Miklos Radnoti - Poet Of My Heart

Actress and writer Mia Nadasi discusses the life and work of Hungarian poet Miklos RadnotiActress and writer Mia Nadasi discusses the life and work of celebrated Hungarian poet Miklos Radnoti, who died in 1944.

His life ended tragically when he was killed by the Nazis as his labour unit was driven on a forced march from a camp in Serbia to Austria.

When his body was later exhumed, a notebook of poems was found hidden in his clothing containing some of his greatest and most memorable poems.

Like most Hungarians of her generation, Mia remembers studying Radnoti's poems at school, and her imagination being fired both by the story of his sad and premature death and by the revolutionary, tender lyricism of his writing.

The talk includes readings of some of Radnoti's most moving poetry.

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* * *2009081820091211

Actress and writer Mia Nadasi discusses the life and work of Hungarian poet Miklos RadnotiActress and writer Mia Nadasi discusses the life and work of celebrated Hungarian poet Miklos Radnoti, who died in 1944.

His life ended tragically when he was killed by the Nazis as his labour unit was driven on a forced march from a camp in Serbia to Austria.

When his body was later exhumed, a notebook of poems was found hidden in his clothing containing some of his greatest and most memorable poems.

Like most Hungarians of her generation, Mia remembers studying Radnoti's poems at school, and her imagination being fired both by the story of his sad and premature death and by the revolutionary, tender lyricism of his writing.

The talk includes readings of some of Radnoti's most moving poetry.

* * *2009081820091211

Actress and writer Mia Nadasi discusses the life and work of Hungarian poet Miklos RadnotiActress and writer Mia Nadasi discusses the life and work of celebrated Hungarian poet Miklos Radnoti, who died in 1944.

His life ended tragically when he was killed by the Nazis as his labour unit was driven on a forced march from a camp in Serbia to Austria.

When his body was later exhumed, a notebook of poems was found hidden in his clothing containing some of his greatest and most memorable poems.

Like most Hungarians of her generation, Mia remembers studying Radnoti's poems at school, and her imagination being fired both by the story of his sad and premature death and by the revolutionary, tender lyricism of his writing.

The talk includes readings of some of Radnoti's most moving poetry.