Music For A While

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Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
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1999100319990829

Five musicians explore treasures at leading British musical museums or collections.

In this last programme, pianist and organist David Owen Norris visits the Reed Organ and Harmonium Museum in Saltaire, Yorkshire, to meet ex-London bus driver Phil Fluke.

The museum's huge collection contains everything from giant harmoniums to a tiny book harmonium.

011999101019990905

Five musicians explore treasures at leading British musical museums or collections.

When Alec Cobbe bought an 18th-century fortepiano for 50 pounds in the 60s, it was the start of a passion which has seen him put together one of the world's great collections of keyboards - all with connections to major composers.

Fortepianist David Ward visits the Cobbe collection at Hatchlands Park near Guildford.

021999101719990912

Six musicians explore treasures at leading British musical museums or collections.

2: Virtuoso violinist Tasmin Little visits the birthplace of one of her favourite composers - Edward Elgar.

Melanie Weatherley and Catherine Sloan provide a tour of the Elgar Birthplace Museum at Lower Broadheath near Worcester.

04The Hirsch Collection19990926

Five musicians explore treasures at leading British musical museums or collections.

4: `The Hirsch Collection'.

When German industrialist Paul Hirsch fled the Nazi regime, he brought to the UK his library of rare and important musical scores.

The collection now resides at the British Library where composer John Rutter meets members of the music staff.

0519990919

Five musicians explore treasures at leading British musical museums or collections.

5: Trumpeter Crispian Steele-Perkins revisits a favourite haunt - the Bate Collection of historic wind and brass instruments housed at Oxford University.

Among the exhibits is the only surviving trumpet made by the state trumpeter of Charles I.

199C0119990706

Six musicians explore treasures at leading British musical museums or collections.

When German industrialist Paul Hirsch fled the Nazi regime in the 1930s, he brought to the UK his extraordinary library of rare and important musical scores.

The Hirsch Collection now resides at the British Library, where composer John Rutter views some prize items.

The Paul Hirsch story is retold by his grandson Desmond Hirsh.

199C0219990713

Six musicians explore treasures at leading British musical museums or collections.

2: Virtuoso violinist Tasmin Little visits the birthplace of one of her favourite composers - Edward Elgar.

Melanie Weatherley and Catherine Sloan provide a tour of the Elgar Birthplace Museum at Lower Broadheath near Worcester.

199C0319990720

Six musicians explore treasures at leading British musical museums or collections.

3: When Alec Cobbe bought an 18th-century fortepiano for 50 pounds in the 60s, it was the start of a passion which has seen him put together one of the world's great collections of keyboards - all with connections to major composers.

Fortepianist David Ward visits the Cobbe collection at Hatchlands Park near Guildford.

199C0419990727

Six musicians explore treasures at leading British musical museums or collections.

4: Lucie Skeaping explores instruments from around the world at London's Horniman Museum, bequeathed to the capital by tea merchant Frederick Horniman in 1901.

199C0519990803

Six musicians explore treasures at leading British musical museums or collections.

5: Trumpeter Crispian Steele-Perkins revisits a favourite haunt - the Bate Collection of historic wind and brass instruments housed at Oxford University.

Among the exhibits is the only surviving trumpet made by the state trumpeter of Charles I.

199C0619990810

Six musicians explore treasures at leading British musical museums or collections.

6: Pianist and organist David Owen Norris visits the Reed Organ and Harmonium Museum at Saltaire, in Yorkshire, in the company of ex-London bus driver Phil Fluke, whose huge collection contains everything from monster harmoniums fit for cathedrals and cinemas, to a tiny book harmonium.