Monday Documentary, The [world Service]

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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20090627

The BBC takes a closer look at former general Hosni Mubarek and the institution that has shaped him and Egypt - the military.

The BBC takes a closer look at former general Hosni Mubarek and the institution that ha.

2009072520090721

Dai Richards looks at the first decade after Iran's Islamic revolution.

2009080320090808

Paul Mitchell looks at the modern-day relationship between the US and Iran and the nuclear negotiation struggle.

2009080420090808

Paul Mitchell looks at the modern-day relationship between the US and Iran and the nucl.

2009081020090815

Navid Akhtar asks if the doyen of 19th Century design, William Morris, is a role model.

Navid Akhtar asks if the doyen of 19th Century design, William Morris, is a role model for British Muslims today.

2009081720090818

Mukul Devichand investigates the attempt to persuade China's middle class to buy Europe.

Mukul Devichand investigates the attempt to persuade China's middle class to buy European foods instead of noodles and soya.

20090919

Benjamin Jealous is the leader of the US's largest civil rights movement (NAACP).

Gary Young asks if the NAACP is still needed.

Gary.

20091031

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service, which marks its centenary this year.

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service,.

20091107

Lucy Ash looks at Russia's 3 all-female regiments that flew more than 30,000 missions on the Eastern Front in World War II.

Lucy Ash looks at Russia's 3 all-female regiments that flew more than 30,000 missions o.

20100920

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights prov.

20100920

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights provided by contemporary neuroscience.

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights prov.

01/08/200920090802

Delphine Jaudeau examines terrorism, including the Hezbollah kidnappings of westerners.

03/08/20092009080320090804

Paul Mitchell looks at the modern-day relationship between the US and Iran and the nucl.

04/01/201020100105

In the year 2000, global warming didn't trouble world leaders too much but by the middl.

04/07/20092009062920090630

The BBC takes a closer look at former general Hosni Mubarek and the institution that ha.

The BBC takes a closer look at former general Hosni Mubarek and the institution that has shaped him and Egypt - the military.

04/07/200920090706

The BBC takes a closer look at former general Hosni Mubarek and the institution that ha.

Thembi Ngubane dared to talk openly about AIDS in South Africa.

This is a tribute to a.

This is a tribute to a young woman of extraordinary courage.

04/10/201020101005

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights prov.

06/07/200920090707

Thembi Ngubane dared to talk openly about AIDS in South Africa.

This is a tribute to a.

07/11/200920091102

Lucy Ash looks at Russia's 3 all-female regiments that flew more than 30,000 missions o.

Lucy Ash looks at Russia's 3 all-female regiments that flew more than 30,000 missions on the Eastern Front in World War II.

07/11/200920091103

Lucy Ash looks at Russia's 3 all-female regiments that flew more than 30,000 missions o.

07/11/200920091108

Lucy Ash looks at Russia's 3 all-female regiments that flew more than 30,000 missions o.

07/11/200920091109

Lucy Ash looks at Russia's 3 all-female regiments that flew more than 30,000 missions o.

08/08/20092009080820090810

For over 20 years of Iran's Islamic revolution, Iranians had chanted ‘death to America'.

After 11 September 2001 however, Iran's moderate President, Mohammad Khatami, ordered it to stop and instead the country mourned the victims of 9/11 along with the rest of the world.

Attacks on the west

Part three of this series tells the story of Iran's complex dealings and confrontation with the West over its nuclear ambitions over the years following 9/11.

Khatami saw the potential of the post 9/11 era as a time to build bridges with the US and transform relations between the two countries.

Secret diplomatic meetings were arranged and, amongst other things, a strategy for dealing with Afghanistan was discussed.

Then, on 29 January 2002 relations cooled dramatically.

President Bush closed the door to all discussion, claiming Iran was part of what he called an axis of evil".

Iran and West: how relations with the US changed in the complex post 9/11 era.

Paul Mitchell looks at the modern-day relationship between the US and Iran and the nucl.

Navid Akhtar asks if the doyen of 19th Century design, William Morris, is a role model.

Navid Akhtar asks if the doyen of 19th Century design, William Morris, is a role model for British Muslims today."

08/08/200920090809

Iran and West: how relations with the US changed in the complex post 9/11 era.

Paul Mitchell looks at the modern-day relationship between the US and Iran and the nucl.

09/08/201020100810

Gordon Corera talks to key figures from Israel's secret service, The Mossad, including.

09/08/201020100814

Gordon Corera talks to key figures from Israel's secret service, The Mossad, including.

09/08/201020100815

Gordon Corera talks to key figures from Israel's secret service, The Mossad, including.

09/08/201020100816

Gordon Corera talks to key figures from Israel's secret service, The Mossad, including.

10/05/201020100511

Gordon Corera is at Britain's secret listening station where the UK's eavesdropping and.

10/07/20102010070520100706

A revealing look at how global images become iconic, and how they take on a life of the.

A revealing look at how global images become iconic, and how they take on a life of their own and affect us.

10/08/200920090811

Navid Akhtar asks if the doyen of 19th Century design, William Morris, is a role model.

11/01/201020100112

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers an.

11/01/201020100116

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers an.

11/01/201020100117

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers an.

11/01/201020100118

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers an.

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundbreaking exploits.

11/07/200920090706

Thembi Ngubane dared to talk openly about AIDS in South Africa.

This is a tribute to a young woman of extraordinary courage.

This is a tribute to a.

11/07/200920090707

Thembi Ngubane dared to talk openly about AIDS in South Africa.

This is a tribute to a.

11/07/200920090712

Thembi Ngubane dared to talk openly about AIDS in South Africa.

This is a tribute to a.

11/07/20092009071320090714

In June, after 7 years locked up at Guantanamo Bay, 4 Uyghur men were released & sent t.

In June, after 7 years locked up at Guantanamo Bay, 4 Uyghur men were released & sent to Bermuda.

Nick Davis hears their story.

Thembi Ngubane dared to talk openly about AIDS in South Africa.

This is a tribute to a.

11/10/201020101012

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights prov.

12/10/200920091013

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service,.

12/10/200920091017

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service,.

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service, which marks its centenary this year.

12/10/200920091018

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service,.

12/10/200920091019

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service,.

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service, which marks its centenary this year.

An unprecedented look inside the MI6 and behind the Iron Curtain in the Cold War days.

The BBC takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service, which marks its centenary this year.

BBC security correspondent Gordon Corera talks to senior intelligence officers, agents and diplomats as well as their former arch enemies about the shadowy world of espionage.

Programme Two - Heroes & Villains explores what went on behind the Iron Curtain during the Cold War.

MI6 chief John Scarlett describes his clandestine meeting with an agent, and the Russian defector Oleg Gordievsky talks about his reasons for coming over to the other side.

This programme was first broadcast on the BBC World Service on 19 October 2009 and originally broadcast on BBC Radio 4.

13/06/200920090615

Martin Wolf returns to examine the state of the global financial markets and what shock.

13/07/200920090718

In June, after 7 years locked up at Guantanamo Bay, 4 Uyghur men were released & sent to Bermuda.

Nick Davis hears their story.

In June, after 7 years locked up at Guantanamo Bay, 4 Uyghur men were released & sent t.

13/07/200920090719

In June, after 7 years locked up at Guantanamo Bay, 4 Uyghur men were released & sent t.

13/07/20092009072020090721

Dai Richards looks at the first decade after Iran's Islamic revolution.

In June, after 7 years locked up at Guantanamo Bay, 4 Uyghur men were released & sent t.

15/02/201020100216

Maurice Walsh reports on the changing face of religion in New York, as Hispanics are ta.

15/02/201020100220

Maurice Walsh reports on the changing face of religion in New York, as Hispanics are taking over from Irish Americans.

Maurice Walsh reports on the changing face of religion in New York, as Hispanics are ta.

15/02/201020100221
15/02/201020100222
15/08/200920090811

Navid Akhtar asks if the doyen of 19th Century design, William Morris, is a role model.

17/08/200920090822

Mukul Devichand investigates the attempt to persuade China's middle class to buy European foods instead of noodles and soya.

Mukul Devichand investigates the attempt to persuade China's middle class to buy Europe.

17/08/200920090824

Mukul Devichand investigates the attempt to persuade China's middle class to buy Europe.

18/01/201020100119

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers an.

18/01/201020100123

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundbreaking exploits.

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers an.

18/01/201020100124

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers an.

18/01/201020100125

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers an.

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundbreaking exploits.

18/10/201020101019

Gerry Northam investigates claims that biofuels, rather than helping the world, may be.

19/09/200920090915

Benjamin Jealous is the leader of the US's largest civil rights movement (NAACP).

Gary.

19/09/200920090920

Benjamin Jealous is the leader of the US's largest civil rights movement (NAACP).

Gary.

19/09/200920090921

Benjamin Jealous is the leader of the US's largest civil rights movement (NAACP).

Gary.

19/10/200920091020

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service,.

An unprecedented look inside the MI6 and behind the Iron Curtain in the Cold War days.

19/10/200920091024

The BBC takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service, which marks its centenary this year.

BBC security correspondent Gordon Corera talks to senior intelligence officers, agents and diplomats as well as their former arch enemies about the shadowy world of espionage.

Programme Two - Heroes & Villains explores what went on behind the Iron Curtain during the Cold War.

MI6 chief John Scarlett describes his clandestine meeting with an agent, and the Russian defector Oleg Gordievsky talks about his reasons for coming over to the other side.

This programme was first broadcast on the BBC World Service on 19 October 2009 and originally broadcast on BBC Radio 4.

An unprecedented look inside the MI6 and behind the Iron Curtain in the Cold War days.

19/10/200920091025

An unprecedented look inside the MI6 and behind the Iron Curtain in the Cold War days.

19/10/200920091026

An unprecedented look inside the MI6 and behind the Iron Curtain in the Cold War days.

20/06/200920090615

Justin Webb's son was diagnosed with type-1 diabetes.

As parent and journalist, Justin examines the extent of the condition.

As parent and journalist, Justin.

20/06/200920090616

Justin Webb's son was diagnosed with type-1 diabetes.

As parent and journalist, Justin.

20/09/201020100921

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights prov.

20/09/201020100921

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights prov.

20/09/201020100925

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights provided by contemporary neuroscience.

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights prov.

20/09/20102010092720100928

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights prov.

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights provided by contemporary neuroscience.

21/12/200920091222

Google has revolutionised what it means to go online.

But beneath the promise are compl.

22/03/201020100323

16 years after fleeing Rwanda, many of Hutu refugees living in countries around Rwanda.

22/03/201020100327

In April 1994, long-standing tensions between Hutus and Tutsis - the two main ethnic groups in the African state of Rwanda - exploded when the plane of Juvenal Habyarimana the Hutu president, was shot down.

A Hutu militia - along with thousands of ordinary Hutus - massacred more than 800,000 Tutsis.

But when the exiled Tutsi-led Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) returned to the country as many as two million Hutus, fearing reprisals, fled across the border to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo).

Sixteen years on, many of those Hutus want to return home as part of a reconciliation and repatriation programme sponsored by the UN and the Rwandan government.

Most refugees in the United Nations refugee transit camp in Goma, in the eastern DR Congo are Rwandan Hutus who fled Rwanda in 1994, following the victory of the invading Tutsi-led rebel force, the RPF.

They were joined by some of those responsible for the genocide of Tutsis, including the Interahamwe, a Hutu paramilitary organisation which continues to fight and still poses a threat to the Rwandan government.

Many of the refugees are traumatised by years spent struggling to survive in the forests of the DR Congo.

But now they have decided to return to Rwanda.

'I didn't kill'

Vestine was just 16 when she fled Rwanda with her family over 15 years ago.

Many of her family members, including her father, died during the ordeal and she has not seen any of her family since 1997.

I didn't know where my mother had gone.

That's when a Congolese man abducted me.

Soon after I got pregnant with my first daughter," she says.

The man married Vestine, but after all five of her children were born by caesarean section, he asked her to leave.

He spent all his money on looking after me after each operation and complained about how I always needed a caesarean section when other women were giving normal births.

That's why he told me to leave, so he could marry someone that will give birth normally.

"With God's help I will get back to my country, back to my home.

That's all.

"I don't know anything about the genocide.

I didn't kill anyone or steal from anyone.

I just want to get back to my home, to my family property with my children," she says.

Vestine had to wait at the transit camp for four days before the transport left for her region.

She did not know the whereabouts of her family and was returning alone with her children, hoping to reclaim her father's land.

But in the most densely populated African country competition for land is great.

That competition fuelled the country's ethnic conflict and, with thousands of refugees returning every year, it is still a potentially explosive issue.

When Vestine finally reached her father's land it was clear that someone else was living in her father's house.

"There's nothing I can do about it.

Maybe the person living here will be kind enough to let us stay.

If not there's nothing I can do.

I'm happy to be here though," she says.

Listen as Sorious Samura follows Vestine and other Hutu refugees as they return to Rwanda.

Sorious Samura follows a Hutu refugee as she returns home to Rwanda after the genocide."

22/03/201020100328

Sorious Samura follows a Hutu refugee as she returns home to Rwanda after the genocide.

22/03/201020100329

Sorious Samura follows a Hutu refugee as she returns home to Rwanda after the genocide.

Frances Fyfield looks at the writ of habeas corpus, which safeguards individuals from a.

Frances Fyfield looks at the writ of habeas corpus, which safeguards individuals from arbitrary state imprisonment.

25/01/201020100126

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers an.

25/01/201020100130

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundbreaking exploits.

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers an.

25/01/201020100131

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers an.

25/01/201020100201

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers an.

25/07/200920090720

Dai Richards looks at the first decade after Iran's Islamic revolution.

25/07/200920090726

Dai Richards looks at the first decade after Iran's Islamic revolution.

25/07/20092009072720090803

Delphine Jaudeau examines terrorism, including the Hezbollah kidnappings of westerners.

Delphine Jaudeau examines terrorism, including the Hezbollah kidnappings of westerners in the 1980s.

Dai Richards looks at the first decade after Iran's Islamic revolution.

25/10/201020101026

Gerry Northam investigates claims that biofuels, rather than helping the world, may be.

25/10/201020101030

Gerry Northam investigates claims that biofuels, rather than helping the world, may be worsening poverty and the environment.

Gerry Northam investigates claims that biofuels, rather than helping the world, may be.

25/10/201020101031

Gerry Northam investigates claims that biofuels, rather than helping the world, may be.

25/10/201020101101

Gerry Northam investigates claims that biofuels, rather than helping the world, may be.

27/06/200920090629

The BBC takes a closer look at former general Hosni Mubarek and the institution that ha.

27/07/200920090728

Delphine Jaudeau examines terrorism, including the Hezbollah kidnappings of westerners.

27/07/20092009080120090803

Delphine Jaudeau examines terrorism, including the Hezbollah kidnappings of westerners.

Delphine Jaudeau examines terrorism, including the Hezbollah kidnappings of westerners in the 1980s.

27/07/200920090802

Delphine Jaudeau examines terrorism, including the Hezbollah kidnappings of westerners.

27/09/2010
28/12/200920091229

The decade had brought a new world order, defined as much by China and its rise as by A.

28/12/200920100102
28/12/200920100103
28/12/200920100104

The decade had brought a new world order, defined as much by China and its rise as by A.

In the year 2000, global warming didn't trouble world leaders too much but by the middl.

In the year 2000, global warming didn't trouble world leaders too much but by the middle of the decade that had begun to change.

29/03/201020100330

Frances Fyfield looks at the writ of habeas corpus, which safeguards individuals from a.

29/03/201020100403

Frances Fyfield looks at the writ of habeas corpus, which safeguards individuals from arbitrary state imprisonment.

Frances Fyfield looks at the writ of habeas corpus, which safeguards individuals from a.

29/03/201020100404

Frances Fyfield looks at the writ of habeas corpus, which safeguards individuals from a.

29/03/201020100405

Frances Fyfield looks at the writ of habeas corpus, which safeguards individuals from a.

31/10/200920091026

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service,.

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service, which marks its centenary this year.

31/10/200920091027

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service,.

31/10/200920091101

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service,.

31/10/200920091102

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service,.

Backing Gaddafi20110307

The recent uprisings in Libya came after four decades of dictatorship under Colonel Muammar Gaddafi.

The regime had pariah status until the Libyan leader's son, Saif al Islam, managed to persuade outsiders that Gaddafi was committed to reform.

But in the face of opposition protests, both Saif and his father refused to relinquish their power and wealth.

In recent years, Saif played a crucial role in wooing big business, former dissidents, academics and Western governments.

Hugh Miles talks to some of those charmed into assisting the regime and to former members of Saif al Islam's circle who saw much of Libya's wealth squandered on buying influence.

Hugh Miles is an award winning writer and broadcaster.

He is the author of Al Jazeera - How Arab TV News Challenged the World.

Hugh Miles reveals the background to recent events in Libya

China - Shaking The World - 220100726

Michael Robinson returns to China to assess the prospects and problems of the unrelenti.

China - Shaking The World - 320100726

Michael Robinson returns to China to assess the prospects and problems of the unrelenti.

Michael Robinson returns to China to assess the prospects and problems of the unrelenting shift of power from West to East.

Cracking The Code20100515

The BBC's Security Correspondent Gordon Corera gains exclusive access to Britain's ultra secret listening station where super computers monitor the world's communications traffic.

It's also where Britain's global eavesdropping and electronic surveillance operations are conducted.

The layers of secrecy which have surrounded the Government's Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) work are peeled away - but what exactly does it do and who is it listening to?

Gordon explores the wide area covered by signals intelligence - from looking for terrorists planning attacks against the United Kingdom to supporting military operations of the type underway in Afghanistan.

He speaks to a team from the counter-terrorism section who describe what it's like to listen in on terrorists' conversations - and the constant battle to predict where the next attack will come from.

Code-breakers also talk about their work, attempting to find a chink in the armour of a carefully encrypted message sent by a terrorist or a foreign government.

Gordon investigates the technological challenges posed by the internet and the threat of cyber warfare, which has led to the establishment of a new cyber operations centre at the GCHQ in Cheltenham, England.

He also explores the scientific and mathematical breakthroughs which have been achieved at GCHQ, including the discovery of public key encryption, which is used when we shop on the internet.

There has been considerable speculation about whether the government is planning huge databases at GCHQ to keep track of all communications and internet traffic.

Do they really spy on us and how accountable are they? Gordon provides the answers.

Gordon Corera gains exclusive access to Britain's ultra secret listening station,

Cracking The Code20100517

Gordon Corera gains exclusive access to Britain's ultra secret listening station,

Defining The Decade: A Googling We Go20091226

Who would have thought, when the Millennium dawned, that it would end with both British and American troops dying in Afghanistan.

Would you have believed that millions would be communicating and doing business over the world wide web? And would you have agreed that climate change was a greater threat than terrorism?

This has been a decade when history has been on fast forward.

Now, as we near the end of the decade, Edward Stourton looks at the big picture, charting the revolutions in science, technology and politics.

What are the underlying themes of the past ten years and what does it all add up to?

Exploring the underlying themes of the past decade.

First, Google's online revolution.

Defining The Decade: A Googling We Go20091227

Exploring the underlying themes of the past decade.

First, Google's online revolution.

Defining The Decade: A Googling We Go20091228

Exploring the underlying themes of the past decade.

First, Google's online revolution.

The decade had brought a new world order, defined as much by China and its rise as by A.

The decade had brought a new world order, defined as much by China and its rise as by America and its struggles.

Defining The Decade: Mission Accomplished20100109

Who would have thought, when the Millennium dawned, that it would end with both British and American troops dying in Afghanistan.

Would you have believed that millions would be communicating and doing business over the world wide web? And would you have agreed that climate change was a greater threat than terrorism?

This has been a decade when history has been on fast forward.

Now, as we near the end of the decade, Edward Stourton looks at the big picture, charting the revolutions in science, technology and politics.

What are the underlying themes of the past ten years and what does it all add up to?

The decade began with China being awarded the Olympics in 2001, then two months later came 9/11.

President Bush turned from being a daddy's boy to America's Commander in Chief, heading a global coalition dedicated to fighting terror.

There would be a new world order, but not in the way many had imagined - defined as much by China and its rise, as it is by America and its struggles.

Edward Stourton speaks to Francis Fukuyama; former Deputy Secretary of State, Richard Armitage; Robert Kagan, and Professor Timothy Garton-Ash.

After 9/11, the new global world order and China's economic rise.

Defining The Decade: Mission Accomplished20100110

After 9/11, the new global world order and China's economic rise.

Defining The Decade: Mission Accomplished20100111

After 9/11, the new global world order and China's economic rise.

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers an.

Prof Jim Al-Khalili, brings alive the stories of the great forgotten Arabic thinkers and their groundbreaking exploits.

Desperate Dreams, Episode 22008112420081125

Jenny Cuffe explores the reality of migration and asylum, revealing the hazardous route.

Every Picture Tells A Story20100710

The cell-phone footage of Neda Agha Soltan who was shot on a peaceful protest in Tehran in 2009.

Eddie Adams's Saigon Execution photograph in 1968.

The lone demonstrator with a shopping bag in front of a People's Liberation Army tank in Tiananmen Square in 1989 and the rescue of the young boy Kiki, from the rubble of Haiti's earthquake earlier this year.

Images like these take on a life of their own far beyond their original inspiration or context.

As a result, they tell us much about events, how they happened and why they mattered.

Razia Iqbal investigates how modern images affect us and why they are able to appeal to our imagination even when we are distanced from the event or the person depicted.

Listen as Razia meets the image makers and discusses the need to contemplate the still picture in the 21st Century.

Razia Iqbal investigates the power of modern images.

Every Picture Tells A Story20100711

Razia Iqbal investigates the power of modern images.

Every Picture Tells A Story20100712

Razia Iqbal investigates the power of modern images.

Power And The Judges - 120101220

Why are judges so important in today's world, and how much power should they have?

Power And The Judges - 220101220

Turkey's political power struggle between its government and judiciary.

Depending where you are in the world, judges may command great respect or huge contempt.

Why are judges so important in today's world and how do the courts earn and use their power?

The BBC's Laura Lynch meets senior judges to gain an insight into how much power they really have.

She questions whether they are always truly impartial and whether they should have the authority to dismiss laws made by democratically-elected politicians.

Revolutions In Iran

Revolutions In Iran20110228

Charting the history of Iran's media revolutions

Iran is facing a media revolution through blogs, social networking sites and mobile phone technology.

Ideas and pictures are reaching people across the globe every day in a matter of seconds.

But Iran has faced a media revolution before.

Across the country in the late 1970s, families and friends would sit together to listen to, read and share subversive material.

Then, it was in the form of cassettes, pamphlets and whispers behind closed doors that spread the message of the Islamic Revolution quickly and effectively across the country and beyond.

Old and new revolutionaries explore how the two movements compare.

Revolutions In Iran20110301

Charting the history of Iran's media revolutions

Revolutions In Iran20110305

Charting the history of Iran's media revolutions

Revolutions In Iran20110306

Charting the history of Iran's media revolutions

Revolutions In Iran20110307

Charting the history of Iran's media revolutions

Ship Of Spies

Ship Of Spies20110221

Tom Mangold joins a spy-themed cruise around the Caribbean

Outward appearances suggest it's just a regular cruise.

But as the MS Eurodam sets sail from Fort Lauderdale in Florida, this vast ship is carrying two men who've been at the very heart of the US intelligence services.

Former CIA directors Porter Goss and Michael Hayden are on board for the Spy Cruise, a seven day trip devoted to issues of national security.

Passengers have paid to hear and mingle with these senior ex-spooks, as well as a range of other former intelligence and military officers.

Whilst other passengers on the ship gamble in the casino, play pool games and try their hand at line-dancing, the spy cruisers are locked into a lecture theatre worrying about the state of global security.

Tom Mangold discovers that the cruise is part of an attempt to repair the damaged reputation of the CIA after a string of controversies.

In wide-ranging and rigorous interviews, he grills the two ex-CIA bosses on extraordinary renditions, enhanced interrogations, water-boarding, and targeted assassinations.

Ship Of Spies20110222

Tom Mangold joins a spy-themed cruise around the Caribbean

Ship Of Spies20110226

Tom Mangold joins a spy-themed cruise around the Caribbean

Ship Of Spies20110227

Tom Mangold joins a spy-themed cruise around the Caribbean.

Outward appearances suggest it's just a regular cruise.

But as the MS Eurodam sets sail from Fort Lauderdale in Florida, this vast ship is carrying two men who've been at the very heart of the US intelligence services.

Former CIA directors Porter Goss and Michael Hayden are on board for the Spy Cruise, a seven day trip devoted to issues of national security.

Passengers have paid to hear and mingle with these senior ex-spooks, as well as a range of other former intelligence and military officers.

Whilst other passengers on the ship gamble in the casino, play pool games and try their hand at line-dancing, the spy cruisers are locked into a lecture theatre worrying about the state of global security.

Tom Mangold discovers that the cruise is part of an attempt to repair the damaged reputation of the CIA after a string of controversies.

In wide-ranging and rigorous interviews, he grills the two ex-CIA bosses on extraordinary renditions, enhanced interrogations, water-boarding, and targeted assassinations.

Ship Of Spies20110228
Thank You For My Freedom2010053120100601

Former Beirut hostage John Mccarthy meets the man who negotiated his release.

Former Beirut Hostage John Mccarthy has never thanked Giandomenico Picco, the United Nations negotiator who arranged his release.

In this documentary John at last travels to meet him and explores the development of the role of the crisis negotiator.

The journey John Mccarthy makes is a deeply personal one.

He is intensely grateful for the role Picco took in arranging his release - at no small risk to himself - and John's journey to New York provides a compelling holding form for his wider purpose.

John is fascinated by the skills and dedication of men such as Picco, and he explores how the techniques used in negotiation have changed and developed.

With the help of archive and interviews, John contemplates the development of the role of the negotiator.

Beginning with the emergence of negotiation as a psychological study in early 70s America, he considers negotiation tactics being used in international crises and domestic incidents - can the same tactics be employed in both arenas?

The programme culminates in John's meeting with Picco.

He will endeavour, in the light of his investigations into the role of the negotiator, to answer some of his closer unanswered questions regarding the back room story that led to his own personal freedom.

Thank You For My Freedom20100605

Former Beirut Hostage John Mccarthy has never thanked Giandomenico Picco, the United Nations negotiator who arranged his release.

In this documentary John at last travels to meet him and explores the development of the role of the crisis negotiator.

The journey John Mccarthy makes is a deeply personal one.

He is intensely grateful for the role Picco took in arranging his release - at no small risk to himself - and John's journey to New York provides a compelling holding form for his wider purpose.

John is fascinated by the skills and dedication of men such as Picco, and he explores how the techniques used in negotiation have changed and developed.

With the help of archive and interviews, John contemplates the development of the role of the negotiator.

Beginning with the emergence of negotiation as a psychological study in early 70s America, he considers negotiation tactics being used in international crises and domestic incidents - can the same tactics be employed in both arenas?

The programme culminates in John's meeting with Picco.

He will endeavour, in the light of his investigations into the role of the negotiator, to answer some of his closer unanswered questions regarding the back room story that led to his own personal freedom.

Former Beirut hostage John Mccarthy meets the man who negotiated his release.

Thank You For My Freedom20100607

Former Beirut hostage John Mccarthy meets the man who negotiated his release.

The Mossad20100816

or 'Institute of Special Tasks', is one of the most feared and fabled security services in the world.

It has been lauded for daring operations and accused of cold-blooded murder.

It is widely thought to have been behind the assassination of a leading member of the group Hamas.

Mahmoud al-Mahbouh's body was found in his luxury hotel room in Dubai earlier this year.

It was locked on the inside and had a 'Do Not Disturb' sign on the outside.

First indications were that he had died from natural causes.

In this documentary, the BBC's Security Correspondent Gordon Corera talks to key figures from The Mossad, which was founded after the Arab-Israeli war in 1948.

The programme includes interviews with a Ephraim Halevy - former head of The Mossad and confidant of Israeli Prime Ministers Yitzhak Rabin, Benjamin Netanyahu, Ehud Barak and Ariel Sharon - as well as Rafi Eitan, leader of the team which captured the Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann in the sixties.

Other former Mossad members talk about their recruitment and training as well as covert operations in the Middle East.

They insist they follow a strict ethical code but others question whether their methods are in breach of international law.

Security Correspondent Gordon Corera reveals the story behind Israel's secret service.

The Mysteries Of The Brain20101002

How do our brains work in everyday life?

The experiences that we take for granted – talking to a friend, listening to a piece of music, lifting a cup of coffee, tasting a peach – depend for their existence on the intricate and silent workings of several cooperative regions of the brain.

Why do some people see numbers as coloured? Do we have five or twenty-five senses? How much of the brain do we need to understand language? Can we cure chronic pain or depression at the flick of an electrical switch? Do we decide how to act before we know about it?

For this four-part series, Professor Barry Smith from the Institute of Philosophy, explores the way neuroscience is addressing the ultimate scientific challenge: namely, how our brain makes us the conscious creatures we are – capable of language, thinking and feeling.

Is the biggest challenge of the brain not to explain thinking but to understand movement?

The Mysteries Of The Brain20101003

Is the biggest challenge of the brain not to explain thinking but to understand movement?

The Mysteries Of The Brain20101004

Is the biggest challenge of the brain not to explain thinking but to understand movement?

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights prov.

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights provided by contemporary neuroscience.

The Mysteries Of The Brain20101009

How do our brains work in everyday life?

The experiences that we take for granted – talking to a friend, listening to a piece of music, lifting a cup of coffee, tasting a peach – depend for their existence on the intricate and silent workings of several cooperative regions of the brain.

Why do some people see numbers as coloured? Do we have five or twenty-five senses? How much of the brain do we need to understand language? Can we cure chronic pain or depression at the flick of an electrical switch? Do we decide how to act before we know about it?

For this four-part series, Professor Barry Smith from the Institute of Philosophy, explores the way neuroscience is addressing the ultimate scientific challenge: namely, how our brain makes us the conscious creatures we are – capable of language, thinking and feeling.

Do the emotional mechanisms in the brain overpower reason?

The Mysteries Of The Brain20101011

Do the emotional mechanisms in the brain overpower reason?

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights prov.

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights provided by contemporary neuroscience.

The Mysteries Of The Brain20101016

How do our brains work in everyday life?

The experiences that we take for granted – talking to a friend, listening to a piece of music, lifting a cup of coffee, tasting a peach – depend for their existence on the intricate and silent workings of several cooperative regions of the brain.

Why do some people see numbers as coloured? Do we have five or twenty-five senses? How much of the brain do we need to understand language? Can we cure chronic pain or depression at the flick of an electrical switch? Do we decide how to act before we know about it?

For this four-part series, Professor Barry Smith from the Institute of Philosophy, explores the way neuroscience is addressing the ultimate scientific challenge: namely, how our brain makes us the conscious creatures we are – capable of language, thinking and feeling.

Examining the link between the brain and consciousness.

The Mysteries Of The Brain20101017

Examining the link between the brain and consciousness.

The Mysteries Of The Brain20101018

Examining the link between the brain and consciousness.

Gerry Northam investigates claims that biofuels, rather than helping the world, may be.

Gerry Northam investigates claims that biofuels, rather than helping the world, may be worsening poverty and the environment.

The Price Of Bio Fuels - Part One2010101820101019 (WS)
20101023 (WS)
20101024 (WS)
20101025 (WS)

Can bio fuels provide a viable alternative energy source?

Gerry Northam investigates claims that biofuels, rather than helping the world, may be.

Gerry Northam investigates claims that biofuels, rather than helping the world, may be worsening poverty and the environment.

Bio fuels were once seen as the answer to global warming and dwindling oil stocks.

Today, many who took that line believe instead, that they increase pollution and are behind worldwide environmental havoc, rising food prices, worsening hunger and poverty.

The first official hint of changing attitudes came in the Gallagher Review of 2007, which expressed concerns that bio fuels - renewable liquid fuels derived from plant or animal material – not only didn't help climate control, but were making poor people in the developing world even poorer.

Then, bodies as diverse as the World Bank and major charities defined bio fuels as "a crime against humanity" and "a silent tsunami".

Some alarming facts also emerged – for example, that the grain required to fill the tank of a Range Rover with ethanol is sufficient to feed one person for a year, and that American land turned over to bio fuel production every two years alone would fill 250 million mouths.

But that is not the whole story.

Governments and multi-nationals fight what they see as a simplistic black-and-white approach, insisting that bio fuels remain our best hope for the future - despite some damaging side-effects.

Scientists meanwhile, are working on ‘a second generation’ of bio fuels which they believe, could eradicate those side-effects.

For this documentary, investigative reporter Gerry Northam finds out exactly how much bio fuels cost and who is paying for it.

He visits Paraguay, where the expansion of the soy industry has happened in tandem with the violent suppression of small farmers and indigenous communities.

It's being alledged that farmers are being bullied into growing soy with pesticides at the expense of their food crops, health, farms, and – in many cases – their lives.

The Silent War20110307

Why has the insurgency in India's north-east lasted so long?

The world's biggest democracy is also home to the Asia's longest running insurgency – dating back to the 1950s.

This conflict, in the seven states of India's north-east, has cost the lives of thousands of people.

For the BBC, Rupa Jha travels to Manipur to investigates why the insurgency has lasted so long and if there is any hope of a peaceful resolution.

The rebellious movement is made up of various armed groups.

They are united by the demand for far greater autonomy for the region – with some factions insisting on complete independence.

Outside India the rebellion has received little media coverage.

But in India itself it has become highly politicized.

Most contentious of all are the special powers given to the military in the region, under the Special Powers Act.

Armed personnel can arrest suspects without a warrant, and enter and search any premise they wish to make arrests.

For 10 years a young woman from Manipur, Irom Sharmila, has been on hunger strike in protest at these powers.

She is being forcibly fed through her nose.

Three years ago Rupa met Irom Sharmila, in the first and only broadcast interview made to international media.

She attempts again to interview Irom Sharmila, whose personal story symbolizes the struggle in the region as a whole.

Rupa also speaks to the underground insurgent groups in the north-east, and to representatives of both local and national government.

Has the Special Powers Act helped the Indian government in its attempt to combat the insurgency – or rather prolonged it, by alienating so many local people?

The Silent War20110308

The world's biggest democracy is also home to the Asia's longest running insurgency – dating back to the 1950s.

This conflict, in the seven states of India's north-east, has cost the lives of thousands of people.

For the BBC, Rupa Jha travels to Manipur to investigates why the insurgency has lasted so long and if there is any hope of a peaceful resolution.

The rebellious movement is made up of various armed groups.

They are united by the demand for far greater autonomy for the region – with some factions insisting on complete independence.

Outside India the rebellion has received little media coverage.

But in India itself it has become highly politicized.

Most contentious of all are the special powers given to the military in the region, under the Special Powers Act.

Armed personnel can arrest suspects without a warrant, and enter and search any premise they wish to make arrests.

For 10 years a young woman from Manipur, Irom Sharmila, has been on hunger strike in protest at these powers.

She is being forcibly fed through her nose.

Three years ago Rupa met Irom Sharmila, in the first and only broadcast interview made to international media.

She attempts again to interview Irom Sharmila, whose personal story symbolizes the struggle in the region as a whole.

Rupa also speaks to the underground insurgent groups in the north-east, and to representatives of both local and national government.

Has the Special Powers Act helped the Indian government in its attempt to combat the insurgency – or rather prolonged it, by alienating so many local people?

Why has the insurgency in India's north-east lasted so long?

The Silent War20110312
The Silent War20110314

Why has the insurgency in India's north-east lasted so long?

William Morris And The Muslims2009081520090816
20090817 (WS)

Navid Akhtar asks if the doyen of 19th Century design, William Morris, is a role model.

Navid Akhtar takes a look at the influence of Islamic design on William Morris.

Journalist Navid Akhtar examines the influence of Islamic design and values in the life of Victorian designer, poet, and craftsman William Morris.

The designs of William Morris are inextricably linked to the curving sinuous arabesques of traditional Islamic Art.

He was inspired by Turkish ceramics and Persian carpets to create a new movement in British design.

For him the Muslim world had managed to preserve the art of the craftsman and avoid the ills of industrial production.

However his admiration went beyond the surface, Morris was influenced by Islamic ideas of what art should be.

His famous advice to have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful," echoes the Muslim saying in the Koran that "God is beautiful and loves beauty".

Morris's artistic ideas including his love for nature, the use of repetition and symmetry, belief in everyday beautiful objects and emphasis on craft are essential Islamic artistic ideals too.

He espoused the philosophy that art should be affordable and hand-made; this was already a reality in the Islamic world.

Not stopping at arts and crafts, he was a passionate advocate of social utopianism and believed in the rights of the worker.

Today, these ideals have profoundly influenced a new generation of British-born Muslim artists as they rediscover Morris and look to his artistic work and socialist ideas for inspiration.

Navid Akhtar examines Morris's interest in Islamic design and takes us on a journey that has come full circle from the arts and crafts movement to contemporary British Islamic Art."

Zainab's Story20100918

"When Mrs Bangura is in action, sometimes she doesn’t even dress like a woman. She walked in like a commander of the armed forces - despite the fact they had guns - she told them it was time for peace."

Zainab Bangura is Sierra Leone's foreign minister. In this documentary she tells her own remarkable story, revealing her personal motivations and how she represents one of the world's poorest countries.

In the 50 years since independence, Zainab is only the second woman to hold the post.

Her father was a strict Muslim cleric who did not believe in educating women.

Her mother - though illiterate - fought for Zainab to go to school and sacrificed her marriage to allow her daughter to progress on to further education.

As civil war swept the country in the 1990s, she founded the Campaign for Good Governance which campaigned for the elections that finally drove the junta from power in 1996 and restored democratic government.

Her life and desire for change was shaped by the civil war which left large parts of the country devastated and in dire poverty.

Zainab entered into political life under much criticism from her family and from her former colleagues.

Many felt that she was being too over ambitious and naive to say that she could make a difference to lives of people in Sierra Leone.

Listen to this fascinating insight of a woman - desperate and determined to make a change for her nation.

Zainab Bangura, Sierra Leones foreign minister, tells her own remarkable story

"When Mrs Bangura is in action, sometimes she doesn’t even dress like a woman.

She walked in like a commander of the armed forces - despite the fact they had guns - she told them it was time for peace."

Zainab Bangura is Sierra Leone's foreign minister.

In this documentary she tells her own remarkable story, revealing her personal motivations and how she represents one of the world's poorest countries.

Zainab's Story20100919

Zainab Bangura, Sierra Leones foreign minister, tells her own remarkable story

Zainab's Story20100920

Zainab Bangura, Sierra Leones foreign minister, tells her own remarkable story

Zainab's Story 120100913

Zainab Bangura, Sierra Leones foreign minister, tells her own remarkable story.

Zainab's Story 120100914

Zainab Bangura, Sierra Leones foreign minister, tells her own remarkable story.

Zainab's Story 120100918

Zainab Bangura, Sierra Leones foreign minister, tells her own remarkable story.

Zainab's Story 120100919

Zainab Bangura, Sierra Leones foreign minister, tells her own remarkable story.

Zainab's Story 120100920

Zainab Bangura, Sierra Leones foreign minister, tells her own remarkable story.

011968 - The Year That Changed The World2008120120081202

John Tusa traces what made 1968 such a climactic year.

Student protests, Soviet might,.

Student protests, Soviet might, assassinations, war and famine.

011968 - The Year That Changed The World20081207

John Tusa traces what made 1968 such a climactic year.

Student protests, Soviet might,...

Student protests, Soviet might, assassinations, war and famine.

011968 - The Year That Changed The World20081208

John Tusa traces what made 1968 such a climactic year.

Student protests, Soviet might,.

01Brazil - Lula's Legacy20101227

As President Lula leaves office, Paulo Cabral assesses the record of one of the most po.

As President Lula leaves office, Paulo Cabral assesses the record of one of the most popular politicians in Brazilian history.

01Brazil - Lula's Legacy20101228

As President Lula leaves office, Paulo Cabral assesses the record of one of the most po.

01Brazil - Lula's Legacy, A Country Of Aspiration20110101

As President Lula leaves office, what has been the legacy of one of the most popular politicians in Brazilian history?

On 1 January, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who won Brazil’s presidency with a landmark win in 2002, leaves office with record approval ratings and a successful economic record.

In this two-part series, the BBC’s Paulo Cabral travels to the two places that marked Lula’s life – the poor region in the northeast where the president was born, and the industrial suburb of Sao Paulo where he made his reputation.

Paulo finds a Brazil with a rapidly expanding middle class, but with many areas still in need of government help.

He visits impressive infrastructure projects, but encounters big bottlenecks.

He talks to everyone from IT entrepreneurs to illiterate farm-workers.

Is life now better for everyone in Brazil?

What has been the biggest change in Lula's hometown?

01Brazil - Lula's Legacy, A Country Of Aspiration20110103

What has been the biggest change in Lula's hometown?

01China - Shaking The World20100712
01China - Shaking The World20100713
01China - Shaking The World20100717

"China," Napoleon is believed to have once said, "is a sleeping giant.

When she awakes, she will shake the world."

China endured decades of occupation, division and international isolation since that 19th Century warning.

When it finally opened to the rest of the world, foreign money and expertise flooded in.

Now - little more than a generation later - China is poised to overtake Japan to become the world's second largest economy.

Its unprecedented growth in exports has left it holding more foreign currency than any other nation - financial power which China is beginning to use to challenge the US dollar's long-standing dominance as the medium of international trade.

Money and expertise are now flowing in the other direction - from China to the rest of the world.

China's economic resurgence has lifted hundreds of millions from poverty and helped the Communist Party maintain its authority and control - but potential dangers lie ahead.

Internally, there's a housing and construction bubble which some warn could burst, spreading problems far beyond China's borders.

Outside the country there are threats of trade sanctions from recession-hit America, where many accuse China of manipulating its currency to gain an unfair advantage.

Also, increasing competition for the resources vital to China's continued growth risk further international tension.

This documentary series examines the political, economic and cultural mechanisms of China's growing global influence.

Michael Robinson, who documented China's awakening for the BBC almost 20 years ago, returns to assess the prospects and problems of the unrelenting shift of power from West to East.

The political, cultural and economic impact of China's rise to superpower status.

01China - Shaking The World20100718

The political, cultural and economic impact of China's rise to superpower status.

01China - Shaking The World20100719
01China - Shaking The World20110124
01China - Shaking The World20110125
01China - Shaking The World20110129

Michael Robinson returns to China to assess the prospects and problems of the unrelenting shift of power from West to East.

Michael Robinson returns to China to assess the prospects and problems of the unrelenti.

01China - Shaking The World20110131

"China," Napoleon is believed to have once said, "is a sleeping giant.

When she awakes, she will shake the world."

China endured decades of occupation, division and international isolation since that 19th century warning.

When it finally opened to the rest of the world, foreign money and expertise flooded in.

Now - little more than a generation later - China is poised to overtake Japan to become the world's second largest economy.

Its unprecedented growth in exports has left it holding more foreign currency than any other nation - financial power which China is beginning to use to challenge the US dollar's long-standing dominance as the medium of international trade.

This documentary series examines the political, economic and cultural mechanisms of China's growing global influence.

Michael Robinson, who documented China's awakening for the BBC almost 20 years ago, returns to assess the prospects and problems of the unrelenting shift of power from West to East.

If China's construction bubble bursts, the impact will be felt far beyond China's borders

Michael Robinson returns to China to assess the prospects and problems of the unrelenti.

01China - Shaking The World, The Monday Documentary20100522
01Family Matters, - Nepal20110319

Far from being in decline, as western newspaper headlines suggest, the nuclear family is emerging as the successful model across much of the developing world.

Sociologists say it's now taking root in all but a handful of countries.

But what makes it such an irresistible model for the 21st Century?

Why is the nuclear family model so successful across the developing world?

01Family Matters, - Nepal20110321

Why is the nuclear family model so successful across the developing world?

01Fresh Start, - The Role Of Art20090208

As prison numbers in Britain continue to soar, Lucy Ash looks at what can be done to stop criminals re-offending.

In this three part series, Lucy travels across the world looking at schemes in business, arts and the natural world, which aim to stop prisoners coming back through the door.

Many psychologists argue that the arts help prisoners to acknowledge their guilt, confront their behaviour and recover self esteem.

These are all essential steps in any rehabilitation process.

Lucy looks at Gamelan workshops run by a group called Good Vibrations which has worked in 17 different prisons across the UK.

She finds out how the use of Indonesian percussion builds team work and promotes calm, especially among mentally ill inmates who make up a large percentage of the prison population.

She also looks at how other schemes involving music and the visual arts in prison, can act as stepping stone to vocational training or numeracy and literacy classes.

Drama is also a very effective catalyst for promoting personal development and change.

Lucy Ash finds out if creativity can help to cut crime.

01Fresh Start, - The Role Of Art20090209

Lucy Ash finds out if creativity can help to cut crime.

01Generation Jihad20100405

Peter Taylor examines the new danger posed by some young Muslims who have embraced mili.

Peter Taylor examines the new danger posed by some young Muslims who have embraced militant Islam.

01Generation Jihad20100406

Peter Taylor examines the new danger posed by some young Muslims who have embraced mili.

01Generation Jihad20100410

Peter Taylor examines the new danger posed by some young Muslims who have embraced militant Islam.

Peter Taylor examines the new danger posed by some young Muslims who have embraced mili.

01Generation Jihad20100411

Peter Taylor examines the new danger posed by some young Muslims who have embraced mili.

01Generation Jihad20100412

Peter Taylor examines the new danger posed by some young Muslims who have embraced mili.

01Inside The Imf20110110

Stephanie Flanders looks at the International Monetary Fund, and its key role in effort.

Stephanie Flanders looks at the International Monetary Fund, and its key role in efforts to fix the global financial crisis.

01Inside The Imf20110111

Stephanie Flanders looks at the International Monetary Fund, and its key role in effort.

01Inside The Imf2011011520110116 (WS)

In the past two years the International Monetary Fund has come out of the shadows to play a key role in efforts deal with global financial crisis.

Governments say they want it to fix the global economy as well.

But what do those working inside the IMF in Washington really think about their role? And are they up to the job?

The BBC Economics Editor, Stephanie Flanders has had an exclusive opportunity to interview staff including the Managing Director of the IMF, Dominique Strauss Kahn.

Is the IMF up to the job of fixing the global economy? Stephanie Flanders reports.

01Inside The Imf20110117
01Mubarak's Egypt20090622

After 28 years in power, Mubarak's promise of leading Egypt into stable democracy has dissipated.

Magdi Abdelhadi reports.

After 28 years in power, Mubarak's promise of leading Egypt into stable democracy has d.

01Mubarak's Egypt20090623

After 28 years in power, Mubarak's promise of leading Egypt into stable democracy has d.

01Opposing Obama20100201

Gary Younge meets people who think Barack Obama's presidency is nothing but bad news.

After eight years of division, America came together last year to celebrate the historic election of its first black president - or at least that was how the story was presented.

In fact, on election day, despite the calamity of the Iraq war and the huge financial crisis, the vote for Republicans actually increased in significant swathes of the country.

Since then, polls suggest that Obama is now the most divisive president since such records began.

One year into his presidency, the gap between how Democrats and Republicans rate Obama is greater than it was for Bush in 2001 and twice as high as it was for Nixon in 1969, during the height of the Vietnam War.

In this two part documentary, author and journalist Gary Younge, tells the story of the other side of the Obama phenomenon; the story of those who say that the Obama presidency is nothing but bad news.

Who are these people who feel they have been marginalised by the Obama revolution? What do they not like about him and what could Obama do, if anything, to win them over?

Listen to Gary as he spends ten days travelling through rural Arkansas and Kentucky, talking to anti-tax protesters, fundamentalist Christians and libertarians, country club members and local dignitaries to find out how they view the last year under Barack Obama and what their hopes and fears are for the coming year.

01Opposing Obama20100202

Gary Younge meets people who think Barack Obama's presidency is nothing but bad news.

01Opposing Obama20100206

After eight years of division, America came together last year to celebrate the historic election of its first black president - or at least that was how the story was presented.

In fact, on election day, despite the calamity of the Iraq war and the huge financial crisis, the vote for Republicans actually increased in significant swathes of the country.

Since then, polls suggest that Obama is now the most divisive president since such records began.

One year into his presidency, the gap between how Democrats and Republicans rate Obama is greater than it was for Bush in 2001 and twice as high as it was for Nixon in 1969, during the height of the Vietnam War.

In this two part documentary, author and journalist Gary Younge, tells the story of the other side of the Obama phenomenon; the story of those who say that the Obama presidency is nothing but bad news.

Who are these people who feel they have been marginalised by the Obama revolution? What do they not like about him and what could Obama do, if anything, to win them over?

Listen to Gary as he spends ten days travelling through rural Arkansas and Kentucky, talking to anti-tax protesters, fundamentalist Christians and libertarians, country club members and local dignitaries to find out how they view the last year under Barack Obama and what their hopes and fears are for the coming year.

Gary Younge meets people who think Barack Obama's presidency is nothing but bad news.

01Opposing Obama20100207

Gary Younge meets people who think Barack Obama's presidency is nothing but bad news.

01Opposing Obama20100208

Gary Younge meets people who think Barack Obama's presidency is nothing but bad news.

01Orphans Of 8920091207

Quentin Peel looks at Communism's prospects as an ideology and system of government aft.

Quentin Peel looks at Communism's prospects as an ideology and system of government after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

01Orphans Of 8920091208

Quentin Peel looks at Communism's prospects as an ideology and system of government aft.

01Orphans Of 8920091212

Quentin Peel looks at Communism's prospects as an ideology and system of government after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Quentin Peel looks at Communism's prospects as an ideology and system of government aft.

01Orphans Of 8920091213

Quentin Peel looks at Communism's prospects as an ideology and system of government aft.

01Orphans Of 8920091214

Quentin Peel looks at Communism's prospects as an ideology and system of government aft.

01Power And The Judges, Part One20101218

Depending where you are in the world, judges may command great respect or huge contempt.

Why are judges so important in today's world and how do the courts earn and use their power?

The BBC’s Laura Lynch meets senior judges to gain an insight into how much power they really have.

She questions whether they are always truly impartial and whether they should have the authority to dismiss laws made by democratically-elected politicians.

Why are judges so important in today's world, and how much power should they have?

01Power And The Judges, Part One20101219

Why are judges so important in today's world, and how much power should they have?

01Power And The Judges, The Rule Of Law20101213

In the struggle for power between government and judges, how much power should judges have, and why they are so important?

01Power And The Judges, The Rule Of Law20101214

In the struggle for power between government and judges, how much power should judges h.

01Return To White Horse20101101

The return of Carrie Gracie's award winning series on the urbanisation of China.

01Return To White Horse20101102

The return of Carrie Gracie's award winning series on the urbanisation of China.

01Return To White Horse20101106

Carrie Gracie's award winning series on White Horse Village returns with this two-part documentary.

She tackles one of the biggest stories of our time, the urbanisation of China.

Over the course of several years - Carrie has charted the transformation of a small mountain village - a thousand miles from Beijing, as it is destroyed to make way for 21st Century China.

Overcoming barriers of language and culture, the story is told through the voices of those experiencing the urban revolution and discovers how they are adjusting.

It also meets those who've moved into this new city - working in the shops and restaurants - that have opened where once there were rice paddies.

Carrie Gracie returns to China to see how 21st Century urbanisation is progressing

01Return To White Horse20101107

Carrie Gracie returns to China to see how 21st Century urbanisation is progressing

01Return To White Horse20101108

Carrie Gracie returns to China to see how 21st Century urbanisation is progressing

01Road Kill20101115

Sheena Mcdonald asks why millions of people die on our roads each year, particularly in.

Sheena Mcdonald asks why millions of people die on our roads each year, particularly in poorer countries.

01Road Kill20101116

Sheena Mcdonald asks why millions of people die on our roads each year, particularly in.

01Road Kill20101120

As the United Nations gears up for a new decade of action to improve road safety across the world, Sheena Mcdonald looks at whether its lofty ambition to save five million lives over the next ten years can work on the ground.

Road deaths are threatening to overtake malaria and HIV, in how many lives they take around the world, particularly in poorer countries.

In this two-part series, Sheena visits some of the world's most dangerous roads in Kenya and Costa Rica to find out why the death toll in developing countries is rising - when the solutions to road accidents are so simple.

The Millennium Development Goals push countries to work hard to improve the mortality rates for children under five, but there are no goals to stop those same children being knocked down when they start school.

Follow Sheena - who was nearly killed by a speeding police car just over ten years ago - as she visits accident blackspots, meets victims and people campaigning for better road safety, and challenges those in power who do not believe it is important enough.

Sheena Mcdonald finds out what the Kenyan government is doing to improve on road safety

01Road Kill20101121

Sheena Mcdonald finds out what the Kenyan government is doing to improve on road safety

01Road Kill20101122

Sheena Mcdonald finds out what the Kenyan government is doing to improve on road safety

01Soft Power20100517

Philip Dodd looks at soft power - how culture and lifestyle are the battleground for gl.

Philip Dodd looks at soft power - how culture and lifestyle are the battleground for global economic and political dominance.

01Soft Power20100518

Philip Dodd looks at soft power - how culture and lifestyle are the battleground for gl.

01Soft Power20100522

The US was once the undisputed global powerhouse.

Now it is under threat from contenders who use the influence of culture and lifestyle to fight for global economic and political dominance.

This political manipulation is referred to as soft power – achieving what you want by attracting and persuading others to adopt your customs - thriving on control, not force.

In this series, Philip Dodd investigates how this cultural rivalry is being formed and what weapons of persuasion are being deployed, from global sporting fixtures to cultural events and educational projects.

In the first part, he takes a look at how China's global charm offensive is taking shape - why they want to be loved and take the world's attention.

He visits the World Expo in Shanghai and looks at the impact the Beijing Olympics had on China's image.

He also pays a visit to Scotland, where the Chinese government is promoting its language and culture to ordinary people - who they are hoping - will develop a more positive attitude to the country.

Philip also reflects on how America - the country where soft power was first thought of - is not the only model to follow.

After the wars in Iraq, and Afghanistan, and the financial crisis - many are even questioning the principal of democracy itself.

Listen as he talks to the key players, from those involved in China's soft power offensive in Africa to the Washington civilians unnerved by their country's loss of influence.

Philip Dodd investigates China's soft power charm offensive.

01Soft Power20100523

Philip Dodd investigates China's soft power charm offensive.

01Soft Power20100524

Philip Dodd investigates China's soft power charm offensive.

01The Atrocity Archives20090407

Gerry Northam reports on the discovery of documents from Guatemala's security forces during the 30-year civil war.

Gerry Northam reports on the discovery of documents from Guatemala's security forces du.

01The Atrocity Archives20090411
01The Atrocity Archives20090412
01The Atrocity Archives20090413

Gerry Northam reports on the discovery of documents from Guatemala's security forces during the 30-year civil war.

01The Brotherhood20100816

The Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood is the oldest Islamic political organisation.

What's th.

What's the secret of its endurance and global reach?

01The Brotherhood20100817

The Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood is the oldest Islamic political organisation.

What's th.

01The Brotherhood20100821
01The Brotherhood20100822
01The Brotherhood20100823

No taxi driver in Cairo knows how to find the headquarters of the Muslim Brotherhood.

The brothers may be everywhere but the organisation is nowhere to be seen."

Egypt's largest opposition group the Muslim Brotherhood - despite being banned - is hoping for a rare opportunity as the Mubarak regime draws to a close after three decades in power.

The Muslim Brotherhood is the oldest and most influential Islamist movement in the world, having spread from its Egyptian birthplace to the wider Middle East, Europe and even the United States.

It was founded in 1928 by those who wanted Egypt rid of British control and by people who felt the nation was being robbed of its Muslim identity.

The organisation prides itself on being the moderate face of Islam and an alternative to extremist voices.

Officially, the group rejects violence in favour of dialogue with other faiths and their objective is to reconcile Islam with modernity - but its leadership remains deeply conservative.

Critics say its world view makes it an entry-point for extremism and allegations of intolerance still persist.

In this two-part series, the BBC's Magdi Abdelhadi tells the story of The Brotherhood and asks whether we should be worried about the group's intentions.

Although they are not allowed to exist as a political party, many of its members stand as independent candidates and in the last election, they won 20% of parliamentary seats.

But what do the brothers want and how far does their influence spread?

Most of all why - despite all the controversy - has it not only survived but thrived, from the teeming streets of Cairo to the leafy boulevards of American suburbia and beyond?

Magdi Abdelhadi investigates Egypt's oldest Islamist organisation, the Muslim Brotherhood.

The Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood is the oldest Islamic political organisation.

What's th.

01The Crash, The Crash - The Bank That Bust The World20090921

What were the key moments that led to the turbulent financial events of Autumn 2008 and.

What were the key moments that led to the turbulent financial events of Autumn 2008 and what happened in the aftermath?

01The Crash, The Crash - The Bank That Bust The World20090922

What were the key moments that led to the turbulent financial events of Autumn 2008 and.

01The Crash, The Crash - The Bank That Bust The World20090928
01The Crescent And The Cross20091109

Owen Bennett Jones explores five crucial battles in the relationship between Christiani.

Owen Bennett Jones explores five crucial battles in the relationship between Christianity and Islam.

01The Crescent And The Cross20091110

Owen Bennett Jones explores five crucial battles in the relationship between Christiani.

01The Crescent And The Cross20091114

Owen Bennett Jones explores five crucial battles in the relationship between Christianity and Islam.

Owen Bennett Jones explores five crucial battles in the relationship between Christiani.

01The Crescent And The Cross20091115
01The Crescent And The Cross20091116
01The Greening Of The Deserts20090701

Some experts now argue that some deserts could get greener.

Ayisha Yahya explores the a.

Ayisha Yahya explores the arguments in Mali, Egypt and Namibia.

01The Greening Of The Deserts20090702

Some experts now argue that some deserts could get greener.

Ayisha Yahya explores the a.

01The Greening Of The Deserts20090704

Some experts now argue that some deserts could get greener.

Ayisha Yahya explores the a.

The BBC takes a closer look at former general Hosni Mubarek and the institution that ha.

The BBC takes a closer look at former general Hosni Mubarek and the institution that has shaped him and Egypt - the military.

01The Legacy Of George W Bush20090119

As President George Bush prepares to leave the White House, Justin Webb looks at his do.

As President George Bush prepares to leave the White House, Justin Webb looks at his domestic and foreign policy legacies.

01The Legacy Of George W Bush20090120

As President George Bush prepares to leave the White House, Justin Webb looks at his do.

01The Legacy Of George W Bush - Part One20090125

As President George Bush prepares to leave the White House, Justin Webb looks at his domestic and foreign policy legacies.

As President George Bush prepares to leave the White House, Justin Webb looks at his do.

01The Legacy Of George W Bush - Part One20090126
01The Legal World20100830

An insider's view of legal battles being fought around the world

Brian King meets lawyers as they battle to achieve justice and defend human rights - often in the face of overwhelming legal and political opposition.

These are the stories of local lawyers, sometimes helped by international agencies, grappling with issues of immense importance for the individuals concerned, but which also have serious national and international implications.

STATELESSNESS IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Thousands of people of Haitian descent are suffering systematic discrimination by authorities in the Dominican Republic it is claimed.

Denied official recognition of their nationality, they are unable to attend school, vote, travel, get married, register the birth of their children or even access the judicial system.

Recent government legislation has meant these people, including schoolteachers, lawyers, doctors and students, have become "functionally stateless".

Brian King meets the local lawyers who - with international support - are fighting individual cases of discrimination at the same time as tackling Government policy in test cases before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

The programme follows lawyers as they meet with clients of Haitian descent, accessing the strength of their cases, going with them to the Registry Office to apply for new ID cards, where officials query their Haitian-sounding names - then turn them away.

We hear how the lawyers prepare to fight cases in court, documenting the hardships and injustices suffered by their clients and their families as a result of being denied the right to citizenship.

01The Legal World20100831

An insider's view of legal battles being fought around the world

01The Legal World20100904
01The Legal World20100905
01The Legal World20100906

Brian King meets lawyers as they battle to achieve justice and defend human rights - often in the face of overwhelming legal and political opposition.

These are the stories of local lawyers, sometimes helped by international agencies, grappling with issues of immense importance for the individuals concerned, but which also have serious national and international implications.

STATELESSNESS IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Thousands of people of Haitian descent are suffering systematic discrimination by authorities in the Dominican Republic it is claimed.

Denied official recognition of their nationality, they are unable to attend school, vote, travel, get married, register the birth of their children or even access the judicial system.

Recent government legislation has meant these people, including schoolteachers, lawyers, doctors and students, have become "functionally stateless".

Brian King meets the local lawyers who - with international support - are fighting individual cases of discrimination at the same time as tackling Government policy in test cases before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

The programme follows lawyers as they meet with clients of Haitian descent, accessing the strength of their cases, going with them to the Registry Office to apply for new ID cards, where officials query their Haitian-sounding names - then turn them away.

We hear how the lawyers prepare to fight cases in court, documenting the hardships and injustices suffered by their clients and their families as a result of being denied the right to citizenship.

An insider's view of legal battles being fought around the world

01The Nuclear Family

01The Nuclear Family20110314

Despite suggestions of decline in the West, the model of the nuclear family is still gr.

Despite suggestions of decline in the West, the model of the nuclear family is still growing.

What makes it so successful?

01The Nuclear Family20110315

Despite suggestions of decline in the West, the model of the nuclear family is still gr.

01The Nuclear Family20110319
01The Nuclear Family20110320
01The Nuclear Family20110321
01The Power And The Passion20100607

David Goldblatt embarks on four very different adventures into the meaning and madness.

David Goldblatt embarks on four very different adventures into the meaning and madness of a game that unites us all: football.

01The Power And The Passion20100608

David Goldblatt embarks on four very different adventures into the meaning and madness.

01The Power And The Passion, A Night At The Opera - Inter Milan V Ac Milan20100612

With the 2010 World Cup fast approaching many football fans around the world will be avidly debating and agonising over the fate of their nations in the tournament.

However it is often at the domestic club level that the game finds its most passionate support.

David Goldblatt, embarks on an assortment of adventures into the meaning and madness of the game.

He travels to four very different football games in Italy, Egypt, Ghana and the UK, to experience the build-up and pitch action from the perspective of the fans.

BY DAVID GOLDBLATT

It's 24 January 2010, a bitingly cold Sunday and the city is enshrouded in freezing fog, trees are encrusted in frost like sparkling diamond telegraph poles.

The elite of Milanese society are swirling up the steps of La Scala for the afternoon performance of Rigoletto but that evening they will most likely be at a more significant performance that will grip the entire city as Inter - the Nerazurri - play their city counterparts Milan - the Rossoneri.

For the first time in years both clubs have a chance of winning the Scudetto - the Italian championship.

The scandal of Calciopoli in 2006 still courses through this fixture and Serie A.

Inter became champions that year, after decades of cursing and waiting - whilst Juventus were disgraced and relegated, and Milan were docked points for their part in the worst ever crisis to hit Italian football.

For decades Inter fans have considered themselves the unlucky ones, in the shadow of Milan’s domestic and European glory.

Milan fans talk patronisingly of them as the idiot cousins, to be tolerated and allowed to share stadium space with.

But not anymore.

Since 2006 Inter have gone on to win successive championships whilst Milan have begun to wane.

An old team presided over by a figure who divides Italian society and whose own powers might be on the wane - Silvio Berlusconi.

His political power built on the spectacle and glory of Milan in the 1990s.

This night is perhaps their last chance to haul Inter back into a title fight.

Many derbies are characterised by hatred, fear and loathing.

But here you can see friends, even families supporting both sides, and walking alongside each other to the match.

Milan have, traditionally been the club of the city’s working class, Inter the club of artists, intellectuals and the elite.

Much has changed since Berlusconi used Milan to create a spectacle of football, full of bling and hyperbole to project his political ambitions on a national stage.

That’s merely the backdrop for a fixture and a game that permeates every sector of Italian society.

In the company of Calcio historian John Foot, I speak to a leading architect and to a hooligan about what football and the Derby della Madonnina - named after the city’s great statue of the Virgin Mary at the top of the Duomo Cathedral - means to all.

Listen as I find out how faith, power, dreams and paranoia clash in the dark night of the San Siro.

David Goldblatt finds out why Italians are so passionate about football in Milan.

01The Power And The Passion, A Night At The Opera - Inter Milan V Ac Milan20100614

David Goldblatt finds out why Italians are so passionate about football in Milan.

01The Price Of Biofuels2010042620100427 (WS)
20100501 (WS)
20100502 (WS)
20100503 (WS)

Gerry Northam investigates the true cost of bio fuels.

Once, bio-fuels were seen as the answer to global warming and dwindling oil stocks.

Today, many who took that line, believe instead that they increase pollution and are behind worldwide environmental havoc, rising food prices, and worsening hunger and poverty.

The first official hint of changing attitudes came in the Gallagher Review of 2007, which expressed concerns that bio fuels - renewable liquid fuels derived from plant or animal material – not only didn't help climate control, but were making poor people in the developing world even poorer.

Today, many who took that view, believe instead that they increase pollution - and are behind worldwide environmental havoc, rising food prices, and worsening hunger and poverty.

Then, bodies as diverse as the World Bank and major charities defined bio fuels as a crime against humanity" and "a silent tsunami".

And then some alarming facts emerged – for example, that the grain required to fill the tank of a Range Rover with ethanol is sufficient to feed one person for a year, and that American land turned over to bio fuel production every two years alone would fill 250 million mouths.

But that is not the whole story.

Governments and multi-nationals fight what they see as a simplistic black-and-white approach, insisting that bio fuels remain our best hope for the future - despite some damaging side-effects.

Scientists, meanwhile, working on ‘a second generation' of bio fuels which, they believe, could eradicate those side-effects.

For this documentary, investigative reporter Gerry Northam finds out exactly how much bio fuels cost and who is paying for it.

He visits Paraguay, where the expansion of the soy industry has happened in tandem with the violent suppression of small farmers and indigenous communities.

It's being alledged that farmers are being bullied into growing soy with pesticides at the expense of their food crops, health, farms, and – in many cases – their lives.

Gerry Northam investigates claims that biofuels, thought to be the answer to global war.

Gerry Northam investigates claims that biofuels, thought to be the answer to global warming, might lead to environmental havoc.

01The Virtual Revolution20100222

The Great Levelling: has the internet lived up to the ideals of its founders?

Since its birth almost twenty years ago, the World Wide Web has transformed our world : A quarter of the planet is now online and able as never before to communicate, publish, and garner information seemingly without limits.

But will the Web's empowerment of ordinary people endure? As part of the BBC's internet season, the computer expert Doctor Aleks Krotoski starts her four part series by documenting the Web's remarkable growth and asking if the old hierarchies it challenges are managing to stage a counter revolution.

01The Virtual Revolution20100223

The Great Levelling: has the internet lived up to the ideals of its founders?

01The Virtual Revolution20100227
01The Virtual Revolution20100228
01The Virtual Revolution20100301

Since its birth almost twenty years ago, the World Wide Web has transformed our world : A quarter of the planet is now online and able as never before to communicate, publish, and garner information seemingly without limits.

But will the Web's empowerment of ordinary people endure? As part of the BBC's internet season, the computer expert Doctor Aleks Krotoski starts her four part series by documenting the Web's remarkable growth and asking if the old hierarchies it challenges are managing to stage a counter revolution.

The Great Levelling: has the internet lived up to the ideals of its founders?

01Third Agers20090302

What is it really like to be old in this century of ageing? Jane Little meets people fr.

What is it really like to be old in this century of ageing? Jane Little meets people from five countries to find out.

01Third Agers20090303

What is it really like to be old in this century of ageing? Jane Little meets people fr.

01Third Agers20090308

What is it really like to be old in this century of ageing? Jane Little meets people from five countries to find out.

What is it really like to be old in this century of ageing? Jane Little meets people fr.

01Third Agers20090309
01West African Journeys20090420

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring c.

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring countries in West Africa.

Part 1: Ghana.

01West African Journeys20090421

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring c.

01West African Journeys20090425

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring countries in West Africa.

Part 1: Ghana.

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring c.

01West African Journeys20090426

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring c.

01West African Journeys20090427

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring c.

01Why Is Africa Poor?20090824

World Affairs Correspondent Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative po.

World Affairs Correspondent Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative poverty.

01Why Is Africa Poor?20090825

World Affairs Correspondent Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative po.

01Why Is Africa Poor?20090830

World Affairs Correspondent Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative po.

01Why Is Africa Poor?20090831

World Affairs Correspondent Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative po.

01Why Is Africa Poor?, Why Is Africa Poor? - Part One20090829

Conflicts - between Africans, with non-Africans and sometimes with the land itself - continue to make too many people on the continent among the poorest on earth.

World Affairs correspondent Mark Doyle explores questions of democracy, modern communications and the impact of multi-national corporations.

Though the question 'why is Africa poor?' is a straightforward one, the answers are not.

Mark takes a look at the impact of foreign investors on countries such as Liberia and Sudan.

Are Africans right to be suspicious of investors, or is the industry that foreigners bring - practical help in the form of building bridges and railways, and making the most of a country's natural mineral deposits - the beginnings of large scale development?

Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative poverty.

01Would You Kill The Big Guy?20101129

Steve Evans explores a moral dilemma, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral.

Steve Evans explores a moral dilemma, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral creatures humans are.

01Would You Kill The Big Guy?20101130

Steve Evans explores a moral dilemma, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral.

01Would You Kill The Big Guy?, Would You Kill The Big Guy20101204

Here's the scenario: a train is hurtling down a railway line, it's out of control and the brakes have failed.

Ahead, five people are tied to the track - all five face certain death.

You can flick a switch to save them, but if you do another man has to die.

What do you do?

Steve Evans explores the possible answers to this moral dilemma, to see what it tells us about the kind of ethical creatures humans are.

What kind of moral creatures are we? Steven Evans explores the issues.

01Would You Kill The Big Guy?, Would You Kill The Big Guy20101206

What kind of moral creatures are we? Steven Evans explores the issues.

01 LASTAnatomy Of A Car Crash20090601

A detailed look at exactly what happened in a car crash on a road in England, and the long term consequences of the crash.

A detailed look at exactly what happened in a car crash on a road in England, and the l.

01 LASTAnatomy Of A Car Crash20090602

A detailed look at exactly what happened in a car crash on a road in England, and the l.

01 LASTAnatomy Of A Car Crash20090606

A detailed look at exactly what happened in a car crash on a road in England, and the long term consequences of the crash.

A detailed look at exactly what happened in a car crash on a road in England, and the l.

01 LASTAnatomy Of A Car Crash20090607

A detailed look at exactly what happened in a car crash on a road in England, and the l.

01 LASTAnatomy Of A Car Crash20090608

A detailed look at exactly what happened in a car crash on a road in England, and the l.

01 LASTDiabetes - A Silent Killer20090620

Having Type-1 diabetes means daily injections of insulin and more chance of suffering from other diseases.

Justin Webb reports.

Having Type-1 diabetes means daily injections of insulin and more chance of suffering f.

Justin Webb's son was diagnosed with type-1 diabetes.

As parent and journalist, Justin.

01 LASTDiabetes - A Silent Killer20090622

Having Type-1 diabetes means daily injections of insulin and more chance of suffering f.

01 LASTFreedom From Slavery In Mauritania20090518

In 2007 owning slaves became a criminal act in Mauritania.

David Gutnick in Nouakchott.

David Gutnick in Nouakchott finds out how entrenched slavery is.

01 LASTFreedom From Slavery In Mauritania20090519

In 2007 owning slaves became a criminal act in Mauritania.

David Gutnick in Nouakchott.

01 LASTFreedom From Slavery In Mauritania20090523

In 2007 owning slaves became a criminal act in Mauritania.

David Gutnick in Nouakchott.

01 LASTFreedom From Slavery In Mauritania20090524

In 2007 owning slaves became a criminal act in Mauritania.

David Gutnick in Nouakchott.

01 LASTFreedom From Slavery In Mauritania20090525

In 2007 owning slaves became a criminal act in Mauritania.

David Gutnick in Nouakchott.

01 LASTFreedom From Slavery In Mauritania, Freedom From Slavery In Mauritania20090523

Mauritania - a desert country on Africa's north west coast - has a history of slavery going back 800 years.

Over the last century Mauritania has made several attempts to ban slavery.

But finally, in August 2007 owning slaves became a criminal act for the first time.

Overnight, half a million people - a fifth of the country's population - were officially freed from bondage.

However many of them didn't hear the news.

Without having access to broadcast media or the ability to read, even if they had, it might not have meant much.

David Gutnick of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation visits Nouakchott, the capital of Mauritania.

He travels around the city - including bustling shanty towns - and finds out more about the rigid caste system that affects all walks of life in Mauritania.

During his journey he travels with his interpretor - who helps him to meet residents in Nouakchott including teachers, religious leaders, and former slaves.

David discovers how the master/slave relationship can't be swept aside so easily.

First broadcast on Monday 18 May 2009.

David Gutnick reports on Mauritania's problem with slavery.

01 LASTFreedom From Slavery In Mauritania, Freedom From Slavery In Mauritania20090524

David Gutnick reports on Mauritania's problem with slavery.

01 LASTFreedom From Slavery In Mauritania, Freedom From Slavery In Mauritania20090525

David Gutnick reports on Mauritania's problem with slavery.

01 LASTLincoln And The World20090525

Alan Little looks at the legacy of Abraham Lincoln.

His political influence is still po.

His political influence is still powerful today, 200 years after his birth.

01 LASTLincoln And The World20090526

Alan Little looks at the legacy of Abraham Lincoln.

His political influence is still po.

01 LASTLincoln And The World20090530

Alan Little looks at the legacy of Abraham Lincoln.

His political influence is still po.

01 LASTLincoln And The World20090531

Alan Little looks at the legacy of Abraham Lincoln.

His political influence is still powerful today, 200 years after his birth.

His political influence is still po.

01 LASTLincoln And The World20090601

Alan Little looks at the legacy of Abraham Lincoln.

His political influence is still po.

01 LASTThe Economy On The Edge20090608

Last summer, Martin Wolf predicted a very deep global downturn.

He returns to examine the state of the global financial markets

He returns to examine t.

01 LASTThe Economy On The Edge20090609

Last summer, Martin Wolf predicted a very deep global downturn.

He returns to examine t.

01 LASTThe Economy On The Edge20090613

Last summer, Martin Wolf predicted a very deep global downturn.

He returns to examine t.

Martin Wolf returns to examine the state of the global financial markets and what shocks to the system may be yet to come.

Martin Wolf returns to examine the state of the global financial markets and what shock.

01 LASTThe Pardon Game20090118

The US president has a constitutional right to grant pardons, usually just before he leaves office.

Owen Bennett-jones reports.

The US president has a constitutional right to grant pardons, usually just before he le.

01 LASTThe Pardon Game20090119

The US president has a constitutional right to grant pardons, usually just before he le.

01 LASTThe Torturers' Tale20090223

Jolyon Jenkins talks to former torturers about the balance of power that exists between.

Jolyon Jenkins talks to former torturers about the balance of power that exists between themselves and their victims.

01 LASTThe Torturers' Tale20090224

Jolyon Jenkins talks to former torturers about the balance of power that exists between.

01 LASTThe Torturers' Tale20090301

Jolyon Jenkins talks to former torturers about the balance of power that exists between themselves and their victims.

Jolyon Jenkins talks to former torturers about the balance of power that exists between.

01 LASTThe Torturers' Tale20090302
021968 - The Year That Changed The World20081208

John Tusa traces what made 1968 such a climactic year.

Student protests, Soviet might,.

Student protests, Soviet might, assassinations, war and famine.

021968 - The Year That Changed The World20081209

John Tusa traces what made 1968 such a climactic year.

Student protests, Soviet might, assassinations, war and famine.

Student protests, Soviet might,.

021968 - The Year That Changed The World20081214

John Tusa traces what made 1968 such a climactic year.

Student protests, Soviet might, assassinations, war and famine.

Student protests, Soviet might,.

021968 - The Year That Changed The World20081215

John Tusa traces what made 1968 such a climactic year.

Student protests, Soviet might,.

02China - Shaking The World20100719
02China - Shaking The World20100720
02China - Shaking The World20100724
02China - Shaking The World20100725
02China - Shaking The World20110131

A non-democratic, state-planned China versus Western democracy and free market ideology.

"China," Napoleon is believed to have once said, "is a sleeping giant.

When she awakes, she will shake the world."

China endured decades of occupation, division and international isolation since that 19th century warning.

When it finally opened to the rest of the world, foreign money and expertise flooded in.

Now - little more than a generation later - China is poised to overtake Japan to become the world's second largest economy.

Its unprecedented growth in exports has left it holding more foreign currency than any other nation - financial power which China is beginning to use to challenge the US dollar's long-standing dominance as the medium of international trade.

This documentary series examines the political, economic and cultural mechanisms of China's growing global influence.

Michael Robinson, who documented China's awakening for the BBC almost 20 years ago, returns to assess the prospects and problems of the unrelenting shift of power from West to East.

In the second part of this series, the BBC's Michael Robinson looks at the potentially world-shaking clash of cultures between non-democratic, state-planned China and the American-centred world of democracy and free market ideology.

02China - Shaking The World20110201

A non-democratic, state-planned China versus Western democracy and free market ideology.

02China - Shaking The World20110205
02China - Shaking The World20110206
02China - Shaking The World20110207

"China," Napoleon is believed to have once said, "is a sleeping giant.

When she awakes, she will shake the world."

China endured decades of occupation, division and international isolation since that 19th century warning.

When it finally opened to the rest of the world, foreign money and expertise flooded in.

Now - little more than a generation later - China is poised to overtake Japan to become the world's second largest economy.

Its unprecedented growth in exports has left it holding more foreign currency than any other nation - financial power which China is beginning to use to challenge the US dollar's long-standing dominance as the medium of international trade.

This documentary series examines the political, economic and cultural mechanisms of China's growing global influence.

Michael Robinson, who documented China's awakening for the BBC almost 20 years ago, returns to assess the prospects and problems of the unrelenting shift of power from West to East.

In the second part of this series, the BBC's Michael Robinson looks at the potentially world-shaking clash of cultures between non-democratic, state-planned China and the American-centred world of democracy and free market ideology.

A non-democratic, state-planned China versus Western democracy and free market ideology.

02Fresh Start20090209

Lucy Ash examines innovative rehabilitation schemes that help reduce reoffending rates.

Lucy Ash examines innovative rehabilitation schemes that help reduce reoffending rates of even the most hardened criminals.

02Fresh Start20090210

Lucy Ash examines innovative rehabilitation schemes that help reduce reoffending rates.

02Fresh Start20090215

Lucy Ash examines innovative rehabilitation schemes that help reduce reoffending rates of even the most hardened criminals.

Lucy Ash examines innovative rehabilitation schemes that help reduce reoffending rates.

02Fresh Start20090216

Lucy Ash examines innovative rehabilitation schemes that help reduce reoffending rates.

02Generation Jihad20100412

Peter Taylor examines the new danger posed by some young Muslims who have embraced militant Islam.

Peter Taylor examines the new danger posed by some young Muslims who have embraced mili.

02Generation Jihad20100413

Peter Taylor examines the new danger posed by some young Muslims who have embraced mili.

02Generation Jihad20100417

Across the Western world it's no longer the threat from al-Qaeda that governments are most concerned about.

Instead, it's home-grown terror plots hatched by their own citizens.

In this three-part series, Peter Taylor investigates the terrorist threat from young Muslims radicalised on the internet.

Although extremists represent a tiny minority of the Muslim community, some would argue they now constitute the single biggest threat to national security.

In the second episode Peter examines a network of young jihadists that stretched across three continents.

They were young, most had no direct contact with al-Qaeda and in some cases, they had not even met each other face to face but they were plotting together with murderous intent.

Peter discovers how members of 'Generation Jihad' were turned into terrorists through exposure to violent al-Qaeda propaganda distributed over the internet.

Peter Taylor investigates the terrorist threat from young Muslims radicalised on the web.

02Generation Jihad20100418

Peter Taylor investigates the terrorist threat from young Muslims radicalised on the web.

02Generation Jihad20100419

Peter Taylor investigates the terrorist threat from young Muslims radicalised on the web.

02The Crash20090928

A longer view of the crash suggests that there are in fact many causes - financial, pol.

A longer view of the crash suggests that there are in fact many causes - financial, political and geographical.

02The Crash20090929

A longer view of the crash suggests that there are in fact many causes - financial, pol.

02The Crash20091003

A longer view of the crash suggests that there are in fact many causes - financial, political and geographical.

A longer view of the crash suggests that there are in fact many causes - financial, pol.

02The Crash20091004
02The Crash20091005
02The Crescent And The Cross20091116
02The Crescent And The Cross20091117
02The Crescent And The Cross20091121
02The Crescent And The Cross20091122
02The Crescent And The Cross20091123
02The Greening Of The Deserts20090708
02The Greening Of The Deserts20090709
02The Greening Of The Deserts2009071120090713

Some experts now argue that some deserts could get greener.

Ayisha Yahya explores the a.

Thembi Ngubane dared to talk openly about AIDS in South Africa.

This is a tribute to a.

This is a tribute to a young woman of extraordinary courage.

02The Power And The Passion20100614
02The Power And The Passion20100615
02The Power And The Passion20100619

With the 2010 World Cup underway, many football fans around the world will be avidly debating and agonising over the fate of their nations in the tournament.

However it is often at the domestic club level that the game finds its most passionate support.

David Goldblatt, embarks on an assortment of adventures into the meaning and madness of the game.

He travels to four very different football games in Italy, Egypt, Ghana and the UK, to experience the build-up and pitch action from the perspective of the fans.

BY DAVID GOLDBLATT

It's 12 December 2009, the day of the Cairo derby.

Billed as a violent clash of the two oldest clubs in Egypt, I arrive to find the fixture overshadowed by the national hysteria of Egypt’s failure to qualify for the World Cup at the hands or feet of hated rivals Algeria.

It’s a clue to what football means to many millions across the nation.

It's one of the few legitimate areas of expression and emotion - in a heavily policed society where frustrations are many and outlets few.

Traditionally Zamalek have been tied to the Egypt of the past, to royalty and the world before the coming of Gamal Abdul Nasser.

Al Ahly are literally the nation" - seemingly the expression of national will.

Set up deliberately in opposition to British rule and as a place to gather like-minded individuals against foreign rule.

When Nasser came to power he chose Al Ahly as the club to be run by one of his close military allies, although Nasser himself seemingly had little enthusiasm for football.

Both clubs are the elite of North African football, shrouded in domestic and African honours - whilst the Egyptian league remains financially stable and able to retain its best players.

Zamalek, the White Knights, have been on the slide recently - bad management, bad results and bad vibes.

Its fans see Al Ahly as the oppressive power - helped by officials and by interested parties to maintain their grip on the league.

They speak of only ever feeling free at the club, like Al Ahly a vast sporting organisation that offers membership to those who can afford it and a range of sporting and social facilities.

Al Ahly, meanwhile, have been at the heart of a new phenomenon, the rise of the Ultras.

Slavishly modelled along the lines of Italian Tifosi, elaborately choreographed displays of support with massive banners, structured leadership and highly orchestrated support.

But to be an Ultra in Egypt is very different from Italian society.

Ultras traditionally hate the police but that is a dangerous thing to do in a virtual police state.

They must organise secretly at night, arriving at the ground hours before anyone else to bring in their banners and paraphernalia.

In the days and hours leading up to the game, leaders of both Al Ahly and Zamalek Ultras have been detained by the police but their plans go ahead.

Al Ahly's Ultras may despise their Zamalek cousins but reserve true hatred for the fans of nearby Ismaily.

At their most recent away fixture, the Ultras stunned police with a blazing display of flares that shrouded the entire game in smoke.

Now, as the hours tick away, the police are taking no chances.

Both the recent loss to Algeria and the orchestrated flares of the Al Ahly Ultras at Ismaily mean the national stadium - the only place big enough and safe enough to host the derby - is surrounded by the police and army.

Fans are thoroughly searched, any flag has its stick removed and all the while, plain-clothed security forces, in comfortable slacks and knitwear, watch attentively.

Which is why my producer and I, perhaps naively brandishing BBC marked microphones are experiencing the ignominy of not being allowed in.

David Goldblatt finds out why Egyptians are so passionate about football in Cairo."

02The Power And The Passion20100621

David Goldblatt finds out why Egyptians are so passionate about football in Cairo.

02The Virtual Revolution20100301

Enemy of the State - the impact of the web on global politics.

02The Virtual Revolution20100302
02The Virtual Revolution20100306
02The Virtual Revolution20100307
02The Virtual Revolution20100308
02Third Agers20090309
02Third Agers20090310
02Third Agers20090315
02Third Agers20090316
02West African Journeys20090427

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring c.

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring countries in West Africa.

Part 1: Ghana.

02West African Journeys20090428

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring c.

02West African Journeys, The Undercover Journalist20090502

Award-winning journalist Sorious Samura takes a trip through four neighbouring countries in West Africa and in each country, he meets up with someone who takes him on a journey.

The journeys are all different.

Some are momentous and life-changing passages, whilst others are quotidian trips undertaken every day to eke out a living.

By following on the footsteps of his hosts, Sorious hears stories which open a window into the challenges, complexities and contradictions of life in modern West Africa.

Programme Two - The Undercover Journalist

Sorious drops into the middle of an undercover investigation of a Chinese brothel in Accra, Ghana, and the sixteen women who have been trafficked from China to work as prostitutes.

His host is a passionate investigative reporter called Anas Aremeyaw.

Anas has won several prestigious international and national awards for his work exposing a complex cross-border human-trafficking syndicate operating in West Africa.

He is the mystery man of Ghanaian journalism because he refuses to allow his face to be photographed for fear that he will be recognised in one of his numerous undercover investigations.

Anas takes Sorious on the last stage of his latest investigation, showing him the Chinese brothel, introducing him to ‘Princess' - a Ghanaian girl who works as a cleaner at the brothel and who Anas has befriended to gain information - and taking him along for the police raid which results in the arrest of the traffickers.

Anas is running a complex and remarkable operation - not only producing what Anas himself describes as wow factor" journalism, but working closely with a charity and the authorities to get human traffickers prosecuted and their victims returned safely home.

Sorious reflects that, in a continent where journalism is challenged and challenging, Anas is an inspiration.

Sorious Samura joins an undercover investigation into human trafficking."

02West African Journeys, The Undercover Journalist20090503

Sorious Samura joins an undercover investigation into human trafficking.

02West African Journeys, The Undercover Journalist20090504

Sorious Samura joins an undercover investigation into human trafficking.

02Why Is Africa Poor?20090831

World Affairs Correspondent Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative po.

World Affairs Correspondent Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative poverty.

02Why Is Africa Poor?20090901

World Affairs Correspondent Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative po.

02Why Is Africa Poor?20090905

World Affairs Correspondent Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative poverty.

World Affairs Correspondent Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative po.

02Why Is Africa Poor?20090907

World Affairs Correspondent Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative po.

02 LASTBrazil - Lula's Legacy, A Country Under Construction20110103

Brazil has undergone drastic economic development - but at what social cost?

As President Lula leaves office, what has been the legacy of one of the most popular politicians in Brazilian history?

On 1 January, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who won Brazil’s presidency with a landmark win in 2002, leaves office with record approval ratings and a successful economic record.

In this two-part series, the BBC’s Paulo Cabral travels to the two places that marked Lula’s life – the poor region in the northeast where the president was born, and the industrial suburb of Sao Paulo where he made his reputation.

Paulo finds a Brazil with a rapidly expanding middle class, but with many areas still in need of government help.

He visits impressive infrastructure projects, but encounters big bottlenecks.

He talks to everyone from IT entrepreneurs to illiterate farm-workers.

Is life now better for everyone in Brazil?

02 LASTBrazil - Lula's Legacy, A Country Under Construction20110104

Brazil has undergone drastic economic development - but at what social cost?

02 LASTBrazil - Lula's Legacy, A Country Under Construction20110108

As President Lula leaves office, what has been the legacy of one of the most popular politicians in Brazilian history?

On 1 January, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who won Brazil’s presidency with a landmark win in 2002, leaves office with record approval ratings and a successful economic record.

In this two-part series, the BBC’s Paulo Cabral travels to the two places that marked Lula’s life – the poor region in the northeast where the president was born, and the industrial suburb of Sao Paulo where he made his reputation.

Paulo finds a Brazil with a rapidly expanding middle class, but with many areas still in need of government help.

He visits impressive infrastructure projects, but encounters big bottlenecks.

He talks to everyone from IT entrepreneurs to illiterate farm-workers.

Is life now better for everyone in Brazil?

Brazil has undergone drastic economic development - but at what social cost?

02 LASTBrazil - Lula's Legacy, A Country Under Construction20110109

Brazil has undergone drastic economic development - but at what social cost?

02 LASTBrazil - Lula's Legacy, A Country Under Construction20110110

Brazil has undergone drastic economic development - but at what social cost?

02 LASTFamily Matters, - Mexico20110321

Why is the nuclear family model so successful across the developing world?

Far from being in decline, as western newspaper headlines suggest, the nuclear family is emerging as the successful model across much of the developing world.

Sociologists say it's now taking root in all but a handful of countries.

But what makes it such an irresistable model for the 21st Century?

02 LASTFamily Matters, - Mexico20110322

Why is the nuclear family model so successful across the developing world?

02 LASTFamily Matters, - Mexico20110326

Far from being in decline, as western newspaper headlines suggest, the nuclear family is emerging as the successful model across much of the developing world.

Sociologists say it's now taking root in all but a handful of countries.

But what makes it such an irresistable model for the 21st Century?

Why is the nuclear family model so successful across the developing world?

02 LASTFresh Start, The Legacy Of George W Bush20090202

As President George Bush prepares to leave the White House, Justin Webb looks at his do.

As President George Bush prepares to leave the White House, Justin Webb looks at his domestic and foreign policy legacies.

02 LASTFresh Start, The Legacy Of George W Bush20090203

As President George Bush prepares to leave the White House, Justin Webb looks at his do.

02 LASTFresh Start, The Legacy Of George W Bush20090208

As President George Bush prepares to leave the White House, Justin Webb looks at his do.

02 LASTInside The Imf20110117
02 LASTInside The Imf20110118
02 LASTInside The Imf20110122
02 LASTInside The Imf20110123
02 LASTInside The Imf20110124
02 LASTOpposing Obama20100208

Gary Younge examines the story of those for whom the Obama presidency is nothing but ba.

Gary Younge examines the story of those for whom the Obama presidency is nothing but bad news.

02 LASTOpposing Obama20100209

Gary Younge examines the story of those for whom the Obama presidency is nothing but ba.

02 LASTOpposing Obama20100213

After eight years of division, America came together last year to celebrate the historic election of its first black president - or at least that was how the story was presented.

In fact, on election day, despite the calamity of the Iraq war and the huge financial crisis, the vote for Republicans actually increased in significant swathes of the country.

Since then, polls suggest that Obama is now the most divisive president since such records began.

One year into his presidency, the gap between how Democrats and Republicans rate Obama is greater than it was for Bush in 2001 and twice as high as it was for Nixon in 1969, during the height of the Vietnam War.

In this two part documentary, author and journalist Gary Younge, tells the story of the other side of the Obama phenomenon; the story of those who say that the Obama presidency is nothing but bad news.

Who are these people who feel they have been marginalised by the Obama revolution? What do they not like about him and what could Obama do, if anything, to win them over?

Listen to Gary as he spends ten days travelling through rural Arkansas and Kentucky, talking to anti-tax protesters, fundamentalist Christians and libertarians, country club members and local dignitaries to find out how they view the last year under Barack Obama and what their hopes and fears are for the coming year.

Gary Younge meets people who think Barack Obama's presidency is nothing but bad news.

Gary Younge examines the story of those for whom the Obama presidency is nothing but ba.

02 LASTOpposing Obama20100214

Gary Younge meets people who think Barack Obama's presidency is nothing but bad news.

Gary Younge examines the story of those for whom the Obama presidency is nothing but ba.

02 LASTOpposing Obama20100215

Gary Younge meets people who think Barack Obama's presidency is nothing but bad news.

Gary Younge examines the story of those for whom the Obama presidency is nothing but ba.

Maurice Walsh reports on the changing face of religion in New York, as Hispanics are ta.

Maurice Walsh reports on the changing face of religion in New York, as Hispanics are taking over from Irish Americans.

02 LASTOrphans Of 8920091214

Quentin Peel looks at Communism's prospects as an ideology and system of government aft.

Quentin Peel looks at Communism's prospects as an ideology and system of government after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

02 LASTOrphans Of 8920091215

Quentin Peel looks at Communism's prospects as an ideology and system of government aft.

02 LASTOrphans Of 8920091219

Quentin Peel looks at Communism's prospects as an ideology and system of government aft.

02 LASTOrphans Of 8920091220

Quentin Peel looks at Communism's prospects as an ideology and system of government aft.

02 LASTOrphans Of 8920091221

Quentin Peel looks at Communism's prospects as an ideology and system of government aft.

Google has revolutionised what it means to go online.

But beneath the promise are compl.

But beneath the promise are complex moral and legal pitfalls.

02 LASTPower And The Judges20101221

Turkey's political power struggle between its government and judiciary.

02 LASTPower And The Judges20101225

Depending where you are in the world, judges may command great respect or huge contempt.

Why are judges so important in today's world and how do the courts earn and use their power?

The BBC's Laura Lynch meets senior judges to gain an insight into how much power they really have.

She questions whether they are always truly impartial and whether they should have the authority to dismiss laws made by democratically-elected politicians.

Turkey's political power struggle between its government and judiciary.

02 LASTPower And The Judges20101226

Turkey's political power struggle between its government and judiciary.

02 LASTPower And The Judges20101227

Turkey's political power struggle between its government and judiciary.

02 LASTReturn To White Horse20101108

The return of Carrie Gracie's award winning series on the urbanisation of China.

02 LASTReturn To White Horse20101109

The return of Carrie Gracie's award winning series on the urbanisation of China.

02 LASTReturn To White Horse20101113

Carrie Gracie's award winning series on White Horse Village returns with this two-part documentary.

She tackles one of the biggest stories of our time, the urbanisation of China.

Over the course of several years - Carrie has charted the transformation of a small mountain village - a thousand miles from Beijing, as it is destroyed to make way for 21st Century China.

Overcoming barriers of language and culture, the story is told through the voices of those experiencing the urban revolution and discovers how they are adjusting.

It also meets those who've moved into this new city - working in the shops and restaurants - that have opened where once there were rice paddies.

Carrie Gracie returns to China to see how 21st Century urbanisation is progressing

02 LASTReturn To White Horse20101114

Carrie Gracie returns to China to see how 21st Century urbanisation is progressing

02 LASTReturn To White Horse20101115

Carrie Gracie returns to China to see how 21st Century urbanisation is progressing

02 LASTRoad Kill20101122

Sheena Mcdonald asks why millions of people die on our roads each year, particularly in.

Sheena Mcdonald asks why millions of people die on our roads each year, particularly in poorer countries.

02 LASTRoad Kill20101123

Sheena Mcdonald asks why millions of people die on our roads each year, particularly in.

02 LASTRoad Kill20101127

As the United Nations gears up for a new decade of action to improve road safety across the world, Sheena Mcdonald looks at whether its lofty ambition to save five million lives over the next ten years can work on the ground.

Road deaths are threatening to overtake malaria and HIV, in how many lives they take around the world, particularly in poorer countries.

In this two-part series, Sheena visits some of the world's most dangerous roads in Kenya and Costa Rica to find out why the death toll in developing countries is rising - when the solutions to road accidents are so simple.

The Millennium Development Goals push countries to work hard to improve the mortality rates for children under five, but there are no goals to stop those same children being knocked down when they start school.

Follow Sheena - who was nearly killed by a speeding police car just over ten years ago - as she visits accident blackspots, meets victims and people campaigning for better road safety, and challenges those in power who do not believe it is important enough.

Sheena Mcdonald finds out what the Costa Rican government is doing to improve road safety

02 LASTRoad Kill20101128

Sheena Mcdonald finds out what the Costa Rican government is doing to improve road safety

02 LASTRoad Kill20101129

Sheena Mcdonald finds out what the Costa Rican government is doing to improve road safety

02 LASTSoft Power20100524

Philip Dodd looks at soft power - how culture and lifestyle are the battleground for gl.

Philip Dodd looks at soft power - how culture and lifestyle are the battleground for global economic and political dominance.

02 LASTSoft Power20100525

Philip Dodd looks at soft power - how culture and lifestyle are the battleground for gl.

02 LASTSoft Power, India20100529

The US was once the undisputed global powerhouse.

Now it is under threat from contenders who use the influence of culture and lifestyle to fight for global economic and political dominance.

This political manipulation is referred to as soft power – achieving what you want by attracting and persuading others to adopt your customs - thriving on control, not force.

In this series, Philip Dodd investigates how this cultural rivalry is being formed and what weapons of persuasion are being deployed, from global sporting fixtures to cultural events and educational projects.

In part two he finds out if the values and culture of India can rival those of China - to make New Delhi Asia's soft superpower.

Philip looks at India's post independence demise to its new found confidence after the Oscar success of Slumdog Millionaire.

He also finds out how India is using its culture, IT knowledge and command of English to push the country's brand globally.

With China's success hosting the Olympic Games and the Shanghai Expo - will India as host of the Commonwealth Games in Delhi this year be able to show the world a new modern side?

Philip Dodd finds out if the values and culture of India can rival those of China.

02 LASTSoft Power, India20100530

Philip Dodd finds out if the values and culture of India can rival those of China.

02 LASTSoft Power, India20100531

Philip Dodd finds out if the values and culture of India can rival those of China.

02 LASTThe Atrocity Archives20090413
02 LASTThe Atrocity Archives20090414
02 LASTThe Atrocity Archives20090418
02 LASTThe Atrocity Archives20090419

Gerry Northam reports on the discovery of documents from Guatemala's security forces du.

02 LASTThe Atrocity Archives20090420
02 LASTThe Brotherhood20100823
02 LASTThe Brotherhood20100824
02 LASTThe Brotherhood20100828
02 LASTThe Brotherhood20100829
02 LASTThe Brotherhood20100830

"No taxi driver in Cairo knows how to find the headquarters of the Muslim Brotherhood.

The brothers may be everywhere but the organisation is nowhere to be seen."

Egypt's largest opposition group the Muslim Brotherhood - despite being banned - is hoping for a rare opportunity as the Mubarak regime draws to a close after three decades in power.

The Muslim Brotherhood is the oldest and most influential Islamist movement in the world, having spread from its Egyptian birthplace to the wider Middle East, Europe and even the United States.

It was founded in 1928 by those who wanted Egypt rid of British control and by people who felt the nation was being robbed of its Muslim identity.

The organisation prides itself on being the moderate face of Islam and an alternative to extremist voices.

Officially, the group rejects violence in favour of dialogue with other faiths and their objective is to reconcile Islam with modernity - but its leadership remains deeply conservative.

Critics say its world view makes it an entry-point for extremism and allegations of intolerance still persist.

In this two-part series, the BBC's Magdi Abdelhadi tells the story of The Brotherhood and asks whether we should be worried about the group's intentions.

Although they are not allowed to exist as a political party, many of its members stand as independent candidates and in the last election, they won 20% of parliamentary seats.

But what do the brothers want and how far does their influence spread?

Most of all why - despite all the controversy - has it not only survived but thrived, from the teeming streets of Cairo to the leafy boulevards of American suburbia and beyond?

Magdi Abdelhadi investigates Egypt's oldest Islamist organisation, the Muslim Brotherhood

The Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood is the oldest Islamic political organisation.

What's th.

02 LASTThe Legacy Of George W Bush - Part One20090126
02 LASTThe Legacy Of George W Bush - Part One20090127
02 LASTThe Legal World20100906

Brian King meets lawyers as they battle for justice and human rights, often facing overwh.

Brian King meets lawyers as they battle for justice and human rights, often facing overwhelming legal and political opposition.

02 LASTThe Legal World20100907

Brian King meets lawyers as they battle for justice and human rights, often facing overwh.

02 LASTThe Legal World20100911
02 LASTThe Legal World20100912
02 LASTThe Legal World20100913

Brian King meets lawyers as they battle to achieve justice and defend human rights - often in the face of overwhelming legal and political opposition.

These are the stories of local lawyers, sometimes helped by international agencies, grappling with issues of immense importance for the individuals concerned, but which also have serious national and international implications.

The lawyers trying to get justice and freedom amidst the chaos of Uganda's legal system

Brian King meets lawyers as they battle for justice and human rights, often facing overwh.

02 LASTThe Nuclear Family

02 LASTThe Nuclear Family20110321
02 LASTThe Nuclear Family20110322
02 LASTThe Pardon Game, Brand Cuba20090112

Fifty years after its revolution, Allan Little analyses some of the factors that have k.

Fifty years after its revolution, Allan Little analyses some of the factors that have kept Cuba in the public imagination.

02 LASTThe Pardon Game, Brand Cuba20090113

Fifty years after its revolution, Allan Little analyses some of the factors that have k.

02 LASTThe Price Of Biofuels20100503
02 LASTThe Price Of Biofuels20100504
02 LASTThe Price Of Biofuels20100508
02 LASTThe Price Of Biofuels20100509
02 LASTThe Price Of Biofuels20100510

Gerry Northam investigates claims that biofuels, thought to be the answer to global war.

Gordon Corera is at Britain's secret listening station where the UK's eavesdropping and surveillance operations are conducted.

02 LASTWould You Kill The Big Guy?20101206

Steve Evans explores a moral dilemma, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral.

Steve Evans explores a moral dilemma, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral creatures humans are.

02 LASTWould You Kill The Big Guy?20101207

Steve Evans explores a moral dilemma, to see what it tells us about what kind of moral.

02 LASTWould You Kill The Big Guy?20101211

Here's the scenario: a train is hurtling down a railway line, it's out of control and the brakes have failed.

Ahead, five people are tied to the track - all five face certain death.

You can flick a switch to save them, but if you do another man has to die.

What do you do?

Steve Evans explores the possible answers to this moral dilemma, to see what it tells us about the kind of ethical creatures humans are.

What kind of moral creatures are we? Steve Evans explores the issues.

02 LASTWould You Kill The Big Guy?20101213

What kind of moral creatures are we? Steve Evans explores the issues.

02 LASTZainab's Story2010092020100926

Zainab Bangura, Sierra Leones foreign minister, tells her own remarkable story

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights provided by contemporary neuroscience.

Barry Smith, head of the Institute of Philosophy, looks at the remarkable insights prov.

031968 - The Year That Changed The World20081215

John Tusa traces what made 1968 such a climactic year.

Student protests, Soviet might,.

Student protests, Soviet might, assassinations, war and famine.

031968 - The Year That Changed The World20081216

John Tusa traces what made 1968 such a climactic year.

Student protests, Soviet might,.

031968 - The Year That Changed The World20081221

John Tusa traces what made 1968 such a climactic year.

Student protests, Soviet might,.

031968 - The Year That Changed The World20081222

John Tusa traces what made 1968 such a climactic year.

Student protests, Soviet might,.

031968 - The Year That Changed The World, 1968: The Year That Changed The World?20081221

John Tusa looks at what made 1968 such a climactic year.

In this four part series, using archive recordings and music from the time, Sir John Tusa examines what made 1968 such a climactic year.

Student protests, Soviet might, assassinations, war and famine - although these dramatic events took place more than a generation ago they seem incredibly immediate and astonishingly relevant today.

Recapturing those events through the voices of those who made them, Sir John investigates if 1968 really did change the world.

In America the civil rights struggle was raging, in Nigeria a brutal civil war resulted in death of almost a million people and in Britain, a Conservative MP Enoch Powell delivered an inflammatory speech that divided a nation.

From political assassination to bitter controversy and a desperate loss of life, the events of 1968 finally put race relations on the world agenda.

Martin Luther King's dream of a promised land for America's black population seemed very remote.

His idealism and non-violent approach were unique, his fight was not just about racial equality but about human dignity.

He was shot and killed in Memphis, Tennessee on April 4th 1968.

The pent-up tide of frustration among America's blacks burst and hundreds of cities across the US erupted in riots.

President Johnson called for the violence to stop, but they killed the one man that people would listen to.

In Britain, two decades of immigration from the Black Commonwealth had created a new situation and the government introduced legislation to improve race relations.

However, a Conservative politician Enoch Powell, offered his country a different vision.

His 'rivers of blood speech' subsequently destroyed his political ambition but for the ordinary man, his words were what many were thinking.

Protests took place all around Britain and a thousand dockers in London went on strike in a stance against his political fall.

Meanwhile in Nigeria, the brutal civil war in Biafra had been ignored by the world for almost a year.

The world finally woke up to the civilian atrocities when the images of starving children and helpless refugees made headlines across the world.

More people were killed in Biafra in the first ten months of civil war, than were killed in the three years of Vietnam.

Biafra became a political tug of war and peace talks got nowhere for almost another two years.

One million lives were lost and the world, not for the first time, had failed Africa.

03China - Shaking The World20100727
03China - Shaking The World20110207
03China - Shaking The World20110208
03China - Shaking The World20110212
03China - Shaking The World20110213

Disputes over wages and working conditions in the factories of China's east coast have grabbed most of the headlines in recent years.

But there are long-simmering problems as well.

How to crack down on corrupt officials? What to do for farmers unhappy about the compensation they receive - or not - for land taken for development? All of these disputes underline a widening gap between China's rich and poor.

In hhis programme Michael Robinson examines China's leaders attempts to manage these growing conflicts and calls for political change - not for multi-party democracy, as some in the West advocate, but for a shift from a system of absolute Communist Party rule to one where individual rights are protected under law.

How will China's government handle corruption and increasing protest?

03China - Shaking The World20110214

How will China's government handle corruption and increasing protest?

03China - Shaking The World, Part Three20100731

Part Three looks at how China's social tensions could threaten the growth the rest of the world is relying on.

Disputes over wages and working conditions in the factories of China's east coast have grabbed most of the headlines recently.

But there are long-simmering problems as well.

How to crack down on corrupt officials? What to do for farmers unhappy about the compensation they receive - or not - for land taken for development?

All of these disputes underline a widening gap between China's rich and poor.

This programme examines China's leaders attempts to manage these growing conflicts and calls for political change - not for multi-party democracy, as some in the West advocate, but for a shift from a system of absolute Communist Party rule to one where individual rights are protected under law.

China's social tensions could threaten the growth the rest of the world is relying on.

03China - Shaking The World, Part Three20100801

China's social tensions could threaten the growth the rest of the world is relying on.

03China - Shaking The World, Part Three20100802
03The Crescent And The Cross20091123
03The Crescent And The Cross20091124
03The Crescent And The Cross20091128
03The Crescent And The Cross20091129
03The Crescent And The Cross20091130
03The Power And The Passion20100621
03The Power And The Passion20100622
03The Power And The Passion, All The King’s Men - Asante Kotoko V Accra Hearts Of Oak20100626

With the 2010 World Cup underway, many football fans around the world will be avidly debating and agonising over the fate of their nations in the tournament.

However it is often at the domestic club level that the game finds its most passionate support.

David Goldblatt, embarks on an assortment of adventures into the meaning and madness of the game.

He travels to four very different football games in Italy, Egypt, Ghana and the UK, to experience the build-up and pitch action from the perspective of the fans.

BY DAVID GOLDBLATT

For decades this has been Ghana’s biggest game.

These two clubs have been contesting bragging rights well before independence.

Following independence, football became crucial to national identity, part of Kwame Nkrumah’s project to achieve Pan African glory.

And these two clubs have been the traditional source of players for the nation’s pride, the Black Stars.

But not now - these two clubs mirror the decline of domestic football.

Kotoko, still very much associated with the regional power base of the Asante kingdom and the rule of the Asantehene - life president of the club and Hearts of Oak - are pale shadows of the glory years in the 1960s and 70s.

The money rich leagues of Europe have drained them of their best players.

A top player at Hearts of Oak - the most supported club in the country - can make something like $5000 a year.

A figure easily surpassed by the lowliest leagues of say Belgium or the Ukraine.

Consequently there has been a mass migration since the late 1980s that has rapidly gathered pace.

To add insult to injury, Ghanaians naturally want to watch their best players play, so the games of the English Premiership, Serie A and La Liga attract huge and passionate crowds to bars and shacks across Accra, and the nation - often at the expense of domestic football attendance.

That and the uncomfortable, occasionally life-threatening experience of watching the game have contributed to dwindling crowds.

In 2001, 126 people lost their lives during a Hearts of Oak versus Asante Kotoko game when riot police fired tear gas into the crowd, following trouble and triggered a panicked stampede.

Last year six died at Asabte Kotoko, in a crush in the ‘popular end’, after senior officials illegally encouraged ticketless fans in and pocketed the money.

To date no one has been prosecuted for either tragedy.

This fixture is one of the few that still draws a large crowd.

Some 20,000 fans on both sides mingle, drumming, singing and dancing their way through a game marked by ferocious tackling, second rate football and officiating that temporarily unites all in bouts of condemnation and cursing.

In the company of local football journalist Jerome Otchere, I hear from the founder of Circle O - the musical voice of Hearts of Oak - still traumatised by the tragedy of 2001.

I also get involved in an impromptu radio phone-in, tease out the myths of royal and political allegiances and wonder whether I really should be eating one of those sweaty doughnuts hawked in the crowd.

David Goldblatt finds out why Ghanaians are so passionate about football.

03The Power And The Passion, All The King’s Men - Asante Kotoko V Accra Hearts Of Oak20100628

David Goldblatt finds out why Ghanaians are so passionate about football.

03The Virtual Revolution20100308

The Cost of Free - how business has colonised the web.

The World Wide Web has transformed retailing, communications, and social lives, with sites like Google and Facebook now household names.

What's more we take it for granted that most such sites we visit are free of charge.

But does “free” come at a price after all? In this week's edition of “The Virtual Revolution” Doctor Aleks Krotoski considers the implications of a commercialised web for privacy - finding that among other things, we're all being watched as we shop, network and send emails.

03The Virtual Revolution20100309

The Cost of Free - how business has colonised the web.

03The Virtual Revolution20100313

The World Wide Web has transformed retailing, communications, and social lives, with sites like Google and Facebook now household names.

What's more we take it for granted that most such sites we visit are free of charge.

But does “free” come at a price after all? In this week's edition of “The Virtual Revolution” Doctor Aleks Krotoski considers the implications of a commercialised web for privacy - finding that among other things, we're all being watched as we shop, network and send emails.

The Cost of Free - how business has colonised the web.

03The Virtual Revolution20100314
03The Virtual Revolution20100315
03Third Agers20090316
03Third Agers20090317
03Third Agers20090322
03Third Agers20090323
03West African Journeys20090504

Sorious Samura is in Liberia investigating child soldiers in the third of this four part series.

This trip to Liberia is an intensely personal journey for Sorious - the last time he was here in 2000 he was imprisoned along with three colleagues on a charge of espionage, a capital offence.

After a week in prison in which he was tortured he and his team were released following personal appeals to the then President, Charles Taylor from, amongst others, Nelson Mandela and Jesse Jackson.

Liberia is still recovering from the brutal 14-year-long civil war.

Sorious is back in the country to follow the journey of a 26 year-old woman called ‘Black Diamond' as she travels hundreds of miles across Liberia in search of the daughter she calls 'Beloved'.

The child was born after Diamond, then aged 15, was raped by government soldiers.

During the rape her parents tried to defend her and were killed.

Fuelled by anger she joined the rebels to become one of Liberia's most infamous child soldiers.

This documentary is a story within a story.

After years of fighting as a rebel soldier in LURD (Liberians United for Reconciliation and Democracy) she gained a fearsome reputation and her nom de guerre; Black Diamond.

One story, often repeated by western journalists, is that she wore a necklace of testicles as a war trophy, a story Black Diamond vehemently denies and as she takes Sorious on her very personal journey she is at pains to tell him her version of the war.

But there are others she must tell.

It's been seven years since Diamond last saw her daughter.

The child is now looked after by Diamond's uncle.

He doesn't know that Beloved's father was one of the men who raped his niece and killed his brother and sister-in-law.

Now Diamond has decided it's time he and the rest of her family know the truth.

Sorious Samura is in Liberia investigating child soldiers in the third part of this series

03West African Journeys20090505

Sorious Samura is in Liberia investigating child soldiers in the third part of this series

03West African Journeys20090509

Sorious Samura is in Liberia investigating child soldiers in the third of this four part series.

This trip to Liberia is an intensely personal journey for Sorious - the last time he was here in 2000 he was imprisoned along with three colleagues on a charge of espionage, a capital offence.

After a week in prison in which he was tortured he and his team were released following personal appeals to the then President, Charles Taylor from, amongst others, Nelson Mandela and Jesse Jackson.

Liberia is still recovering from the brutal 14-year-long civil war.

Sorious is back in the country to follow the journey of a 26 year-old woman called ‘Black Diamond' as she travels hundreds of miles across Liberia in search of the daughter she calls 'Beloved'.

The child was born after Diamond, then aged 15, was raped by government soldiers.

During the rape her parents tried to defend her and were killed.

Fuelled by anger she joined the rebels to become one of Liberia's most infamous child soldiers.

This documentary is a story within a story.

After years of fighting as a rebel soldier in LURD (Liberians United for Reconciliation and Democracy) she gained a fearsome reputation and her nom de guerre; Black Diamond.

One story, often repeated by western journalists, is that she wore a necklace of testicles as a war trophy, a story Black Diamond vehemently denies and as she takes Sorious on her very personal journey she is at pains to tell him her version of the war.

But there are others she must tell.

It's been seven years since Diamond last saw her daughter.

The child is now looked after by Diamond's uncle.

He doesn't know that Beloved's father was one of the men who raped his niece and killed his brother and sister-in-law.

Now Diamond has decided it's time he and the rest of her family know the truth.

Sorious Samura is in Liberia investigating child soldiers in the third part of this series

03West African Journeys20090511

Sorious Samura is in Liberia investigating child soldiers in the third part of this series

03 LASTDesperate Dreams2008113020081201

Jenny Cuffe explores the reality of migration and asylum, revealing the hazardous route.

Jenny Cuffe explores the reality of migration and asylum, revealing the hazardous routes people take to escape their homelands.

03 LASTFresh Start20090216

Lucy Ash examines innovative rehabilitation schemes that help reduce reoffending rates.

Lucy Ash examines innovative rehabilitation schemes that help reduce reoffending rates of even the most hardened criminals.

03 LASTFresh Start20090217

Lucy Ash examines innovative rehabilitation schemes that help reduce reoffending rates.

03 LASTFresh Start20090222

Lucy Ash examines innovative rehabilitation schemes that help reduce reoffending rates.

03 LASTFresh Start20090223

Lucy Ash examines innovative rehabilitation schemes that help reduce reoffending rates.

03 LASTGeneration Jihad20100419

Peter Taylor examines the new danger posed by some young Muslims who have embraced mili.

Peter Taylor examines the new danger posed by some young Muslims who have embraced militant Islam.

03 LASTGeneration Jihad20100420

Peter Taylor examines the new danger posed by some young Muslims who have embraced mili.

03 LASTGeneration Jihad20100424

Across the Western world it's no longer the threat from al-Qaeda that governments are most concerned about.

Instead, it's home-grown terror plots hatched by their own citizens.

In this three-part series, Peter Taylor investigates the terrorist threat from young Muslims radicalised on the internet.

Although extremists represent a tiny minority of the Muslim community, some would argue they now constitute the single biggest threat to national security.

In the third episode, Peter looks at why the British government is now investing big money in trying to combat the appeal of radical Islam.

But will its strategy work?

The British Government is spending £140m trying to counter radicalisation in the UK – it's a policy called Prevent.

Sir Norman Bettison, Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police in the UK believes that it will be with us for many years to come.

“I think this is generational, I think we woke up as a society in 2005 to the idea that people were prepared to commit suicide and carry out atrocities in Britain because of the perversion of an ideology.

I think it's a generation of treatment to prevent the infection spreading, and I think that that will take us probably 20 years.”

Travelling across the UK Peter Taylor looks at what Prevent means in practice and how it's attempting to head off the violent extremists in their tracks.

He speaks exclusively to “Kasim” - a man who took his own journey to Pakistan - to the very heart of violent Jihad.

He almost lost his life in a US drone strike before he renounced violent extremism.

“Kasim” doesn't see any change on the horizon.

Peter Taylor investigates the terrorist threat from young Muslims radicalised on the web.

03 LASTGeneration Jihad20100425

Peter Taylor investigates the terrorist threat from young Muslims radicalised on the web.

03 LASTGeneration Jihad20100426

Peter Taylor investigates the terrorist threat from young Muslims radicalised on the web.

03 LASTThe Crash20091005

We concentrate on the efforts, in the US and Europe, to stave off a collapse of the glo.

We concentrate on the efforts, in the US and Europe, to stave off a collapse of the global economy after September 15th 2008.

03 LASTThe Crash20091006

We concentrate on the efforts, in the US and Europe, to stave off a collapse of the glo.

03 LASTThe Crash20091010

We concentrate on the efforts, in the US and Europe, to stave off a collapse of the global economy after September 15th 2008.

We concentrate on the efforts, in the US and Europe, to stave off a collapse of the glo.

03 LASTThe Crash20091011
03 LASTThe Crash20091012

We concentrate on the efforts, in the US and Europe, to stave off a collapse of the glo.

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service,.

Gordon Corera takes an unprecedented look inside Britain's Secret Intelligence Service, which marks its centenary this year.

03 LASTWhy Is Africa Poor?20090907

World Affairs Correspondent Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative po.

World Affairs Correspondent Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative poverty.

03 LASTWhy Is Africa Poor?20090908

World Affairs Correspondent Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative po.

03 LASTWhy Is Africa Poor?20090912

Even in poor areas in Africa there are signs of dynamic commerce - due to a large informal" economy and an entrepreneurial spirit.

Is making these enterprises more formal – by paying taxes - the answer to lifting Africa out of poverty?

African academics are working on transforming ideas for improvement into practical, do-able projects that will change lives.

Money is available.

And thanks to a billion dollars a year of debt relief, countries such as Nigeria are implementing a school-for-all plan - an attempt to educate people out of poverty.

Is tapping into a continent's optimism the key to Africa's future?"

03 LASTWhy Is Africa Poor?20090913

World Affairs Correspondent Mark Doyle examines the reasons behind Africa's relative po.

03 LASTWhy Is Africa Poor?2009091420090919

Is tapping into a continent's optimism the key to Africa's future?

Benjamin Jealous is the leader of the US's largest civil rights movement (NAACP).

Gary Young asks if the NAACP is still needed.

Gary.

04 LAST1968 - The Year That Changed The World20081222

John Tusa traces what made 1968 such a climactic year.

Student protests, Soviet might,.

Student protests, Soviet might, assassinations, war and famine.

04 LAST1968 - The Year That Changed The World20081223

John Tusa traces what made 1968 such a climactic year.

Student protests, Soviet might,.

04 LASTChina - Shaking The World20100802
04 LASTChina - Shaking The World20100803
04 LASTChina - Shaking The World20100807
04 LASTChina - Shaking The World20100808
04 LASTChina - Shaking The World20100809

Michael Robinson returns to China to assess the prospects and problems of the unrelenting shift of power from West to East.

Michael Robinson returns to China to assess the prospects and problems of the unrelenti.

Gordon Corera talks to key figures from Israel's secret service, The Mossad, including.

Gordon Corera talks to key figures from Israel's secret service, The Mossad, including a former chief of the service.

04 LASTChina - Shaking The World20110214
04 LASTChina - Shaking The World20110215
04 LASTChina - Shaking The World20110219
04 LASTChina - Shaking The World20110221

Michael Robinson returns to China to assess the prospects and problems of the unrelenti.

Michael Robinson returns to China to assess the prospects and problems of the unrelenting shift of power from West to East.

04 LASTThe Crescent And The Cross20091130
04 LASTThe Crescent And The Cross20091201
04 LASTThe Crescent And The Cross20091205
04 LASTThe Crescent And The Cross20091206
04 LASTThe Crescent And The Cross20091207
04 LASTThe Power And The Passion20100628
04 LASTThe Power And The Passion20100629
04 LASTThe Power And The Passion, Geordie Nation - Newcastle V Anybody20100703

With the 2010 World Cup underway, many football fans around the world will be avidly debating and agonising over the fate of their nations in the tournament.

However it is often at the domestic club level that the game finds its most passionate support.

David Goldblatt, embarks on an assortment of adventures into the meaning and madness of the game.

He travels to four very different football games in Italy, Egypt, Ghana and the UK, to experience the build-up and pitch action from the perspective of the fans.

David Goldblatt travels to the English Premiership’s beleaguered Newcastle United.

04 LASTThe Power And The Passion, Geordie Nation - Newcastle V Anybody20100705

David Goldblatt travels to the English Premiership’s beleaguered Newcastle United.

04 LASTThe Virtual Revolution20100315

Homo Interneticus - are our brains being rewired by the net?

Dr Aleks Krotoski concludes her investigation into how the world wide web is transforming our lives by looking at its effect on us, and how it is changing the way we think and relate.

In the last five years we have witnessed the meteoric rise of social networks such as MySpace, Bebo and Facebook.

Now Aleks explores what impact this new way of connecting humanity has on the younger generation, for whom it is becoming second nature.

The film features exclusive interviews with Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg as well as the inventor of the web himself, Tim Berners-Lee.

The essence of the web is in linking data, and for some this liberates their minds because they can now leap from subject to subject in the vast virtual library.

Yet critics worry that this very quality may in fact be making us more distracted.

Aleks puts these competing ideas to the test in a pioneering experiment to find out if the web is rewiring our brains.

04 LASTThe Virtual Revolution20100316

Homo Interneticus - are our brains being rewired by the net?

04 LASTThe Virtual Revolution20100320

Dr Aleks Krotoski concludes her investigation into how the world wide web is transforming our lives by looking at its effect on us, and how it is changing the way we think and relate.

In the last five years we have witnessed the meteoric rise of social networks such as MySpace, Bebo and Facebook.

Now Aleks explores what impact this new way of connecting humanity has on the younger generation, for whom it is becoming second nature.

The film features exclusive interviews with Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg as well as the inventor of the web himself, Tim Berners-Lee.

The essence of the web is in linking data, and for some this liberates their minds because they can now leap from subject to subject in the vast virtual library.

Yet critics worry that this very quality may in fact be making us more distracted.

Aleks puts these competing ideas to the test in a pioneering experiment to find out if the web is rewiring our brains.

Homo Interneticus - are our brains being rewired by the net?

04 LASTThe Virtual Revolution20100321
04 LASTThe Virtual Revolution20100322

Homo Interneticus - are our brains being rewired by the net?

16 years after fleeing Rwanda, many of Hutu refugees living in countries around Rwanda.

16 years after fleeing Rwanda, many of Hutu refugees living in countries around Rwanda are returning.

Sorious Samura reports.

04 LASTThird Agers20090323
04 LASTThird Agers20090324
04 LASTThird Agers20090329
04 LASTWest African Journeys20090511

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring c.

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring countries in West Africa.

Part 4: Sierra Leone.

04 LASTWest African Journeys20090512

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring c.

04 LASTWest African Journeys20090516

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring c.

04 LASTWest African Journeys20090517

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring countries in West Africa.

Part 4: Sierra Leone.

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring c.

04 LASTWest African Journeys20090518

Sorious Samura heads to Sierra Leone as a starting point for a trip to 4 neighbouring c.