Medical Matters

show more detailshow less detail

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
Cowan in Colour20131215

Cowan in Colour2013121520140712 (RS)

It can stop you having the job you want, impact on relationships and worst of all, make you rubbish at snooker. One in ten men are colour blind, including Tam Cowan.

Cowan in Colour20131215

Cowan In Colour2013121520140505 (RS)

It can stop you having the job you want, impact on relationships and worst of all, make you rubbish at snooker. One in ten men are colour blind, including Tam Cowan.

Sleepless in Scotland20131027

Sleepless in Scotland2013102720140331 (RS)

On the day that the clocks go back and the nation snuggles down to an extra hour in bed, Vic Galloway explores what's stopping one in five Scots from getting a good night's sleep.

Presenting his Radio Scotland music show, often involves late nights at gigs for Vic and he's worried that he may have to pay the health consequences for burning the candle at both ends. During the programme he embarks on a 2 week experiment, monitoring his sleep to discover whether he has a problem and what he ought to do about it. He ponders on how the temptations of our 24-hour society, in particular the internet, can make it difficult to switch off - literally and mentally. Vic meets mother and daughter, Laura and Fiona, who argue constantly about Laura's late nights online; and gaming addict, Scott, who suffers from post traumatic stress and uses the internet as a distraction from sleep and the night terrors it brings.

Colin Espie, Professor of Behavioural Sleep Medicine at Oxford University, reveals that sleep has more impact than was previously thought on both our mental and physical health, with poor sleep now being closely associated with conditions like depression, diabetes and heart disease. Whilst Nicola Morgan, author of the self-help book for teenagers 'Blame My Brain', suggests why it's a good idea to keep your phone or your computer outside the bedroom.

09Gut Reaction20160101

Each one of us each carries about 3lbs of microbes in and on our bodies - that's trillions of tiny organisms that between them contain 100 times as many genes as our own genomes do.

By far the most important place these microbes make their home is deep within our guts. And in the last ten years, a technological revolution means scientists are now beginning to discover just how crucial these microscopic creatures living within us are to our overall health.

What they're learning has been called one of the biggest developments in medical research in the 21st century. And it could provide opportunities for some startling new treatments.

In this special edition of Medical Matters, Edi Stark puts gut bacteria under the microscope and asks if our bacteria and the food we feed them might be contributing to conditions as diverse as heart disease, asthma, arthritis, autism, depression, multiple sclerosis and diabetes.

From the Glasgow doctor pioneering fecal transplants in patients with otherwise untreatable bowel complaints, to the woman with multiple sclerosis convinced that changing her diet has improved her condition, we hear from the doctors and patients harnessing the power of their own microbes for good.

13Cowan In Colour20131215

It can stop you having the job you want, impact on relationships and worst of all, make you rubbish at snooker. One in ten men are colour blind, including Tam Cowan.

0501Headaches20090318

0501Headaches2009031820090322 (RS)

Cathy MacDonald looks at the full spectrum of headaches and how best to deal with them.

0501Headaches20090318

0501Headaches20090318

Cathy MacDonald looks at the full spectrum of headaches, from the mild to the immensely painful, and discusses how best to deal with them.

0502Panic Attacks20090325

0502Panic Attacks2009032520090329 (RS)

Edi Stark talks to sufferers and discusses how best to manage the condition.

0502Panic Attacks20090325

0502Panic Attacks20090325

Edi Stark looks at the causes and symptoms of panic attacks, talks to sufferers and discusses how best to manage the condition.

0503 LASTCOPD20090401

0503 LASTCOPD2009040120090405 (RS)

Pennie Taylor finds out about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

0503 LASTCOPD20090401

0503 LASTCOPD20090401

Pennie Taylor finds out about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which doctors consider the worst of smoking-related conditions.

0601Swine Flu20090902

0601Swine Flu2009090220090906 (RS)

Pennie Taylor gets the latest information on swine flu.

0601Swine Flu20090902

0601Swine Flu20090902

Pennie Taylor gets the latest information on swine flu. Should you send your children to nursery or school? How do you balance the risks if you're pregnant?

0602Gastric banding20090909

0602Gastric banding2009090920090913 (RS)

Cathy MacDonald talks to TV presenter Anne Diamond about using a gastric band.

0602Gastric banding20090909

0602Gastric banding20090909

Cathy MacDonald talks to former TV-am presenter Anne Diamond about the reasons for her weight gain and her decision to have a gastric band fitted.

0603The Vasectomy20090916
0603The Vasectomy2009091620090920 (RS)

Edi Stark finds out about the emotional and physical realities of 'the snip'.

0603The Vasectomy20090916

0603The Vasectomy20090916

Edi Stark finds out about the emotional and physical realities of 'the snip' from two men who have undergone a vasectomy, plus she talks to medical experts about the procedure.

0604Animal Therapy20090923

0604Animal Therapy2009092320090927 (RS)

Cathy MacDonald explores the rise in popularity of animal therapy.

0604Animal Therapy20090923

0604Animal Therapy20090923

From Kune Kune pigs in Carstairs to horses in Dingwall, Cathy MacDonald explores the rise in popularity of animal therapy as a complementary medicine.

0605Standards of Care20090930

0605Standards of Care20090930

Anna Magnusson investigates why many older patients experience a lower standard of care than they expect. If respect is at the top of the agenda, why are so many complaining?

0606 LASTAnatomy of a Hangover20091004

0606 LASTAnatomy of a Hangover20091004

Singer Aidan Moffat investigates the consequences of his drinking.

0606 LASTAnatomy of a Hangover20091004

0606 LASTAnatomy of a Hangover20091004

Singer Aidan Moffat likes a sociable drink or five. In this programme, he investigates the consequences of his actions, from the very first tipple, all the way through to the next day's hangover.

0606 LASTAnatomy of a Hangover20091004

0606 LASTAnatomy of a Hangover2009100420100101 (RS)

Singer Aidan Moffat likes a sociable drink or five. In this programme, he investigates the consequences of his actions, from the very first tipple, all the way through to the next day's hangover.

0704Football On The Brain20110202
0704Football On The Brain20110202

3/4

Football is giving "remarkable" new life to people with dementia, as discovered by a groundbreaking Scottish project. As with all the best ideas, the simplicity and effectiveness of the approach is so remarkable that it is incredible that nobody stumbled upon it before, and yet it came about during a conversation between a group of Scottish football fans. Michael White is the Falkirk Football Club historian and sits on the board of a care home. He'd discovered that old football photos were a "potent trigger" for fans with dementia. This stimuli opened up discussions about memories of players and games and greatly reduced levels of anger and frustration with those men and women participating in these reminiscence sessions.

He got the Scottish Football Museum involved, they contacted Glasgow Caledonian University, and pretty soon the international medical community was aware of the discovery. The results have been so rewarding that the idea is being exported to Canada, with ice hockey providing the key to communication.

Professor Debbie Tolson is the director of the university's Centre for Evidence Based Care of Older People. She embarked on an evaluation to see if this approach genuinely worked. Her results were impressive and she describes this kind of reminiscence work as something that could "make a big impact". There are nearly 25 million people with dementia across the world, with an estimated 4.6 million new cases each year. This programme follows the Centre's progress and evaluates the impact on the lives of those they're working with.

0705The Peri-menopause20110209
0705The Peri-menopause20110209

From your late mid 40s things start to go a bit irregular. Either non-stop rivers of Babylon or once in a blue moon.

Sleeplessness, hot flushes, mood swings, low sex drive, weight gain, memory loss are just a few of the symptoms that that might indicate the peri-menopause. But what is the peri-menopause and how do you know you're in it? Alison Craig talks to the women who have been there and meets the experts who can offer various solutions.