Music From Ireland

show more detailshow less detail

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert2014020420140826

This week's series of Lunchtime Concerts features concerts recorded in Dublin, Belfast and Omagh. The members of the Capuçon Trio performed an all-Fauré programme in Dublin's National Concert Hall last spring. Meanwhile, BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artists, the Danish Quartet took part in Moving on Music's Tour of Northern Ireland during the autumn. Today a violin sonata by Fauré and a string quartet by Haydn.

The first of Fauré's two violin sonatas, the Sonata in A major, Op. 13, was written in 1875 and 1876. Dedicated to Paul Viardot, the son of the singer Pauline Viardot and brother of the girl to whom Fauré was briefly engaged, it is considered one of his early masterpieces. Youthfulness, elegance and the ease of the melody, for which Fauré became synonymous, are apparent from the beginning. Haydn's F minor string quartet, written in 1771, goes back to the earliest days of the string quartet. Throughout the six quartets that make up Opus 20 Haydn introduces compositional techniques that were to shape and define the genre. The set is renowned for the range and contrast of emotion explored in each quarter. The sorrowful No.5 in F minor is one of the best known and immediately recognisable from its opening elegiac main theme.

Fauré: Violin Sonata No. 1 in A major, Op. 13

Renaud Capuçon, violin; Michel Dalberto, piano

Haydn: String Quartet Op 20 No. 5

Danish String Quartet

Frederik Øland, violin; Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen, violin;

Asbjørn Nørgaard, viola; Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin, cello.

02Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert2014020520140827

The second of four Lunchtime Concerts performed by members of Capuçon at the National Concert Hall in

Dublin and BBC Radio 3 New Gereration Artists, the Danish Quartet as part of Moving on Music's touring programme in Northern Ireland.

The Cello Sonata No. 2 in G minor, Op. 117 was written between March and November 1921 and unlike the reflective first cello sonata which was composed during World War 1, this is more contented music. Vincent d'Indy, complimented his fellow composer on his 'mastery of maturity' and also said the sonata was, 'so beautiful!'

This is complimented by Danish Quartet performing the work of fellow Scandinavian, Hans Abrahamsen, the quartet worked with the composer on the performance of this work: the String Quartet No.1 "10 Preludes for String Quartet". The ten short movements contain a full gamut of expression, from almost violent dissonances through to the peaceful resolution of last of the preludes - a Baroque pastiche - which, in the context, is quite a surprise

Fauré: Cello Sonata No. 2 in G minor, Op. 117

Gautier Capuçon, cello; Michel Dalberto, piano

Hans Abrahamsen: 10 preludes (Quartet No.1)

Danish String Quartet

Frederik Øland, violin; Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen, violin;

Asbjørn Nørgaard, viola; Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin, cello.

03Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert2014020620140828

Today's concert begins with two Nocturnes by Fauré performed in the National Concert Hall, Dublin by Michel Dalberto, a member of the Capuçon Trio. The invention of the Nocturne is attributed to the Irishman, John Field and Fauré uses the form to present his profound writing for piano. Dalbeto begins with the bleak and almost despairing, Nocturne No 7 and couples it with the Nocturne No. 6 which is one of Fauré's most loved works, perhaps because of its achingly beautiful opening theme.

BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artists, the Danish Quartet presented Mendelssohn's String Quartet in A minor at the Strule Arts Centre in Omagh as part of the musician's tour of Northern Ireland presented by Moving on Music. In March 1837, Felix Mendelssohn married Cecile Jeanrenaud in Frankfurt, and during the summer they extended the honeymoon with a stay in Bingen am Rhein, where Felix and Cecile kept a joint diary and so we know that it was during this time that he composed his String Quartet in E Minor, completing it on June 18, 1837.

Fauré: Nocturne No. 7 in C sharp minor, Op. 74

Nocturne No. 6 in D flat major, Op. 63

Michel Dalberto, piano

Mendelssohn: String Quartet in A minor, Op. 13

Danish String Quartet

Frederik Øland, violin; Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen, violin;

Asbjørn Nørgaard, viola; Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin, cello.

04 LASTRadio 3 Lunchtime Concert2014020720140829

This week's series of Lunchtime Concerts is brought to a close with chamber music by Nielsen and Fauré. BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artists, the Danish Quartet brought the music of fellow Dane, Carl Nielsen, to the MAC in Belfast.

Nielsen composed his Third Quartet in 1897-8, and in it he breaks away from his reliance on the German romantic tradition and transports the listener to the landscape of his native Denmark. The music is rich in sonority and melodic counterpoint.

For the first time this week, the members of the Capuçon Trio come together to perform Fauré's Piano Trio Op. 20 which was recorded at the National Concert Hall in Dublin last spring.

Fauré composed the Trio when he was well into his 70s, at a time when his hearing in the high and low registers was failing - this is probably why the sound spectrum occupies the mid-range - but the trio written in the final years of a compositional life that linked romanticism to the freedoms of 20th century harmony, is a masterpiece.

Nielsen: String Quartet No 3 in E flat major

Danish String Quartet

Frederik Øland, violin; Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen, violin;

Asbjørn Nørgaard, viola; Fredrik Schøyen Sjölin, cello

Fauré: Piano Trio in D minor, Op. 120

Capuçon Trio

Renaud Capuçon, violin; Gautier Capuçon, cello;

Michel Dalberto, piano.

This week's series of Lunchtime Concerts is brought to a close with chamber music by Nielsen and Fauré. BBC Radio 3 New Gereration Artists, the Danish Quartet brought the music of fellow Dane, Carl Neilsen, to the MAC in Belfast.