More Than A Game

Professor Anthony King tells the story of politically-significant sporting events.

show more detailshow less detail

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
0120100628 (BBC7)
20120625 (BBC7)

Uncovering the early forms of the game, the former Prime Minister reads from his vivid book about cricket's rich past.

01The Fight2010010620101206

Professor Anthony King reports on one of the most famous matches in boxing history, the rematch in 1938 at Yankee Stadium in New York, between the Brown Bomber, Joe Louis of the United States and Max Schmeling of Germany. Two years earlier in 1936, in the same stadium , Schmeling , to everyone's astonishment, had knocked out Louis in the 12th round. For Adolf Hitler and his propaganda chief, Josef Goebbels, it was a triumph of white over black. By 1938, the rematch had taken on even greater value, for the Germans, for the Jews, and for black and white Americans. On the night of the fight, millions of people around the world, many with little previous interest in boxing, were glued to their radios. In the U.S. , 64 per cent of all Americans who owned a radio, tuned in. The match lasted less than a round, Schmeling was sensationally knocked out. But after the war, it was Schmeling who prospered. He helped Louis financially and was a pallbearer at the Brown Bomber's funeral.

In June 1938, 64 per cent of Americans who owned a radio tuned in to listen to a heavyweight boxing match in New York between Joe Louis, known as The Brown Bomber, and the German Max Schmeling.

Two years before, Schmeling had sensationally defeated the seemingly invincible Louis, in a propaganda triumph for the Nazi regime The rematch was one of the most politically charged matches in history.

Professor Anthony King of Essex University looks back at the fight and explains why it was so politically significant.

Professor Anthony King reports on one of the most famous matches in boxing history, the rematch in 1938 at Yankee Stadium in New York, between the Brown Bomber, Joe Louis of the United States and Max Schmeling of Germany.

Two years earlier in 1936, in the same stadium , Schmeling , to everyone's astonishment, had knocked out Louis in the 12th round.

For Adolf Hitler and his propaganda chief, Josef Goebbels, it was a triumph of white over black.

By 1938, the rematch had taken on even greater value, for the Germans, for the Jews, and for black and white Americans.

On the night of the fight, millions of people around the world, many with little previous interest in boxing, were glued to their radios.

In the U.S.

, 64 per cent of all Americans who owned a radio, tuned in.

The match lasted less than a round, Schmeling was sensationally knocked out.

But after the war, it was Schmeling who prospered.

He helped Louis financially and was a pallbearer at the Brown Bomber's funeral.

Professor Anthony King reports on one of the most famous boxing matches ever held.

02Blood In The Water2010011320100629 (BBC7)
20120626 (BBC7)

In October 1956, thousands of students and workers took to the streets of the Hungarian capital, Budapest, to demand greater political freedom and an end to Soviet domination of their country.

At first they seemed to be succeeding: Soviet forces pulled back and a reformer, Imre Nagy, became prime minister.

At the same time, the Hungarian Olympic team set off for the Melbourne Olympics.

By the time they arrived in Australia, however, everything back home had changed.

Soviet tanks had returned to Budapest and brutally crushed the Hungarian revolution.

Hundreds were arrested and thousands fled into exile.

In Melbourne, the Hungarian water polo team were determined to defend their Olympic title.

They cruised through the early rounds, and in the semi final were drawn, as fate would have it, against the Soviet Union.

It became the most famous game in the history of the sport, known as the 'Blood in the Water' match.

The Hungarian water polo team's match against the Soviet Union at the 1956 Olympics.

Tracing the game through the revolutionary 18th century, the former Prime Minister reads from his book about cricket's past.

02Revolution, The Melbourne Olympics And Water Polo20101207

Professor Anthony King reports on the brutally suppressed revolution against Soviet rule in Hungary; the Melbourne Olympics of 1956 and the most infamous water polo match in history.

For a time in '56 it looked as though the popular uprising in Budapest against Soviet rule might succeed, but it wasn't long before the Soviet tanks rolled back in.

But at the same time, the Hungarian team had been able to set out for the Olympics in Melbourne.

It wasn't until they reached Darwin that they learned that the uprising had been put down.

The water polo team were the reigning Olympic champions and determined to defend the title.

In the semi-finals, they were drawn against the Soviet Union.

The game turned into a bloodbath, it became known as the "blood in the water" match, but the Hungarians won and did eventually retain their Olympic title.

Professor Anthony King reports on revolution, the Melbourne Olympics and water polo.

02Revolution, the Melbourne Olympics and Water Polo20100113

02Revolution, the Melbourne Olympics and Water Polo20100113

Professor Anthony King reports on the brutally suppressed revolution against Soviet rule in Hungary; the Melbourne Olympics of 1956 and the most infamous water polo match in history. For a time in '56 it looked as though the popular uprising in Budapest against Soviet rule might succeed, but it wasn't long before the Soviet tanks rolled back in. But at the same time, the Hungarian team had been able to set out for the Olympics in Melbourne. It wasn't until they reached Darwin that they learned that the uprising had been put down. The water polo team were the reigning Olympic champions and determined to defend the title. In the semi-finals, they were drawn against the Soviet Union. The game turned into a bloodbath, it became known as the "blood in the water" match, but the Hungarians won and did eventually retain their Olympic title.

0320100630 (BBC7)
20120627 (BBC7)

Charting the rise of the institutions that still dominate, the former Prime Minister reads from his book about cricket's past.

03 LASTThe Football War20100120

03 LASTThe Football War20100120

Professor Anthony King tells the story of politically-significant sporting events.

In 1969, Honduras and El Salvador played each other in a series of qualifying matches for the 1970 World Cup in Mexico. Both were absolutely determined to win, so much so that shortly after the final whistle of the final match, they went to war. It only lasted four days but thousands were killed and thousands more displaced. Was it really all about football?

03 LASTThe Football War20100120

In 1969, Honduras and El Salvador played each other in a series of qualifying matches for the 1970 World Cup in Mexico.

Both were absolutely determined to win, so much so that shortly after the final whistle of the final match, they went to war.

It only lasted four days but thousands were killed and thousands more displaced.

Was it really all about football?

The war between Honduras and El Salvador in 1969 after their World Cup qualifying matches.

03 LASTThe Football War2010121420101208
042010012720100701 (BBC7)
20120628 (BBC7)

Recalling one of the game's most enduring figures, WG Grace - the former Prime Minister reads from his book about cricket's past.

05 LAST2010020320100702 (BBC7)
20120629 (BBC7)

Moving on to the 20th century and the threat of war - the former Prime Minister reads from his book about cricket's rich past.