Music Matters

Radio 3's flagship classical music magazine programme, with topical in-depth interviews, features and discussions on the big ideas driving today's music world.

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
19970531

Ivan Hewett with news and views from the musical world.

This week, a walk round a Mendelssohn exhibition at the Bodleian Library in Oxford, and a trip to a musical weekend in Lacock for players of the serpent, an ancient bass wind instrument.

19970601
19970607

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world.

This week, choreographer Mark Morris on his interpretation of Handel, violinist Gidon Kremer on master of tango Astor Piazzolla, and a look at Ravel's fascination with Spain.

19970608

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world.

This week, choreographer Mark Morris on his interpretation of Handel, Gidon Kremer pays homage to the master of tango Astor Piazzolla, and a look at Ravel's fascination with Spain.

19970614

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and events in the musical world.

This week, a new book on Mahler, a meeting between Ensemble Bash and musicians from Ghana, and what a new-born baby hears.

19970615
19970628

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and events in the musical world.

This week, composers' fascination with the poetry of Byron; a new scheme to provide music in prisons; and how Hong Kong's music scene will be affected by the handover to China at the end of this month.

19970629
19970712

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and events in the musical world.

This week, the symphony becomes heroic in the wake of Beethoven; composers write again for the virginals; a new book on English cathedral music; and a project in Birmingham to get young people singing.

19970713
19970914

A new season and a new time for the popular music magazine presented by Ivan Hewett.

This week, a review of Jonathan Miller's TV series for people who do not like opera; the hidden riches of Yemenese music heard for the first time in this country; and a composing computer - will it ever replace the human composer?

19970915

A new season and a new time for the repeat of the popular music magazine presented by Ivan Hewett.

This week, a review of Jonathan Miller's TV series for people who do not like opera; the hidden riches of Yemenese music heard for the first time in this country; and a composing computer - will it ever replace the human composer?

19970921

Weekly music magazine presented by Ivan Hewett.

This week, a new book about Diaghilev, the San Francisco Opera House re-opens, music-making in Manchester, and the Diva as an icon.

19970922
19970928

Music magazine.

This week, Ivan Hewett discusses the flourishing cultural life in Vienna during the first half of the century; looks at how pop musicians like Paul McCartney have crossed over to classical music; and brings news of Riccardo Muti's appeal to halt the destruction of musical manuscripts in Naples.

19970929
19971005

Weekly music magazine presented by Ivan Hewett.

This week, the Russian choral tradition, a new ballet about Edward II, and Vaughan Williams - establishment figure or subversive?

19971006
19971109

Ivan Hewett explores Sibelius's fascination with Finnish legends and folklore, looks at the way Soundbeam helps people with disabilities make music, and joins 700 young people working on an education project to be performed at Huddersfield Football Stadium.

19971110
19971123

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world, including news of a Prokofiev festival, the Brahms clarinet sonatas revisited, and a look at traditional music from the Andes.

19971124
19971214

Ivan Hewett looks at how Christmas music has changed through the ages.

McCarthy, artistic director, Music Theatre Wales; and Tom Sutcliffe, opera critic and author.

19971215
19980104

Ivan Hewett reviews the musical highlights of 1997 and looks forward to the year ahead.

Plus a report from Mostar, where the Pavarotti Music Centre has just opened.

19980105
1998012519980126

Music magazine, presented by Ivan Hewett.

This week, Beethoven the revolutionary in Glasgow, the history of the drum kit and a new book on different styles of singing.

This week, Beethoven the revolutionary in Glasgow, and a new book on different styles of singing.

1998020119980202

Music magazine, presented by Ivan Hewett.

This week, a new book on Verdi, a festival of improvisation and a new piece for the virginals.

/ Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world.

1998021519980216

This week, Rostropovich conducts Shostakovich, and the newly formed European Opera Centre perform Mozart at Buxton.

1998030119980302

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world.

This week, Prince Albert's contribution to musical life, the problems of themed concert programming, and hot dishes and Cuban spice at Club Tropicana.

This week, Prince Albert's contribution to musical life, what went on in Bluebeard's castle, and the problems of themed concert programming.

1998031519980316

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world.

This week, what makes a good musical biography, musical versions of Shakespeare, and Tchaikovsky tackled by Roger Norrington

1998032219980323

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world.

This week, a glance backstage at the opera, new ideas on Verdi, and a work by Handel rediscovered after 261 years.

1998040519980406

Ivan Hewett visits Stockholm, this year's European City of Culture, and asks what the role of music is in the global city of the future.

1998041219980413

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world.

Pianist Joanna MacGregor explains how Birtwistle's music has links with music of the past, and a group of amateur musicians creates a new piece with the Danish composer Per Norgard.

1998041919980420

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world.

Pianist Imogen Cooper talks about her forays into the rich repertoire for piano trio.

Plus the unique sounds of Pham Van Ty and the Ca Tru Thai Ha Ensemble of Hanoi, who are here for a festival of Vietnamese culture.

1998042619980427

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world.

This week, a look at Siobhan Davies's new dance piece choreographing Conlan Nancarrow's extraordinary studies for player piano.

Plus a visit to the new Wiltshire Music Centre.

1998050319980504

Ivan Hewett talks to Thomas Hampson about Mahler's Ruckert Lieder and reviews Channel 4's new series on the jazz greats.

1998051019980511

Ivan Hewett interviews Daniel Barenboim about his current Beethoven cycle at the Royal Festival Hall and celebrates 25 years of the Kronos Quartet.

1998052419980525

Ivan Hewett investigates noise levels in orchestras, talks to Broadway singer Kim Criswell about the unearthing of some Cole Porter treasures, and samples ancient music from Georgia performed by Ensemble Mzetamze.

1998053119980601

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world.

This week, a feature celebrating the centenary of the birth of Spanish poet and dramatist Federico Garcia Lorca, a tribute to the great Russian bass Chaliapin, and a preview of a new music theatre piece set in a Scottish pub.

1998061419980615

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the music world.

This week, silent-film legend Charlie Chaplin as a composer, and an assessment of the Royal Ballet on the hundreth birthday of its founder Dame Ninette de Valois.

1998062119980622

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the music world.

This week, composers who have written for and about children.

And the Lindseys talk about the evocative musical language in Janacek's quartets.

19980705

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the music world.

This week, a look behind behind the scenes at Almeida Opera's Chinese double bill, and medieval music on the streets of York.

Also, what exactly is vibrato?

19980920

Music magazine, with Ivan Hewett.

This week: defnining the classical in music, and new attitudes to the role of music in society.

19980927

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world.

This week: a rare interview with legendary dancer and choreographer Merce Cunningham, and a look at a new scheme which aims to transform the way music is taught in schools.

19981004

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world.

This week: a tribute to the extraordinary singer-actress Lotte Lenya as the centenary of her birth approaches.

Plus an assessment of the influence of the great visionary of 20th-century music - Karlheinz Stockhausen, celebrating his seventieth birthday.

19981101

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world.

This week, 25 years of the pioneering early-music vocal ensemble the Tallis Scholars.

Plus a look at the roots of klezmer as a month-long festival of Jewish music begins in London.

19981108

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world.

This week, he interviews Hans Werner Henze, a leading composer of contemporary opera, as the Royal Northern College of Music launches its festival of his music.

Plus a look at the new British Library transformed into a performance space for dance.

19981115

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world.

This week, he previews Simon Holt's first opera, based on an erotic strip cartoon by Lorca; reports on progress of the new Gateshead Arts Centre; and investigates the music that will create the atmosphere in the Millennium Dome.

19981122

Ivan Hewett with the latest news and views from the musical world, including symmetries in Bach, music and gender, and the panpipes of Eastern Europe.

19981220

Ivan Hewett previews music programmes on television this Christmas, explores the King's College Choir phenomenon, and looks back at the musical highlights of 1998.

19990110

Ivan Hewett explores the way in which orchestras are developing new audiences.

He also visits the Richard Attenborough Arts Centre in Leicester, designed with disabled people in mind.

19990124

With Ivan Hewett.

This week, Julian Lloyd Webber comments from personal experience on the new film about Jacqueline Du Pre.

He also looks at the problems facing young musicians launching a professional career.

19990131

Ivan Hewett looks at the role of sponsorship in music.

And Tony Woodcock, former head of the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra but now in charge of the Oregon Symphony, sends a postcard comparing Britain's sunny south coast with America's wild west.

19990207

Ivan Hewett debates the lack of a first-rate concert hall in London and looks at the plans for improving the acoustics of the Royal Festival Hall, the regenration of the ground-breaking Roundhouse in Camden, and the novel idea of reconstructing the Queen's Hall as it was in Sir Henry Wood's day.

19990214

Ivan Hewett analyses the identity crisis in English music and asks if music is the food of love.

19990221

Ivan Hewett dons his hard hat and visits the site of the Royal Opera House development to see where the millions have gone.

Plus a report from France on how the opera scene has become a political hot potato.

19990307

In National Orchestra Week, Ivan Hewett looks at the range of educational activities being run by orchestras.

Plus the latest research into communicating with babies through music.

19990404

Ivan Hewett talks to Jonathan Miller about the drama of the Passion and looks at the state of contemporary music publishing.

19990411

Ivan Hewett looks at the influence of painter Vassily Kandinsky as a major exhibition of his work opens at the Royal Academy of Art.

Plus a report from Venice on the latest news in the troubled history of the Fenice Theatre.

19990418

Ivan Hewett investigates the decline of individuality in arts centres' programming around the world.

Plus John Eliot Gardiner on his mammoth project to perform the complete cycle of Bach's cantatas in the year 2000.

19990425

To celebrate Duke Ellington's centenary, Ivan Hewett looks at his influence over jazz and classical music.

And teachers and pupils give their opinions of the Associated Board's new jazz examinations.

19990502

Ivan Hewett visits Salford to see how the North West will benefit culturally from the new Lowry Centre.

He also discovers Rachmaninov with Vladimir Ashkenazy.

19990509

Ivan Hewett looks at how politics have influenced music in Cuba since the revolution 40 years ago, as the Barbican plays host to the UK's largest ever Cuban arts festival.

Plus the furore over who should succeed Wolfgang Wagner as director of the Bayreuth Festival.

19990523

Ivan Hewett meets the Soglasie Male Voice Choir of St Petersburg, who are reviving Russian choral music that was banned in the Soviet era.

He also finds out about about Chamber Music 2000 - the Schubert Ensemble's ambitious plan to encourage the writing and playing of chamber music.

19990530

Ivan Hewett with news and views from the musical world, including an interview with doyen of musicologists H C Robbins Landon, who talks about his discoveries and adventures in music.

19990606

As the Cardiff Singer of the World competition gets under way, Ivan Hewett explores the benefits and perils of singing competitions.

Plus a look at challenge of finding a new chief conductor for the Berlin Philharmonic, as Claudio Abbado prepares to hand over the baton.

19990613

Ivan Hewett reports on choreographer Twyla Tharp's reworking of Beethoven's Diabelli Variations.

Plus a look at whether music festivals are losing their individual identities.

19990620

As the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra celebrates the diamond jubilee of its own hall, Ivan Hewett looks at the orchestra's uncertain future.

Plus a look at the future of music in the new millennium with Danish compmoser Per Norgard, featured composer at this year's Aldeburgh Festival.

19990627

As the South Bank Centre's Meltdown festival reaches its climax, Ivan Hewett asks: has the fashion of playing any kind of music in any venue gone too far? Also, does the opening of the new Scottish Parliament signal that Scotland needs its own national anthem?

19990704

Ivan Hewett looks at the musical heritage of Bangladesh as a festival of Bangladeshi arts and culture opens in the UK.

He also previews a new television series which explores six masterpieces of 20th-century British classical music.

19990711

Ivan Hewett looks forward to the televising of the first night of the Proms by exploring different approaches to directing concerts on television.

He also discusses the future of international arts centres with Karsten Witt of London's South Bank Centre and John Rockwell, former director of the Lincoln Center, New York.

19991010

Ivan Hewett presents the music magazine, which takes a look at the Arts Council's New Audience Programme.

19991024

Ivan Hewett talks to Sir Peter Maxwell Davies about the role of the composer in encouraging children's musical creativity.

Plus a report on why the Paris Opera is auctioning off 10,000 costumes.

19991107

Ivan Hewett debates the future of the musical with Tim Rice, Jeremy Sams and Sheridan Morley, and investigates whether ten years on Berlin's cultural life has benefited from the fall of the Wall.

19991212

Ivan Hewett asks whether the new spiritualism in music is the genuine article.

Plus a report from Argentina on People's Opera at the Teatro Colon.

19991219

Ivan Hewett discusses the music of Thomas Ades - the most feted British composer since Britten - in light of a new Channel 4 profile.

He also talks to William Orbit about his remix of classical music.

20000123

Ivan Hewett examines the public personae of modern composers.

How highly do we value our composers? What is their role in contemporary society? Plus a look at how Bristol is shaking off the disappointment of its failed Lottery bid for the refurbishment of a long-neglected music venue to provide an arts centre.

20000130

Ivan Hewett talks to conductor and composer Pierre Boulez, whose seventy-fifth year is marked by the Boulez 2000 Festival.

Plus a look at the first steps to change the Royal Festival Hall's acoustics, which musicians and audiences have complained about for years.

20000220

In the week that the South Bank Centre unveils its redevelopment masterplan, Ivan Hewett investigates the implications for the UK's largest arts complex.

Plus a discussion on whether the classical music magazine market can support the imminent lauch of yet another title.

20000227

Ivan Hewett presents a special edition live from Berlin, new capital of a unified Germany and the most culturally vibrant city in Europe.

Despite the city's optimism, money is tight, and the ghosts of a divided past still haunt the place.

Leading conductors, musicians and commentators debate the politics of Berlin's cultural life.

20000312

Ivan Hewett presents the latest news and views from the world of music, including a discussion on the future of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic in the light of Gerard Schwarz's appointment as music director.

Plus a report on musical life in the former republics of the Soviet Union.

20000326

As Deborah Warner's staging of the St John Passion opens at English National Opera, Ivan Hewett explores the powerful connections between music and theatre in Bach's music.

Plus a discussion on Pierre Boulez - 75 this week - as a force on the contemporary music scene.

20000402

Ivan Hewett discusses the mplications for music institutions around the country as the Arts Council of England devolves power to the regional arts boards.

Plus a report on how the 250th anniversary of Bach's death is being marked in his homeland.

20000409

Ivan Hewett investigates whether the new arts centre in Salford is what the region needs or whethr it is at risk of becoming a white elephant.

Plus a report from France about why the proposal to move Berlioz's remains to the Pantheon in Paris is causing such a political furore.

20000416

Ivan Hewett debates whether amateur music-making in this country is valued.

Plus an exploration of the extraordinary world of sound art, as a major exhibition opens at London's Hayward Gallery.

20000430

As a celebration of Gypsy music and arts opens at London's Barbican Centre, Ivan Hewett investigates whether Gypsy culture is still alive today.

Plus a report on a music project tackling racism among football supporters at Charlton Athletic.

20000507

As a major festival devoted to works inspired by impresario Sergei Diaghilev opens, Ivan Hewett investigates whether there is still a place in the modern world for old-fashioned music dictators.

Plus a report on the background to today's controversial performance by the Vienna Philharmonic under Simon Rattle at the site of the Mauthausen concentration camp.

20000521

Italian politics is currently taking turn to the right.

Ivan Hewett investigates how this may affect the country's musical life.

Plus a report on the reaction to the news that the three Paris-based symphony orchestras have all appointed new conductors, none of them French.

20000604

Ivan Hewett investigates a project in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, where the opera house has just been restored, and investigates the work of the specialists who treat injured dancers.

20000611

Ivan Hewett investigates what community music will be like in the 21st century and how community musicians will develop their skills to meet new challenges.

Plus a report on the use of computers in the musical classroom.

Are computers just another tool, or do they inhibit musical originality?

20000618

Ivan Hewett talks to Andrew Porter, who this week gives the Hesse Lecture at the Aldeburgh Festival on the subject of the responsibilities and rewards of being a music critic.

What are critics for? And who reads them? Ivan Hewett discusses these questions with Andrew Porter and some of his colleagues, and talks to those who read the critics, and those who commission their work.

20000625

Ivan Hewett discovers the background to the recent controversial collaboration between the Berlin Philharmonic and a leading German rock band.

Plus a report on the recent conference in Iceland on music and national identity.

Does English music still sound English? And should it still try?

20000702

Ivan Hewett explores the life and teaching of the composer Franz Schreker.

Plus why several international companies are currently vying to become dominant in the new multimedia musical world - in the process acquiring some of the most famous old-school music publishers, especially in France and Italy.

20000910

Ivan Hewett returns with a new series of his weekly look at matters of the moment in the musical world.

Today, he explores the origins of music itself, plus a look back at the Proms and a look forward to the autumn season.

20000917

Ivan Hewett takes a weekly look at current issues in the musical world.

In this edition, he previews an Argentinian fiesta and asks whether the phenomenon of cultural tourism is entirely healthy.

Plus a look at Sir John Drummond's thoughts on the state of music in Britain as revealed in his recently published memoirs.

20000924

Ivan Hewett takes a weekly look at current issues in the musical world.

In this edition, he invites Sir Charles Mackerras to mark the approach of his 75th birthday by reflecting upon his musical involvement in an ever-changing Eastern Europe.

Plus an investigation into the threats faced by brass bands.

20001001

Ivan Hewett takes a weekly look at current issues in the musical world.

This edition looks at a shared commissioning exercise between two female composers, namely Sally Beamish and Karin Rehnkvist.

Plus an investigation into the state of music publishing across Europe.

20001008

Ivan Hewett investigates how the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra has regrouped following the demise last winter of the Bournemouth Sinfonietta.

Plus news of a three-week celebration of the music of Sir John Taverner

20001022

Ivan Hewett investigates how the recently lifted EU sanctions against Austria have affected the musical life of the country.

20001029

Ivan Hewett looks at the changing role that music plays in forging cultural identity around the world.

20001105

Ivan Hewett investigates how the course of opera was changed by a philosopher and previews a new community opera inspired by the Tower of Babel.

20001112

Ivan Hewett investigates how politics impinges on music-making in Haiti.

Neil Hoyle make a plea for politics to be kept out of music.

And Christopher Cook looks at modern dance in China.

20001210

Ivan Hewett asks whether the tradition of British travelling folk singers is dying out, examines the teaching of music in the classroom, and assesses the artistic and financial health of the Ulster Orchestra.

20001217

On the centenary of the death of the Marxist composer Alan Bush, Ivan Hewett asks who are today's political composers.

And Michael Kaiser reflects on the arts, subsidy, and running an opera house in Britain.

20010107

Ivan Hewett takes a weekly look at current issues in the musical world.

This edition focuses on the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, the seventh edition of which is due to be published tomorrow.

As well as a 29-volume print version, taking up almost five feet of shelf room and weighing 68 kilos, the dictionary will also be available in a constantly updated online version.

20010114

Ivan Hewett discovers how, with the establishment of the Sonic Arts Research Centre, Northern Ireland hopes to become a pioneer in the field of fusing technology and music.

Plus a report on Manchester's Halle Orchestra.

20010121

Ivan Hewett celebrates the sixtieth birthday of organist Dame Gillian Weir, anticipates Verdi centenary, and talks to pianist Robert Levin about improvisation.

20010204

Ivan Hewett visits Tate Modern's new exhibition Century City: Art and Culture in the Modern Metropolis and asks whether the trend towards the use of background music in galleries enhances or distracts.

Plus a look at how Northern Ireland hopes to lead the field in fusing music and technology with the establishment of the Sonic Arts Research Centre.

20010218

Ivan Hewett investigates the difference between the City of Birmingham Touring Opera and the Birmingham Opera Company and talks to composer Ned Rorem about the UK premieres of three of his operas.

20010225

Ivan Hewett talks to Nicholas Kenyon about whether authentic performance has a future and looks at a new mentor scheme for young composers.

20010311

Ivan Hewett lvisits the new music venue Ocean, which aims to regenrate one of London's most deprived boroughs.

Plus a report on Vienna's millennium project the House of Music.

20010318

Ivan Hewett talks to two grand old men of music: the composer Hans Werner Henze - 75 later this year and currently being celebrated on London's South Bank - and musical iconoclast and prankster Mauricio Kagel, who is the subject of a retrospective at the Royal Academy of Music.

20010401

Sir Andrew Davis talks to Ivan Hewett about his first six months as the head of the Chicago Lyric Opera.

And Irene Schreier Scott makes the case for music theorist Heinrich Schenker.

20010408

Ivan Hewett is joined by two historians of recorded sound, Timothy Day and Robert Philip, to discuss the value of old recordings for today's musicians.

Plus news of two contrasting schemes to encourage young composers.

20010415

Ivan Hewett visits Rome and investigates a new concert hall, the Rome Opera and the state of music funding in Italy.

He also searches for lost musical treasures in the Vatican cellars.

20010429

Ivan Hewett talks to Peter Maxwell Davies about his trip to Antarctica and the resulting symphony, which premieres next weekend.

Plus an investigation into how Britain's summer music festivals will be affected by the foot and mouth epidemic.

20010506

Live from the Royal Festival Hall, Ivan Hewett chairs a debate on the future of the South Bank Centre.

The panel includes Nicky Gavron, Deputy Mayor of London, Jodi Myers, Director of Performing Arts at the South Bank, Serge Dorny, Artistic Director of the LPO, Claire Fox, Director of the Institute of Ideas, and David Jones, concert promoter and Director of Serious Ltd.

20010513

Ivan Hewett launches Radio 3's Remaking the Past season in conversation with the composer Alexander Goehr.

Plus a report on how musicals are breaking free of the past by turning to garage and hip hop music.

20010520

On the eve of the Chard Festival of Women Composers, Ivan Hewett discusses feminism in music.

And pianist Abdullah Ibrahim talks about new projects back home in South Africa.

Plus a profile of veteran film composer Ennio Morricone.

20010527

Ivan Hewett meets some of the members of the Chamber Orchestra of Europe - which celebrates its 20th anniversary this year - and eavesdrops on a commission by Heinz Holliger.

Plus a 70th-birthday recital and interview with pianist Alfred Brendel

20010603

Ivan Hewett talks to Valery Gergiev, Musical Director of the Kirov Opera.

Plus views on politics and the arts from musicians around the country.

20010610

Ivan Hewett investigates the education and training of the next generation of British musicians, talking to teachers, administrators, agents, seasoned performers and the young musicians themselves.

He compares their situation to that of their counterparts in Europe and America, and asks to what extent the current system of education is working and whether things are getting better or worse.

20010624

Ivan Hewett celebrates the centenary of the music publishing house Universal Edition, which since its foundation has been at the forefront of musical developments, publishing works by composers such as Mahler, Janacek, Boulez, Stockhausen and Birtwistle.

20010708

Ivan Hewett looks back at the pioneering fusion band Shakti, who are taking part in the South Bank Centre's Rhythm Sticks Festival.

Plus a report on why today's composers want to abandon the concert hall.

20010715

In the final edition before the programme takes a summer break, Ivan Hewett investigates ancient Greek water-organs, a pair of remarkable dramatic sisters and the continuing refurbishment of the Royal Albert Hall.

He also celebrates the centenary of Gerald Finzi, who was born yesterday in 1901.

20020106

Ivan Hewett takes the temperature of the symphony orchestra with conductor Douglas Bostock, composer Alwynne Prichard and managing director of the LSO Clive Gillinson

20020113

Ivan Hewett discusses surtitles for opera, the homeless state of La Scala, and a new Granta collection of writing on music.

20020120

Ivan Hewett explores the work of the Irene Taylor Trust, which uses music to teach prison inmates artistic and personal skills.

Plus reviews of two new books on William Walton.

20020127

Ivan Hewett marks the first BBC World Music Awards with a special edition discussing issues facing the world music scene today.

Plus an interview with Susheela Raman.

20020203

Ivan Hewett blows the dust off musical manuscripts at Magdalen College, Oxford, and finds out what is happening to the Bach family archive, currently housed in Kiev.

20020303

With Ivan Hewett.

Including an investigation of the Peter Warlock archive at Eton College and a profile of ballerina Beryl Grey as she approaches her seventy-fifth birthday.

20020310

Ivan Hewett talks to Daniel Barenboim.

Plus a review of a new book about Toscanini's 17 years at the helm of the NBC Symphony Orchestra, and Hilary Finch's views on the encore.

20020407

Ivan Hewett talks to conductor Lorin Maazel and investigates the theory that digital music editing has killed off interpretation in real music making.

20020414

Ivan Hewett pays tribute to Hungarian composer Gyorgy Kurtag, who is on a visit to the UK, and Damian Fowler reports on the demise of classical music radio stations in America.

20020512

Ivan Hewett explores new works by composer Peter Maxwell Davies and choreographer Christopher Wheeldon and reports on musical life down under.

20020519

Ivan Hewett investigates the world of Baroque music as part of the theme of this year's Lufthansa Festival, and examines the influences on music written for Bollywood films.

20020526

Ivan Hewett with features on this year's Spitalfields Festival, composer Iannis Xenakis, and the St Petersburg Philharmonic's bicentenary.

20020609

Ivan Hewett talks to Andre Previn; Catherine Guilyardi considers the cultural policies of Jean-Marie Le Pen; and Roger Nichols reviews a new book about Swiss conductor Paul Sacher.

20020616

Ivan Hewett talks to pianist Murray Perahia.

Plus a feature on the Alvin Ailey Dance Company, and writer Janice Galloway on her new novel based on the life of Clara Schumann.

20020623

Ivan Hewett's guests include composer Nigel Osborne and father-and-daughter duo Ravi and Anoushka Shankar.

Plus a new Janacek biography and this year's City of London Festival.

20020707

Ivan Hewett talks to countertenor James Bowman and Naxos boss Klaus Heymann.

20030209

With Dermot Clinch and Tommy Pearson.

Film director Ken Russell talks about how music helped him through a personal crisis.

And an examination of how well we nurture our composers.

20030223

Dermot Clinch and Tommy Pearson with news from the music world, an interview with pianist Murray Perahia and a fresh examination of Sergei Prokofiev.

20030413

The weekly magazine programme with Dermot Clinch and Tommy Pearson.

20030427

With Dermot Clinch and Tommy Pearson.

As Almeida Opera prepares to return to its Islington home, Music Matters takes a walk around its newly renovated theatre.

20030511

Dermot Clinch and Tommy Pearson with news from the music world and an interview with American pianist Richard Goode.

20030518

With Dermot Clinch and Tommy Pearson.

Music Matters takes a look at the relationship of singers and their unsung heroes, accompanists.

20030525

With Dermot Clinch and Tommy Pearson.

In the anniversary year of Queen Elizabeth the First, Dermot Clinch views some important Elizabethan musical scores in the British Library.

Plus a look at African polyrhythm and its influence on modern composers, and a consideration of the concept of virtuosity - lost art from a bygone age or relevant musical phenomenon?

20030601

With Dermot Clinch and Tommy Pearson.

Including an interview with composer George Benjamin and an examination of how top jobs in the music profession are filled.

20030921

Music magazine with Tom Service, featuring an interview with New York pianist and writer Charles Rosen, and a look at A Tale Of Four Houses, a new book charting the history of four of the world's most important and influential opera houses: The Royal Opera House; La Scala in Milan; Vienna's Staatsoper; and the New York Met.

20031012

With Tom Service Including an interview with The English conductor Sir Roger Norrington whose work on musical scores, on sound, on orchestra size, seating and playing have influenced the way 18th and 19th Century music is now perceived.

And a look at the world of some of the unsung heroes of the operatic world: understudies.

20031019

With Tom Service.

An interview with architect Frank Gehry whose 'Walt Disney Concert Hall' opens in Los Angeles next week, plus Music Matters assesses the reputation of Claudio Monteverdi.

20031109

With Tom Service.

Including news and interviews with key players in the music world.

20031116

With Tom Service.

News and interviews with key players in the music world.

20031214

With Tom Service.

News and interviews from key players in the music world.

20040104

Tom Service talks to William Christie, director of Les Arts Florissants, about the demands of Baroque repertoire.

Plus a discussion of two new biographies of Mendelssohn.

20040111

Tom Service with news and views from the world of music.

20040118

In a special live edition of Music Matters, Tom Service discusses the life and legacy of John Cage with experts and enthusiasts and illustration from those who knew him.

20040201

Austrian maverick HK Gruber talks about his work as composer, conductor, chansonnier and double bass player.

Simon Broughton reports from the most remote music festival in the world, held annually in the Sahara Desert.

And a look at a new assessment of the work of Luigi Dallapiccola, one of the most important Italian composers of the twentieth century.

Presented by Tom Service.

20040208

Featuring 'Spectrum', a new book and CD published by the Associated Board containing specially commissioned short cello pieces aimed at students, amateur and professional musicians.

Music Matters puts it to the test.

Presented by Tom Service.

20040307

With Tom Service.

Today's programme includes an interview with Scottish composer James MacMillan, whose work features heavily in the Sounds New festival in Canterbury.

And, as the organ in the Royal Festival Hall celebrates its 50th birthday, we'll be asking whether this particular instrument is as controversial today as it was back in 1954.

20040314

With Tom Service In this special edition Music Matters asks what was the genius of Mozart? Joining in the discussion are director Peter Hall, pianist Mitsuko Uchida, conductor Neville Marriner and Professor Joan Freeman, international expert on gifted children.

And composer John Tavener talks about why he thinks Mozart was divinely inspired.

Evening Morning

Afternoon

20040321

With Tom Service.

The violin is possibly the most versatile of all instruments and blessed with a range and emotional intensity to rival even the human voice.

As a major festival devoted to the instrument opens this week across London, Music Matters takes a look at the violin from the great triumphs of instrument making in the seventeenth century to the latest repertoire written for it.

With contributions from Gil Shaham, Maxim Vengerov, Nigel Kennedy, Anne-Sophie Mutter and Ida Haendel.

20040404

When Stalin stormed out of an early performance of Shostakovich's earthy and often violent opera, Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, the composer feared he would be arrested and killed.

Music Matters discusses Solomon Volkov's new account of the relationship between composer and dictator.

And, as a new production of the opera opens at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Tom Service talks to its director, Richard Jones.

20040411

Tom Service presents a special edition of Music Matters looking at the legacy of Luciano Berio, who died last year.

As a major festival devoted to life and work of the composer opens this week at London's South Bank Centre, Tom talks to some of those closest to him, including his widow Talia Pecker-Berio, cellist Rohan de Saram, trombonist Christian Lindberg and his biographer David Osmond-Smith.

20040418

Conductor Marc Minkowski has made a virtue out of playing not only early repertoire but classical, romantic and modern music too.

With such diversity, Tom asks him how he manages to keep focused.

Michael Kennedy talks about his new biography of Edward Elgar and Tom travels to Northumberland to explore its native folk music.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

Conductor Marc Minkowski has made a virtue out of playing not only early repertoire but classical, romantic and modern music too. With such diversity, Tom asks him how he manages to keep focused. Michael Kennedy talks about his new biography of Edward Elgar and Tom travels to Northumberland to explore its native folk music.

Conductor Marc Minkowski has made a virtue out of playing not only early repertoire but classical, romantic and modern music too.

With such diversity, Tom asks him how he manages to keep focused.

Michael Kennedy talks about his new biography of Edward Elgar and Tom travels to Northumberland to explore its native folk music.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20040502

English conductor Sir Edward Downes is currently in his eightieth year.

As he prepares to conduct Verdi's Il Trovatore at the Royal Opera House, where he has worked for more than half a century, he talks of his life, work, and collaboration with great artists including the composer Shostakovich.

20040509

Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time was given one of the most unusual and moving premieres of any in the last century in Stalag VIII A, a Nazi prison camp.

Author Rebecca Rischin talks to Tom Service about her investigation into the history of the premiere based on testimonies by former prisoners and musicians.

Plus, Judith Weir, one of Britain's most wide ranging composers, looks back on her prolific career on the occasion of her 50th birthday, and the Battersea Arts Centre, pioneers of the phenomenally successful Jerry Springer the Opera, celebrate the beginning of their opera festival.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time was given one of the most unusual and moving premieres of any in the last century in Stalag VIII A, a Nazi prison camp. Author Rebecca Rischin talks to Tom Service about her investigation into the history of the premiere based on testimonies by former prisoners and musicians.

Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time was given one of the most unusual and moving premieres of any in the last century in Stalag VIII A, a Nazi prison camp.

Author Rebecca Rischin talks to Tom Service about her investigation into the history of the premiere based on testimonies by former prisoners and musicians.

Plus, Judith Weir, one of Britain's most wide ranging composers, looks back on her prolific career on the occasion of her 50th birthday, and the Battersea Arts Centre, pioneers of the phenomenally successful Jerry Springer the Opera, celebrate the beginning of their opera festival.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20040516

With Tom Service The operas of Richard Strauss are hugely popular - a new production of Arabella is one of three Strauss operas staged by the Royal Opera House this year.

Music Matters asks whether the composer's genius for operatic music is matched by his characterisation and plot.

With Tom Service

The operas of Richard Strauss are hugely popular - a new production of Arabella is one of three Strauss operas staged by the Royal Opera House this year.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

The operas of Richard Strauss are hugely popular - a new production of Arabella is one of three Strauss operas staged by the Royal Opera House this year. Music Matters asks whether the composer's genius for operatic music is matched by his characterisation and plot.

With Tom Service The operas of Richard Strauss are hugely popular - a new production of Arabella is one of three Strauss operas staged by the Royal Opera House this year.

Music Matters asks whether the composer's genius for operatic music is matched by his characterisation and plot.

With Tom Service

The operas of Richard Strauss are hugely popular - a new production of Arabella is one of three Strauss operas staged by the Royal Opera House this year.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20040523

Tom Service's guest is Sir Richard Rodney Bennett is one of the most versatile composers around, composing for concerts and films, playing the piano in contemporary music and in jazz idioms, singing and playing classic show tunes in cabaret.

With a major world premiere, he is also the featured composer at this year's Bury St.

Edmunds festival.

What does his success owe to his 1979 move to New York and what does he feel is the current state of American contemporary music?

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20040606

Tom Service talks to key players in today's music scene and looks back at the world of the medieval troubador.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20040613

Tom Service talks to composer Kevin Volans, whose latest string quartet, 'Black Woman Rising', is premiered at the Ravinia Festival, one of America's largest musical events.

And five years ago, Youth Music set out to bring music making to children living in areas of social and economic need.

Tom previews their big birthday bash in Birmingham this week with music from Taiko drummers to hip hop bands and youth orchestras.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

Tom Service talks to composer Kevin Volans, whose latest string quartet, 'Black Woman Rising', is premiered at the Ravinia Festival, one of America's largest musical events. And five years ago, Youth Music set out to bring music making to children living in areas of social and economic need. Tom previews their big birthday bash in Birmingham this week with music from Taiko drummers to hip hop bands and youth orchestras.

Tom Service talks to composer Kevin Volans, whose latest string quartet, 'Black Woman Rising', is premiered at the Ravinia Festival, one of America's largest musical events.

And five years ago, Youth Music set out to bring music making to children living in areas of social and economic need.

Tom previews their big birthday bash in Birmingham this week with music from Taiko drummers to hip hop bands and youth orchestras.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20040620

Tom Service talks to leading singers about Britten's tenor roles and reviews a new biography of the Canadian pianist Glenn Gould.

20040711

Includes a conversation with Pierre Boulez as he prepares to return to Bayreuth with Parsifal and Jonathan Coe on why he prefers composers who are often regarded as 'second rate'.

20040912

With Tom Service.

Daniel Barenboim explains why, relatively late in his career, he has now joined the pantheon of great pianists to have recorded Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier.

And a look at Push 04, a season of British, black-led theatre, opera and ballet.

Daniel Barenboim explains why, relatively late in his career, he has now joined the pantheon of great pianists to have recorded Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier. And a look at Push 04, a season of British, black-led theatre, opera and ballet.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon

With Tom Service.

Daniel Barenboim explains why, relatively late in his career, he has now joined the pantheon of great pianists to have recorded Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier.

And a look at Push 04, a season of British, black-led theatre, opera and ballet.

20040919

Tom Service presents a live edition of the programme in which he meets composer conductor Pierre Boulez ahead of a series of performances with the London Symphony Orchestra.

Author Jerrold Northrop Moore explores the rural landscape of Worcestershire that informed much of Elgar's work, and as English National Opera prepare to present the complete production of Berlioz's opera, The Trojans, Tom talks to some of those who remember the British premiere of the epic in Glasgow in 1935.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

Tom Service presents a live edition of the programme in which he meets composer conductor Pierre Boulez ahead of a series of performances with the London Symphony Orchestra. Author Jerrold Northrop Moore explores the rural landscape of Worcestershire that informed much of Elgar's work, and as English National Opera prepare to present the complete production of Berlioz's opera, The Trojans, Tom talks to some of those who remember the British premiere of the epic in Glasgow in 1935.

Tom Service presents a live edition of the programme in which he meets composer conductor Pierre Boulez ahead of a series of performances with the London Symphony Orchestra.

Author Jerrold Northrop Moore explores the rural landscape of Worcestershire that informed much of Elgar's work, and as English National Opera prepare to present the complete production of Berlioz's opera, The Trojans, Tom talks to some of those who remember the British premiere of the epic in Glasgow in 1935.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20041003

Virtuoso recorder player Michala Petri talks about forging a modern career with an instrument most associated with baroque music.

And, as productions of the one-act opera Duke Bluebeard's Castle open in England and Scotland, Music Matters looks at the personal and psychosexual elements of Bartok's dark, interior drama.#

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

Virtuoso recorder player Michala Petri talks about forging a modern career with an instrument most associated with baroque music. And, as productions of the one-act opera Duke Bluebeard's Castle open in England and Scotland, Music Matters looks at the personal and psychosexual elements of Bartok's dark, interior drama.#

Virtuoso recorder player Michala Petri talks about forging a modern career with an instrument most associated with baroque music.

And, as productions of the one-act opera Duke Bluebeard's Castle open in England and Scotland, Music Matters looks at the personal and psychosexual elements of Bartok's dark, interior drama.#

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20041010

The acting skills of many opera singers are often said to be as wooden as the stage the performers are standing on.

Tom Service investigates the infinite difficulties posed by combining acting with singing.

Tom also meets one of Europe's most influential composers, Louis Andriessen.

He has continually challenged conventional ideas about what music is and today he visits some of the places most important to him in his native Amsterdam.

And as the National Brass Band Championships take place next week at the Royal Albert Hall in London, Tom looks at how the passion and excitement of banding informs so much of the nation's music making.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

The acting skills of many opera singers are often said to be as wooden as the stage the performers are standing on. Tom Service investigates the infinite difficulties posed by combining acting with singing. Tom also meets one of Europe's most influential composers, Louis Andriessen. He has continually challenged conventional ideas about what music is and today he visits some of the places most important to him in his native Amsterdam. And as the National Brass Band Championships take place next week at the Royal Albert Hall in London, Tom looks at how the passion and excitement of banding informs so much of the nation's music making.

The acting skills of many opera singers are often said to be as wooden as the stage the performers are standing on.

Tom Service investigates the infinite difficulties posed by combining acting with singing.

Tom also meets one of Europe's most influential composers, Louis Andriessen.

He has continually challenged conventional ideas about what music is and today he visits some of the places most important to him in his native Amsterdam.

And as the National Brass Band Championships take place next week at the Royal Albert Hall in London, Tom looks at how the passion and excitement of banding informs so much of the nation's music making.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20041017

A live edition with music news and interviews including a profile of composer Harrison Birtwistle.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20041024

Sakari Oramo talks to Tom Service about one of the most remarkable, yet forgotten figures of the British Music Renaissance, Manchester born John Foulds.

And Tom discovers what the young composers from the Royal Academy of Music are learning from their Stateside contemporaries.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

Sakari Oramo talks to Tom Service about one of the most remarkable, yet forgotten figures of the British Music Renaissance, Manchester born John Foulds. And Tom discovers what the young composers from the Royal Academy of Music are learning from their Stateside contemporaries.

Sakari Oramo talks to Tom Service about one of the most remarkable, yet forgotten figures of the British Music Renaissance, Manchester born John Foulds.

And Tom discovers what the young composers from the Royal Academy of Music are learning from their Stateside contemporaries.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20041107

As the dust begins to settle on the US elections, a look at the American music scene past and present.

What do events in the Oval Office mean for American orchestras and music-making? With American musician Joshua Rifkin on Sousa, Joplin and Bach, and a personal memoir of the journalist Paul Moor on his 1948 meeting with the composer Charles Ives.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

As the dust begins to settle on the US elections, a look at the American music scene past and present. What do events in the Oval Office mean for American orchestras and music-making? With American musician Joshua Rifkin on Sousa, Joplin and Bach, and a personal memoir of the journalist Paul Moor on his 1948 meeting with the composer Charles Ives.

As the dust begins to settle on the US elections, a look at the American music scene past and present.

What do events in the Oval Office mean for American orchestras and music-making? With American musician Joshua Rifkin on Sousa, Joplin and Bach, and a personal memoir of the journalist Paul Moor on his 1948 meeting with the composer Charles Ives.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20041114

Almost nine years after Venice's La Fenice Opera House was burnt to the ground, the phoenix of the Italian opera world is about to re-open with a new production of La Traviata originally written for the theatre in 1853.

The first time it was performed there was a disaster with the audience sniggering at the large leading lady apparently wasting away from consumption, but this time directed by Robert Carsen, it promises to be a more celebratory affair in the newly restored building.

Tom Service presents a special edition of the programme talking to the director and taking a tour of the resplendent opera house.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

Almost nine years after Venice's La Fenice Opera House was burnt to the ground, the phoenix of the Italian opera world is about to re-open with a new production of La Traviata originally written for the theatre in 1853. The first time it was performed there was a disaster with the audience sniggering at the large leading lady apparently wasting away from consumption, but this time directed by Robert Carsen, it promises to be a more celebratory affair in the newly restored building. Tom Service presents a special edition of the programme talking to the director and taking a tour of the resplendent opera house.

Almost nine years after Venice's La Fenice Opera House was burnt to the ground, the phoenix of the Italian opera world is about to re-open with a new production of La Traviata originally written for the theatre in 1853.

The first time it was performed there was a disaster with the audience sniggering at the large leading lady apparently wasting away from consumption, but this time directed by Robert Carsen, it promises to be a more celebratory affair in the newly restored building.

Tom Service presents a special edition of the programme talking to the director and taking a tour of the resplendent opera house.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20041121

Tom Service looks at the state of jazz today.

Are the new breed of young jazz performers really developing the genre or just giving it a glossy, marketable image?

Tom Service looks at the state of jazz today. Are the new breed of young jazz performers really developing the genre or just giving it a glossy, marketable image?

Evening

Morning

Afternoon

Tom Service looks at the state of jazz today.

Are the new breed of young jazz performers really developing the genre or just giving it a glossy, marketable image?

20041205

Today a rare interview with Dame Janet Baker, the English mezzo-soprano who was one of the most sought after and beloved voices of music in the twentieth century.

Does Joachim Kohler's new biography of Richard Wagner succeed in painting a rounded portrait of the composer as both historical phenomenon and complex personality? And, with a season of horror films in full swing at the National Film Theatre, a look at the way music has expressed fear in the movies.

Presenter Tom Service.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

Today a rare interview with Dame Janet Baker, the English mezzo-soprano who was one of the most sought after and beloved voices of music in the twentieth century. Does Joachim Kohler's new biography of Richard Wagner succeed in painting a rounded portrait of the composer as both historical phenomenon and complex personality? And, with a season of horror films in full swing at the National Film Theatre, a look at the way music has expressed fear in the movies.

Today a rare interview with Dame Janet Baker, the English mezzo-soprano who was one of the most sought after and beloved voices of music in the twentieth century.

Does Joachim Kohler's new biography of Richard Wagner succeed in painting a rounded portrait of the composer as both historical phenomenon and complex personality? And, with a season of horror films in full swing at the National Film Theatre, a look at the way music has expressed fear in the movies.

Presenter Tom Service.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20041212

Tom Service talks to Portuguese pianist Maria Joao Pires about the spirituality of her performances, and examines the letters of Benjamin Britten written between 1946 and 1951 - the period when he wrote many of his best known works, founded both the English Opera Group and the Aldeburgh Festival, and toured widely as a pianist and composer.

20050109

Tom Service talks to conductor Charles Dutoit about giving old music new vitality, the influence Herbert von Karajan made on him and how, unusually for a conductor, he prefers short rehearsals.

And as Orthodox Christians celebrated Christmas last Friday, Tom takes a look at the music associated with the celebrations.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

Tom Service talks to conductor Charles Dutoit about giving old music new vitality, the influence Herbert von Karajan made on him and how, unusually for a conductor, he prefers short rehearsals. And as Orthodox Christians celebrated Christmas last Friday, Tom takes a look at the music associated with the celebrations.

Tom Service talks to conductor Charles Dutoit about giving old music new vitality, the influence Herbert von Karajan made on him and how, unusually for a conductor, he prefers short rehearsals.

And as Orthodox Christians celebrated Christmas last Friday, Tom takes a look at the music associated with the celebrations.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20050123

Tom Service takes a look at music written to commemorate the liberation of the Second World War concentration camps as the 60th anniversary is marked on Thursday by Holocaust Memorial Day.

He also talks to one of the world's foremost experts in the performance of 18th century music, Frans Brüggen.

Tom Service takes a look at music written to commemorate the liberation of the Second World War concentration camps as the 60th anniversary is marked on Thursday by Holocaust Memorial Day. He also talks to one of the world's foremost experts in the performance of 18th century music, Frans Brüggen.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon

Tom Service takes a look at music written to commemorate the liberation of the Second World War concentration camps as the 60th anniversary is marked on Thursday by Holocaust Memorial Day.

He also talks to one of the world's foremost experts in the performance of 18th century music, Frans Brüggen.

20050206

Meredith Monk has been described as 'a voice of the future' and 'one of America's coolest composers', she talks to presenter Tom Service about her career that spans more than 35 years.

And Tom follows the members of the Sacconi Quartet as they make their debut at one of London's most prestigious venues, in the first in a short series investigating the pitfalls of launching a performing career.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

Meredith Monk has been described as 'a voice of the future' and 'one of America's coolest composers', she talks to presenter Tom Service about her career that spans more than 35 years. And Tom follows the members of the Sacconi Quartet as they make their debut at one of London's most prestigious venues, in the first in a short series investigating the pitfalls of launching a performing career.

Meredith Monk has been described as 'a voice of the future' and 'one of America's coolest composers', she talks to presenter Tom Service about her career that spans more than 35 years.

And Tom follows the members of the Sacconi Quartet as they make their debut at one of London's most prestigious venues, in the first in a short series investigating the pitfalls of launching a performing career.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20050213

Today's programme includes an interview with one of Britain's great conducting talents, Sir Colin Davis, Principal conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra.

Plus a profile of maverick American composer Marc Blitzstein and, 50 years since its invention, a look at the synthesiser, the electronic instrument that transformed pop and classical music.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20050313

Tom Service talks to Fanny Waterman, doyenne of piano teachers, and takes a look at the reputation of the prolific Czech composer Bohuslav Martinu.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon

Tom Service talks to Fanny Waterman, doyenne of piano teachers, and takes a look at the reputation of the prolific Czech composer Bohuslav Martinu.

20050327

GF Handel is one of the best known and loved of all composers, but why has his music fascinated and delighted so many?

As the 28th London Handel Festival opens, Tom Service talks to leading musicians drawn to the Handelian flame, including Christopher Hogwood, Nicholas McGegan and Emmanuelle Haim.

Does the image of Handel the jolly composer and impressario belie a darker side to his character? And what were Handel's views on food, music, money and the opposite sex?

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20050403

In a major interview ahead of a festival of his music at the South Bank Centre in London, Sir Peter Maxwell Davies speaks frankly to Tom Service about the position he holds as the Master of the Queen?s Music, the future of contemporary classical music, and the government?s recently announced Music Manifesto.

Tom also investigates the complex life of the Faustian figure, composer Ferruccio Busoni, as the first biography of him is published for over 70 years.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

Tom Service talks to director Peter Sellars, conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen and video artist Bill Viola about their extraordinary new production of Wagner's Tristan and Isolde which opens in Paris this week, promising to deliver fresh insight into Wagner's operatic masterpiece.

In the UK, a new play Tristan and Yseult opens at the National Theatre and Music Matters calls on psychologists and philosophers to explain why the Tristan myth has endured so strongly since the middle ages - and is still relevant today.

And leading musicians talk about their make-or-break career decisions.

In the UK, a new play Tristan and Yseult opens at the National Theatre and Music Matters calls on psychologists and philosophers to explain why the Tristan myth has endured so strongly since the middle ages - and is still relevant today. And leading musicians talk about their make-or-break career decisions.

In a major interview ahead of a festival of his music at the South Bank Centre in London, Sir Peter Maxwell Davies speaks frankly to Tom Service about the position he holds as the Master of the Queen?s Music, the future of contemporary classical music, and the government?s recently announced Music Manifesto.

Tom also investigates the complex life of the Faustian figure, composer Ferruccio Busoni, as the first biography of him is published for over 70 years.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

Tom Service talks to director Peter Sellars, conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen and video artist Bill Viola about their extraordinary new production of Wagner's Tristan and Isolde which opens in Paris this week, promising to deliver fresh insight into Wagner's operatic masterpiece.

In the UK, a new play Tristan and Yseult opens at the National Theatre and Music Matters calls on psychologists and philosophers to explain why the Tristan myth has endured so strongly since the middle ages - and is still relevant today.

And leading musicians talk about their make-or-break career decisions.

20050410

Tom Service talks to director Peter Sellars, conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen and video artist Bill Viola about their extraordinary new production of Wagner's Tristan and Isolde which opens in Paris this week, promising to deliver fresh insight into Wagner's operatic masterpiece.

In the UK, a new play Tristan and Yseult opens at the National Theatre and Music Matters calls on psychologists and philosophers to explain why the Tristan myth has endured so strongly since the middle ages - and is still relevant today.

And leading musicians talk about their make-or-break career decisions.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

In the UK, a new play Tristan and Yseult opens at the National Theatre and Music Matters calls on psychologists and philosophers to explain why the Tristan myth has endured so strongly since the middle ages - and is still relevant today. And leading musicians talk about their make-or-break career decisions.

Tom Service talks to director Peter Sellars, conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen and video artist Bill Viola about their extraordinary new production of Wagner's Tristan and Isolde which opens in Paris this week, promising to deliver fresh insight into Wagner's operatic masterpiece.

In the UK, a new play Tristan and Yseult opens at the National Theatre and Music Matters calls on psychologists and philosophers to explain why the Tristan myth has endured so strongly since the middle ages - and is still relevant today.

And leading musicians talk about their make-or-break career decisions.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

20050417

Better known as conductor rather than composer, Lorin Maazel's new opera based on George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty Four opens at the Royal Opera House at the beginning of May.

It's directed by Robert Lepage, and Tom Service talks to both Maazel and Lepage about the work and the possibilities Orwell's novel presents on the operatic stage.

Meanwhile, conductor, Ingo Metzmacher's declared passion is to turn today's music into accepted repertoire, he talks about his ideas for radical concert programming and his success in giving concerts combining composers as incongruous as Beethoven and Luigi Nono.

Evening

Morning

Afternoon.

Better known as conductor rather than composer, Lorin Maazel's new opera based on George Orwell's Nineteen Eigh