Moral Notes

Simon Brett explores how the Victorians perfected the use of popular song as a way to reflect values, morality and beliefs.

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Family Life2001011120160903 (BBC7)
20160904 (BBC7)

How the Victorians perfected the use of song as a way to reflect values and beliefs.

How the Victorians perfected the use of song as a way to reflect values and beliefs.

4 Extra Debut. Simon Brett explores how the Victorians perfected the use of popular song as a way to reflect values and beliefs. From January 2001.

It began in the 1840s and so it continues: the image of family life as a happy gathering presided over by fond parents.

But behind the facade, songs chart the shift from obedience to disaffection.

02Demon Drink And Drugs2001011820021202
20160917 (BBC7)
20160918 (BBC7)

Simon Brett explores Victorian morality through songs directed at alcohol and drug use.

Simon Brett explores Victorian morality through the popular songs directed at the use of alcohol and drugs. From January 2001.

`Won't You Sign the Pledge?' sang the Victorians, while handing opium-enriched cough mixture to the masses.

03Love2001012520021209
20160924 (BBC7)
20160925 (BBC7)

Simon Brett explores how the Victorians perfected the use of popular song as a way to reflect values and beliefs. From January 2011.

Simon Brett explores how the Victorians perfected the use of popular song.

He explores how the Victorians edged the concept of love with lace, turning it into an ideal to be aspired to - at least in public.

04 LASTEmpire2001020120021216
20161001 (BBC7)
20161002 (BBC7)

The reality of how the masses viewed British Imperialism is revealed to be less than altruistic.

Simon Brett explores morality through the popular songs under the theme of The Empire.

Simon Brett explores morality through the popular songs under the theme of The Empire and British imperialism. From February 2001.