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01New Dawn2012040220140916He is the only man who's run the BBC, Channel 4 and ITV. In this six-part series, Michael Grade tells the inside story of Britain's television industry. It's a story that takes us from Alexandra Palace in London to Southfork Ranch in Dallas. The series examines the key milestones in the story of TV seen from Michael's unique and personal viewpoint.
In 1973, Michael Grade joined London Weekend Television as Deputy Controller of Programmes (Entertainment) on a salary of £11,000. His life would never be the same again, "I realised that TV was destined to be the entertainment medium of the future".
In the opening programme, 'New Dawn', Michael considers the arrival of ITV - "commercial television" - and examines the impact the new network had on the BBC's television monopoly.
Michael recalls the creation, and later demise, of 'The South Bank Show' with Melvyn Bragg. He visits 165 Eaton Place, the home of 'Upstairs, Downstairs' with its co-creator Jean Marsh. Plus, he remembers the reasons why Thames Television undertook the landmark documentary series 'The World at War'. The programme also examines the impact of 'Coronation Street' in 1960, how the LWT sit com 'Agony' helped to launch the career of Maureen Lipman and why Michael was so keen to reunite the husband-and-wife acting team of Pauline Collins and John Alderton in 'No Honestly'.
The series features a wealth of newly recorded personal interviews and this programme includes contributions from Melvyn Bragg, David Frost, Roger Bolton, Jon Snow, Jeremy Isaacs, TV Drama Executive Mal Young, Historian Asa Briggs, Professors Anthony Smith and Christopher Frayling, Academic Dorothy Hobson and former Channel Controllers Paul Fox and Brian Tesler.
Written and produced by Malcolm Prince.

In 1973, Michael Grade joined London Weekend Television as Deputy Controller of Programmes (Entertainment) on a salary of £11,000. His life would never be the same again, "I realised that TV was destined to be the entertainment medium of the future".
In the opening programme, 'New Dawn', Michael considers the arrival of ITV - "commercial television" - and examines the impact the new network had on the BBC's television monopoly.



The inside story of Britain's TV industry. Exploring how ITV beat the BBC at its own game.
02Aunty Fights Back2012040920140923He's the only man who's run the BBC, Channel 4 and ITV. In this series for Radio 2, Michael Grade tells the inside story of Britain's television industry. It's a story that takes us from Alexandra Palace in London to Southfork Ranch in Dallas. The series examines the key milestones in the story of TV seen from Michael's unique and personal viewpoint.
In 1973, Michael Grade joined London Weekend Television as Deputy Controller of Programmes (Entertainment), "I realised that TV was destined to be the entertainment medium of the future".
In the second programme, 'Aunty Fights Back', Michael considers how, under the leadership of Director General Hugh Greene, the BBC refreshed its television offering and began to compete against ITV.
Michael recalls landmark dramas like 'Cathy Comes Home' with its Producer Tony Garnett, the controversial Falklands' film 'Tumbledown' with its Director Richard Eyre and the significance of BBC ONE'S weekly 'Play For Today' strand.
The programme also examines the launch of BBC2, the impact of 'That's Life!' and 'Child Watch' and the significance of the arts strand 'Monitor'. And Michael recalls the genesis and influence of 'Live Aid' which he green lit for BBC ONE.
The series features a wealth of newly recorded personal interviews with many of the people Michael has worked with over the years, and this programme includes contributions from Bob Geldof, Esther Rantzen, Sharon Osbourne, Angela Rippon, and Melvyn Bragg, TV Drama Executives Jeremy Isaacs and Peter Bazalgette, Historian Asa Briggs, Professors Anthony Smith and Christopher Frayling, Producer William G. Stewart and former Channel Controllers Paul Fox and Jonathan Powell.
Presented by Michael Grade
Written and produced by Malcolm Prince.
He's the only man who's run the BBC, Channel 4 and ITV. In this new series for Radio 2, Michael Grade tells the inside story of Britain's television industry. It's a story that takes us from Alexandra Palace in London to Southfork Ranch in Dallas. The series examines the key milestones in the story of TV seen from Michael's unique and personal viewpoint.
In 1973, Michael Grade joined London Weekend Television as Deputy Controller of Programmes (Entertainment), "I realised that TV was destined to be the entertainment medium of the future".






How the BBC refreshed its television offering and began to compete against ITV.
03New Kid On The Block2012041620140930He's the only man who's run the BBC, Channel 4 and ITV. In this new series for Radio 2, Michael Grade tells the inside story of Britain's television industry. It's a story that takes us from Alexandra Palace in London to Southfork Ranch in Dallas. The series examines the key milestones in the story of TV, as seen from Michael's unique and personal viewpoint.
In the third programme, New Kid On The Block, Michael recalls the broadcasting landscape of the early 1980s, when there were only three channels in the UK and how that all changed in 1982, with the arrival of Channel 4. With its distinctive logo made up of multicoloured blocks and a simple four-note signature tune, the new channel unleashed a new approach to programme-making and commissioning. It also, "quite frankly, gave the nation's other broadcasters a much needed kick up the bum".
Michael considers some of the shows that helped to define Channel 4 as "edgy, different and distinctive": Brookside, Channel 4 News, The Tube, The Word and Big Brother. He talks to Chris Evans and Producer Charlie Parsons about the genesis of The Big Breakfast and to the former C4 Chief Executive Jeremy Isaacs, who explains the significance of Film Four. Michael also assesses the importance of Friends with its co-creator and writer Marta Kauffman.
This programme features newly recorded interviews with: Bob Geldof, Jon Snow, Anthony McPartlin and Declan Donnelly, TV Executives Peter Bazalgette, Brian Tesler, Roger Bolton, John Yorke, Mal Young and Mark Thompson, historian Asa Briggs, professors Anthony Smith and Christopher Frayling, and actresses Sue Johnston and Maureen Lipman.

In the third programme, New Kid On The Block, Michael recalls the broadcasting landscape of the early 1980s, when there were only three channels in the UK and how that all changed in 1982, with the arrival of Channel 4. With its distinctive logo made up of multicoloured blocks and a simple four-note signature tune, the new channel unleashed a new approach to programme-making and commissioning. It also, "quite frankly, gave the nation's other broadcasters a much needed kick up the bum".
Michael considers some of the shows that helped to define Channel 4 as "edgy, different and distinctive": Brookside, Channel 4 News, The Tube, The Word and Big Brother. He talks to Chris Evans and Producer Charlie Parsons about the genesis of The Big Breakfast and to the former C4 Chief Executive Jeremy Isaacs, who explains the significance of Film Four. Michael also assesses the importance of Friends with its co-creator and writer Marta Kauffman.

How everything changed for UK TV in 1982 with the arrival of Channel 4.
04Importing The Box2012042320141007In this new series for Radio 2, Michael Grade tells the inside story of Britain's television industry.
The series examines the key milestones in the story of TV, as seen from Michael's unique and personal viewpoint.
In 1982, Grade left the comfort and relative stability of a job at LWT to take up a new post as President of Embassy Television in Hollywood. "People put up with the city's madness and insecurity because the rewards can be truly fabulous".
While British cinema has had to struggle to compete with the might of Hollywood, the UK's television industry has long been the envy of the world. Even so, as long ago as the 1950s, ITV and later the BBC and Channel 4, imported shows from America. In the fourth programme, 'Importing The Box', Michael examines Britain's love affair with American shows like 'The Golden Girls' and 'Frasier'.
Marc Cherry remembers his lucky break creating 'Desperate Housewives' and how he became the most successful writer on American television almost overnight. Steven Bochco discusses the creation of genre-changing cop show 'Hill Street Blues' and Marta Kauffman recalls the relentless production schedule of the sit-com 'Friends'.
Grade also reunites the stars of two of America's most popular dramas: Ralph Waite and Miss Michael Learned played John and Olivia Walton respectively in 'The Waltons' and Larry Hagman and Linda Gray (J R and Sue Ellen Ewing), who will soon star in the revived 'Dallas'.
With contributions from Head of ABC Television Anne Sweeney, CBS Network Chief Leslie Moonves, Head of Fox Kevin Reilly, Director Terry Hughes, Writer Lynda La Plante, Actor Matthew Rhys and TV Executives Mal Young and Jane Tranter.
Presented by Michael Grade. Written and produced by Malcolm Prince.

In 1982, Grade left the comfort and relative stability of a job at LWT to take up a new post as President of Embassy Television in Hollywood. "People put up with the city's madness and insecurity because the rewards can be truly fabulous".
Michael examines why British TV viewers have long enjoyed American shows.
05Dishing The Dirt20120430Michael Grade tells the inside story of Britain's television industry, as seen from his unique and personal viewpoint.
Part 5: Dishing The Dirt
Following his stint in Hollywood, Michael Grade returned to the UK in 1984 to take up the post of Controller of BBC ONE or as he calls it "the best job at the BBC". This programme looks at the legacy of his tenure which included a hard-hitting soap opera, the world's longest running medical drama and the cancellation of one of the most iconic shows on the box.
Michael visits Elstree TV studios, the home of 'EastEnders' and talks to actresses Pam St. Clement (Pat) and June Brown (Dot), Controller of BBC Drama John Yorke and the show's current production team, while discussing the origins of the hit soap with former Controller of BBC ONE Jonathan Powell.
Michael also recalls the creation of 'Casualty' - another show Michael commissioned for the BBC - and his past truly catches up with him as he meets Steven Moffat, Writer and Executive Producer of 'Doctor Who', the series Michael tried to cancel in 1985.
Away from the BBC, Michael recalls the arrival of satellite broadcasting in Britain and considers the impact of rolling news channels like Sky News, the ITN News Channel and the then BBC News 24.
Contributors include: Broadcasters Melvyn Bragg, Piers Morgan, Angela Rippon and Richard Quest, actors Maureen Lipman and Pauline Collins, Writers Simon Ashdown and Lynda La Plante, Executives Mark Thompson, Peter Fincham, Paul Fox, Mal Young and Jane Tranter, and others.
Written and produced by Malcolm Prince.
Michael returns to BBC 1 where he green-lights EastEnders and cancels Doctor Who.
05Dishing The Dirt2012043020141014Michael Grade tells the inside story of Britain's television industry, as seen from his unique and personal viewpoint.
Part 5: Dishing The Dirt
Following his stint in Hollywood, Michael Grade returned to the UK in 1984 to take up the post of Controller of BBC ONE or as he calls it "the best job at the BBC". This programme looks at the legacy of his tenure which included a hard-hitting soap opera, the world's longest running medical drama and the cancellation of one of the most iconic shows on the box.
Michael visits Elstree TV studios, the home of 'EastEnders' and talks to actresses Pam St. Clement (Pat) and June Brown (Dot), Controller of BBC Drama John Yorke and the show's current production team, while discussing the origins of the hit soap with former Controller of BBC ONE Jonathan Powell.
Michael also recalls the creation of 'Casualty' - another show Michael commissioned for the BBC - and his past truly catches up with him as he meets Steven Moffat, Writer and Executive Producer of 'Doctor Who', the series Michael tried to cancel in 1985.
Away from the BBC, Michael recalls the arrival of satellite broadcasting in Britain and considers the impact of rolling news channels like Sky News, the ITN News Channel and the then BBC News 24.
Contributors include: Broadcasters Melvyn Bragg, Piers Morgan, Angela Rippon and Richard Quest, actors Maureen Lipman and Pauline Collins, Writers Simon Ashdown and Lynda La Plante, Executives Mark Thompson, Peter Fincham, Paul Fox, Mal Young and Jane Tranter, and others.
Written and produced by Malcolm Prince.
06 LASTUnder Pressure20120507(06/06)
Michael Grade tells the inside story of Britain's television industry, as seen from his unique and personal viewpoint.
Part 6: Under Pressure
In the final programme, Michael examines the challenges faced by programme-makers today and the shows that bring audiences together.
He considers the role and importance of children's programmes at the BBC with former Editor of 'Blue Peter' Biddy Baxter and former Controller of BBC ONE Lorraine Heggessey. Michael also questions the value and need of the 'linear schedule'.
Key programmes in this episode: 'Widows', 'Sherlock' and 'Britain's Got Talent'.
Contributors include: Writers Steven Moffat and Lynda La Plante, Broadcaster Piers Morgan and Head of ITV Peter Fincham.
Written and Produced by Malcolm Prince.
Michael examines the programmes that bring people together.

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  • Programme ID: b01f1c8q

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  • " / Arts / Culture and the Media