Moscow During The War

Episodes

First
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
2011082320121010

Sasha Dugdale unpackages the official Soviet myths which helped sustain the Russian people during World War Two and celebrates the personal poetry which later gave a more truthful reflection of their experience.

Linking in with the twentieth century Russian music in the first part of the concert, the poet and translator Sasha Dugdale explores how the Soviet government promulgated a complex blend of truth and lies in order to sustain the Russian people during the darkest hours of what they called The Great Patriotic War.

Drawing on oral testimony, journalism and broadcasting, she considers the continuing psychological impact of these stories on the Russian people, even today.

By contrast, Sasha celebrates the poetry which was written at the time and which provides a more truthful picture of real Russian heroism.

Readers: Gerard McDermott and Elaine Claxton

Producer: Beaty Rubens

(Repeat).

Sasha Dugdale unpackages the official Soviet myths which helped sustain the Russian people during World War Two and the personal poetry which later reflected their true experience.

Prokoviev's Fifth Symphony, which features in the second half of this evening's Prom, was premiered in 1945 as Russia came to terms with the aftermath of the the war.

During the interval, the poet and translator Sasha Dugdale explores how the Soviet government wove a complex web of true heroism and myth in order to sustain the Russian people during their darkest hour.

Drawing on oral testimony, journalism and broadcasting, she reveals the long unravelling of this web and, over half a century later, considers its continuing psychological impact on the Russian people who lived through what they called The Great Patriotic War.

In contrast to these unreliable myths, Sasha celebrates the poetry which was written at the time and which provides a truer picture of real Russian heroism.

Sasha Dugdale on the official Soviet myths that sustained the country during World War II.

2011082320121010

Sasha Dugdale unpackages the official Soviet myths which helped sustain the Russian people during World War Two and celebrates the personal poetry which later gave a more truthful reflection of their experience.

Linking in with the twentieth century Russian music in the first part of the concert, the poet and translator Sasha Dugdale explores how the Soviet government promulgated a complex blend of truth and lies in order to sustain the Russian people during the darkest hours of what they called The Great Patriotic War.

Drawing on oral testimony, journalism and broadcasting, she considers the continuing psychological impact of these stories on the Russian people, even today.

By contrast, Sasha celebrates the poetry which was written at the time and which provides a more truthful picture of real Russian heroism.

Readers: Gerard McDermott and Elaine Claxton

Producer: Beaty Rubens

(Repeat).

Sasha Dugdale unpackages the official Soviet myths which helped sustain the Russian people during World War Two and the personal poetry which later reflected their true experience.

Prokoviev's Fifth Symphony, which features in the second half of this evening's Prom, was premiered in 1945 as Russia came to terms with the aftermath of the the war.

During the interval, the poet and translator Sasha Dugdale explores how the Soviet government wove a complex web of true heroism and myth in order to sustain the Russian people during their darkest hour.

Drawing on oral testimony, journalism and broadcasting, she reveals the long unravelling of this web and, over half a century later, considers its continuing psychological impact on the Russian people who lived through what they called The Great Patriotic War.

In contrast to these unreliable myths, Sasha celebrates the poetry which was written at the time and which provides a truer picture of real Russian heroism.

Sasha Dugdale on the official Soviet myths that sustained the country during World War II.