Music Machine

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19971114

A Japanese Zen master told John Cage, `If something bores you after two minutes, try it for four; if it still bores you, try it for eight, sixteen, thirty-two, and so on.

Eventually you discover that it is not boring at all but very interesting.' Tommy Pearson experiences transcendence in the art of Western composition.

19980706

Tommy Pearson is joined by the quartet Tintagel to discover how animals - both domestic and exotic - were a source of inspiration for medieval composers.

19990112

Tommy Pearson talks toTerry Pratchett, who has written, specially for `Music Machine', the words to a national anthem for his fictitious Discworld city of Ankh-Morpork.

19990114

`Music Machine' has asked composer Carl Davis to write the music toTerry Pratchett's Discworld National Anthem.

Tommy Pearson asks him how you create a memorable melody.

19990329

This is the last week for `Music Machine'.

To mark the occasion, Tommy Pearson and Verity Sharp look at musical endings.

Today, Tommy Pearson finds out how eras from the Baroque to punk rock came to an end and asks if an end is not really just another beginning.

1998 Montreux Jazz Festival19990216

The line-up for the 1998 Montreux Jazz Festival included Earth, Wind and Fire, the Corrs and Phil Collins, so why call it a jazz festival? Tommy Perason gets some thoughts and definitions from George Benson, Cassandra Wilson, Billy Cobham and DJ Gilles Peterson.

1998 Montreux Jazz Festival19990215

Tommy Pearson reports from last year's Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland.

This has been an annual event on the shores of Lake Geneva for over thirty years, and it just gets bigger and better.

Tommy finds out how it started and meets many of this year's organisers and musicians, including George Benson, the Corrs, and the founder of Atlantic Records, Ahmet Ertegun.

1998 Montreux Jazz Festival1998092119990219

Bootsy Collins and Billy Cobham explain funk to Tommy Pearson - the style, the attitude and the beat.

/ Tommy Pearson reports from this year's Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland.

The festival has been an annual event on the shore of Lake Geneva for over 30 years, and it just gets bigger and better.

Tommy finds out how it all started and meets many of this year's organisers and musicians, including George Benson, the Corrs and the founder of Atlantic Records, Ahmet Ertegun.

1998 Montreux Jazz Festival1998092219990219

This year's line up for the Montreux Jazz Festival included Earth, Wind and Fire, the Corrs and Phil Collins - so why call it a jazz festival? Tommy Pearson gets some thoughts and definitions from George Benson, Cassandra Wilson, Billy Cobham and Radio 1 DJ Gilles Peterson.

1998 Montreux Jazz Festival1998092419990219

Over the years, the Montreux Jazz Festival has also played host to the blues.

Tommy Pearson looks through the impressive list of names who have played there and talks to this year's star, John Mayall.

And with music from Cuba as another of this year's highlights, Tommy takes the party boat round Lake Geneva to salsa the night away.

1998 Montreux Jazz Festival1998092519990219

Funk featured loudly at this year's Montreux Jazz Festival - but what exactly is funk? Bootsy Collins and Billy Cobham explain the style, the attitude and the beat to Tommy Pearson

1998 Montreux Jazz Festival1999021819990219

The blues have always a part of the Montreux Jazz Festival.

Tommy Pearson looks through the impressive list of names who have played there and talks to last year's star John Mayall.

Music from Cuba has been another of the festival's highlights, and Tommy Pearson takes a boat round Lake Geneva to salsa the night away.

A Good Hoot19980601

This week, Verity Sharp goes in search of music that can be found in the street.

Today, she is in Manchester for the performance of two works featuring car horns.

Stephen Montague's new Horn Concerto is scored for an orchestra of automobiles, and Urban Strawberry Lunch's piece `A Good Hoot' involves Manchester's rush hour drivers.

A Musical Offering19980810

In 1747, Bach visited the court of Frederick the Great in Potsdam, where the king presented the composer with a royal theme to improvise on.

To find out how difficult Bach's task was, Tommy Pearson teams up with pianist Wayne Marshall.

A Musical Offering1998020919980811

Tommy Pearson and George Pratt try to solve some of Bach's puzzles.

/ In 1747, Bach visited the court of Frederick the Great in Potsdam, where the king presented the composer with a royal theme to improvise on.

To find out how difficult Bach's task was, Tommy Pearson teams up with pianist Wayne Marshall.

A Musical Offering1998021019980811

Tommy Pearson tries to solve some of Bach's puzzles with George Pratt.

A Question Of Gender19981012

This week, Tommy Pearson and Verity Sharp look at music which blurs the edges between male and female sexuality.

Today they are in the world of opera, investigating the concept of the trouser role and discovering why composers chose to write certain male roles for performers of the opposite sex.

A Question Of Gender19981013

Lots of songs are written from either a male or a female point of view and are usually performed by a singer of the relevant sex - but should this always be the case? Tommy Pearson and Verity Sharp investigate.

A Question Of Gender19981016

In the 1980s, pop music went through a period where sexual ambiguity was the rule rather than the exception, with artists like David Bowie, Boy George and Human League.

Verity Sharp and Tommy Pearson take a look at the pop music scene during this time.

A Theatre Piece For Singers, Players And Dancers1998103019990326

Leonard Bernstein composed his Mass in 1971, and it is by no means a conventional setting of the mass.

It was commissioned by Jackie Kennedy in honour of her late husband, and is subtitled `A Theatre Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers'.

Tommy Pearson discovers why this work has always been so controversial and what the composer was trying to achieve.

A Winter19970613

From the 17th century to the 20th: this year's opening festival includes a production of `A Winter's Tale' with newly commissioned music.

The composer, Claire van Kampen, talks about how she has tried to capture the spirit of the play, and musicians and actors explain how music works in performance.

Acoustics19971006

This week, Tommy Pearson looks at the acoustics of musical instruments - how and why they make the sound they do.

Today, he investigates the woodwind family.

Acoustics19971007

Tommy Pearson looks at the acoustics of musical instruments - how and why they make the sound they do.

Today, he investigates the acoustics of keyboard instruments.

Why does a piano sound different from a harpsichord, and how does an organ make that incredible noise?

Acoustics19971009

Tommy Pearson looks at the acoustics of musical instruments - how and why they make the sound they do.

Today, he investigates the acoustics of brass instruments.

What is actually going on in all that pipework?

Acoustics19971010

Tommy Pearson looks at the acoustics of musical instruments - how and why they make the sound they do.

Today, he investigates the string family.

Why does a double bass have to be so big, and what makes a Strad worth all that money?

Aiming High19980423

Tommy Pearson finds out about the collaborative work required to create an education project like the BBC Philharmonic's `Aiming High', which has involved 450 year nine students from north Staffordshire over the past year.

He talks to Martin Maris, the BBC Philharmonic's education and community co-ordinator; and to composer Bill Connor about the making of `From a Kiln in the Corner of the Sky'.

Animals And Music19980707

Tommy Pearson talks to musicologist Roderick Swanston about how composers have featured birdsong in their music or have been inspired by it.

Animals And Music19980709

Tommy Pearson takes a look at some of the ways in which composers have depicted animals in their music.

Animals And Music19980710

Music can have quite a dramatic effect on the behaviour of some animals.

Tommy Pearson investigates with the help of vet Nigel Taylor and a collection of four-legged friends.

Arranging And Borrowing19981218

`Arranging and Borrowing'.

Many composers have made use of English folk music in their compositions.

Verity Sharp looks at how folk music fares from this treatment.

Is it always a one-way journey?

Bach Machine1998021319980814

Composer Julian Anderson talks about his piece `Bach Machine', based on the theme from Bach's `A Musical Offering'.

Bells19971215

Tommy Pearson visits the Loughborough Bell Foundry to find out how church bells are made.

Bells19971216

Verity Sharp tries to teach Tommy Pearson the complicated art of change-ringing.

Bells19971218

Tommy Pearson discovers the ways in which bells feature in music and culture around the world, with the help of David Fanshawe.

Bells19971219

Tommy Pearson looks at the ways in which composers have used bells in their music.

Blue Lines19981208

This week, Tommy Pearson talks to four celebrity guests about an album that has played an important role in their listening experiences.

Today, he discusses Massive Attack's `Blue Lines' with DJ Jo Whiley

Blue Peter19980917

Tommy Pearson finds out how this year's Proms attracted an audience of younger listeners with a special `Blue Peter' Fortieth Birthday Prom.

He talks to some of the people behind the idea and finds out how the concert went down with the audience.

Borrowing Music19980302

This week, Verity Sharp looks at some of the many ways in which composers have borrowed other people's music over the centuries.

Today, she talks to Michael Oliver about one of music's best-known borrowers, George Frideric Handel.

Borrowing Music19980303

For centuries, composers have borrowed other people's tunes to form the theme for a set of variations.

Possibly the best-known and most used theme is from Pagaini's Caprice No 24 in A minor for solo violin.

With the help of musicologist and critic Stephen Johnson, Verity Sharp sets out to discover why so many composers - including Brahms, Rachmaninov and Andrew Lloyd Webber - have been moved to write variations on this theme.

Borrowing Music19980305

Verity Sharp takes a look at borrowing music in the jazz world.

She talks to writer and broadcaster Geoffrey Smith about the widespread practice of quoting other well-known tunes in improvised solos.

Brass Bands19980511

All this week, Tommy Pearson takes a look at the brass band and features the work of the National Youth Brass Band of Great Britain.

Today he finds out all about the history and make-up of this versatile ensemble with the help of brass band conductor Richard Evans

Brass Bands19980512

Tommy Pearson looks at the huge variety of music that makes up the repertoire of the brass band - from arrangements to specially composed showpieces.

He talks to composer Elgar Howarth, conductor Roy Newsome and members of the National Youth Brass Band of Great Britain.

Brass Bands19980515

To end the week, Tommy Pearson finds out about the National Youth Brass Band of Great Britain.

He talks to its president Elgar Howarth, conductor Roy Newsome and to some of its members.

Cabaret1998061619980615

Tommy Pearson spends a week finding out about the history of cabaret, but first needs to define what it is.

Today he asks what the differences are between cabaret, revue, variety and fringe.

Artistes and enthusiasts help to explain.

/ Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht were two big names in cabaret when it was all the rage in Berlin.

In Paris, the hot spot was the Chat Noir.

Tommy Pearson samples the atmosphere of both.

Cabaret1998061819980615

The American style of cabaret is very much alive in New York and has been for decades.

Tommy Pearson sets the scene and learns about the history.

Cabaret1998061919980615

There does not seem to have been a time when Britain was really humming with the sound of the cabaret.

Tommy Pearson visits London to see if the scene is healthy today.

Cante Flamenco1997061919980820

Elements of the flamenco style were absorbed by the gypsies as they travelled through Spain.

Many settled in Andalusia and developed a new and intense way of singing - `cante flamenco'.

Tommy Pearson explores how this and other styles reflect the tragedy and futility of the gypsy's life in Spain.

Cartoon Music19980608

Is there a musical shorthand that composers can use to conjure images in a listener's mind? Tommy Pearson explores this idea with pianist David Owen Norris.

Cartoon Music1997063019980609

In the days of the silent movie, pianists were often employed to provide a musical accompaniment to the film.

Tommy Pearson meets movie pianist Andrew Youdell to find out what they did and how they did it.

/ Is there a musical shorthand that composers can use to instantly conjure up images in a listener's mind? Tommy Pearson explores this idea with pianist David Owen Norris.

Cartoon Music1997070119980609

In the days of the silent movie, pianists were often employed to provide a musical accompaniment to the film.

Tommy Pearson meets movie pianist Andrew Youdell to find out what they did and how they did it.

Cartoon Music1997070319980609

Tommy Pearson finds out how the relationship between a cartoon animator and a composer works.

Cartoon Music1997070419980609

Is it possible to create a story in music so that listeners can tell what is going on without the help of words? Tommy Pearson attempts to find out with the help of composer Sarah Class.

Ceremonial Music19970714

Tommy Pearson troops the colour and changes the guard as he talks to Maj Terry Davies of the Band of the Welsh Guards.

Ceremonial Music19970715

Tommy Pearson goes back in history to look at the music that was composed for the royal courts.

Ceremonial Music19970716

Tommy Pearson investigates the music behind a coronation ceremony.

Ceremonial Music19970717

Tommy Pearson takes a trip around the world, dropping in on a few weddings along the way.

Ceremonial Music19970718

Tommy Pearson looks at the use of music in politics.

Chamber Music19990315

Tommy Pearson begins a week in which he explores the art of performing chamber music.

Today, he talks to pianist John Constable and violinist Tasmin Little about music for strings and piano.

Chamber Music19990316

Tommy Pearson continues his look at chamber music by examining music for strings alone.

He meets viola player Philip Dukes and cellist Julian Lloyd Webber

Chamber Music19990318

Tommy Pearson continues his exploration of chamber music with a look at music for wind.

He talks to oboist Nicholas Daniel and horn player Michael Thompson.

Chamber Music19990319

There are popular combinations that appear again and again in chamber music - the piano trio, the string quartet and the woodwind quartet.

Why have these combinations proved so successful, and how successful have composers been at trying new combinations?

Closer1998031719980901

Tommy Pearson discusses Joy Division's `Closer' with composer Steve Martland.

Collectors And Transcriptions19981215

`Collectors and Transcriptions'.

Much of our knowledge of English folk music is due to the efforts of collectors.

Verity Sharp takes a look at their work.

Was it all beneficial?

Composers And The Digital Age19970623

This week, Verity Sharp explores the world of music and machines, looking at music from the early days, in which composers cut up bits of tape, to today, when bands jam across the internet.

`Composers and the Digital Age'.

An interview with composer Jonathan Harvey about how and when composers started to use electronic instruments and techniques in their music.

Composing Computers19970625

Verity Sharp explores the world of music and machines.

`Composing Computers'.

How do you compose music while juggling? Verity Sharp finds out on a trip to York University, where she meets composer Tony Myatt.

She tries her hand at composing music with the help of his computer, two coloured balls and a video camera.

Coronation Of Poppea19981015

In many early operas like Monteverdi's `Coronation of Poppea', Handel's `Julius Caesar' and Gluck's `Orpheus and Eurydice', the leading male role was written for a castrato.

Today, these parts are more often played by women than by men.

Tommy Pearson and Verity Sharp talk to male and female singers who have sung these roles.

Cultural Thieving19970626

Verity Sharp explores the world of music and machines.

`Cultural Thieving'.

An interview with Greg Roberts, sampling expert and drummer with the band Dreadzone.

He shows Verity Sharp how sampling has changed contemporary music and gives her a quick lesson in drum loops.

Culture On A Budget19980309

Establishing an opera company may sound expensive, but Travelling Opera are a successful small business.

They are self-funding, accessible and affordable - and they do not cost the government a penny.

After ten years, their bank balance may not be huge, but their history and philosophy are rich.

Tommy Pearson meets the founding director, Peter Knapp.

Culture On A Budget19980310

There is nothing unfamiliar about funding cutbacks, but recently county music schools have been particularly hard hit.

Kent Music School is preparing to celebrate its fiftieth year, but as budgets continue to shrink, how optimistic are its staff about the future? Tommy Pearson meets the director, Michael Wearne.

Culture On A Budget19980312

African drumming, jazz improvisation and acrobatics all take place in an afternoon at Jackson's Lane Community Centre in Highgate, London, where contemporary music is performed in the evening.

It is diverse, different and run largely by volunteers, who keep those with limited incomes very much in mind.

Tommy Pearson and Verity Sharp pay a visit.

Culture On A Budget19980313

A poetry evening may not sound like a riotous night out, but at the Chapter Arts Centre in Cardiff, poetry is pulling in crowds.

This is performance poetry.

There is a lot more to it than just recitation, and the audience joins in with cheers and jeers.

Poets Marcus Moore and Katie-Jo Luxton talk to Tommy Pearson.

Dance Rhythm19970804

Tommy Pearson begins a week in which he investigates dance.

He starts with popular dance styles of the last fifty years.

Designs On The Cello19981116

Verity Sharp spends a week with cellists and composers for some of the latest thoughts on the cello and its repertoire.

Today, cellists Steven Isserlis, Philip Sheppard and Andrew Shulman discuss the pieces this century that have shaped the cello as we approach the millennium.

Designs On The Cello19981117

Composer John Woolrich talks to Verity Sharp about his new cello concerto with Steven Isserlis and leads a composition workshop for composers recently selected to write a new piece for cello duo.

Designs On The Cello19981119

Bach and Britten have both written seminal works for cello, so what is left to be said? Verity Sharp meets composers who are trying out some new ideas in a workshop, with cellists Philip Sheppard and Andrew Shulman and composer John Woolrich.

Dynamics19981105

What is loud? Everyone's idea of loud is different.

Tommy Pearson explores the outer limits of sound with James Doheny, Dr Rosemary Leonard and Bill Baddeley.

Dynamics19981103

Did dynamics define the keyboard? Tommy Pearson investigates the different sounds produced by Broadwood and Steinway pianos.

He talks to David Winston, Ulrich Gerhardt and pianist Olga Tverskaya.

Dynamics1998052619981106

are crucial to electronic music.

With spatial and surround sound, the possibilities are endless.

Jonty Harrison opens up the world of electroacoustic music to Tommy Pearson.

/ Did dynamics define the keyboard? Tommy Pearson investigates the different sounds produced by Broadwood and Steinway pianos.

Dynamics1998052819981106

What is loud? Everyone's idea of loud is different.

Tommy Pearson explores the outer limits of sound.

Dynamics1998052919981106

are crucial to electronic music.

With spatial and surround sound, the possibilities are endless.

Jonty Harrison opens up the world of electroacoustic music to Tommy Pearson.

Electronic Performance19970624

Steven Roberts of the Fine Arts Brass Ensemble talks about the different skills needed to perform electroacoustic music.

Jazz saxophonist Julian Landymore reveals how he uses an electronic saxophone to play synthesisers as well as his alto sax at live concerts.

Electronics And Digits19970627

Is Res Rocket Surfer a band with four thousand members spread across the globe, or a computer in north London? Verity Sharp meets founder members Tim Bran and Willie Henshall to find out and to listen to some music being made across the internet.

English Folk Music19981214

This week, Verity Sharp looks at English folk music.

She starts by trying to obtain a satisfactory definition of folk music.

Equations And Creation19970722

`Equations and Creation'.

A composition is an organised heap of random sounds, and they often sound best when they are arranged according to geometrical patterns and symmetary.

Verity Sharp talks to composer Sir Peter Maxwell-Davies to find out the intriguing ways in which he uses numbers.

She also discovers why composers from Bach to Oasis have relied heavily on mathematical patterns for success.

Eurovision19980504

This week, Tommy Pearson looks at the Eurovision Song Contest.

Today, he talks to Jonathan King about how the contest has changed over the last thirty years.

Eurovision19980505

This week, Tommy Pearson looks at the Eurovision Song Contest.

Today, he eavesdrops on songwriter Mike Connaris and Paul Brown as they talk about composing a hit Eurovision song.

Eurovision19980507

This week, Tommy Pearson looks at the Eurovision Song Contest.

Today, he talks to the judges about what they look for in a Eurovision song and he finds out how the British entries are selected.

Eurovision19980508

This week, Tommy Pearson looks at the Eurovision Song Contest.

Today, he finds out from Cheryl Baker and Terry Wogan what it's like to perform in front of the whole of Europe.

Famous Names19981109

Tommy Pearson meets four special guests from the world of music.

Today, he talks to jazz singer Cassandra Wilson.

Famous Names19981110

Tommy Pearson meets four special guests from the world of music.

Today, he talks to composer and arranger Ronnie Hazlehurst.

Famous Names19981112

Tommy Pearson meets four special guests from the world of music.

Today, he talks to singer, songwriter and drummer Phil Collins.

Famous Names19981113

Tommy Pearson meets four special guests from the world of music.

Today, he talks to British blues legend John Mayall.

Filling The Blanks19970725

`Filling the Blanks'.

When inspiration strikes the house next door by mistake, technology comes to the rescue.

Verity Sharp learns how a collection of terribly dry, silicon-stuffed boxes can be bullied into providing an abundance of fresh musical ideas and material using the minimum of physical force.

Martin Russ arrives on a white charger with some inspiringly creative stuff.

Finland19971117

Verity Sharp begins her journey through the music of Finland with a look at the Kalevala and the native myths of the country.

She discovers the effect these stories have had on composers such as Sibelius.

Finland19971118

Verity Sharp meets one of Finland's many amateur choirs, which represent one of the country's great musical institutions.

Finland19971120

The Savonlinna Opera Festival has one of the most romantic settings of any opera festival anywhere in the world - a medieval castle in the middle of a vast English lake.

Verity Sharp visits the festival to find out how important it is to Finnish musical life.

Finland19971121

One of Finland's most successful living composers is Einojuhani Rautavaara.

Verity Sharp meets him to find out how Finnish composers picked up the mantle left to them by Jean Sibelius.

From The Lake District19970908

Tommy Pearson begins a week from the Lake District in Cumbria.

He remembers one of the area's most famous sons, poet William Wordsworth, and looks at how some of the ideas of Romanticism were taken up in music.

From The Lake District19970909

In the second of five programmes from the Queen Katherine School in Kendal, Tommy Pearson explores music from the time of Henry VIII.

With the help of the City Waites, he finds out the kinds of music and instruments that would have been played at the court of the king and his last queen.

From The Lake District19970910

Pianist Martin Roscoe joins a trio of musicians from the Queen Katherine School in Kendal to learn some of the secrets of playing chamber music.

From The Lake District19970911

Today, the students from Queen Katherine School in Kendal get the chance to put their own questions to soprano Emma Kirkby.

Tommy Pearson chairs the proceedings.

From The Lake District19970912

The composition skills of the students at the Queen Katherine School in Kendal are put to the test today when they are challenged to put together a dance track using sounds recorded in and around the town.

With the help of composer and recording engineer Pete Nash, the students set to work to create an original piece that represents their town.

Tommy Pearson follows their progress.

Futurespace19970606

`Futurespace'.

The internet is potentially one of the largest spaces for musicians to explore in the next millennium.

Steve Tanza gives listeners a tour of his web site.

Is it possible to hear music on the radio in 3-D? Binaural recording has been used by composers and the BBC for several years to try to offer a surround-sound experience.

After a demonstration, music by Dallas Simpson, a composer working with the technique.

Gcse/a-level19971014

Verity Sharp looks at Dvorak's Cello Concerto.

Gladiators19980827

Verity Sharp talks to composers of music for film, television, advertisements and jingles and finds out if composing this type of music is really as lucrative as everyone seems to think.

She meets Carl Davis, who is well known for his scores for films and television dramas; and Muff Murfin, who writes music for jingles and television entertainment shows like `Gladiators'.

Goldberg Variations19971016

Verity Sharp looks at Bach's `Goldberg Variations'.

Gypsy Music19980818

The romantic freedom of the music of the gypsies has had a profound effect on some classical composers.

George Weigand shows how composers such as Haydn, Liszt and Brahms drew inspiration from the gypsy style.

Gypsy Music19980817

There is no single musical style common to all Gypsies.

The music of different tribes is coloured by a wealth of folk styles they have encountered on their travels around the globe.

Tommy Pearson talks to Iren Kertesz and George Weigand about how a nomadic lifestyle has affected the nature of the Gypsy's music.

Gypsy Music1997061619980821

Tommy Pearson meets members of the Bashava Band for a lesson in performance techniques.

The violinist, singer and cimbalom player show him the skills that are needed to capture the essence of gypsy style.

/ There is no single musical style common to all gypsies.

The music of different tribes is coloured by a wealth of folk styles they have encountered on their travels around the globe.

Tommy Pearson talks to Iren Kertesz and George Weigand about how a nomadic lifestyle has affected the nature of the gypsy's music.

Gypsy Music1997061719980821

Hungary has a rich tradition of gypsy music.

The roots lie in traditional peasant songs, but by the 19th century, musicians had become so accomplished that they often attracted aristocratic patrons.

This encouraged gypsies to settle in towns, which inevitably had an effect on the very nature of their music.

Tommy Pearson talks to Iren Kertesz about the colour changes in Hungarian gypsy music over the years.

Gypsy Music1997061819980821

The romantic freedom of the music of the gypsies has had a profound effect on some classical composers.

George Weigand shows how composers such as Haydn, Liszt and Brahms drew inspiration from the gypsy style.

Gypsy Music1997062019980821

Tommy Pearson meets members of the Bashava Band for a lesson in performance techniques.

The violinist, singer and cimbalom player show him the skills that are needed to capture the essence of gypsy style.

Harpsichords And Virginals19980126

The harpsichord may not be an obvious choice of jazz instrument, yet way back in 16th-century France, composers were already beginning to swing the beat.

Harpsichordist Sophie Yates sets the scene for a week of programmes in which Tommy Pearson and the harpsichord get acquainted.

Harpsichords And Virginals19980127

When it came to building harpsichords, the Ruckers family from Flanders got it down to an art.

What these 16th-century craftsmen did not know about bird quills, hogs bristle and buffalo skin was not worth knowing.

But did things have to change when well-tempered tuning came along? Harpsichordist Sophie Yates continues to explain a few things to Tommy Pearson.

Harpsichords And Virginals19980130

As the popular instrument of its day, the harpsichord played a significant role in dancing and courting.

And when Dominico Scarlatti found love, his feelings were so intense he ended up writing 550 sonatas for his lover to show off her talents.

Presented by Tommy Pearson, with harpsichordist Sophie Yates.

Hear My Song19980421

Tommy Pearson talks to John Altman about his many musical collaborations, including composing film music for `Hear My Song', orchestrating Eric Serra's music for `GoldenEye' and arranging music for artists such as Hot Chocolate, Van Morrison and Bjork.

Hot Sounds!19990301

Calypso began in Trinidad in the 19th century and went on to dominate every carnival and party in the Caribbean right through to the 1970s.

Tommy Pearson samples the sound with Simon Broughton and also takes a look at soca, its more modern offshoot.

Hot Sounds!19990302

To make a steel drum, you need a 45-gallon oil drum, a sledgehammer, a ruler, compasses and chalk.

Tommy Pearson meets members of a steel band for a closer look and finds out what is in their repertoire.

Hot Sounds!19990304

Whether in the samba or the bossa nova, Brazilian rhythms are compulsive.

Tommy Pearson is introduced to some of the beats using rattles, drums and tambourines, and including such mysteries as the agogo bell and the reco-reco.

Hot Sounds!19990305

The merengue is salsa's cousin and today is heard mostly as big band dance music.

When it started out, however, it represented the gentler sounds of Haiti and went on to be popular in the Dominican Republic in the 1930s.

Tommy Pearson looks at the history of merengue and reveals how it produces some of the hottest Latin music around.

How Do Composers Make Money?19980825

Once a composer has written the music and it has been performed or recorded, he can just sit back and let the money roll in from royalties.

Or is it not quite as simple as that? Verity Sharp investigates the intricacies of publishing, record deals, the PRS and MCPS.

How Do Composers Make Money?19980824

Verity Sharp takes a look at how composers are commissioned to write music and finds out how the notes they have written are transformed into hard-earned cash.

She talks to Nicholas Kenyon, director of the BBC Proms and to composer Judith Bingham.

How Do Composers Make Money?1997120119980828

Verity Sharp discovers that there are endless ways in which composers can make money without writing music for the concert hall or film and TV screens.

She talks to Pam Wedgewood, who writes music for people who are learning to play instruments; and to Colin Matthews about the things he does in addition to composing music.

/ Verity Sharp takes a look at how composers are commissioned to write music and finds out how it works if you are a composer-in-residence with an ensemble or orchestra.

How Do Composers Make Money?1997120219980828

Once a composer has written the music and it has been performed or recorded, he can just sit back and let the money roll in from royalties.

Or is it not quite as simple as that? Verity Sharp investigates the intricacies of publishing, record deals, the PRS and MCPS.

How Do Composers Make Money?1997120419980828

Verity Sharp talks to composers of music for film, television, advertisements and jingles and finds out if composing this type of music is really as lucrative as everyone seems to think.

How Do Composers Make Money?1997120519980828

Verity Sharp discovers that there are endless ways in which composers can make money without writing music for the concert hall or film and TV screens.

Hurl19980424

Tommy Pearson looks at the partnership between composer and musicians by talking to composer Graham Fitkin and members of the Apollo Saxophone Quartet about `Hurl', which he wrote especially for the group.

Hypothetically Speaking19980907

This week, Tommy Pearson and Verity Sharp try their hand at recording and producing a CD called `Hypothetically Speaking'.

Today, Tommy Pearson joins the jazz band called the Sloane Square Syncopators to learn the art of performing in a studio.

Hypothetically Speaking1997092219980911

Tommy Pearson joins a team of CD marketing people and tries to catch a few eyes and ears with his CD, `Hypothetically Speaking'.

/ This week, Tommy Pearson and Verity Sharp try their hand at recording and producing a CD called `Hypothetically Speaking'.

Today, Tommy Pearson joins the jazz band called the Sloane Square Syncopators to learn the art of performing in a studio.

Hypothetically Speaking1997092619980911

Tommy Pearson joins a team of CD marketing people and tries to catch a few eyes and ears with his CD, `Hypothetically Speaking'.

In At The Deep End - The Big Mix19980908

Verity Sharp finds out what a record producer does and tries her hand at producing a CD featuring the Sloane Square Syncopators.

In At The Deep End - The Big Mix1997092319980910

Verity Sharp twiddles a few knobs and pulls a few faders in an attempt to create a perfect studio balance.

/ Verity Sharp finds out what a record producer does and tries her hand at producing a CD featuring the Sloane Square Syncopators.

In At The Deep End - The Big Mix1997092519980910

Verity Sharp twiddles a few knobs and pulls a few faders in an attempt to create a perfect studio balance.

In Tune19970529

Four young composers from different music schools and colleges in Manchester have been commissioned to write a piece for a quintet made up of members of the BBC Philharmonic.

The student chosen to take part from the University of Salford was Rosie Douglas.

Verity Sharp followed her progress as she wrote her piece under the guidance of composer Bill Connor.

Her piece can be heard during `In Tune'.

Introductions19970818

Tommy Pearson talks to Roderick Swanston about the prelude and its many different forms.

Introductions19970819

Tommy Pearson explores the use of introductions in pop music with the help of James Doheney.

Introductions19970820

Tommy Pearson charts the history of the overture with the help of Roderick Swanston.

Introductions19970821

Tommy Pearson talks to Wajahat Khan about the alap in Indian classical music.

Introductions19970822

Tommy Pearson talks to Roderick Swanston about how composers have used introductions in their symphonies.

Invitation To The Dance19980216

Tommy Pearson looks at some of the dances which have survived the ravages of time, and discovers how they have changed over the years.

Today, he investigates the history of the waltz.

Invitation To The Dance19980217

Tommy Pearson's exploration of history's favourite dances continues with the jig.

Invitation To The Dance19980219

Tommy Pearson continues his investigation of the dance world's perennial survivors with a look at the history of the minuet.

Invitation To The Dance19980220

Tommy Pearson's survey of how dance has changed ends with the dances of Spain.

Jazz19970825

Tommy Pearson examines the relationship between singer and accompanist and talks to Ahnee Sharon Freeman.

Jazz19970826

Tommy Pearson looks at the integration of vocal styles in jazz.

He talks to Maria Pio del Vito from Italy and Marjorie Whylie from Jamaica.

Jazz19970827

Tommy Pearson examines the role of the tenor saxophone in jazz.

He talks to Tommy Smith and Andy Shepherd.

Jazz19970828

Tommy Pearson talks to Mike Westbrook about jazz composition.

Jazz19970829

Tommy Pearson talks to Marcus Stenz and Guy Barker about the London Sinfonietta's project featuring the music of Miles Davis and Gil Evans.

Jazz Plus19980112

This week, Verity Sharp looks at the way jazz combines with or is influenced by other genres of music.

Today, she investigates jazz-rock fusion.

Jazz Plus19980116

Many musicians today combine jazz with the indigenous music of their country.

Verity Sharp talks to saxophonist Jan Garbarek about the way in which his Norwegian roots influence his music, and to Nitin Sawhney about how he fuses Asian music, flamenco and jazz.

Jewish Music19990208

In the musical traditions of the synagogue, the role of the cantor is particularly important.

Verity Sharp meets Cantor Stephen Robins to find out more.

Jewish Music19990209

The Sephardim is the branch of the Jewish diaspora that came from Spain, and it has a particularly rich musical history.

Verity Sharp talks to Lucie Skeaping about the wealth of music and songs from this tradition.

Jewish Music19990211

Many composers of western art music are of Jewish origin, and many non-Jewish composers have chosen to incorporate Jewish melodies into their music.

Verity Sharp and Alex Knapp look at the music of composers like Bloch, Schoenberg and Bernstein and ask why so many musicians have been inspired by Jewish melodies.

Jewish Music19990212

To complete her look at Jewish music, Verity Sharp explores the world of klezmer music.

The klezmorim were bands of itinerant musicians who played for weddings and other celebrations in the old Ashkenazi tradition.

This type of band is still popular today, and, with the help of DJ Richard Ford, Verity Sharp discovers how musicians are bringing this tradition right up to date.

Just The Way You Are1998033019990122

Each day this week, Verity Sharp talks to jazz musicians about what is going on in their heads while their fingers or voices are weaving their intricate patterns around the original tune - in this case, Billy Joel's `Just the Way You Are'.

Today's guest is pianist Julian Joseph.

/ Each day this week, Verity Sharp talks to a jazz musician about what is going on in their head while their fingers or voices are weaving their intricate patterns around the original tune - in this case, Billy Joel's `Just the Way You Are'.

Today Verity Sharp talks to the Midland Youth Jazz Orchestra.

Just The Way You Are1998033119990122

Each day this week, Verity Sharp talks to jazz musicians about what is going on in their heads while their fingers or voices are weaving their intricate patterns around the original tune - in this case, Billy Joel's `Just the Way You Are'.

Today's guest is pianist Julian Joseph.

/ Each day this week, Verity Sharp talks to a jazz musician about what is going on in their head while their fingers or voices are weaving their intricate patterns around the original tune - in this case, Billy Joel's `Just the Way You Are'.

Today Verity Sharp talks to the Midland Youth Jazz Orchestra.

Verity Sharp talks to Tina May.

Just The Way You Are1998040219990122

Each day this week, Verity Sharp talks to jazz musicians about what is going on in their heads while their fingers or voices are weaving their intricate patterns around the original tune - in this case, Billy Joel's `Just the Way You Are'.

Today's guest is pianist Julian Joseph.

/ Each day this week, Verity Sharp talks to a jazz musician about what is going on in their head while their fingers or voices are weaving their intricate patterns around the original tune - in this case, Billy Joel's `Just the Way You Are'.

Today Verity Sharp talks to the Midland Youth Jazz Orchestra.

Verity Sharp talks to Tina May.

Just The Way You Are1998040319990121

Each day this week, Verity Sharp talks to jazz musicians about what is going on in their heads while their fingers or voices are weaving their intricate patterns around the original tune - in this case, Billy Joel's `Just the Way You Are'.

Today's guest is pianist Julian Joseph.

/ Each day this week, Verity Sharp talks to a jazz musician about what is going on in their head while their fingers or voices are weaving their intricate patterns around the original tune - in this case, Billy Joel's `Just the Way You Are'.

Today Verity Sharp talks to the Midland Youth Jazz Orchestra.

Verity Sharp talks to Tina May.

Just The Way You Are1998040319990119

Each day this week, Verity Sharp talks to jazz musicians about what is going on in their heads while their fingers or voices are weaving their intricate patterns around the original tune - in this case, Billy Joel's `Just the Way You Are'.

Today's guest is pianist Julian Joseph.

/ Each day this week, Verity Sharp talks to a jazz musician about what is going on in their head while their fingers or voices are weaving their intricate patterns around the original tune - in this case, Billy Joel's `Just the Way You Are'.

Today Verity Sharp talks to the Midland Youth Jazz Orchestra.

Verity Sharp talks to Tina May.

Just The Way You Are1998040319990118

Each day this week, Verity Sharp talks to jazz musicians about what is going on in their heads while their fingers or voices are weaving their intricate patterns around the original tune - in this case, Billy Joel's `Just the Way You Are'.

Today's guest is pianist Julian Joseph.

/ Each day this week, Verity Sharp talks to a jazz musician about what is going on in their head while their fingers or voices are weaving their intricate patterns around the original tune - in this case, Billy Joel's `Just the Way You Are'.

Today Verity Sharp talks to the Midland Youth Jazz Orchestra.

Verity Sharp talks to Tina May.

Just The Way You Are1998040319990122

Each day this week, Verity Sharp talks to jazz musicians about what is going on in their heads while their fingers or voices are weaving their intricate patterns around the original tune - in this case, Billy Joel's `Just the Way You Are'.

Today's guest is pianist Julian Joseph.

/ Each day this week, Verity Sharp talks to a jazz musician about what is going on in their head while their fingers or voices are weaving their intricate patterns around the original tune - in this case, Billy Joel's `Just the Way You Are'.

Today Verity Sharp talks to the Midland Youth Jazz Orchestra.

Verity Sharp talks to Tina May.

King Lear19970901

Tommy Pearson talks to composer Dominic Muldowney about writing music for the Royal National Theatre's production of `King Lear'.

Led Zeppelin Iv1998031919980903

Tommy Pearson talks to Loyd Grossman about `Led Zeppelin IV'.

Listen To Norway19971020

In the first of four programmes recorded in Norway, Tommy Pearson talks to Mona Levin, editor of `Listen to Norway', the journal of the Norwegian Music Information Centre.

Norway's rich and varied musical life transpires to be about more than Grieg and the Hardanger fiddle.

Liverpool And Manchester19971124

Verity Sharp explores the music scene that grew up in Liverpool at the end of the fifties and in the sixties.

In conversation with John Savage, she tries to establish why this musical explosion happened in Liverpool, rather than in any other British city.

Liverpool And Manchester19971125

Verity Sharp tours Liverpool in search of the Mersey Beat to discover exactly what characterised the sound of Liverpool bands like Gerry and the Pacemakers and the Beatles and singers like Billy Fury and Cilla Black.

Liverpool And Manchester19971127

Tommy Pearson discovers why Manchester has been the birthplace of a whole generation of bands in the 1990s.

He talks to John Savage to find out what is so special about the social climate in this northern city that has allowed it to produce bands like Oasis, Happy Mondays and the Inspiral Carpets.

Liverpool And Manchester19971128

Tommy Pearson tries to discover whether the bands that have come out of Manchester in the past few years have their own distinctive Manchester sound.

He compares the sounds of groups like Take That, Oasis, ABC and Happy Mondays.

Mechanical Music19990311

Verity Sharp visits the St Albans Organ Museum to take a look at mechanical organs.

Mechanical Music19990309

Verity Sharp talks to Rex Lawson about the Duo-Art system of player piano and the music that can be played on it.

Mechanical Music19990308

This week, Verity Sharp looks at some of the huge number of different types of mechanical instruments.

Today, she investigates the player piano.

Mechanical Music1998020219990312

Verity Sharp looks at small-scale instruments, discovers an incredible mechanical violin and is entertained by some early jukeboxes.

/ This week, Verity Sharp looks at some of the huge number of different types of mechanical instruments.

Today, she investigates the player-piano.

Mechanical Music1998020319990312

Verity Sharp talks to Rex Lawson about the Duo-Art system of player-piano and the music that can be played on it.

Mechanical Music1998020519990312

Verity Sharp visits the St Albans Organ Museum to take a look at mechanical organs.

Mechanical Music1998020619990312

Verity Sharp looks at small-scale instruments, discovers an incredible mechanical violin and is entertained by some early jukeboxes.

Music And Children19980428

Verity Sharp talks to violinist Julian Rachlin about the pressures of having grown up as a child prodigy.

Music And Children19980430

Verity Sharp looks at the art of writing musical stage works for children and talks to Peter Maxwell Davies.

Music And Children19980501

It has been proved that singing in school improves standards of behaviour, improves pupils' confidence and raises academic standards.

Yet it is a discipline that is fast disappearing from primary education.

The Voices Foundation are determined to stop the decline and are introducing programmes into schools that go so far as requiring teachers and pupils always to greet each other in song.

Verity Sharp visits Oakfield School in Rugby, where the programme has made a remarkable difference.

Music And Drama19970903

What exactly is a melodrama, who wrote them and what do they sound like? Tommy Pearson investigates with the help of musicologist and critic Jan Smaczny.

Music And Drama19970904

Tommy Pearson talks about opera with the celebrated Italian mezzo Cecilia Bartoli.

Music And Drama19970905

What are the key dramatic ingredients in a good musical? Tommy Pearson looks back on some of the greatest musicals of the last 50 years to find out whether there is a pattern to success.

Music And Shakespeare19980929

Verity Sharp investigates the function of songs within Shakkespeare's plays.

Music And Shakespeare19981001

Verity Sharp talks to Alan Blyth about how Shakespearean drama has been adapted in music dramas and operas by a wide range of composers, from Bellini and Verdi to Briten and Bernstein.

Music And Shakespeare19981002

Verity Sharp visits the Royal Shakespeare Company to find out how a composer goes about writing incidental music for a stage production of a Shakespeare play.

Music And Technology19990222

Tommy Pearson visits SuperScape in Reading to see how designers are building virtual worlds where musicians can present their music.

Music And Technology19990223

Tommy Pearson visits ResRocket to see how jamming on the internet has progressed over the last two years.

Music And Technology19990225

Digital Diaspora enable collaborations and performances involving artists and musicians from all over the globe.

Tommy Pearson visits them to see how and why.

Music And Technology19990226

What do the internet and other digital media mean for the record industry and the record-buying public? Will music become better, cheaper and more easily available? Tommy Pearson investigates.

Music And The Mass19990323

In some settings of the mass, composers chose to replace some parts of the text with pieces for organ alone: these types of mass are, not surprisingly, called organ masses.

Tommy Pearson investigates.

Music And The Mass19990322

This week, Tommy Pearson investigates some of the wealth of music composed over the centuries for the celebration of mass.

He begins with a whistle-stop tour of masses, from the earliest days of plainchant right up to the 20th century.

Music And The Mass1998102619990325

A requiem is a mass for the dead, and many composers - including Mozart, Verdi and Faure - have been inspired by this text.

Tommy Pearson finds out why setting a requiem is different from setting a regular mass text.

/ This week, Tommy Pearson investigates some of the wealth of music composed over the centuries for the celebration of mass.

He begins with a whistle-stop tour of masses, from the earliest days of plainchant right up to the 20th century.

Music And The Mass1998102719990325

In some settings of the mass, composers chose to replace some parts of the text with pieces for organ alone: these types of mass are, not surprisingly, called organ masses.

Tommy Pearson investigates.

Music And The Mass1998102919990325

A requiem is a mass for the dead, and many composers - including Mozart, Verdi and Faure - have been inspired by this text.

Tommy Pearson finds out why setting a requiem is different from setting a regular mass text.

Music And Trance19971110

Music can control the emotions more forcefully than can the mind.

For centuries, Eastern cultures have put music to use in healing chants, mantras and rituals.

Tommy Pearson explores these musical routes to the inner self and asks if we should be meditating to Mozart.

Music And Trance19971111

In the 1960s, concerned by the West's increasing materialism, the younger generation turned to exotic cultures for spiritual enrichment.

Many musicians went underground, using improvisation and hallucinatory drugs to try to contact their inner selves.

Tommy Pearson explores the world of psychedelia.

Music And Trance19971113

Indian classical music has hypnotic powers - if you know how to listen.

Concentrate on the notes and the rhythm, leave aside all other preoccupations and try to become one with the artist.

Tommy Pearson achieves inner tranquillity by concentrating on one particularly powerful raga.

Music And Wood19990125

Tommy Pearson looks at some of the connections between music and wood.

Today, he talks to George Caird about the history and evolution of the orchestra's woodwind section.

Music And Wood19990126

Tommy Pearson visits Newark and Sherwood College to find out how a violin is made, from selecting the wood to the finished instrument.

Music And Wood19990128

The Shaker people of New England are renowned for their beautifully crafted wooden furniture and boxes.

Tommy Pearson visits Hancock Shaker Village in Massachusetts for a guided tour.

Music And Wood19990129

Drums come in all shapes and sizes, and many of them are made out of wood.

Richard Benjafield takes Tommy Pearson on a guided tour of some of his instruments, ranging from the simplest African log drum to some of the most recent high-tech drums.

Music At The Globe19970609

The Globe Theatre of the 17th century was the birthplace of some of Shakespeare's finest plays.

Now, in the 20th century, it has been reconstructed and its official opening by the HM the Queen takes place this week.

Verity Sharp goes behind the scenes at the Globe to find out about the place of music in the theatre.

Music At The Globe19970610

The Musicians at the Globe and their director Philip Pickett talk about the instruments that would have been heard in the Globe Theatre in Shakespeare's time.

Music At The Globe19970611

The Globe education project Our Theatre involves schools in the Southwark area of London.

Verity Sharp visits a school working on the entertainments that would have preceded plays at the Globe in Tudor times.

Music At The Globe19970612

With Verity Sharp.

Philip Pickett, music director at the Globe Theatre, talks about references to music in Shakespeare's plays and about what is known of the music used in performances during the 17th century.

Music By Numbers19970721

`Music by Numbers'.

If it is not organised, it is not music.

And if it is a note, it follows strict rules of the sort harnessed by the first musical instrument designers.

Verity Sharp meets brass player Crispian Steele-Perkins, who blows a raspberry into some very awkward old trumpets to check whether the maths add up.

Music In Finland19980713

On her travels through Finland, Verity Sharp discovers the country's national folk instrument - the kantele - and enjoys some of the traditional music written for it.

Music In Finland19980714

Helsinki has a vibrant and distinctive musical nightlife, as Verity Sharp discovers when she visits a few of the nightclubs there in search of the best of Finnish rock and pop.

Music In Finland19980716

The Sibelius Academy in Helsinki has an international reputation for having produced some of the world's greatest musicians.

Verity Sharp visits the academy to find out why it has proved so successful.

Music In Finland19980717

In her final programme about music in Finland, Verity Sharp looks back at some of the great musicians who have emerged from the country in recent years.

She tries to find out why Finland in particular has produced so many top-class conductors.

Music In The Home19990104

This week, Tommy Pearson looks at the many ways in which music occurs within the domestic setting of our own homes.

Today, he finds out how the role of music making within the home has changed over the centuries.

Music In The Home19990105

Tommy Pearson visits two houses and discovers musical instruments on a scale that you would not normally expect to find in the home.

Michael and Doreen Muskett's house is home to an extraordinary collection of musical instruments.

Music In The Home19990107

In the 18th Century, the only way to hear music in the home was by performing it.

Tommy Pearson talks to Hansgeorg Schmeiser and Dominic Fyfe to discover how you can fit a Mozart opera into your living room.

Music In The Home19990108

For many of today's composers, the home is the place where they create most of their music.

Tommy Pearson visits Michael Berkeley, who escapes to the quiet of rural Wales to write his music.

Musical Endings19990330

Verity Sharp looks at musical endings and asks: how does a composer know when it is time for a piece to come to a stop?

Musical Endings19990401

Endings of one kind or another have been a source of inspiration to many composers.

Tommy Pearson looks at how endings have been portrayed in music, from a trip to the scaffold to the demise of Valhalla and maybe even the end of one small dog.

Musical Offering1998021219980813

What would a composer today make of the royal theme presented to Bach for his `Musical Offering'? Composer Diana Burrell explains the ideas she uses in `Winter Offering'.

My Song19981210

This week, Tommy Pearson talks to four celebrity guests about an album that has played an important role in their listening experiences.

Today, he discusses Keith Jarrett's `My Song' with pianist Django Bates.

National Anthems19990111

This week, Tommy Pearson investigates the concept of the national anthem.

Later this week, he will be exploring the collaboration between authorTerry Pratchett and composer Carl Davis, who have been commissioned by the programme to create a national anthem.

Today, he looks at anthems from around the world.

Norway19980119

The Hardanger fiddle is Norway's national folk instrument.

Tommy Pearson travels to the heart of the beautiful Telemark region to visit the home of the 19th-century Hardanger fiddling legend Myllarguten.

There, he meets Lars Underdal, one of a growing number of young people taking up the instrument.

Norway19980120

Tommy Pearson talks to Mariss Jansons, music director of the Oslo Philharmonic, about his relationship with the orchestra and how he made it into an international ensemble.

Norway19980122

Tommy Pearson meets young Norwegians and discovers what sort of music they study, listen to, dance to and perform.

Among them are members of an all-male choir called Gli Scapoli (the Bachelors).

Norway19980123

In the last of his visits to Norway, Tommy Pearson goes in search of the legendary figure Peer Gynt and tries to find out if the story is based on fact or whether the character and his exploits were all just inventions of the playwright Ibsen.

He visits Gudbrandsdal, where there is an annual Peer Gynt festival in the town of Vinstra, and talks to Ibsen scholar Robert Ferguson.

Piano1998052519981102

Tommy Pearson talks to Catherine Bott about the time when composers first started putting expression on paper.

Early in the 17th century, Mazzocchi was the first to use `piano' and `forte' markings in his madrigals.

/ Tommy Pearson talks to Christopher Page about the time when composers first started putting expression on paper.

Early in the 15th century, Mazzocchi was the first to use `piano' and `forte' markings in his madrigals.

Playing Space19970605

The theremin was used in many 1950s B-movies, and featured on the Beach Boys hit `Good Vibrations'.

Today, bands like Portishead and Blur make music out of the ether with this remarkable creation.

Bruce Woolly of the Radio Science Orchestra demonstrates how to play any instrument with a wave of the hand on the MIDI theremin.

And Tod Machover of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in America has been creating hyper-instruments which link human bodies to the composing power of a computer.

Porgy And Bess19980113

How do you give a label to a piece of music like Gershwin's `Porgy and Bess'? Is it classical, is it jazz, or is it neither of these? Verity Sharp talks to Ben Markland about how composers this century have mixed jazz with classical music.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 01 January 199619960101

Producer: A.

PITTS

Next in series: 02 January 1996

Previous in series: 21 December 1995

Broadcast history

01 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-12-21.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 01 June 199519950914

First broadcast on 1995-06-01

Producer: J.

ISAACS

Next in series: 02 June 1995

Previous in series: 31 May 1995

Broadcast history

01 Jun 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

14 Sep 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-05-27

Programme Catalogue - Details: 02 January 199619960102

Producer: A.

PITTS

Next in series: 03 January 1996

Previous in series: 01 January 1996

Broadcast history

02 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-12-21

Programme Catalogue - Details: 02 June 199519950915

First broadcast on 1995-06-02

Producer: J.

ISAACS

Next in series: GALICIANS

Previous in series: 01 June 1995

Broadcast history

02 Jun 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

15 Sep 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-05-31

Programme Catalogue - Details: 03 January 199619960103

Producer: A.

PITTS

Next in series: 04 January 1996

Previous in series: 02 January 1996

Broadcast history

03 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-12-21

Programme Catalogue - Details: 04 January 199619960104

Producer: A.

PITTS

Next in series: 08 January 1996

Previous in series: 03 January 1996

Broadcast history

04 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-12-21

Programme Catalogue - Details: 05 February 199619960205

Producer: PRITCHARD, C

Next in series: 06 February 1996

Previous in series: 26 January 1996

Broadcast history

05 Feb 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-01-26.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 06 February 199619960206

Producer: PRITCHARD, C

Next in series: ALBION PROG.

3

Previous in series: 05 February 1996

Broadcast history

06 Feb 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-01-26.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 08 January 199619960108

Producer: PRITCHARD, C

Next in series: 09 January 1996

Previous in series: 04 January 1996

Broadcast history

08 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-12-20

Programme Catalogue - Details: 09 January 199619960109

Producer: PRITCHARD, C

Next in series: 10 January 1996

Previous in series: 08 January 1996

Broadcast history

09 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-12-20

Programme Catalogue - Details: 10 January 199619960110

Producer: C.

PRICHARD

Next in series: 11 January 1996

Previous in series: 09 January 1996

Broadcast history

10 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-12-15

Programme Catalogue - Details: 11 January 199619960111

Producer: C.

PRITCHARD

Next in series: 12 January 1996

Previous in series: 10 January 1996

Broadcast history

11 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-12-15

Programme Catalogue - Details: 12 January 199619960112

Producer: C.

PRICHARD

Next in series: 15 January 1996

Previous in series: 11 January 1996

Broadcast history

12 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-12-15

Programme Catalogue - Details: 15 January 199619960115

Producer: PRITCHARD, C

Next in series: 16 January 1996

Previous in series: 12 January 1996

Broadcast history

15 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-01-09

Programme Catalogue - Details: 16 January 199619960116

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 17 January 1996

Previous in series: 15 January 1996

Broadcast history

16 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-01-09

Programme Catalogue - Details: 17 January 199619960117

Producer: PRITCHARD, C

Next in series: 18 January 1996

Previous in series: 16 January 1996

Broadcast history

17 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-01-09

Programme Catalogue - Details: 18 January 199619960118

Producer: PRITCHARD, C

Next in series: 19 January 1996

Previous in series: 17 January 1996

Broadcast history

18 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-01-16

Programme Catalogue - Details: 19 February 199619960219

Producer: M.

DODD

Next in series: 20 February 1996

Previous in series: ALBION PROG 5

Broadcast history

19 Feb 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-02-16

Programme Catalogue - Details: 19 January 199619960119

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 22 January 1996

Previous in series: 18 January 1996

Broadcast history

19 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-01-09

Programme Catalogue - Details: 19 September 199519950919

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 20 September 1995

Previous in series: CHELTENHAM PROG.

1

Broadcast history

19 Sep 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-09-11

Programme Catalogue - Details: 20 February 199619960220

Producer: M.

DODD

Next in series: 21 February 1996

Previous in series: 19 February 1996

Broadcast history

20 Feb 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-02-16.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 20 September 199519950920

Producer: MORRISSEY, H

Next in series: 21 September 1995

Previous in series: 19 September 1995

Broadcast history

20 Sep 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-09-14

Programme Catalogue - Details: 21 September 199519950921

Producer: MORRISSEY, H

Next in series: 22 September 1995

Previous in series: 20 September 1995

Broadcast history

21 Sep 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-09-14

Programme Catalogue - Details: 22 February 199619960222

Producer: M.

DODD

Next in series: 23 February 1996

Previous in series: 21 February 1996

Broadcast history

22 Feb 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-02-16

Programme Catalogue - Details: 22 January 199619960122

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 23 January 1996

Previous in series: 19 January 1996

Broadcast history

22 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-01-15

Programme Catalogue - Details: 22 September 199519950922

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 25 September 1995

Previous in series: 21 September 1995

Broadcast history

22 Sep 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-09-20

Programme Catalogue - Details: 23 February 199619960223

Producer: M.

DODD

Next in series: 26 February 1996

Previous in series: 22 February 1996

Broadcast history

23 Feb 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-02-16

Programme Catalogue - Details: 23 January 199619960123

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 24 January 1996

Previous in series: 22 January 1996

Broadcast history

23 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-01-16

Programme Catalogue - Details: 24 January 199619960124

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 25 January 1996

Previous in series: 23 January 1996

Broadcast history

24 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-01-17

Programme Catalogue - Details: 25 January 199619960125

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 26 January 1996

Previous in series: 24 January 1996

Broadcast history

25 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-01-17

Programme Catalogue - Details: 25 September 199519950925

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 26 September 1995

Previous in series: 22 September 1995

Broadcast history

25 Sep 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-09-14

Programme Catalogue - Details: 26 February 199619960226

Producer: PRODUCER UNKNOWN

Next in series: 27 February 1996

Previous in series: 26 February 1996

Broadcast history

26 Feb 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-02-23

Programme Catalogue - Details: 26 January 199619960126

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 05 February 1996

Previous in series: 25 January 1996

Broadcast history

26 Jan 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-01-18

Programme Catalogue - Details: 26 September 199519950926

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 27 September 1995

Previous in series: 25 September 1995

Broadcast history

26 Sep 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-09-13

Programme Catalogue - Details: 27 February 199619960227

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: SALVATION ARMY MUSIC

Previous in series: 26 February 1996

Broadcast history

27 Feb 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-02-21

Programme Catalogue - Details: 27 September 199519950927

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 28 September 1995

Previous in series: 26 September 1995

Broadcast history

27 Sep 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-09-13

Programme Catalogue - Details: 28 September 199519950928

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 29 September 1995

Previous in series: 27 September 1995

Broadcast history

28 Sep 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-09-14

Programme Catalogue - Details: 29 September 199519950929

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 02 October 1995

Previous in series: 28 September 1995

Broadcast history

29 Sep 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-09-28

Programme Catalogue - Details: 31 May 199519950913

First broadcast on 1995-05-31

Producer: J.

ISAACS

Next in series: 01 June 1995

Previous in series: 26 May 1995

Broadcast history

31 May 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

13 Sep 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-05-27

Programme Catalogue - Details: Albion Prog 419960208

Producer: PRITCHARD, C

Next in series: ALBION PROG 5

Previous in series: ALBION PROG.

3

Broadcast history

08 Feb 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-02-01

Programme Catalogue - Details: Albion Prog 519960209

Producer: PRITCHARD, C

Next in series: 19 February 1996

Previous in series: ALBION PROG 4

Broadcast history

09 Feb 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-02-01

Programme Catalogue - Details: Albion Prog. 319960207

Producer: PRITCHARD, C

Next in series: ALBION PROG 4

Previous in series: 06 February 1996

Broadcast history

07 Feb 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-02-01

Programme Catalogue - Details: Another Byte 519950901

First broadcast on 1995-04-14

Producer: E.

KINGSLEY

Next in series: 24 April 1995

Previous in series: ANOTHER BYTE 4

Broadcast history

14 Apr 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

01 Sep 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-03-31

Programme Catalogue - Details: Cheltenham Prog. 119950918

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 19 September 1995

Previous in series: BODY OF MUSIC-5

Broadcast history

18 Sep 1995 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1995-09-11

Programme Catalogue - Details: Salvation Army Music19960228

Producer: WINES, C

Next in series: 11 March 1996

Previous in series: 27 February 1996

Broadcast history

28 Feb 1996 17:00-17:15 (RADIO 3)

Recorded on 1996-02-23

Progressive Rock!19981005

In the 1970s, a group of virtuoso rock musicians, tired of turning out the usual three-minute songs about teenage love and angst, set about creating something different.

Tommy Pearson explores the world of progressive rock.

Progressive Rock!19981006

Tommy Pearson continues his investigation into progressive rock with a look at some of the major bands from the 70s and 80s: Genesis, Pink Floyd, King Crimson, Yes and Emerson, Lake and Palmer.

And he unearths the first ever attempt to create a rock opera.

Progressive Rock!19981008

Tommy Pearson finds out how some of the progressive groups from the seventies and eighties explored the fusion of rock with classical music, creating symphonic rock.

He meets one of the most successful exponents of such music, keyboard player Rick Wakeman.

Progressive Rock!19981009

In the last of the week's programmes exploring the world of progressive rock, Tommy Pearson and Clive Noland look at the influence of the genre on today's rock music.

Ring A Ring O'roses19980602

Verity Sharp investigates the world of children's singing games and their history.

She finds out the stories behind the old favourites such as `Ring a Ring o' Roses' and `Oranges and Lemons'.

Road To Freedom1998032019980904

Tommy Pearson discusses the Young Disciples' `Road to Freedom' with Lisa I'Anson.

Romeo And Juliet19980928

Director Baz Luhrmann's 1997 film `Romeo and Juliet' starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes is set in Verona Beach.

As well as original music by Craig Armstrong and Marius De Vries, the soundtrack features contemporary pop music by groups such as the Cardigans.

Verity Sharp investigates the thinking behind the use of music in this production.

Scandinavia - Norway19971021

Tommy Pearson visits the Concert Hall in Oslo to find out about Norway's best-known ambassadors of classical music - the Oslo Philharmonic.

He meets members of the orchestra and its management and also speaks to the orchestra's principal conductor, Mariss Jansons.

Scandinavia - Norway19971023

Tommy Pearson begins his investigations into the folk-music traditions of Norway with a visit to a folk festival in Bo in the Telemark region.

He finds out why young musicians are so keen to continue singing and playing in the old traditions, and meets a singer and a poet who have collaborated on a project to provide new words for old folk tunes.

Scandinavia - Norway19971024

The most famous composer to come out of Norway is Edvard Grieg.

Tommy Pearson visits his summer house at Troldhaugen near Bergen, where he meets curator Erling Dahl.

They tour the house and gardens to find out how the composer lived and worked.

Scottish Traditional Music19970929

A series about Scottish folk music invariably starts with the bagpipes.

Verity Sharp visits the Piping Centre in Glasgow where the director of piping, Roddy Macleod, introduces her to the instrument's history and the students who flock there today to master the playing technique.

Scottish Traditional Music19970930

Aly Bain is a master of the Shetland fiddle and now enjoys international fame.

Verity Sharp meets him at the press launch of his latest album to discover what it is about the Shetland style that has captured the global market.

Scottish Traditional Music19971002

Scottish folk music falls naturally into two traditions - Gaelic and Scots.

Singers Sheena Wellington and Ishbel Mackaskill specialise in each but also form a duo that fuses the two.

They talk to Verity Sharp about what is complementary and contrasting about the styles.

Scottish Traditional Music19971003

Scottish folk music is very much a living tradition.

Young people today often choose to dance to a ceilidh band rather than going clubbing.

Verity Sharp meets members of the band Shooglenifty and the jazz clarssach player Corrina Hewat to find out how they are making sure the country's folk music is enjoying a continual comeback.

Sculpting Sound19970603

The second of this week's programmes exploring music and space.

Modern technology means that composers can make music come from any direction for the listener; some feel that they are actually sculpting sound.

Composer Trevor Wishart records sounds and then creates a new sonic soundstage which has its own characters, scenery and acoustics.

Karlheinz Stockhausen created a piece which needs four helicopters, camera crews, a quartet, a performance hall and the whole city of Amsterdam.

Sergeant Pepper1998031619980831

This week Tommy Pearson talks to four celebrity guests about an album that has played an important role in their listening experiences.

Today, he discusses the Beatles' `Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band' with writer Douglas Adams

Sonic Landscapes19970604

`Sonic Landscapes'.

An opportunity to hear a remarkable experiment by Alvin Lucier, who explains in an exclusive interview how he created a piece of music out of an empty room.

American composer La Monte Young was encouraged by Yoko Ono to begin performing in a New York loft space, and this programme contains the first broadcast of his `Dreamhouse', which is performed continuously as a sonic landscape.

Brian Eno's new sound installation `Music for White Cube' and Peter Lawrence's beatless ambient club `The Big Chill' are part of a growing interest in ambient environments.

Sounds In Sequence19970724

Organising sounds into patterns through a sequence of precise instructions was once the practice of sheet music, but now is used by composers.

Martin Russ shows Verity Sharp how a sequencer can help musicians to organise their thoughts without the need for traditional composing skills.

Storm19980915

Tommy Pearson finds out all about the role played by young singers in the Choral Day at this year's Proms.

He meets members of the City of Birmingham Symphony Youth Chorus and talks to composer Judith Weir, who wrote her piece `Storm' especially for them.

Street Music19980604

Verity Sharp looks at the importance of Tin Pan Alley and the development of American popular music at the end of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th.

Street Music19980605

Today, Verity Sharp is on the trail of street musicians in Cambridge.

She meets Michael Copley and Ian Moore, otherwise known as the Classic Buskers, as they treat passers-by to an impromptu performance.

They also delve into the history of busking and find out some of the legal implications of performing music in the streets.

Summing Up Sounds19970723

`Summing Up Sounds'.

Verity Sharp meets synthesiser wizard Martin Russ, who conjures up spellbinding sound textures and reveals that even the most enchanting of sounds are more mathematics than magic.

Technology19980629

To start a week of programmes looking at technology and music, Verity Sharp tries her hand at making generative music with the Koan system.

Technology19980630

Verity Sharp visits Tony Myatt of York University to see how electroacoustic composers use technology to design sounds for live performance.

Technology19980702

Verity Sharp visits Mad about Music 98 at Docklands Arena to try out the latest in music technology.

Technology19980703

Verity Sharp explores the latest developments in music creation and distribution on the internet.

Teletubbies19980427

This week, Verity Sharp looks at some of the ways in which music affects the lives of children.

Today, she takes a look at how composers of music for children's television programmes seek to appeal to their young audience.

She talks to Andrew McCrorie-Shand, who has written music for the `Teletubbies', `Tots TV' and `Rosie and Jim', and to Michael Omer, who has composed music for a teenage audience.

The 1990s19990201

The decade has seen big changes in pop, classical and world music.

Tommy Pearson talks to leading musicians and commentators, starting today with jazz and guests Geoffrey Smith and John Fordham.

The 90s belong to young jazzers like Claire Martin and Django Bates and have taken jazz on to the dance floor, with acid jazz and jazz funk.

But it has also been a time for reflection, with some classic recreations.

been a time for reflection with some classic recordings being recreated.

Tommy Pearson talks to Geoffrey Smith and John Fordham.

The 1990s19990202

Tommy Pearson discusses the advent of world music in the 90s with Simon Broughton and Charlie Gillett.

The CD revolution has seen music flooding in from all corners of the globe.

World music is now big business; the sound is influencing music as diverse as dance music and jazz, classical and film music; and it is part of the National Curriculum.

The 1990s19990204

Tommy Pearson looks back on a decade of classical music with Norman Lebrecht, Michael Berkeley and Fiona Maddocks.

The 90s have seen mass CD sales of Gorecki, Nyman, Adiemus and Vanessa-Mae, and Kennedy has re-established himself.

Opera got a boost with the 1990 World Cup, and young composers like Mark-Anthony Turnage and Steve Martland took centre stage.

For a while, marketing ruled - but does it still?

The 1990s19990205

Already pop music in the 1990s has recreated the sound and fashions of the 1960s, 70s and 80s.

But where is the new sound of the nineties? Many commentators are angry at the waves of nostalgia but still recognise that the 1990s has been an important decade for pop.

Tommy Pearson talks to Caitlin Moran and Colin Larkin.

The Aesthetics Of Music19971208

Roger Scruton's book `The Aesthetics of Music' makes a case against pop music.

He thinks it is dangerous and argues that if young people were to listen to an equal dose of classical music, they would grow up to be more balanced individuals.

Tommy Pearson examines the evidence.

The Ankh-morpork National Anthem19990115

Tommy Pearson goes to Scotland, home of the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, to attend the premiere of `The Ankh-Morpork National Anthem', written specially for `Music Machine' byTerry Pratchett and Carl Davis

The Big Divide19971209

Classical musicians rarely become idolised like pop stars, though a few have tried.

Vanessa Mae's image is of wannabe violinist, but does it really wash with the audience? Tommy Pearson finds out about her career, fans, lifestyle and attitude.

The Big Divide19971211

Classical music record sales are in a bad way, but does the market benefit when a pop star gets serious? Tommy Pearson looks at what has helped and what has hindered when McCartney and Clapton are sold alongside McCartney and Clementi.

The Big Divide19971212

A group of Benedictine monks found fame when they recorded an album of Gregorian chant, and the surprise appeal of the recording has encouraged a few more ventures.

Two of the latest girl groups are Anonymous 4 and Medieval Baebes.

It seems there is something sexy about early music.

Tommy Pearson sets out to discover what.

The Country Of The Blind19980420

Tommy Pearson returns with a week exploring partnerships between composers and other artists.

Today, he talks to Mark-Anthony Turnage and writer Clare Venables about their collaboration on the opera `The Country of the Blind'.

The Folk Revival19981217

`The Folk Revival'.

English folk music has not always been as popular as it is now.

Verity Sharp looks at the enthusiasts who rescued it from oblivion.

But is what we have today the genuine article?

The Garden Of Earthly Delights19980918

Tommy Pearson looks at some of the ways in which this year's Proms concerts have featured young musicians.

He talks to members of the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain and to composer Michael Berkeley, whose piece `The Garden of Earthly Delights' was written specially for them and premiered at the Proms.

The Glass Cathedral19981120

Philip Sheppard from the Smith Quartet has just bought a new cello.

It has five strings, no body, needs an amp and at the flick of a switch turns into a percussion section.

He gives Verity Sharp a demonstration and talks about his latest composition, `The Glass Cathedral'.

The Guardian19980914

This week, Tommy Pearson looks at some of the ways that this year's Proms season has invested in the musicians and audiences of the future.

Today, he finds out about a competition for young composers organised by `The Guardian' in association with the Proms.

The Indian Subcontinent19980518

This week, Verity Sharp takes a look at some aspects of the music of India and Pakistan.

Today, she talks to Nicholas Magriel about the sarangi - a fretless, bowed stringed instrument that has the reputation of being one of the most difficult to learn to play.

The Indian Subcontinent19980519

Verity Sharp looks at the issue of gender in the music of the Indian subcontinent and discovers how female instrumentalists are beginning to make their mark in a traditionally male-dominated culture.

She talks to ethnomusicologist Neil Sorrel and tabla player Anuradha Pal.

The Indian Subcontinent19980521

Verity Sharp investigates the vocal traditions of the ghazal and dhrupad with the help of Najma Akhtar and Richard Widdes.

The Indian Subcontinent19980522

Verity Sharp talks to John Mayer and Priti Paintal about what is at the cutting edge of Indian classical music today.

The Inner Ear19981130

Tommy Pearson begins a week of programmes looking at how the ear and the brain between them determine the way in which we hear music.

He starts the week with a trip inside the ear with Brian Moore of Cambridge University to find out how it works.

The Inner Ear19981201

Tommy Pearson is joined by Ian Cross of Cambridge University for a look at how we determine pitch.

The Inner Ear19981203

Tommy Pearson and Ian Cross look at how we determine rhythm and melody.

The Inner Ear19981204

Tommy Pearson joins Steve MacAdams at IRCAM in Paris to find out how the ear distinguishes the many different types of sound.

The Music Of Switzerland19981019

Switzerland is alive with music, and many composers have been drawn to it over the years.

Stravinsky, Tchaikovsky and Mendelssohn were all refreshed and inspired by its peaceful beauty.

But where are all the Swiss composers? Verity Sharp talks to Francis Travis about the country's musical history.

The Music Of Switzerland19981020

Paul Hindemith spent the last ten years of his life in Switzerland, and his memory lives on.

He was a composer committed to doing anything he could to enrich the musical education of children and amateurs, and in the small village of Blonay in the Swiss Alps, many still benefit.

Verity Sharp visits the Hindemith Foundation and samples the variety of courses on offer.

The Music Of Switzerland19981022

One musician stands out from the contemporary music scene in Switzerland - Heinz Holliger.

Verity Sharp finds out about the man and his music.

The Music Of Switzerland19981023

To play the alphorn you have to use your ears and your soul - and take lots of outdoor exercise.

Verity Sharp visits the Alphorn Academy above Lake Geneva for a closer look at Switzerland's best-loved folk instrument.

She meets Jozsef Molnar, the country's most virtuosic player.

The New Jerusalem19980514

With the help of the National Youth Brass Band and conductor Roy Newsome, Tommy Pearson looks at the special skills required to compose a piece for brass band.

He talks to Philip Wilby about his new piece, `The New Jerusalem', which was written specially for today's guest band.

The Rapsody Overture19980306

Verity Sharp takes a look at the ways in which today's musicians borrow other people's material.

She investigates the widespread practice of sampling and talks to record producer Achim Voelker about one of his latest releases, `The Rapsody Overture', which is an innovative blend of famous classical music themes and hip-hop.

The Resonating Room19970602

`The Resonating Room'.

The sound of hundreds of Tibetan voices echoing round a prayer chamber illustrates man's continuing fascination with resonant spaces.

Composer Katharine Norman recorded one of her pieces in a tunnel under the River Thames.

Karlheinz Stockhausen describes how he created a performance sphere where the audience listened in mid-air.

And the acoustics of Birmingham's new Symphony Hall can be changed at the flick of a switch using technology that is like something out of a James Bond film.

The Ring19981126

The Wagner tuba was specially invented by the composer for his operatic cycle `The Ring'.

Verity Sharp investigates.

The Rite Of Spring19971017

Verity Sharp explores Stravinsky's ballet `The Rite of Spring' in context of French music at the turn of the century.

The Siege Of Chester19980129

No-one has written a piece for the virginals for centuries, so why has composer William Mival decided it is a good idea now? Sophie Yates plays through the new piece, `The Siege of Chester', and sees what, if anything, it has taken from the instrument's English tradition.

The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall19970902

How does writing music for a drama on the stage compare with writing music for a drama on television? Tommy Pearson meets Richard Mitchell who wrote the music for BBC Television's `The Tenant of Wildfell Hall'.

Those You Have Loathed19980105

Verity Sharp talks to pianist Rolf Hind and discovers which pieces of music he would cheerfully throw on the fire.

Those You Have Loathed19980106

Verity Sharp talks to violinist Tasmin Little about her pet hates.

Those You Have Loathed19980108

Verity Sharp talks to saxophonist John Harle about his musical dislikes.

Those You Have Loathed19980109

Verity Sharp talks to Iain Burnside about his least favourite music.

Till Eulenspiegel19971013

Verity Sharp looks at Strauss's symphonic poem `Till Eulenspiegel'.

Tom And Jerry1997070219980611

Tommy Pearson talks to Rodney Newton from Warner Bros in America about the art of writing a score for a cartoon short such as `Tom and Jerry'.

/ Tommy Pearson investigates the art of writing a score for a Warner Bros cartoon short such as `Tom and Jerry'.

Tra-la-la19970801

Tommy Pearson finds out why some composers choose words such as `tra-la-la' and `shoobeedoo' or any others they care to invent.

Unusual Instruments19981123

This week, Verity Sharp looks at some of the more extraordinary musical instruments that composers have written for over the centuries.

Today, she investigates the glass harmonica, which, although unusual, is associated with such eminent composers as Gluck and Mozart.

Unusual Instruments19981124

Continuing her look at unusual instruments, Verity Sharp investigates the ophicleide - perhaps a cross between a bugle and a serpent.

Unusual Instruments19981127

Verity Sharp concludes her look at unusual instruments with the ondes martenot.

She finds out about this electronic instrument that was particularly favoured by the French composer Olivier Messiaen.

Unusual Voices19980622

Tommy Pearson explores the world of high male voices, including the castrato and countertenor, with the help of singer and author Peter Giles.

Unusual Voices19980623

Tommy Pearson takes a look at some of the more unusual sounds that are produced by singers from different cultures and continents.

Unusual Voices19980625

With the help of Terry Edwards and singers from London Voices, Tommy Pearson investigates some of the weird and wonderful effects and singing techniques that 20th-century composers have demanded from singers.

Unusual Voices19980626

Tommy Pearson ends his look at unusual voices with a whistle-stop tour of some of the more extraordinary vocalists who have left recordings for posterity.

Wallace And Gromit19980612

Tommy Pearson talks to Julian Nott, the composer of the `Wallace and Gromit' music, and finds out how the relationship between an animator and a composer works.

We19981207

This week, Tommy Pearson talks to four celebrity guests about an album that has played an important role in their listening experiences.

Today, he discusses Frank Zappa's `We're Only in It for the Money' with actor and comedian John Sessions

What Is Acid Jazz?19980115

Verity Sharp sets out to answer the question `What is acid jazz?'.

She talks to Eddie Pillar, founder of Acid Jazz Records.

Words For Music19970728

Kyrie, Sanctus, Magnificat.

Tommy Pearson discovers why the Latin texts have been set to music more often than any other words.

Words For Music19970729

Tommy Pearson considers how styles have developed in the last 40 years of British pop-music song texts.

Words For Music19970730

Composer Sally Beamish discusses how ay she works with poet Janice Galloway to create a song, while lieder expert Roger Vignoles talks about the great song texts of the past.

Words For Music19970731

With Tommy Pearson.

How is a text written for a spoken drama different from one written for an opera?

Young Composers' Workshop19970526

In this week's programmes, Verity Sharp follows the fortunes of four young composers who have been commissioned to write new pieces for a quintet of musicians from the BBC Philharmonic.

The project forms part of the BBC's Talent 2000 initiative and is part of the orchestra's ongoing education and community outreach work.

In today's programme, the four young composers and the musicians get together at the University of Salford for a workshop led by Bill Connor, who will be guiding the students throughout.

Young Composers' Workshop19970527

Verity Sharp follows young composer Tim Benjamin from the Royal Northern College of Music as he gets to grips with writing a new work for five members of the BBC Philharmonic.

He is guided by composer Bill Connor.

Tim Benjamin's piece can be heard during In Tune starting at 5.15.

Young Composers' Workshop19970528

Young composer Andrew Higgs, currently studying at Chetam's Schools of Music in Manchester has written a piece for obe viola, trombone, harp and percussion under the guidance of Bill Connor.

The first performance was given by five members of the BBC Philharmonic in the Barbirolli Room of the Bridgewater Hall on Sunday Evening.

Verity Sharp followed Andrew's fortunes through the project.

The piece can be heard during In Tune at 5.15.

Young Composers' Workshop19970530

Verity Sharp charts the progress of postgraduate composer Scott Kennedy-French, from the University of Manchester, as he tackles the commission for a new piece for five members of the BBC Philharmonic.

His guide for the project is composer Bill Connor.

Young Musicians 9819980323

In a week including the finals of Young Musicians 98, Tommy Pearson looks at ths history of music competitions around the world.

Young Musicians 9819980324

Why do musicians enter music competitions? Is it possible to prepare yourself for the sort of pressures that are imposed? What does it mean if you fail to win? Verity Sharp talks to people who have been through the competition process.

Young Musicians 9819980326

How do you judge a music competition? Verity Sharp and an experienced judge review one of the past entrants of the Young Musicians competition to see what qualities the judges look for.

Young Musicians 9819980327

Tommy Pearson attends the finals of the Young Musicians 98 conducting workshop to find out how a week-long event is turned into a few hours of television.

Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars19981211

This week, Tommy Pearson talks to four celebrity guests about an album that has played an important role in their listening experiences.

Today, he discusses David Bowie's `Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars' with DJ Mark Radcliffe

0319970918

Tommy Pearson explores some of the many ways in which musical instruments are used across different cultures of the world.

3: Violins.

03I Have A Dream19971106

3: `I Have a Dream'.

Tommy Pearson seeks out the sounds of protest in the 20th-century folk revival and discovers music's part in the civil rights movements of America and Africa.

03My Triplets Are A Bit Of A Handful19971030

3: `My Triplets Are a Bit of a Handful'.

Verity Sharp finds that getting Baroque and jazz rhythms right is as hard as cutting a cake into three equal slices.

03The Management19980226

This week, Tommy Pearson joins the London Symphony Orchestra, one of the world's great orchestras, to investigate the planning of a symphony concert.

3: `The Management'.

It takes more than a band of musicians playing music to create an orchestral concert.

Tommy Pearson looks at the job of orchestral manager and orchestral librarian.

0419970919

Tommy Pearson explores some of the many ways in which musical instruments are used across different cultures of the world.

4: Flutes.

04Really Odd Numbers19971031

4: `Really Odd Numbers'.

Verity Sharp takes five, dances to the most irrational rhythms, and ends up in a very strange loop.

04Satire - What19971107

4: `Satire - What's the Ugliest Part of Your Body?'.

From broadside ballads and Kurt Weill to Frank Zappa and `Spitting Image', Tommy Pearson looks at the role of music in holding up a distorting mirror to the rich and powerful.

04The Chorus19980227

This week, Tommy Pearson joins the London Symphony Orchestra, one of the world's great orchestras, to investigate the planning of a symphony concert.

4: `The Chorus'.

To end the week, Tommy Pearson looks at the work of the chorus and chorus master.

LAST19990402

To mark the end of `Music Machine', Verity Sharp and Tommy Pearson take a trip through the archives to sample some of the enormous variety of music, musicians and experts to have featured on the programme over the last five years.

197C01Dangerous Kitchen19970707

This week's programmes come from Debenham High School, Suffolk, and feature the group Dangerous Kitchen.

1: What are they, and what is their repertoire? Presented by Tommy Pearson

197C01Dangerous Kitchen19970915

A new regular time for the music series aimed at teenagers.

This week, Tommy Pearson explores some of the many ways in which musical instruments are used across different cultures of the world.

1: Drums.

197C02Dangerous Kitchen19970708

A week of programmes from Debenham High School, Suffolk, featuring the group Dangerous Kitchen.

Today, Tommy Pearson looks at the sound structure created by the group and their instruments.

197C02Dangerous Kitchen19970916

Tommy Pearson explores some of the many ways in which musical instruments are used across different cultures of the world.

2: Bagpipes.

197C03Dangerous Kitchen19970709

A week of programmes from Debenham High School, Suffolk, featuring the group Dangerous Kitchen.

Today, Tommy Pearson finds out how to improvise.

197C04Dangerous Kitchen19970710

A week of programmes from Debenham High School, Suffolk, featuring the group Dangerous Kitchen.

Today, the pupils join the group for a workshop.

Presented by Tommy Pearson

197C05Dangerous Kitchen19970711

A week of programmes from Debenham High School, Suffolk, featuring the group Dangerous Kitchen.

Today, students from the school join the group in a workshop.

Presented by Tommy Pearson

197D01Once I Caught A Fish Alive19971027

Verity Sharp searches for the maths behind the music - from three-chord tricks to ten thousand maniacs.

197D01Propaganda - Just Say No19971103

1: `Propaganda - Just Say No'.

Tommy Pearson looks at how governments around the world have used music to provide information and influence opinion on everything from war to sanitation.

197D02Clapping Clapping Music Music19971028

2: `Clapping Clapping Music Music'.

Verity Sharp deconstructs music by Steve Reich, Igor Stravinsky and Heaven 17 and watches a simple echo turn into a complex canon.

197D02Raise Your Banners19971104

2: `Raise Your Banners'.

Tommy Pearson drops in on a rehearsal of Glasgow's socialist women's choir Eurydice, and finds out about the history of political music-making in Britain.

198A01The Conductor And Assistant19980223

This week, Tommy Pearson joins the London Symphony Orchestra, one of the world's great orchestras, to investigate the planning of a symphony concert.

1: `The Conductor and Assistant'.

198A02The Players19980224

This week, Tommy Pearson joins the London Symphony Orchestra, one of the world's great orchestras, to investigate the planning of a symphony concert.

2: `The Players'.

What exactly is required of an orchestral player, and how has the job changed over the years?