Meeting Myself Coming Back

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0101Rev Jesse Jackson2009081520090817
20110919 (R4)

High-profile figures, in conversation with John Wilson, replay their own sound archive and use it as a basis for a re-examination of their lives.

Rev Jesse Jackson, a witness to the murder of Martin Luther King and the first African-American candidate for US President, reflects on his life in sound drawn from a half-century of BBC archive.

Being close to Dr King during the troubled years of the 1960s Civil Rights Movement was just one of the formative experiences for Jackson.

Here he listens back to his younger self, recalls his thoughts at the time and applies to them the self-knowledge that comes from distance.

Other episodes in his life include addressing the first black political rally, negotiating with President Assad of Syria over hostages, running twice for US president, witnessing the swearing-in of Barack Obama, and most recently defending one of America's most controversial black icons, Michael Jackson.

Witness to the murder of Martin Luther King; the first African-American to make a significant bid for the US Presidency: in a new series on BBC Radio 4, the Reverend Jesse Jackson joins presenter John Wilson to reflect on the soundtrack to his life, drawn from a half century of BBC archive.

Being close to Dr King during the troubled years of the 1960s Civil Rights Movement was just one of the formative experiences for the Reverend Jesse Jackson.

Here he gets the chance to listen back to his younger self, recall his thoughts at the time, and apply the self-knowledge that comes from distance.

Other episodes in his life include addressing the first black political rally; negotiating with President Saddam Hussein of Iraq over hostages; running twice for President of the USA; witnessing the swearing in of the first black President; and most recently defending one of America's most controversial black icons, Michael Jackson.

Producers: Emma Kingsley and Sara Jane Hall (SNF).

Witness to the murder of Martin Luther King - the Reverend Jesse Jackson's life in sound.

0102Michael Grade *2009082220090824

High-profile figures, in conversation with John Wilson, replay their own sound archive and use it as a basis for a re-examination of their lives.

Michael Grade reflects on the soundtrack to his life drawn through over 30 years of the BBC sound archives.

From his earliest job as a sports writer on the Daily Mirror to his varied career as controller of BBC One, chief executive of Channel 4 and now in charge of ITV, his life has been a very public one.

Coming from a showbusiness family, with an agent for a father and uncles Lew Grade and Bernard Delfont in theatre and television, Grade has seen at first hand how the language of variety and vaudeville can work.

In his six-year career at the Daily Mirror, as 'Mike Grade', he had a sports column and learned how to work with the press.

His move into TV came in the 1970s, and from the 1980s he was a major player in BBC television, becoming controller of BBC One.

He hears the sound archive of his life and ponders what he has learned and how he has developed, from his earliest writings to his return to the BBC in 2004 and his subsequent move to ITV.

Michael Grade, in conversation with John Wilson, replays his own sound archive.

0103Clare Short * *2009082920090831

High-profile figures, in conversation with John Wilson, replay their own sound archive and use it as a basis for a re-examination of their lives.

Clare Short has spent her life in the public eye, never less than passionate and never short of opinions.

From her first appearance as a community activist in the early 1980s, through to her announcement that she will be standing down as an MP at the next election, her career has always been controversial.

What does she think now of her early causes: her opposition to Page 3 and support for the legalisation of cannabis? And what of those resignations? Was she really, as she claimed at the time, 'making a sacrifice to a higher purpose' by staying inside the Cabinet despite her opposition to the Iraq War?

As Clare meets herself coming back over nearly 30 years of sound recordings, is she proud, pleased, or driven, as she says she often is, to think, 'Oh, shut up Clare', for her insistance on always speaking up, even when staying quiet might be a wiser choice?

John Wilson takes Clare Short back through her life as captured in the BBC Archive.

0202Sir Jonathan Miller2010082120100823

He became famous as a member of the Beyond the Fringe cast and went on to present television programmes and direct opera and theatre productions around the world.

Now, in the last of the series "Meeting Myself Coming Back", Sir Jonathan Miller explores his life and work through the BBC Sound archive.

In conversation with John Wilson, he looks back at his younger self and discusses the ways in which he has changed and developed.

Revered as a polymath, Jonathan Miller's life has taken in medical studies at university, comedy performing and television presenting with series like "The Body in Question".

Throughout his career there has been a tension between his medical career and his reputation as a satirist and director.

In this programme he explores the pull of the two worlds upon him and the guilt that he still feels at having abandoned his work as a doctor.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

From Beyond the Fringe to atheism, Sir Jonathan Miller relives his life in sound.

0203 LASTJanet Street-porter2010082820100830

In the second programme in the series "Meeting Myself Coming Back", Janet Street-porter takes a look back at her younger self through the BBC Sound archives.

In conversation with John Wilson, she re-examines her career, beginning as a newspaper journalist and then moving into radio and television and reflects on the highs and lows of her career.

Janet Street-porter's career has been bound up with media from her earliest days writing for papers and then as a young presenter on LBC radio.

Her work on TV programmes like Network 7 and later the BBC's Def II strand has ensured that she'll always be associated with "Yoof TV".

Her distinctive voice and looks have been parodied over the decades and she's often been vilified in the press for taking television downmarket.

Her attempt to launch Live TV ended with her resignation after only a few months.

But she's always bounced back in another guise, as a newspaper editor, a TV personality and a rambler.

In this programme Janet re-examines her past life and meets her younger self, analysing how she's changed and developed over the decades.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

Janet Street-porter relives key moments in her career through the BBC Sound Archives.

0301Bob Geldof2011070220110704
20110715 (R4)

The first programme in the new series of 'Meeting Myself Coming Back', the series in which leading public figures explores their lives through the BBC archives, features an intimate, revealing and emotional interview with Sir Bob Geldof.

When Bob Geldof exploded onto the pop scene as lead singer of The Boomtown Rats in the 1970s, he quickly forged a reputation for being outspoken.

This trait would stand him in good stead when he used his skill as an organiser and negotiator to persuade fellow musicians to sing for famine relief in Africa, first on the Band Aid single 'Do They Know It's Christmas?' and then for the subsequent Live Aid concert.

It was to be the start of campaigning work which has lasted to the present day and brought him a knighthood, meetings with the world's leaders and recognition upon the global stage.

In the first programme of the new series of 'Meeting Myself Coming Back', Bob Geldof meets his younger self in the BBC archives in an experience which provokes both laughter and tears.

At one point he becomes overwhelmed by reliving his first experience of being in Ethiopia and seeing the consequences of the famine for himself.

He hears his own career progression from opinionated rock star through to Live Aid organiser and world anti-poverty ambassador.

And he relives his reactions to personal tragedies like the death of his former wife, Paula Yates.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

From Boomtown Rat to famine relief ambassador, Bob Geldof explores his life in sound.

The first programme in the new series of 'Meeting Myself Coming Back', the series in which leading public figures explores their lives through the BBC archives, features Bob Geldof in an intimate, revealing and emotional interview with John Wilson

The first programme in the new series of "Meeting Myself Coming Back", the series in which leading public figures explores their lives through the BBC Sound archive, features an intimate, revealing and emotional interview with Sir Bob Geldof, in conversation with John Wilson.

When Bob Geldof exploded onto the pop scene with "The Boomtown Rats" in the 1970s, he quickly forged a reputation for being outspoken. This trait would stand him in good stead when he used his skill as an organiser and negotiator to persuade fellow musicians to sing for famine relief in Africa, first on the Band-Aid single "Do They Know It's Christmas?" and then for the subsequent Live Aid concert. It was to be the start of campaigning work which has lasted to the present day and brought him a knighthood, meetings with the world's leaders and recognition upon a global stage.

In the first programme of the new series of "Meeting Myself Coming Back", Bob Geldof meets his younger self in the BBC archives in an experience which provokes both laughter and tears. At one point he becomes overwhelmed by reliving his first experience of being in Ethiopia and seeing the consequences of the famine for himself.

He hears his own career progression from opinonated rock star through to Live Aid organiser and world anti-poverty ambassador.

Revised Repeat.

0302Michael Heseltine2011070920110711
20110801 (R4)

From backbench novice MP to the challenger for the party leadership and the man credited with ousting Margaret Thatcher, Michael Heseltine - now Lord Heseltine - has commanded more headlines than most.

In the 1970s he won a reputation as a maverick when he took up the mace in the House of Commons after being enraged at the Labour Party's voting tactics.

He began the 1980s with a rousing speech to the Conservative Party Conference reminding members about the rights of ethnic minorities, but he ended the decade on the backbenches after walking out of a Cabinet meeting and resigning over the Westland Affair.

In 1990 he challenged Margaret Thatcher for the party leadership.

She eventually resigned, but Heseltine did not succeed her.

In the second programme of the series 'Meeting Myself Coming Back', Lord Heseltine listens back to his younger self in conversation with John Wilson.

He talks frankly about the mace incident and relives the moment when he walked out of Cabinet.

He discusses whether he could have been persuaded to return if his departure had not been witnessed by a cameraman outside Number 10.

He also talks about the moment when Margaret Thatcher resigned as Prime Minister and he knew that his chances of becoming Conservative leader were at an end.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

Michael Heseltine relives his life in sound through the BBC archives with John Wilson.

In the second programme in the series 'Meeting Myself Coming Back', he listens back to his younger self in a variety of political guises from his earliest broadcasts to the present day.

In conversation with John Wilson, he relives the emotions of the moments and discusses the political motivations which underpinned them.

From backbench novice MP to the Cabinet table, the man credited with ousting Margaret Thatcher, Michael - now Lord - Heseltine, has commanded more headlines than most. In the second programme in the series "Meeting Myself Coming Back", he listens back to his younger self in a variety of political guises from his earliest broadcasts to the present day. In conversation with John Wilson, he relives the emotions of the moments and discusses the political philosophies which underpinned them.

0303 LASTGermaine Greer2011071620110718

Professor Germaine Greer's book 'The Female Eunuch' defined the 1970s for a generation of women, and she's continued to be an outspoken champion for women today.

Her career is well-known for encompassing academic success and feminist thought.

But there are other sides of her career too which are less well known - acting in revue and hosting TV sketch shows for instance, as well as a short stint in the 'Big Brother' house.

In the final programme in the series 'Meeting Myself Coming Back', Germaine Greer relives key moments from her life and career in conversation with John Wilson.

She discusses her role in the development of feminist thought and reflects on her life through the decades.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

The feminist and scholar Germaine Greer meets her younger self in the BBC's Sound Archive.

0401Richard Branson2012060920121226

The first programme in the new series of 'Meeting Myself Coming Back', the series in which leading public figures explore their lives through the BBC archives, features Sir Richard Branson in conversation with John Wilson. From his early days as the founder of "Student" magazine, to the creation of the Virgin record business and expansion into a global empire, Richard Branson has been an icon of entrepreneurship. In this interview, he meets his younger self from the sound archive and discusses his reactions with John Wilson.

He begins by hearing his 21- year old self running the influential "Student Magazine" from a basement in London and relives the way he created Virgin Records as a cut price mail order enterprise. He also hears the sound archive from 1984 when he announced the setting up of Virgin Atlantic with only one plane. We hear his memories of his daring exploits in hot air balloons and at sea and his thoughts on escaping death by a whisker.

Richard Branson also relives the episode when one of his planes flew into Baghdad airport in to bring out the British hostages held by Saddam Hussain after the invasion of Kuwait in 1990. He talks about the eerie stillness of the deserted airport, the tension of waiting and the relief when the hostages finally came on board.

We also hear his thoughts on doing business, taking knocks, political affiliation, plans for space travel and paying tax.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

Music, planes and trains: Virgin boss Sir Richard Branson's life from the sound archive.

0402Clive James20120623

Clive James was seldom off our television screens in the 80s and 90s. His shows like "Saturday Night Clive" and "Clive James on Television", featured clips of TV around the world and pioneered many techniques that we take for granted today.

But throughout this time, he was also writing memoirs, poems and critical essays. After leaving his native Australia, he began his career writing for literary magazines and later became the TV critic of "The Observer".

This more serious side has often been overlooked because of his TV fame. But, having left TV presenting behind and now having been diagnosed with leukaemia, Clive is re-assessing his life and legacy.

In "Meeting Myself Coming Back", Clive hears clips from moments in his life and discusses his reaction to them with John Wilson. We hear a recording from his student days in Cambridge performing a comic monologue at a college "Smoker" event. There are clips from early appearances on radio, in the company of the novelist Kingsley Amis and also his first attempts at writing and performing on television.

We also hear extracts from his TV shows of the 80s and 90s, when, in addition to his shows about television, he presented travel programmes and a series considering the nature and history of fame in the 20th century.

In an honest and penetrating look back at his life, Clive discusses his achievements, his past mistakes and his illness.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

0403 LASTPaddy Ashdown20120630

From rookie MP to Liberal Democrats leader, from the Royal Marines to high office in Bosnia, Paddy Ashdown relives his life from the archives in a frank and sometimes emotional conversation with John Wilson

From his early days in the army to his leadership of the Liberal Democrats, Paddy Ashdown - now Lord Ashdown- has been a singular political figure. He arrived in Westminster as a Liberal but soon his party voted for a merger with the SDP. He led the newly named Liberal Democrats for 11 years and then worked in Bosnia, trying to repair the damage that the war had done.

In this interview he meets his younger self at key moments from the sound archive and discusses his reactions with John Wilson. We hear his memories of serving in the Marines and also hear extracts from his first major speech at the Liberal Party Conference when he warned of the dangers of Cruise missiles.

There are highly emotional moments as well, when Paddy recounts the horrors of the scenes he saw in Bosnia in 1992.

And the programme comes up to the present with a consideration of what the Coalition and the recent local elections have meant for the Liberal Democrats.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.