russian, German, French, British and American competitors and its dramas of who won and who lost.

But the tournament also demonstrated the Russian passion for chess that continues to this day and helps define its national identity as well as the fierce competition with other countries.

As part of the Music on the Brink season, each programme in this series of The Essay considers the special character of St. Petersburg, Berlin, Vienna, Paris and London.

Producer Simon Coates.

ESSAY05 LASTLondon20140110

Stepping back in time exactly a century, five BBC News correspondents present a personal perspective on the principal cities of the major European powers that later in 1914 would fight the Great War.

As part of the "Music on the Brink" season, each programme in this series of "The Essay" considers the special character of Vienna, Paris, Berlin, St Petersburg and London. The programmes conclude with Emma Jane Kirby considering the capital of the largest contemporary modern maritime empire: London.

To today's listeners some of Londoners' concerns in 1914 may seem remarkably familiar. Complaints about the Tube were as frequent and heartfelt a hundred years ago as they are today. To try and divert travellers from their misery, Macdonald Gill - the brother of Eric Gill, the sculptor and designer - was commissioned to produce a "Wonderground" map.

It was intended to amuse them as they waited for their trains which were infrequent, often dirty and over-crowded. The map's whimsical illustrations - together with Cockney asides put in the mouths of some of the invented characters - captured the city's above-ground, pre-war character. It evoked the zeitgeist which George Bernard Shaw simultaneously reflected on stage in "Pygmalion" - and led to a subsequent commission to design a theatreland map during the First World War.

Emma Jane Kirby considers the idea of Britain which London was presenting to both the wider world and Britons themselves in 1914. And she assesses how far these attitudes still resonate today.

Producer Simon Coates.