The Media Show

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20100106

The government has signalled its intention to allow product placement on commercial television and, with the consultation period ending this week, there's been a flurry of arguments for and against the change. Steve Hewlett discusses this with Richard Lindley of Voice of the Listener and Viewer, Claire Heys of independent production company Tiger Aspect and Ian Twinn of the advertisers' body ISBA, which has come out against the changes.

As the first 3D television channel is announced in the US, Sky TV shows Steve how its 3D programming could look when it starts broadcasting programmes later this year. Several of the major television manufacturers are launching 3D sets at a technology fair in Las Vegas tomorrow.

Thomas Gensemer, of Blue State Media, gives his views on how social media helped Barack Obama's presidential campaign and how that experience might be used in the next UK general election. Blue State Media has been credited with helping the campaign to raise over 500 million dollars and mobilise over ten million activists.

20100113

Is the BBC still committed to entertainment on television? Four years ago, the government called entertainment 'central to the BBC's mission'. This month, though, it's been revealed that entertainment is not on a list of the Director General's top priorities for the future. Steve asks Jana Bennett, who heads the BBC's TV channels, if there is a change and if Jonathan Ross's departure is a symptom of that change.

Media commentator Roy Greenslade gives his views on the future of The Independent newspaper, which is locked into takeover talks with Alexander Lebedev. If the takeover goes ahead, will The Indy become a free paper like Mr Lebedev's London Evening Standard?

An announcement is due about who will go through to the next round in the bid to run TV news in some of the ITV regions. Richard Hooper is heading the advisory panel working on the shortlist. Can this process guarantee that viewers will still get local news on ITV?

And, with Google announcing it may withdraw from China, we hear what Chinese internet users are saying.

20100120

The BBC Trust has started a year long review into the accuracy and impartiality of the BBC's science coverage, with climate change one of the topics which has attracted controversy. How does the BBC and the media at large measure up to the task of reporting science? And what does impartiality mean in the context of science reporting? Steve Hewlett is joined by James Delingpole of The Telegraph, Mary Hockaday who heads the BBC newsroom and Fiona Fox, director of the Science Media Centre.

Lord Heseltine has stepped down this month from his role at the magazine publishers Haymarket. He talks about the challenge of competing with magazines linked to television programmes - and ways of making money from a magazine's name even when it is no longer actually printed.

And what's really going on with pay TV? Reports have claimed that Sky is to be forced to drop the price it charges for its sports channel. Will this lead to lower prices for viewers - and will Sky get their pay channels on Freeview in return? Media commentator Mathew Horsman gives his view.

20100127

The BBC's New York correspondent Matthew Price on the story behind his report of a pregnant Haitian woman he drove to hospital, saving her and the baby's life. Plus Dr Nancy Snyderman from NBC, one of the US doctor-reporters who spent more time tending to the injured in Haiti than filing stories.

Sir Jeremy Isaacs, Channel 4's first chief executive, tells Steve Hewlett about the phone call he received from the new chief executive, David Abraham, and what they'll be discussing when they go for lunch. Media commentator Maggie Brown gives her views on the challenges ahead.

On the day that Apple is expected to launch its new Tablet computer, can it live up to the hype - and the hopes - of the publishing industry? Will it do for magazines and newspapers what iTunes did for music downloads? Steve talks to media analyst Dan Sabbagh.

20110202

In the last week, the Guardian, the New York Times and Der Spiegel have each published books telling the story of their relationship with Wikileaks and its leader Julian Assange, following their recent publication of leaked US diplomatic cables. Some of the information in the Guardian's book, referring to the alleged source of the leak, Bradley Manning, prompted Wikileaks to label the Guardian "the slimiest media organisation in the UK". The Guardian's editor Alan Rusbridger talks to Steve Hewlett about working with Julian Assange and how their relationship soured.

George Brock is Professor and Head of Journalism at City University London and former foreign news editor at the Times. He picks up on the impact of Wikileaks and comments on its shift this week to the Telegraph.

Peta Buscombe of the Press Complaints Commission responds to complaints about its handling of the phone hacking scandal. On Monday, the Financial Times editor Lionel Barber remarked that the PCC had taken no serious action over the allegations and that it was "supine at best". Yesterday, a ComRes poll for the Independent indicated that two thirds of those polled think the affair shows the industry should no longer regulate itself. So does the PCC have the confidence of the public and is it robust enough and responsible enough to be left alone?

George Brock comments on Lionel Barber's fear that the UK media risks retribution for the phone hacking, with statutory regulation.

20110209

As Question Time's editor leaves the programme owing to its move from London to Glasgow, Steve Hewlett looks at the BBC's plans to move more programmes to the regions. Former Question Time editor Nick Pisani and Professor of Journalism Tim Luckhurst discuss whether political programmes can work well so far from Westminster. BBC Chief Operation Officer Caroline Thomson explains the BBC's strategy.

The commercial giant AOL has bought the pioneering blogs and news website the Huffington Post. Emma Barnett, the Telegraph's digital media editor, discusses whether the acquisition is a good buy for AOL and whether the Huffington Post can remain unique when it becomes part of a larger organisation.

Sky Sports presenters Andy Gray and Richard Keys left the channel last month amid a storm of controversy following sexist remarks about linesman Sian Massey. Now radio station TalkSport has hired the presenters for a week day show. TalkSport's Programme Director Moz Dee talks to Steve Hewlett about the decision.

The Producer is Simon Tillotson.

20110216

Last month, BBC director general Mark Thompson said the arrival of YouView would "herald an intense battle for the living room". This month, though, it became clear that viewers would have to wait for this upgrade to Freeview for up to a year longer than expected and more than two years longer than originally hoped. What are the implications for those viewers who want this next generation of free TV over the internet? Analyst Matthew Horsman, of Mediatique, offers an explanation for the delay and Steve Hewlett asks YouView's chief executive Richard Halton to give a date when it will finally arrive.

This week saw the launch of OK!TV on TV Channel 5. Is it, as one reviewer said in the Guardian, neither "ok nor TV" or, according to another in the Express, a "resounding hit"? And how are the chances of OK!TV's success affected by the fact that OK!, Channel 5 and the Express are all owned by Richard Desmond's Northern and Shell, which may also be on the point of buying Big Brother? David Butcher of the Radio Times and Amanda Andrews of the Telegraph discuss the fortunes of 5.

And it has been three weeks since Jeremy Hunt, the Culture Secretary, announced he would give Rupert Murdoch's NewsCorp more time to address his concerns over "potential threats to media plurality" if NewsCorp buys the remaining 61% of BSkyB. If those concerns are not addressed, he said he would refer the bid to the Competition Commission. David Elstein, formerly of BSkyB and Chris Goodall, formerly of the Competition Commission, give their views on what's going on behind the scenes and what we can expect in the next few weeks.

20110223

Former Radio 4 controller Mark Damazer shares his thoughts on the future of BBC Trust. What does he think of the man widely expected to be its new Chair, Lord Patten, and what will his biggest challenges be?

Steve Hewlett is joined by Alex Thompson, Chief News Correspondent at Channel 4, and the BBC's Wold News Editor Jon Williams. How do they deal with reporting on the protests which are sweeping the Middle East and Northern Africa? Does social media make it easier or more difficult? And, with Western journalists banned from Libya how can you verify what is happening on the ground?

And the programme everyone is still talking about - My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding. Veteran documentary maker Roger Graef and journalist Anne McElvoy discuss.

The Producer is Joe Kent.

20120725

Will a digital first strategy mean the end for some newspapers. Lord Leveson begins writing his report - what will it mean for the future of the press ? We road test the TV of the future - Super Hi-Vision. And as one Olympic sponsor prepares to make its first move into funding a TV music programme broadcast during the games - we ask is ad-funded programming the way forward.

Presenter: Anne McElvoy

Producer: Beverley Purcell

Super Hi-Vision screenings are taking place in London, Bradford and Glasgow until 12 August:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/showsandtours/events/

http://www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk/Events/OlympicGamesLondon2012SuperHiVision.aspx.

Super Hi-Vision TV, 'digital first' newspapers, ad-funded programming, the end of Leveson.

20120808

Have TV's Red Button and HD channels struck gold at the Olympics? Plus where are we with DAB and the digital radio switchover.

Presenter Steve Hewlett

Producer Beverley Purcell.

Gold medal for the BBC's Olympic coverage? Plus DAB and the radio digital switchover.

20121219

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20121226

Steve Hewlett explores the dark art of festive TV scheduling, and talks to David Jason

20130206

Dido Harding, CEO of TalkTalk, on YouView; Andrew Mullins, MD of the Lebedev UK newspapers on winning the biggest new local tv licence; the US company paying £15bn for Virgin Media.

20130227
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Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Simon Tillotson.

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20131009

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20131016
20131030
20131106

The Sunday People, one of Britain's oldest Sunday newspapers, has finally developed an online presence. Under the stewardship of Trinity Mirror executive Sue Douglas, People.co.uk is being described as 'news without the boring bits'. Steve Hewlett asks Sue Douglas why she was so keen to take the helm of the digital offering, and discusses how she can turn a weekly newspaper into a 24 hour website.

Meanwhile, the Independent newspaper has had yet another re-design. It's the fifth one in as many years. The red masthead brought in by then editor Chris Blackhurst in 2011 will now run vertically down the front page. It's the brain child of new editor Amol Rajan who says he wants to capture the essence of the paper's first editions from 1986. As he describes it, the style is, 'classic with a twist'. But can reverting back to a vintage style recapture a lost audience? The paper has a circulation of just 70,000. Steve talks to Chris Blackhurst, who is now the Group Content Editor of The Independent, i, The Independent on Sunday and Evening Standard, about whether a re-design is really the answers to the papers problems.

Bidding is now underway for rights to cover Champions League football games. The question on analysts' lips is whether BT Sport will decide to go head to head against Sky Sports and try and win the right to cover these games. It comes as BT announces record broadband subscriber numbers, due in part to it offering it's sports channel free of charge. It's already paid £246m per season to broadcast 38 Premier League games, so will it seek to further challenge the dominance of Sky?

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20131113
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20140108

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140115

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140122

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140129

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140205

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140212

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140219

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140226

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140305

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140312

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140319

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140326

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140402

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140409

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140416

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140430

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140507

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140514

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140521

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140528

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140604

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140611

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140618

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140625

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140709

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20140716

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20140730

A House of Lords report says that The European Court of Justice's demand for internet search engines to respect individuals', "right to be forgotten" is unworkable. The ECJ ruled in May that links to data should be erased on request, which has led to Google receiving more than 70,000 applications. Emma Barnett talks to Lord John Sharkey who sits on the committee which authored the report, and asks UK Information Commissioner Christopher Graham, who would adjudicate on requests rejected by search engines, how he will assess whether individuals will have a, 'right to be forgotten'.

The BBC wants to close BBC Three as a broadcast TV channel in autumn 2015 and move it online. It comes at a time when the BBC is being urged to tackle its declining reach among young viewers and black, Asian and minority ethnic audiences. Whilst the plans still have to be approved by the BBC Trust, viewer Jono Read is so concerned he has started a petition to Save BBC3. Emma Barnett talks to him, and Natt Tapley, a comedy writer and performer who has written for the channel.

Regional TV station London Live has applied to Ofcom to reduce its commitment to local programming. It wants to air just one hour of local programming during the prime time evening slot, compared to the current three. London Live says it's because it's not pulling in as much advertising revenue as it had hoped. Nigel Dacre, the Chair of the Local TV Network, explains why some stations may want to revisit their programming commitments, whilst columnist Roy Greenslade says London Live's application proves that local TV isn't working.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

20140813

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20140820

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20140827

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20140903

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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The Guardian newspaper is launching a new website for its US readers today. It's the latest step in a global digital expansion, which has seen it move into the Australian and American markets. But with a strategy that focuses on being 'open' - not behind a pay wall - and with annual losses of upwards of £30 million a year, how can the group afford to keep content free? Andrew Miller the CEO of Guardian Media Group joins Steve Hewlett to discuss his strategy.

Filmmakers have gained access to high security psychiatric hospital Broadmoor - home to some of the country's most violent men, including Peter Sutcliffe and Kenneth Erskine. The documentary, to be broadcast on ITV, offers a window into the lives of patients and support staff. Steve speaks to the Producer and Director Olivia Lichtenstein about the ethical issues of recording inside one of the country's most dangerous places.

Facebook and Twitter both reported strong revenues this week. However, figures showed that Twitter has struggled to get new users, and Facebook is saying its spending will increase next year. Steve Hewlett talks to Katherine Rushton, The Telegraph's US business editor, about the results and what this could mean for the two social networking giants.

Russia Today is to launch a dedicated UK TV channel. It's been criticised in the past as a propaganda mouthpiece for the Russian government and has faced complaints over its stance on the Ukraine crisis. Steve hears from Afshin Rattansi, presenter and journalist, about what the new dedicated UK service has to offer.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

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20141112
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20150107

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150114

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150121

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150128
20150211

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150225

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150304

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150311

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150318

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150325

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150401

20150401

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150408

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150415

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150422

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150429

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150506

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150722

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150729

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150812

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150819

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150826

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20150909

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20151007

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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20151014

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20151021

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20151111

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20151202

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20151209
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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20160106

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20160113

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

20160120

Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

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Topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

Adam Crozier Itv20120801

ITV's Chief Executive talks to Steve Hewlett about the company's latest results and what the future holds for Britain's biggest free to air commercial broadcaster. Plus what impact is new media - particularly Twitter having on the Olympics?

Producer Beverley Purcell.

ITV's Chief Executive Adam Crozier on what the future holds for the network.

Armando Iannucci20120912

talks to Steve Hewlett about 'The Thick of it' and the role of writers, producers and directors in TV. Plus the Leveson enquiry into the culture, practices and ethics of the press. What will he recommend and what will the post Leveson media world look like.

Producer Beverley Purcell.

Bbc Called To Account20130710

This afternoon, the BBC's Chairman and Director General are before the MPs on the Public Accounts Committee. Lord Patten and Lord Hall are answering questions about the size of compensation payments made to senior executives who left the BBC in the last few years, some of them greater than contractually allowed. Tara Conlan reports from the hearing - she is a long term BBC watcher in her role at the Guardian. One of the questions raised by the National Audit Office report into the payments relates to the BBC Trust and whether it can adequately supervise or inspect the BBC board decisions. Tim Suter, a founding partner of Ofcom and Claire Enders of Enders Analysis discuss what changes need to be made to the way the BBC is governed, if any, in the interests of licence payers.

Brian Cathcart is a founder of the Hacked Off campaign. He responds to the announcement this week of plans for a replacement to the Press Complaints Commission, proposed by the industry. These plans are linked to the so-called Rival Royal Charter which the industry has put forward and is being considered by the Privy Council today.

And what impact might the secret recording of his meeting at The Sun have on Rupert Murdoch? The Commons Media Select Committee has invited him to return to explain his comments, which relate to a range of controversial subjects including the extent to which Fleet Street paid police for information. Claire Enders and Brian Cathcart are joined by Peter Preston, former Guardian editor.

Presenter: Steve Hewlett

Producer: Simon Tillotson

Editor: Andy Smith.

Bbc Digital Strategy; Press Reform20131009

The Privy Council - an ancient body which advises the Queen, and mostly made up of senior politicians - has rejected press proposals for a royal charter. Alternative plans proposed by the government after cross-party talks will now be re-examined, with ministers saying they might consider some of the industry's ideas. Some publications, like the Guardian, say the differences between the two charters are bridgeable. Others, like The Spectator, say it amounts to a 'politicians charter' that they won't be signing up to. Steve Hewlett speaks to The Times editor John Witherow, one of the central characters in the debate, about what happens next, now the newspapers' proposals for regulation have been rejected.

The BBC Director General Tony Hall has set out his big plans for the future of the BBC. They include the launch of a BBC One + 1 service, and a revamped, personalised iPlayer, offering a 30-day catch-up period. In his first major interview since his appointment in February, Steve Hewlett speaks to James Purnell - former Labour politician - now the BBC's Director of Strategy and Digital, about how the BBC's future vision can become a reality.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

BBC plans, IPSO, X Factor20150909

BBC plans, IPSO, X Factor20150909

The BBC outlined its vision this week for a more open and more distinctive BBC that would involve working more closely with arts and science institutions and local news services. Steve Hewlett hears from the BBC's Director of Strategy James Purnell about the plans.

A year after the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) was set up, a survey for the pressure group Hacked Off found over sixty percent of people lacked confidence in the regulator, which is backed by the majority of the UK's major newspaper publishers. A letter in this week's Guardian signed by eleven people who had taken a complaint to IPSO denounced the regulator as a sham body. Steve speaks to Evan Harris, Joint Executive Director Hacked Off, about its concerns, and to Matt Tee, Chief Executive of IPSO, about the criticisms, and gets his reflections on the last year and what's next for the regulator.

The X Factor has been criticised for scouting for contestants with a pre-existing professional pedigree rather than relying solely on genuine walk-in applicants. The show has also come under attack for contestants giving humble back stories, like this week's "I work on a farm", that do not reflect their true previous success in showbiz. So has the well of UK talent dried up? Should the X Factor format be put out of its misery? Is the audience too jaded, too cynical and too small to care anyway? Steve hears from Kevin O'Sullivan, the Sunday Mirror's TV columnist.

Producer: Dianne McGregor.

BBC plans, IPSO, X Factor20150909

The BBC outlined its vision this week for a more open and more distinctive BBC that would involve working more closely with arts and science institutions and local news services. Steve Hewlett hears from the BBC's Director of Strategy James Purnell about the plans.

A year after the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) was set up, a survey for the pressure group Hacked Off found over sixty percent of people lacked confidence in the regulator, which is backed by the majority of the UK's major newspaper publishers. A letter in this week's Guardian signed by eleven people who had taken a complaint to IPSO denounced the regulator as a sham body. Steve speaks to Evan Harris, Joint Executive Director Hacked Off, about its concerns, and to Matt Tee, Chief Executive of IPSO, about the criticisms, and gets his reflections on the last year and what's next for the regulator.

The X Factor has been criticised for scouting for contestants with a pre-existing professional pedigree rather than relying solely on genuine walk-in applicants. The show has also come under attack for contestants giving humble back stories, like this week's "I work on a farm", that do not reflect their true previous success in showbiz. So has the well of UK talent dried up? Should the X Factor format be put out of its misery? Is the audience too jaded, too cynical and too small to care anyway? Steve hears from Kevin O'Sullivan, the Sunday Mirror's TV columnist.

Producer: Dianne McGregor.

BBC Studios, Ad-blocking, Female tech journalists, The Voice20151014

BBC Studios, Ad-blocking, Female tech journalists, The Voice20151014

The BBC's latest submission to the Government on the Charter Review consultation includes further detail on BBC Studios. The proposal removes the key guarantees and quotas for BBC in-house programmes but establishes BBC Studios as a separate entity, to maintain the BBC's tradition of programme making. To discuss the implications for the UK's independent TV production sector at large, Steve is joined by Cat Lewis, CEO of Nine Lives Media and Debbie Manners, MD Keo Films and former Chair of Pact Council.

Axel Springer, the owner of the German tabloid Bild, has become the first major German publisher to insist that users of ad-blocking software either pay a monthly fee, or turn off the ad-blockers before viewing its content. Earlier this month, Apple launched its first operating system permitting users to download ad-blocking software from its app store. Media Editor of The Times, Beth Rigby, joins Steve.

New research shows 20% of female technology journalists surveyed said they had disguised their gender, name or published anonymously, to avoid abuse. Catherine Adams, freelance journalist & senior lecturer in Communications at Nottingham Trent joins Steve to discuss the conclusions of her new research. And Holly Brockwell, Editor in Chief of Gadgette, a technology website aimed at women, talks about the sexist abuse she has experienced in the course of her work.

The BBC have issued a statement denying that it has axed The Voice, saying: "We are in discussions about its future, but we won't get into a bidding war." Reports from The Daily Mirror had suggested the BBC had dropped the programme and that it could appear on ITV. The Guardian's Tara Conlan joins Steve to discuss the wrangling over this Saturday night talent show.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

BBC Studios, Ad-blocking, Female tech journalists, The Voice20151014

The BBC's latest submission to the Government on the Charter Review consultation includes further detail on BBC Studios. The proposal removes the key guarantees and quotas for BBC in-house programmes but establishes BBC Studios as a separate entity, to maintain the BBC's tradition of programme making. To discuss the implications for the UK's independent TV production sector at large, Steve is joined by Cat Lewis, CEO of Nine Lives Media and Debbie Manners, MD Keo Films and former Chair of Pact Council.

Axel Springer, the owner of the German tabloid Bild, has become the first major German publisher to insist that users of ad-blocking software either pay a monthly fee, or turn off the ad-blockers before viewing its content. Earlier this month, Apple launched its first operating system permitting users to download ad-blocking software from its app store. Media Editor of The Times, Beth Rigby, joins Steve.

New research shows 20% of female technology journalists surveyed said they had disguised their gender, name or published anonymously, to avoid abuse. Catherine Adams, freelance journalist & senior lecturer in Communications at Nottingham Trent joins Steve to discuss the conclusions of her new research. And Holly Brockwell, Editor in Chief of Gadgette, a technology website aimed at women, talks about the sexist abuse she has experienced in the course of her work.

The BBC have issued a statement denying that it has axed The Voice, saying: "We are in discussions about its future, but we won't get into a bidding war." Reports from The Daily Mirror had suggested the BBC had dropped the programme and that it could appear on ITV. The Guardian's Tara Conlan joins Steve to discuss the wrangling over this Saturday night talent show.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

BBC Studios, Ad-blocking, Female tech journalists, The Voice20151014

BBC Studios, Ad-blocking, Female tech journalists, The Voice20151014

The BBC's latest submission to the Government on the Charter Review consultation includes further detail on BBC Studios. The proposal removes the key guarantees and quotas for BBC in-house programmes but establishes BBC Studios as a separate entity, to maintain the BBC's tradition of programme making. To discuss the implications for the UK's independent TV production sector at large, Steve is joined by Cat Lewis, CEO of Nine Lives Media and Debbie Manners, MD Keo Films and former Chair of Pact Council.

Axel Springer, the owner of the German tabloid Bild, has become the first major German publisher to insist that users of ad-blocking software either pay a monthly fee, or turn off the ad-blockers before viewing its content. Earlier this month, Apple launched its first operating system permitting users to download ad-blocking software from its app store. Media Editor of The Times, Beth Rigby, joins Steve.

New research shows 20% of female technology journalists surveyed said they had disguised their gender, name or published anonymously, to avoid abuse. Catherine Adams, freelance journalist & senior lecturer in Communications at Nottingham Trent joins Steve to discuss the conclusions of her new research. And Holly Brockwell, Editor in Chief of Gadgette, a technology website aimed at women, talks about the sexist abuse she has experienced in the course of her work.

The BBC have issued a statement denying that it has axed The Voice, saying: "We are in discussions about its future, but we won't get into a bidding war." Reports from The Daily Mirror had suggested the BBC had dropped the programme and that it could appear on ITV. The Guardian's Tara Conlan joins Steve to discuss the wrangling over this Saturday night talent show.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

BBC Studios, Ad-blocking, Female tech journalists, The Voice20151014

The BBC's latest submission to the Government on the Charter Review consultation includes further detail on BBC Studios. The proposal removes the key guarantees and quotas for BBC in-house programmes but establishes BBC Studios as a separate entity, to maintain the BBC's tradition of programme making. To discuss the implications for the UK's independent TV production sector at large, Steve is joined by Cat Lewis, CEO of Nine Lives Media and Debbie Manners, MD Keo Films and former Chair of Pact Council.

Axel Springer, the owner of the German tabloid Bild, has become the first major German publisher to insist that users of ad-blocking software either pay a monthly fee, or turn off the ad-blockers before viewing its content. Earlier this month, Apple launched its first operating system permitting users to download ad-blocking software from its app store. Media Editor of The Times, Beth Rigby, joins Steve.

New research shows 20% of female technology journalists surveyed said they had disguised their gender, name or published anonymously, to avoid abuse. Catherine Adams, freelance journalist & senior lecturer in Communications at Nottingham Trent joins Steve to discuss the conclusions of her new research. And Holly Brockwell, Editor in Chief of Gadgette, a technology website aimed at women, talks about the sexist abuse she has experienced in the course of her work.

The BBC have issued a statement denying that it has axed The Voice, saying: "We are in discussions about its future, but we won't get into a bidding war." Reports from The Daily Mirror had suggested the BBC had dropped the programme and that it could appear on ITV. The Guardian's Tara Conlan joins Steve to discuss the wrangling over this Saturday night talent show.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

BBC Trust chair Rona Fairhead, 'Tips' when interviewing will.i.am, Press freedom v privacy20160406

Some weeks ago, Sir David Clementi said the current regulatory model of the BBC Trust, was 'flawed and that a unitary board should run the BBC. Since then, John Whittingdale, the culture secretary, has said if board members were appointed by the government, that this would not compromise the independence of the BBC. However, the current chair of the BBC Trust, Rona Fairhead, has concerns. Steve Hewlett talks to her about whether the Clementi model is really the best model, the importance of the BBC retaining its independence, and why she thinks the White Paper on the future of the BBC, initially due out in March, needs to be published as soon as possible.

A three page list of "tips for maximising your interview time" with the popstar will.i.am were given to journalists interviewing him recently, dictating what can and cannot be discussed, and offering advice for when to ask the most important questions. Is this level of involvement from celebrity PRs helpful or meddling in journalism? Steve Hewlett talks to Telegraph writer Harry Wallop who was the recipient of the 'tip' checklist.

The Sun on Sunday has lost a court battle to print a story about a celebrity's alleged threesome on the grounds their children deserve protection. It's raised concerns amongst press freedom advocates that this defence will be used by claimants more frequently, and offer those with children carte blanche to act in any way they want, with immunity from press coverage. Steve Hewlett discusses the issues with lawyers Sara Mansoori from Matrix Chambers and Mark Stephens from Howard Kennedy. Plus, editor of the Press Gazette Dominic Ponsford explains his concerns about the potential impact on journalism.

Prod: Katy Takatsuki.

BBC Trust chair Rona Fairhead, 'Tips' when interviewing will.i.am, Press freedom v privacy20160406

BBC's future set out in government White Paper.20160512

As the government's long-awaited White Paper on the future of the BBC is published, Steve Hewlett talks to the leading players about what it actually says. Will it mark the end of the BBC as we know it? Or has all the hype been misplaced? Steve speaks to Culture Secretary John Whittingdale, before asking a panel of experts what these plans really mean for the future of the corporation. He's joined by former Culture Secretary Dame Tessa Jowell; Michael Grade, who was chairman of the BBC from 2004 to 2006 and executive chairman of ITV from 2007 to 2009; former BBC Trustee, David Liddiment, who is also founder of All3 Media, and Tim Suter, once of Ofcom and the DCMS - and the BBC, and now a broadcasting consultant.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

BBC's future set out in government White Paper.20160512

BBC's future set out in government White Paper.20160512

As the government's long-awaited White Paper on the future of the BBC is published, Steve Hewlett talks to the leading players about what it actually says. Will it mark the end of the BBC as we know it? Or has all the hype been misplaced? Steve speaks to Culture Secretary John Whittingdale, before asking a panel of experts what these plans really mean for the future of the corporation. He's joined by former Culture Secretary Dame Tessa Jowell; Michael Grade, who was chairman of the BBC from 2004 to 2006 and executive chairman of ITV from 2007 to 2009; former BBC Trustee, David Liddiment, who is also founder of All3 Media, and Tim Suter, once of Ofcom and the DCMS - and the BBC, and now a broadcasting consultant.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

BBC's future set out in government White Paper.20160512

Benefits Street; Future Of The Bbc20140115

Birds Of A Feather, The Telegraph, Diversity In The Tv Industry20140122

Black Audiences; Moderating Online; The End Of Millionaire?20131023

Yesterday, the BBC DG Lord Hall was asked what the BBC was doing to improve programmes for black audiences - he said he wasn't satisfied the BBC appeals enough. Steve asks Pat Younge, the BBC's most senior black executive, how big a problem there is for black viewers. Journalist Bim Adewunmi and Simone Pennant of The TV Collective, a former TV producer, discuss whether the main channels need to change.

A recent ruling in the European Court of Human Rights has given cause for concern to publishers of online comments. It suggests that publishers have editorial control over comments and should prevent clearly unlawful ones from appearing. The current practice is to take down comments once notified of a complaint, though the extent to which complaints are investigated first differs from one publisher to another. Law consultant David Banks looks at the laws and Justine Roberts, founder of Mumsnet, considers the implications.

And Chris Tarrant is to retire from Who Wants To Be A Millionaire, 15 years after its launch. ITV confirms that it has no plans to make further special programmes, beyond those already in the pipeline. David Liddiment, who commissioned the show for ITV, looks back at the launch and why its initial success was far from guaranteed.

Producer: Simon Tillotson

Editor: Fiona Couper.

Broadchurch20130306

After years of campaigning for reform could the Defamation Bill be derailed by "Leveson clauses"? Could BBC Worldwide be about to sell a controlling stake in travel guidebooks publisher Lonely Planet to the US billionaire Brad Kelley. And how much does the new ITV drama Broadchurch owe to the Danish Drama The Killing? Presented by Steve Hewlett. Producer Beverley Purcell.

Bt Sport; Nicholas Coleridge; Digital Switchover20131113
Ceo Of News Uk; Ad-funded Programmes; Press Reform20131211

In his first broadcast interview since becoming Chief Executive of News UK, Mike Darcey shares his thoughts on the success of Sun digital subscriptions, competing with the Daily Mail, press reform and page 3.

An aspiring press self-regulator has emerged; the Impress Project says it wants to be independent, affordable, and accountable to the public. But will a regulator that's in support of the recent Royal Charter - when all the main national papers are opposed to it - really be able to get any of them on board? We speak to its founder.

Declining budgets are forcing traditional media to reach out to different types of content funding; more are working with commercial companies and brands for help with finance. However, there's a view that "paid for programming" compromises editorially decisions, and this view underpins much of the present regulatory framework. In a new report, former Newsnight Editor and Director of BBC World News Sian Kevill asks audiences what they think of ad-funded content and determines that they are more tolerant than we think. We speak to her and former Ofcom Director Chris Banatvala about his concern with relaxing the rules.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Ceo Of Virgin Media, President Of Aol Content, Expert Women20151125

The president of AOL Content, which owns the Huffington Post, says the media industry is undergoing a 'revolutionary change'. In a speech at the Reuters Institute, Jimmy Maymann says it's because of a shift from 'destination' to 'distributed' media. This means that rather than actively visiting branded websites to choose content, users are consuming what's being offered to them, often via social media. Steve Hewlett talks to Jimmy Maymann about the impact of this shift, and Sarah Marshall, social media editor at the Wall Street Journal, gives her thoughts on what publishers need to do to respond to this change.

A new study by City University's Professor of Broadcasting claims that the news, far from reflecting society, 'distorts society'. In her latest work into the representation of women in the media, Lis Howell has found that while female expertise generally runs at a ratio of about 2.5 male experts to every female expert, in the news men outnumber women by around 3 to 1. Lis talks to Steve Hewlett about the findings, and about what broadcasters could be doing to improve the ratios.

Virgin Media provides TV, internet, mobile and fixed-line telephone services in the UK. The company's cable network delivers broadband to over half of all UK homes, and there's a current project to extend this to four million additional premises over the next five years. Tom Mockridge has been at the helm since June 2013, following the company's acquisition by Liberty Global, the world's largest international cable operator. Steve Hewlett talks to him about content, broadband, sports rights and retransmission fees.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Channel 4 privatisation, Freeview Play, Corbyn's press jokes, Local World sale talks20150930

Channel 4 privatisation, Freeview Play, Corbyn's press jokes, Local World sale talks20150930

Plans to privatise Channel 4 have been revealed after documents were photographed as they were carried into Downing Street. A sale would raise an estimated £1bn for the Treasury. Steve Hewlett talks to David Elstein, former chief executive of Channel 5, about the potential benefits of having Channel 4 in private hands. Also joining him is historian and journalist Maggie Brown who explains the challenges the broadcaster would face in delivering its public remit, should it be accountable to shareholders, rather than the government.

New Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn began his maiden Party Conference speech with jokes aimed at the national press. He went on to talk about media commentators who have 'sneered' at the growth in Labour's popularity, and called for an end to cyberbullying. It's not the first time he's criticised the press - recently describing headlines about himself as 'unpleasant' and 'unfair'. Steve Hewlett talks to Fraser Nelson of The Spectator about the growing hostility between Corbyn and the media.

The free to air TV service Freeview is launching Freeview Play this week. It's a new TV catch up service bringing together BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and Channel 5 on demand services. Steve asks Caroline Thomson, Chair of Digital UK, the organisation behind Freeview, why people would buy a box when there are so many packages on offer?

Trinity Mirror is in talks to buy the shares of Local World it does not already own. Local World is one of the largest media networks in the UK - with over 100 print titles and 70 websites. The Daily Mail and General Trust currently own just over 38% of the business. So why does it want to sell, and why would Trinity Mirror want to buy? Ian Whittaker, media analyst with Liberum, explains.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Channel 4 privatisation, Freeview Play, Corbyn's press jokes, Local World sale talks20150930

Plans to privatise Channel 4 have been revealed after documents were photographed as they were carried into Downing Street. A sale would raise an estimated £1bn for the Treasury. Steve Hewlett talks to David Elstein, former chief executive of Channel 5, about the potential benefits of having Channel 4 in private hands. Also joining him is historian and journalist Maggie Brown who explains the challenges the broadcaster would face in delivering its public remit, should it be accountable to shareholders, rather than the government.

New Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn began his maiden Party Conference speech with jokes aimed at the national press. He went on to talk about media commentators who have 'sneered' at the growth in Labour's popularity, and called for an end to cyberbullying. It's not the first time he's criticised the press - recently describing headlines about himself as 'unpleasant' and 'unfair'. Steve Hewlett talks to Fraser Nelson of The Spectator about the growing hostility between Corbyn and the media.

The free to air TV service Freeview is launching Freeview Play this week. It's a new TV catch up service bringing together BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and Channel 5 on demand services. Steve asks Caroline Thomson, Chair of Digital UK, the organisation behind Freeview, why people would buy a box when there are so many packages on offer?

Trinity Mirror is in talks to buy the shares of Local World it does not already own. Local World is one of the largest media networks in the UK - with over 100 print titles and 70 websites. The Daily Mail and General Trust currently own just over 38% of the business. So why does it want to sell, and why would Trinity Mirror want to buy? Ian Whittaker, media analyst with Liberum, explains.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Children's Tv, 90 Years Of The Radio Times20130925

The BBC has published its review of children's services at the corporation, revealing how viewing trends amongst youngsters is changing. It says children want more content online so they can access it from their mobile phones and tables. Steve Hewlett speaks to Helen Bullough, head of in-house production for CBBC about the challenges posed by creating apps and on-demand content for children. Also joining him is Greg Childs, who launched the first internet services for Children's BBC and is now Director of the Children's Media Foundation, and asks him why he thinks the BBC needs to do more to move children's entertainment from TV to online.

A new season on Channel 4 starts next week which claims to examine how pornograph is affecting people's lives. One show, Sex Box, will feature couples having sex in a solid, sound-proofed box and then discussing their experience with a panel of experts. We talk to host Mariella Frostrup about why she decided to get involved, and what can be gained from a programme like this. And Ralph Lee, head of factual programmes at the channel, discusses whether programming like this fulfills a public service remit, or is simply a gimmick to attract a dwindling youth audience.

The Radio Times celebrates its 90th birthday this week. Launched in a fit of pique in 1923, after an announcement from the Newpaper Proprietors' Association that it would be charging the BBC for publishing radio listings, it's since become one of the best known magazines of its kind. Steve Hewlett talks to its editor Ben Preston about how it's keeping pace by providing online guides, and keeping circulation going by brokering exclusives with big names like Naomi Campbell and Jamie Oliver.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki

Chris Blackhurst On Leveson Letter20120829

In today's programme with Steve Hewlett:

Independent editor Chris Blackhurst's shocked reaction to a letter from the Leveson Inquiry; Stuart Cosgrove, C4's head of diversity, on the difference the Paralympics could make to the channel; former PCC chairman Sir Christopher Meyer on the fallout from the Sun's publication of the Harry photos and the impact this could have on Leveson; Jane Kinninmont of Chatham House on the widening range and varied goals of Arabic TV channels.

The producer is Simon Tillotson.

Chris Blackhurst on Leveson, C4's Paralympics, and Sir Christopher Meyer on Harry photos.

Commissioning Bbc Tv Programmes, News On Smart Phones, The 'pause' In Local Tv Rollout20150624

The BBC Trust says that the BBC's TV commissioning process is not sustainable. Currently, 50% is guaranteed for in house commissions, independent producers compete for 25% and the last 25% is open to all. However, the Trust says there is a strong case for reducing or even removing the 50% currently guaranteed for in house commissions. The decision opens the doors for Director General Tony Hall's BBC Compete or Compare strategy, announced last July. Andrea Catherwood is joined by James Purnell, BBC's Director of Strategy and Digital, and John McVay, Chief Executive of PACT to discuss the pros and cons of changing how BBC TV content is made and supplied.

A survey conducted by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford has revealed that millions of young viewers have turned to online sources to access news content, "abandoning television news completely." Facebook was the most popular social network for news in all countries in the study except Japan, and it found that smart phones are the 'defining device' for consuming journalism. Andrea Catherwood talks to author Nic Newman from the Reuters Institute about what the findings tell us about changes in news consumption.

Carlisle has become the 34th city to be awarded a local TV licence by Ofcom. However, much to the disappointment of the Local TV Network, this may be the last licence for some time: regulator Ofcom has said that until it makes a decision about what it's going to do with the 700 MHTZ spectrum, it won't be awarding any more licences. Whilst Ofcom has described this as a 'pause', Chairman of the Local TV Network Chris Johnson has some concerns. Andrea Catherwood talks to him about how this delay is affecting the roll-out of local TV.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Dame Joan Bakewell, EU debates, 24 - the 'north's national', City AM editor20160608

Dame Joan Bakewell, EU debates, 24 - the 'north's national', City AM editor20160608

The Archbishop of Canterbury is calling on the BBC to give religion the same prominence as politics, sport or drama. In a speech at the Sandford St Martin awards for religious broadcasting, The Most Rev Justin Welby will suggest that the Corporation's charter include protection for religious programming. Also at the ceremony, Dame Joan Bakewell will receive a special award in recognition of a 'commitment to religious and ethical broadcasting'. She joins Steve Hewlett in the studio.

Nigel Farage and David Cameron faced "tough" questions on the EU referendum from a live studio audience last night for the referendum special on ITV. It's the latest in a series of debates across networks which started last week with Sky News' interviews with David Cameron and Michael Gove. Steve Hewlett speaks to Sky's Head of Politics Esme Wren about how negotiations went and how much planning went into the interviews.

A new daily newspaper described as the "North's national" is being launched. Called 24, the title will be published by Cumbria-based CN Group and will provide a "distinctly northern perspective" on big news stories. Steve Hewlett speaks to Editorial Director David Helliwell about his ambitions for the paper, and how they plan to make it work in a market suffering big declines.

The free London newspaper City AM is going to allow commercial brands to directly upload content to the City AM website without any pre-moderation by its editorial team. Joining Steve to discuss why City AM have embarked on this new model, and how they hope to benefit from this venture, is Christian May, editor of City AM.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Dame Joan Bakewell, EU debates, 24 - the 'north's national', City AM editor20160608

The Archbishop of Canterbury is calling on the BBC to give religion the same prominence as politics, sport or drama. In a speech at the Sandford St Martin awards for religious broadcasting, The Most Rev Justin Welby will suggest that the Corporation's charter include protection for religious programming. Also at the ceremony, Dame Joan Bakewell will receive a special award in recognition of a 'commitment to religious and ethical broadcasting'. She joins Steve Hewlett in the studio.

Nigel Farage and David Cameron faced "tough" questions on the EU referendum from a live studio audience last night for the referendum special on ITV. It's the latest in a series of debates across networks which started last week with Sky News' interviews with David Cameron and Michael Gove. Steve Hewlett speaks to Sky's Head of Politics Esme Wren about how negotiations went and how much planning went into the interviews.

A new daily newspaper described as the "North's national" is being launched. Called 24, the title will be published by Cumbria-based CN Group and will provide a "distinctly northern perspective" on big news stories. Steve Hewlett speaks to Editorial Director David Helliwell about his ambitions for the paper, and how they plan to make it work in a market suffering big declines.

The free London newspaper City AM is going to allow commercial brands to directly upload content to the City AM website without any pre-moderation by its editorial team. Joining Steve to discuss why City AM have embarked on this new model, and how they hope to benefit from this venture, is Christian May, editor of City AM.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Devolved Powers And The Bbc, Inside Police Custody, Phone Hacking20140924

Whilst the No Vote has halted plans for a full-blown Scottish Broadcasting Corporation, with Charter Renewal on the horizon, the pan-UK public broadcaster is unlikely to escape political pressures to decentralise more power from London. To discuss the ramifications for funding, commissioning and regulation are Tim Suter - former Ofcom and BBC executive, Glyn Mathias - Ofcom content board member for Wales and Alex Bell - a former BBC presenter and one time Head of Policy to Alex Salmond.

A new Channel 4 documentary series about Luton Police Station's custody suite shows viewers how crimes like murder, child sex abuse and domestic violence are dealt with in the first few hours by police. Filmed by 60 fixed-rig cameras and 5 crews, the series provides an insight into the challenges faced by the staff and the criminal justice process. Steve Hewlett talks to Colette Paul, Chief Constable of Bedfordshire police, about the difficult decision she made to allow cameras in, and how staff reacted. Also joining Steve is Executive Producer Simon Ford about how issues of consent and legal considerations led this to be one of his toughest projects.

Trinity Mirror has admitted liability and agreed to pay compensation to four individuals who sued the group for alleged hacking of voicemails. A further six claims have already been settled out of court. What this will mean for Trinity Mirror? Steve is joined by Mark Lewis, the solicitor who acted for the Dowler family and Sven Goran Eriksson.

Diversity, Changes To Radio 5 Live And Facebook Controlling Emotions20140702

Radio 5 Live has announced that three of their main presenters - Richard Bacon, Victoria Derbyshire and Shelagh Fogarty - are to leave the station in the autumn. Adrian Chiles and Tony Livesey are to get expanded roles. Although there will be no shortage of female co-presenters on the station, Eleanor Oldroyd's one-hour Friday afternoon show will be the only programme fronted solely by a woman. Steve hears from Jonathan Wall, Controller 5 Live about the changes.

Act For Change, a project designed to address the lack of diversity in British television was launched this week with both ITV and the BBC in attendance. It comes after the BBC Director General announced plans to increase representation of Black, Asian or ethnic minority groups (BAME) on and off screen. Proposals include a new top level leadership programme, a £2.1 million Diversity Creative Talent Fund and, for around one in six people on air to be from BAME backgrounds within three years - an increase of nearly five percent. Steve hears from Simon Albury, Chair of the Campaign for Broadcasting Equality, who is concerned about the amount of money invested in the Talent Fund and Avril Russell, a black writer who says Tony Hall's plans won't help her. They are joined by Alan Yentob, the BBC's Creative Director.

Facebook has revealed that it manipulated the news feeds of nearly 700,000 unknowing, randomly selected users in a psychological study, to determine how positive and negative emotions can spread on social media. The study, which has just come to light, has sparked outrage from some people and the Information Commissioner's Office is looking into it. Steve Hewlett is joined by the web psychologist Nathalie Nahai.

Producer: Dianne McGregor.

Don Mccullin; Christopher Martin-jenkins20130102

Steve Hewlett presents a topical programme about the fast-changing media world.

'dramatised' Natural History; Channel 5; Sir Hayden Phillips On Ipso Jobs20140108

Election Polls In The News, Ceo Of All3media Jane Turton20150513

Research from Cardiff University shows that coverage of this election was dominated by the story of the polls, with broadcasters choosing to run stories about the 'horse-race' between Labour and the Conservatives, rather than stories about policy or issues. So, why did they decide to give poll results such prominence, and had they focused more on covering policies, would this have revealed more about the real mood of the public? Steve Hewlett talks to James Harding, director of BBC News; Jonathan Levy, head of news gathering at Sky News, and Richard Sambrook, a former director of BBC news who is now Professor of Journalism at Cardiff University. They discuss the editorial decisions around covering the election campaign, and what can be learned for next time round. Also joining Steve is David Dinsmore, editor of Britain's best-selling daily, The Sun - a paper which prides itself on being closely attuned to what the nation thinks - about his decision to go strong on coverage of the "neck and neck" race between the parties, and whether there was an over-reliance on opinion polls in this years coverage.

All3Media is Britain's biggest independent production company, responsible for content ranging from the BBC's acclaimed Wolf Hall, to Ramsey's Kitchen Nightmares and Hollyoaks. It was recently bought by Discovery Communications, the US media company behind the Discovery Channel, and Liberty Global - two companies controlled by American billionaire John Malone. Jane Turton, the newly appointed chief executive, talks to Steve Hewlett about the challenges of American ownership, how the indie sector can continue to foster creativity in a global marketplace, and her views on the current industry landscape.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

End Of Page 3, Josie Cunningham's Agent, Sir Alan Moses On Press Feedom20150121

Britain's best-selling newspaper The Sun has stopped publishing photographs of topless Page 3 models after 44 years. The paper still hasn't confirmed the move but its sister publication, The Times, reported the change has been approved by owner Rupert Murdoch. It's been hailed a victory for campaigner groups like No More Page 3, who have long said the images are sexist. However, readers can now go online to see topless pictures, and it's understood the Sun's Page 3 website has enjoyed a surge in traffic. Steve Hewlett talks to academic and columnist Roy Greenslade about where this leaves the Sun's print edition, and whether Page 3 is indeed gone for good?

The Independent Press Standards Organisation, or IPSO, which regulates the press, wants to put a 'red pencil' through rules and regulation which allow publishers to 'resist' investigations. So says its Chair Sir Alan Moses, who, at the Lords Communication Committee yesterday, said the rules are opaque and difficult to understand. Steve Hewlett asks him about the independence of the organisation, rival regulators, and his vision for the future of press self-regulation.

Josie Cunningham appeared on the front page of the Sun after having a boob job on the NHS. In 2014, she made headlines again when she announced she was considering aborting her unborn baby for the chance to appear on Big Brother. This week, Channel 4 airs, 'Josie: the most hated women in Britain?', which looks at how she has occupied the media spotlight by promoting shocking stories, including a plan to sell tickets to the birth of her baby. Steve Hewlett talks to the man behind this coverage - her agent Rob Cooper - about his controversial media strategy and how he goes about securing column inches.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Freesat20120905

Steve Hewlett on Freesat, the in-tray of the new culture secretary and Daybreak relaunch.

Steve Hewlett interviews Emma Scott, managing director of Freesat, as the free to air satellite TV operator launches a new service called "Free Time". What's in the in-tray of the new Culture Secretary Maria Miller? And will ITV's relaunch of Daybreak with a new set and new presenters draw viewers?

Future of the BBC: The Media Show Debate20151027

Future of the BBC: The Media Show Debate20151027

Steve Hewlett hosts a debate on the future of the BBC.

Future of the BBC: The Media Show Debate20151027

Steve Hewlett hosts a debate on the future of the BBC.

Future of the BBC: The Media Show Debate20151027

Future of the BBC: The Media Show Debate20151027

The Media Show's Steve Hewlett hosts a landmark discussion about the BBC's future as the corporation approaches the review of its Royal Charter. The main players from government, regulators, broadcasters and other media will come together to assess how the BBC should be funded, what it should and should not do, and how it should be regulated. Steve and his guests will challenge the evidence, expose the brinkmanship and explore how specific changes could alter the DNA of the BBC. The no holds barred discussion will take place in front of a public audience which will put its own questions to the panel.

Producer: Paul Waters

Editor: Karen Dalziel.

Future of the BBC: The Media Show Debate20151027

The Media Show's Steve Hewlett hosts a landmark discussion about the BBC's future as the corporation approaches the review of its Royal Charter. The main players from government, regulators, broadcasters and other media will come together to assess how the BBC should be funded, what it should and should not do, and how it should be regulated. Steve and his guests will challenge the evidence, expose the brinkmanship and explore how specific changes could alter the DNA of the BBC. The no holds barred discussion will take place in front of a public audience which will put its own questions to the panel.

Producer: Paul Waters

Editor: Karen Dalziel.

Hacked Off On Leveson20130109

Head of BBC Trust's first major speech; The battle for sports rights; Sky's Fortitude20150204

Head of BBC Trust's first major speech; The battle for sports rights; Sky's Fortitude20150204

The head of the BBC Trust Rona Fairhead has said most people want an independent body to set the level of the licence fee. In her first major speech since joining, she voiced the importance of the public being involved in the BBC's Royal Charter negotiations, which are due to start this year. Steve Hewlett is joined by Tim Suter, former partner at Ofcom and Lis Howell, Director of Broadcasting at City University, to excavate the key points she made, and discuss how the public might get involved in deciding the future shape of the organisation.

Satellite broadcaster Sky has reported that it's added 200,000 new customers in UK and Ireland in recent months- its highest growth in subscribers in nine years. This week, Sky's intervention ended one of sport's longest partnerships, when the BBC formally surrendered the rights to The Open Golf Championship. And this week Sky will go head to head with BT Sport as the deadline approaches for media players to submit sealed bids for the rights to show Premier League Football. Steve Hewlett talks to analyst Claire Enders about Sky's dominance in sports, and whether other media giants might enter the battle.

Staying with Sky, and the launch this week of the broadcaster's own big budget production, Fortitude. The programme, which has cost around £25 million pounds, stars Michael Gambon and Sofie Gråbøl. It launched simultaneously on Sky across Europe, now that Sky, Sky Deutschland and Sky Italia are combined. Steve Hewlett talks to Sky's Head of Entertainment Stuart Murphy about the broadcaster's strategy to diversify away from sport and invest in drama, what success will look like for Fortitude, and how pan European transmission impacts on profits.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Head of BBC Trust's first major speech; The battle for sports rights; Sky's Fortitude20150204

The head of the BBC Trust Rona Fairhead has said most people want an independent body to set the level of the licence fee. In her first major speech since joining, she voiced the importance of the public being involved in the BBC's Royal Charter negotiations, which are due to start this year. Steve Hewlett is joined by Tim Suter, former partner at Ofcom and Lis Howell, Director of Broadcasting at City University, to excavate the key points she made, and discuss how the public might get involved in deciding the future shape of the organisation.

Satellite broadcaster Sky has reported that it's added 200,000 new customers in UK and Ireland in recent months- its highest growth in subscribers in nine years. This week, Sky's intervention ended one of sport's longest partnerships, when the BBC formally surrendered the rights to The Open Golf Championship. And this week Sky will go head to head with BT Sport as the deadline approaches for media players to submit sealed bids for the rights to show Premier League Football. Steve Hewlett talks to analyst Claire Enders about Sky's dominance in sports, and whether other media giants might enter the battle.

Staying with Sky, and the launch this week of the broadcaster's own big budget production, Fortitude. The programme, which has cost around £25 million pounds, stars Michael Gambon and Sofie Gråbøl. It launched simultaneously on Sky across Europe, now that Sky, Sky Deutschland and Sky Italia are combined. Steve Hewlett talks to Sky's Head of Entertainment Stuart Murphy about the broadcaster's strategy to diversify away from sport and invest in drama, what success will look like for Fortitude, and how pan European transmission impacts on profits.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Head Of Bbc Trust's First Major Speech; The Battle For Sports Rights; Sky's Fortitude20150204

The head of the BBC Trust Rona Fairhead has said most people want an independent body to set the level of the licence fee. In her first major speech since joining, she voiced the importance of the public being involved in the BBC's Royal Charter negotiations, which are due to start this year. Steve Hewlett is joined by Tim Suter, former partner at Ofcom and Lis Howell, Director of Broadcasting at City University, to excavate the key points she made, and discuss how the public might get involved in deciding the future shape of the organisation.

Satellite broadcaster Sky has reported that it's added 200,000 new customers in UK and Ireland in recent months- its highest growth in subscribers in nine years. This week, Sky's intervention ended one of sport's longest partnerships, when the BBC formally surrendered the rights to The Open Golf Championship. And this week Sky will go head to head with BT Sport as the deadline approaches for media players to submit sealed bids for the rights to show Premier League Football. Steve Hewlett talks to analyst Claire Enders about Sky's dominance in sports, and whether other media giants might enter the battle.

Staying with Sky, and the launch this week of the broadcaster's own big budget production, Fortitude. The programme, which has cost around £25 million pounds, stars Michael Gambon and Sofie Gråbøl. It launched simultaneously on Sky across Europe, now that Sky, Sky Deutschland and Sky Italia are combined. Steve Hewlett talks to Sky's Head of Entertainment Stuart Murphy about the broadcaster's strategy to diversify away from sport and invest in drama, what success will look like for Fortitude, and how pan European transmission impacts on profits.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Host Graham Norton On The Changing Nature Of The Chat Show20141231

Chat shows have been the staple of TV schedules for decades. The Bee Gees storming off Clive Anderson's show, David Icke claiming to be the 'son of God' on Wogan, Victoria Beckham's 'Golden Balls' confession, and Grace Jones slapping Russell Harty, are considered some of the best of British chat show moments. However, some have lamented the demise of the 'traditional' talk show, where hosts do one-on-one in-depth interviews with celebrities. Instead, networks favour comedy entertainment shows, like Alan Carr and Graham Norton. So, why the change in style, and what are the ingredients for chat show success? Graham Norton joins Steve Hewlett to discuss chat show gold and explains how age, experience, and celebrity demands have influenced his style. Also in the studio; Elaine Bedell, Director of Entertainment and Comedy at ITV; Jonathan Shalit, Chair of talent management agency Roar Global, and the Guardian TV critic Julia Raeside. Together, they discuss how the changing nature of celebrity has had an impact on talk show styles, and ask where next for the genre.

Producer: Dianne McGregor.

Janice Hadlow, Sir Ray Tindle, Public Views On Press Regulation20131016

Steve Hewlett talks to Janice Hadlow, the controller of BBC Two and Four about losing The Great British Bake Off to BBC1 and her priorities for the channels. How can BBC2 and BBC4 be distinctive in a multi-channel world?

Sir Ray Tindle joins Steve to explain how his local newspapers have remained profitable when many around him are losing money - and what he thinks of plans to regulate local news. Martin Moore, director of the Media Standards Trust, picks up on issues affecting local papers and discusses the findings of the MST's recent poll which appears to show support for the Royal Charter. Earlier today, The Sun published its poll appearing to show the opposite.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki

Editor: Andy Smith.

John Whittingdale, Itv News At 10 Revamp With Tom Bradby20151028

In this first full interview for The Media Show, the Culture Secretary John Whittingdale talks about the BBC's distinctiveness, value for money and the licence fee settlement. Also joining Steve Hewlett in the studio to give their reactions are former OFCOM partner Tim Suter, and Professor Lis Howell, Director of Broadcasting at City University in London.

ITV's News at Ten has been revamped with its former political editor Tom Bradby replacing Julia Etchingham and Mark Austin as the main anchor on the programme. The more informal style has been met with mixed reactions on social media - some argue that it adopts a US style anchor approach, while other viewers say they want the news, not personal comments. Tom Bradby joins Steve to explain the vision behind the revamp, how the dynamic will work between him and newly-appointed Robert Peston, and why he thinks the BBC news should vacate its ten o'clock slot.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Local Tv: Birmingham's Experience20120815

Why does Birmingham Alabama have eight local TV stations, when Birmingham UK has none?

This week with Steve Hewlett:

Why does Birmingham Alabama have eight local TV stations when Birmingham in the UK - four times the size - has none? Secretary of State Jeremy Hunt MP posed that question over two years ago when he set out his vision for new local tv stations across the UK. The deadline for submissions from the would-be tv operators in 21 towns and cities closed this week and now we have a clearer picture of how Jeremy Hunt's question might be answered. Join Steve Hewlett and his guests in the West Midlands to find out more.

The producer is Simon Tillotson.

Lord Burns, On- And Off-screen Diversity, Ft Staff Vote To Strike20160127

The chairman of Channel 4 Lord Terry Burns leaves the organisation today. His departure has been seen by some as an indication that the government is favouring 'privatisation options' for the channel. On the last day of his second term, and in his final interview for The Media Show as chairman, we speak to him about the highs and lows of the job, his thoughts on how the broadcaster should be structured in the future, and his view on the BBC's Charter renewal.

Idris Elba has put diversity back on the agenda for UK broadcasters. The British actor said in a speech to MPs last week, "diversity in the modern world is more than just skin colour." New commitments were also announced by both the BBC and Channel 4. So, what's it like at the sharp end for diversity champions working for the broadcasters? Steve is joined by Joyce Adeluwoye-Adams, BBC Diversity Lead for Television and Channel 4's Creative Diversity Manager, Ade Rawcliffe, to discuss their roles, and the challenges they face when trying to make a positive change.

Financial Times journalists have voted in favour of a 24-hour strike over proposed changes to the newspaper's pension policy. It would be the first strike in 30 years if it goes ahead. Last July, Pearson struck a deal to sell the Financial Times to Japan's Nikkei Group for nearly 900 million pounds, after nearly 60 years of ownership. The purchase underscored the Nikkei's bid for a global expansion, but it also led to suggestions that the tie-up could lead to a clash of cultures. Since then, staff have expressed concern over a number of issues, including the editorial independence of the FT. Steven Bird is the National Union of Journalists representative at the FT. He joins Steve in the studio.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Lord Justice Leveson20121130

First, last year, David Cameron called on Lord Justice Leveson to recommend a new regulatory system for the press. Then, yesterday, after he'd made his recommendations, Leveson LJ passed responsibility for the next steps back to the government - they, he said, must decide "who guards the guards". Where does that leave the industry, whose own plans for self-regulation were rejected by the inquiry? How much of the Leveson scheme can they accept and what can or should they now offer to meet the calls for independent self-regulation?

To explore the behind-the-scenes negotiations, Steve Hewlett talks to a range of editors tasked with finding a solution: Peter Wright, former editor of the Mail on Sunday, Chris Blackhurst, editor of The Independent, John Witherow, editor of the Sunday Times, Trevor Kavanagh, associate editor of The Sun and Anne Pickles, associate editor of The Cumberland News and the News and Star which are part of the Cumbrian Newspaper Group.

Producer Beverley Purcell.

Lord Puttnam on BBC White Paper, Women on air, BBC online cuts20160518

The BBC has announced it's scaling back and closing a range of online services - including BBC Food and Newsbeat websites - in order to save £15m. The proposed closure of the BBC Food website quickly drew widespread criticism and an online petition against the move raised over 100,000 signatures in one day. James Harding, Director of BBC News & Current Affairs, joins Steve Hewlett to explain the changes.

David Puttnam, whose credits include the Oscar-winning Chariots of Fire, has spent the last few months fronting an alternative inquiry into the future of public service broadcasting. Its aim is to look at the 'nature, purpose and role of public service television today and in the future' and the findings will be published at the end of June. Lord Puttnam has been opposed to any suggestion that the government BBC Charter White Paper could reduce the size and scope of BBC. So, with the proposals now published, what does he make of them? He shares his concerns over governance and thoughts on Ofcom's new involvement with Steve Hewlett.

New research shows the BBC News at Ten features the fewest number of women experts compared to other news programmes, booking nearly 4 men for every woman - just a 3% improvement compared to May 2014. It's part of findings from City University, which periodically reviews the numbers of women featured on air. This year's research has shown some improvements; ITV News at Ten, despite being similar to the BBC in terms of male/female ratio, has managed to increase its female representation by 27%. So what is the picture of gender equality across news outlets, and why is it so hard to get women on air? Steve Hewlett discusses with report author Prof. Lis Howell.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Lord Puttnam on BBC White Paper, Women on air, BBC online cuts20160518

Lord Puttnam on BBC White Paper, Women on air, BBC online cuts20160518

The BBC has announced it's scaling back and closing a range of online services - including BBC Food and Newsbeat websites - in order to save £15m. The proposed closure of the BBC Food website quickly drew widespread criticism and an online petition against the move raised over 100,000 signatures in one day. James Harding, Director of BBC News & Current Affairs, joins Steve Hewlett to explain the changes.

David Puttnam, whose credits include the Oscar-winning Chariots of Fire, has spent the last few months fronting an alternative inquiry into the future of public service broadcasting. Its aim is to look at the 'nature, purpose and role of public service television today and in the future' and the findings will be published at the end of June. Lord Puttnam has been opposed to any suggestion that the government BBC Charter White Paper could reduce the size and scope of BBC. So, with the proposals now published, what does he make of them? He shares his concerns over governance and thoughts on Ofcom's new involvement with Steve Hewlett.

New research shows the BBC News at Ten features the fewest number of women experts compared to other news programmes, booking nearly 4 men for every woman - just a 3% improvement compared to May 2014. It's part of findings from City University, which periodically reviews the numbers of women featured on air. This year's research has shown some improvements; ITV News at Ten, despite being similar to the BBC in terms of male/female ratio, has managed to increase its female representation by 27%. So what is the picture of gender equality across news outlets, and why is it so hard to get women on air? Steve Hewlett discusses with report author Prof. Lis Howell.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Lord Puttnam on BBC White Paper, Women on air, BBC online cuts20160518

Media Agencies; Journalese; Twitter Flotation20130918

On today's programme, Steve Hewlett discusses the influence of media agencies on broadcast networks. It follows comments by Channel 5 owner Richard Desmond, who has hit out at the power of Sir Martin Sorrell's UK media buying operation, Group M - the biggest player in the market. Joining Steve is chairman of Walker Media, Phil Georgiadis, and John McVay of Pact, the producer's alliance for cinema and television. And Steve asks Martin Bowley, the former chief executive of Carlton Media Sales, how the balance of power has shifted in the media buying world in recent years.

In the week that's seen Twitter announce its intention to float, we ask how the model might have to change when under the scrutiny of investors. Keen tweeter and technology and digital media correspondent at the Telegraph Emma Barnett discusses how its coming-of-age may mark the start of some fundemental changes for the social networking site. And NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik talks about it's impact on global news.

And we look at the language used by newspapers and TV reporters alike; 'journalese'. Robert Hutton, UK political correspondent for Bloomberg News has written a book, 'Romps, Tots and Boffins - The Strange Language of News'. He joins Steve to discuss his favourite examples.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Media Bans For Sports Journalists, Vice's New Women's Channel, Clarkson On Amazon Prime20150805

The National Union of Journalists (NUJ) has called on the Football Association to act on a "worrying trend" among its member clubs of handing out media bans. It comes days after Scottish football columnist on The Times, Graham Spiers, along with a BBC journalist, was banned from Rangers. Andrea Catherwood talks to Graham Spiers, who explains how his journalism has impacted on relationships with football clubs; NUJ President Michelle Stanistreet about her concerns over clubs having this power, and Professor Tim Luckhurst from the University of Kent about how the rise in clubs' own TV channels, websites and blog sites are increasing the control they yield.

The expanding digital media brand Vice has launched a new women's interest channel. "Broadly" says it will cover stories affecting women that the mainstream media fails to cover properly. It will run in partnership with the multi-national consumer goods company Unilever and cover subjects including politics, sex and fashion. Andrea Catherwood speaks to Editor in Chief Tracie Egan Morrissey about the channel's editorial remit, and what she thinks women want from a news provider.

Former BBC Top Gear presenters Jeremy Clarkson, James May and Richard Hammond have been signed up to present a new show on Amazon's streaming video service. They'll front a new motoring programme on Amazon Prime - with the first season available in 2016. Andrea Catherwood talks to Michael Underhill, TV analyst at Enders Analysis, about the platform's market position and how it hopes the trio will boost its offering. And Mark Wells, former ITV controller of Entertainment, discusses how the deal marks a moment that sees top talent no longer beholden to free to air broadcasters like ITV and the BBC.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Media Coverage Of Events In Paris, Tory Mp Jesse Norman On Bbc Studio Concerns20151118

A series of co-ordinated attacks in Paris on Friday night have resulted in the deaths of at least 129 people. Media outlets quickly mobilized with blanket coverage across television, radio, newspapers and social media. How do the news media outlet co-ordinate and respond to such a breaking and dangerous situation? How do you decide what is a proportionate amount of coverage? And with so many unconfirmed reports, how can you be sure of the reliability of your story? Steve Hewlett discusses the pitfalls and challenges with a panel of guests; John McAndrew from Sky News', the BBC's Gavin Allen, Professor of TV journalism Stewart Purvis, Jeremy Griffin from The Times and Ryan Broderick from Buzzfeed UK.

The chair of the Commons culture, media and sport select committee has written to BBC director general Tony Hall about his concern over the corporation's plans to spin off its TV production arm into a separate commercial unit and create BBC Studios. Conservative MP Jesse Norman, who replaced John Whittingdale in May, says he has asked Lord Hall about the impact on commercial rivals and the production sector. He tells Steve Hewlett why its important for the public to be fully consulted over the creation of the new subsidiary.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Mh17 And Gaza Reporting, Al Jazeera English Journalist Sue Turton, Murdoch's Media Moves20140723

For rolling news services, there are tough choices to make in the newsroom over how to cover the MH17 disaster and the conflict in Gaza - which story to prioritise, how to deploy, and which angles to cover. Whilst, for reporters, there are the challenges of verifying stories and working in hostile environments. Steve Hewlett discusses how the news makes it onto our screens, and issues of taste and decency with two heads of newsgathering, Jonathan Munro from the BBC, and Jonathan Levy from Sky News.

Al Jazeera English journalists Peter Greste, Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed have been in prison in Egypt for six months. Last month, they were convicted of spreading false news and supporting the Muslim Brotherhood, and sentenced to between seven and 10 years in prison each. During that same trial, Sue Turton was sentenced to 10 years in absentia. Steve talks to Sue about the guilt she feels as her colleagues serve time in jail, and whether there is any hope of the convictions being overturned.

21st Century Fox, which Rupert Murdoch owns, has tried to buy Time Warner, which controls the likes of cable giants HBO and CNN. The offer of 46.6 billion pounds was rejected. It comes at a time when the sale of Sky Italia, owned by 21st Century Fox, and Sky Deutschland, 57 per cent of which is owned by 21st Century Fox, is believed to be imminent, leading to speculation that Rupert Murdoch will use the proceeds of the sale to boost his bid for Time Warner. Claire Enders from Enders Analysis discusses what this could mean for Rupert Murdoch's empire.

Producer: Dianne McGregor.

Netflix, Channel 5 rebrand, The end of print?20160330

A report from BARB (The Broadcasters Audience Research Board) estimates that Netflix is now in some 5 million UK households, stating that: 'Netflix is by some margin the market leader' among subscription video on demand services. But can its subscriber base keep pace with its ambition to become 'a global Internet TV network'? To discuss, Steve is joined by media analyst Mathew Horsman, from Mediatique.

Channel Five is weeks into its first rebrand in five years, aiming to attract younger and more affluent audiences. Its head of programmes Ben Frow has been reportedly handed a 'double digit increase' in his programming budget to change perceptions about the channel. So, what commissioning decisions is he taking to make this happen? He speaks to Steve Hewlett about his ambitions.

A Media Society debate tonight will ask, 'is this the end of print?' The Independent's spin-off, the i, is continuing in print form under new ownership; Trinity Mirror has recently launched a new national daily, The New Day, and the free distributed Metro and London Evening Standard are turning a profit. So is it too soon to write off the traditional newspaper? Steve Hewlett asks journalist and Professor of Journalism at City University Roy Greenslade, Independent Digital Editor Christian Broughton and Sarah Baxter, deputy editor of the Sunday Times.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Netflix, Channel 5 rebrand, The end of print?20160330

New Chair Of Ipso; The Duchess's Bottom.20140528

Sir Alan Moses, the newly appointed Chair of the new press regulator, has today announced the

board members that will make up the Independent Press Standards Organisation, (IPSO). In his first interview since taking up the position, he talks to Steve Hewlett about the measures he'll put in place to make sure the body is independent, and his views on press freedom. We'll also hear from Brian Cathcart of campaign group Hacked Off, and columnist and former Editor of the Guardian Peter Preston, on what they think of the new appointments.

A picture of the Duchess of Cambridge, in which she is seen exposing her bare bottom, has been published by German tabloid Bild and Rupert Murdoch's Sydney Daily Telegraph. The picture, which was taken during the recent Royal tour of Australia, is yet to be published by any of the UK press although some newspapers have published a pixilated version online. Steve Hewlett talks to Sarrah Le Marquand fron the Sydney Daily Telegraph about the media's reaction to the pictures - which has included TV debates and radio interviews about her underwear, and Ingrid Seward of Majesty magazine on why publishing the picture is one step too far away from taste and decency.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki

Presenter: Steve Hewlett

New Ipso Rules, Assisted Suicide Being 'normalised' In The Media20160210

The Independent Press Standards Organisation, which regulates many national newspapers, says its members have given it enhanced powers and increased independence. The Media Show speaks to IPSO Chairman Sir Alan Moses about exactly how these new powers will work. For instance, under what circumstances will IPSO be able to launch investigations in the absence of a complaint? And will newspapers really be risking a £1 million fine if they misbehave? We'll be asking how IPSO's newly chosen reviewer will oversee the operation of the press regulator. And we'll also get Sir Alan's response to claims from critics that IPSO is both too close to and too lenient towards the newspapers it regulates. Plus, The Guardian's Jane Martinson reacts to his comments.

The BBC will tonight air a programme showing an assisted suicide taking place at a facility in Switzerland. It's the latest in a line of similar documentaries shown in recent years, leading to concerns from campaigners that assisted suicide is being 'normalised' in the media. The documentary, called "How to Die: Simon's Choice", was filmed against the backdrop of a House of Commons debate last year, in which MPs voted resoundingly against a Bill to legalise assisted suicide. Steve Hewlett talks to the producer director Rowan Deacon about the making of the film. Plus, Alistair Thompson, spokesman for Care Not Killing, shares his concerns about documentaries depicting assisted suicide; and film maker Charlie Russell, director of Terry Pratchett: Choosing to Die discusses the ethical dilemmas he faced.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

New Laws For Bloggers; The Impartiality Of Reporters; Radio Presenters Working For Free20140806

Public council meetings in England can now be filmed and tweeted about, following the introduction of new legislation. Local government secretary Eric Pickles today signed a Parliamentary order allowing press and public to film and digitally report from all public meetings of local government bodies. It follows a spate of cases where journalists and bloggers have been asked to stop filming or recording proceedings at meetings, despite the, 'open government' doctrine. Steve Hewlett talks to one blogger, ejected for reporting proceedings, and Ian Murray, Southern Daily Echo editor-in-chief and President of the Society of Editors about the opportunities this ruling could yield for local news.

Jon Snow has stepped out from behind the neutrality of his newsreader's desk to present a piece to camera on his recent trip to Gaza, where he described being haunted by the horrific injuries inflicted on innocent children caught up in the conflict. The video has reopened a debate questioning where an appropropriate line lies between impartiality and so called, 'attachment journalism' for reporters. Steve is joined by David Loyn, the BBC's Afghanistan correspondent who says that, 'emotion is the stuff of propaganda', and Newsweek correspondent Alex Perry, on how they navigate the emotional turmoil of covering conflicts.

A well-respected radio industry executive says he's concerned that some presenters in commercial radio are working for free. John Myers says he's been contacted by a number of people including some who work for national services at profitable major media organisations. He talks to Steve Hewlett about his calls for an industry review into pay.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

New People Website, The Independent Relaunch, Sports On Tv, The Mirror Ruling20131106
Newscorp Split20130626

Andrew Knight, chairman of Times Newspapers, on this week's split of NewsCorp into separate entertainment and publishing arms; Henry Porter of The Observer and Stephen Glover of The Mail discuss whether rival news media under-reported the Guardian's spying scoops; Lisa Campbell, editor of Broadcast, on Charlotte Moore who today takes over at BBC1.

Presenter: Steve Hewlett

Producer: Simon Tillotson

Editor: Andy Smith.

Nfl In The Uk; Dmi Failure; News Uk; Sky Results20140129

Ofcom's Ed Richards; Mp Andrew Bridgen On Scrapping The Licence Fee; Trinity Mirror Closures; Teen Blogger On Ocd20141119

Conservative MP Andrew Bridgen is leading a move to scrap the licence fee. He's sent a letter to the Culture Secretary Sajid Javid, urging him to review how the BBC is funded. In the letter, he says the corporation should be planning for a future without the licence fee and investigating subscription-based payment instead. So, how feasible are his suggestions? And why has the man who led the debate into decriminalising licence fee evasion now stepped up his campaign? Steve Hewlett asks him.

Ed Richards has been with Ofcom, the independent media regulator for the UK, since it was established in 2004. In his role as Chief Executive, he was credited with saving Ofcom from David Cameron's so called, 'bonfire of the quangos' and been at the helm during great shifts in the media landscape. Steve Hewlett asks him what he's achieved, what the priorities for the regulator should be in the future, and what it was like being interviewed for the BBC's Director General job.

A fifteen year old has won a prestigious award for her blog about her experiences of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Ellen White was praised by mental health charity MIND for her candid posts about the condition, and for providing support to other young people. Steve talks to Ellen about how the medium of blogging has been the best way for her to connect with others.

Trinity Mirror is closing seven regional newspapers in the Berkshire and Surrey regions. The group say it's part of a, 'bold digital-only publishing transformation', to move journalism online. Steve talks to former editor of the Birmingham Mail Steve Dyson, which is part of the group, about the strategy to move online and how this may impact on local communities.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Photos Of Prince Harry20120822

Sport on TV post-Olympics, Liz Murdoch's big speech, TV on the second screen, Harry pics.

In today's programme with Steve Hewlett:

After the Olympics, there were calls for those less-prominent events in which Team GB won medals to get wider coverage on tv. Is there really an appetite for this, though, now the excitement has died down? John Fairley of Highflyer TV talks about his plans to run a new tv channel showcasing minority interest sports, London Legacy.

How have so-called second screens affected tv viewing habits and what impact does that have on broadcasters? Paul Lee of Deloitte takes Steve through the key findings of his recent research into this, with almost half of younger viewers using their smart phones or laptops while watching tv.

Liz Murdoch is due to follow her father Rupert and brother James tomorrow, delivering the MacTaggart lecture at the Edinburgh TV Festival. Sarah Ellison of Vanity Fair and Dan Sabbagh of the Guardian discuss her ambitions both inside and outside the family's businesses.

And, as the programme learns many UK newspapers have agreed terms to run the Prince Harry photos, will they actually print them? With Dan Sabbagh, lawyer Duncan Lamont examines the options open to editors.

The producer is Simon Tillotson.

Premier League Football; Sir Harold Evans20130130

Press Awards Women Nominees, Lord Best On Bbc Inquiry, Trinity Mirror's The New Day20160224

The shortlist for the Press Awards 2015 has been unveiled and includes just 20 women, among a total of 114 journalists. The lack of women shortlisted has caused anger amongst some journalists - in response, an alternative awards ceremony 'Words By Women' has been set up, with Kay Burley of Sky News and Lisa Markwell, Editor of the Independent on Sunday on the judging panel. Joining Steve to discuss the representation and recognition of women in journalism are Marie Le Conte, journalist and co-founder of the awards, plus judge columnist Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, and Bob Satchwell, Executive Director of the Society of Editors and the Press Awards Chair of Judges.

Publisher Trinity Mirror is launching a new 'optimistic' and 'politically neutral' national newspaper next week. 'The New Day' will be an entirely new paper, not a sister-title or 'Daily Mirror-light' - making it the first standalone newspaper to be launched for around 30 years. Steve Hewlett talks to editor Alison Phillips about the editorial slant of the publication and how they hope to reverse the declines other papers are facing.

The House of Lords Communications Committee says the scale and scope of the BBC should not be cut back. The report, 'Reith not Revolution' - the title of which refers to Lord Reith, whose principles for broadcasting are at the heart of the corporation - follows an eight month inquiry. Steve Hewlett talks to cross party chair of the Committee Lord Best about the findings, the recommendations, and suggested changes the BBC could make.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Press Regulation, Jacksgap, Bedlam20131030

Newspaper publishers have lost a High Court battle to stop Government ministers going to the Privy Council to seek the Queen's approval for a new royal charter to regulate the press. We discuss what the next chapter in the story of press reform might be.

Steve Hewlett visits the offices of JacksGap, where he meets Jack and Finn Harries, the brains and talent behind the new media phenomenon. Now with 3 million subscribers, he talks to the twins about the online community they've created, and asks what's next for the business.

A new 4 part series called Bedlam on Channel 4 challenges the myths and taboos about mental illness, through access to the patients and staff of the South London and Maudsley - the world's oldest psychiatric institution. Dave Nath, series director, explains the challenges for the programme makers and how they worked with patients who lacked the capacity to consent.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Rebekah Brooks returns, Call for controls on BBC website, Turkish media, Chair of Atvod20150902

Rebekah Brooks returns, Call for controls on BBC website, Turkish media, Chair of Atvod20150902

Rebekah Brooks is returning to News Corp as chief executive of its UK division, a year after she was cleared of all phone hacking charges. Her appointment has been condemned by Hacked Off and the shadow culture secretary Chris Bryant. What impact will her return have on a business that has tried to re-shape its image in light of the phone hacking scandal? Steve hears from Peter Preston, former editor of the Guardian.

The News Media Association, the trade body for the UK newspaper industry, is calling on the government to implement 10 changes around the scope of the BBC's digital news services. In its submission to the government green paper on the BBC charter review, it says it "fundamentally disagrees" with the corporation's ambition to grow this area of its business. Steve Hewlett talks to Mark Oliver, former head of strategy at the BBC, and founder of Oliver and Ohlbaum - the firm commissioned to write the report.

Following the arrest of two British journalists working for Vice News on the charge of aiding a terrorist organisation, we discuss the state of press freedom in Turkey. Steve is joined by former editor of The Guardian Peter Preston, who travelled to Turkey in his previous role of chairman of the International Press Institute (IPI) and Turkish journalist Yavuz Baydar, the founding member of P24, the Platform for Independent Media.

ATVOD, The Authority for Television On-Demand, is the independent co-regulator for the editorial content of UK video on-demand services. With websites of every stripe publishing video content to entice viewers, Steve speaks to ATVOD's Chief Executive Peter Johnson about the organisation's ever-broadening remit and how regulation differs between news and entertainment content.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Rebekah Brooks returns, Call for controls on BBC website, Turkish media, Chair of Atvod20150902

Rebekah Brooks is returning to News Corp as chief executive of its UK division, a year after she was cleared of all phone hacking charges. Her appointment has been condemned by Hacked Off and the shadow culture secretary Chris Bryant. What impact will her return have on a business that has tried to re-shape its image in light of the phone hacking scandal? Steve hears from Peter Preston, former editor of the Guardian.

The News Media Association, the trade body for the UK newspaper industry, is calling on the government to implement 10 changes around the scope of the BBC's digital news services. In its submission to the government green paper on the BBC charter review, it says it "fundamentally disagrees" with the corporation's ambition to grow this area of its business. Steve Hewlett talks to Mark Oliver, former head of strategy at the BBC, and founder of Oliver and Ohlbaum - the firm commissioned to write the report.

Following the arrest of two British journalists working for Vice News on the charge of aiding a terrorist organisation, we discuss the state of press freedom in Turkey. Steve is joined by former editor of The Guardian Peter Preston, who travelled to Turkey in his previous role of chairman of the International Press Institute (IPI) and Turkish journalist Yavuz Baydar, the founding member of P24, the Platform for Independent Media.

ATVOD, The Authority for Television On-Demand, is the independent co-regulator for the editorial content of UK video on-demand services. With websites of every stripe publishing video content to entice viewers, Steve speaks to ATVOD's Chief Executive Peter Johnson about the organisation's ever-broadening remit and how regulation differs between news and entertainment content.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Rebekah Brooks Returns?, Call For Controls On Bbc Website, Turkish Media, Chair Of Atvod20150902

The News Media Association, the trade body for the UK newspaper industry, is calling on the government to implement 10 changes around the scope of the BBC's digital news services. In its submission to the government green paper on the BBC charter review, it says it "fundamentally disagrees" with the corporation's ambition to grow this area of its business. Steve Hewlett talks to Mark Oliver, former head of strategy at the BBC, and founder of Oliver and Ohlbaum - the firm commissioned to write the report.

Rebekah Brooks is rumoured to be returning to News Corp as chief executive of its UK division, a year after she was cleared of all phone hacking charges. Her appointment has been condemned by Hacked Off and the shadow culture secretary Chris Bryant. What impact would her return have on a business that has tried to re-shape its image in light of the phone hacking scandal? Steve hears from Peter Preston, former editor of the Guardian.

Following the arrest of two British journalists working for Vice News on the charge of aiding a terrorist organisation, we discuss the state of press freedom in Turkey. Steve is joined by former editor of The Guardian Peter Preston, who travelled to Turkey in his previous role of chairman of the International Press Institute (IPI) and Turkish journalist Yavuz Baydar, the founding member of P24, the Platform for Independent Media.

ATVOD, The Authority for Television On-Demand, is the independent co-regulator for the editorial content of UK video on-demand services. With websites of every stripe publishing video content to entice viewers, Steve speaks to ATVOD's Chief Executive Peter Johnson about the organisation's ever-broadening remit and how regulation differs between news and entertainment content.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Royal Video; Ft Rejects Ipso; Documentaries On Adoption; Peter Greste Update20140423

The Financial Times newspaper has said it will not be joining IPSO, the Independent Press Standards Organisation. It's announced it will regulate itself by setting up it's own in-house system. Some other papers, including the Independent, have still to decide whether to join. Steve Hewlett talks to the editor of the Independent, Chris Blackhurst, about whether the FT's decision to go it alone is influencing their decision to join.

The latest in a series of programmes on adoption starts on ITV this week. "Wanted: A Family of My Own", is a four part series nearly two years in the making. It follows other documentaries this year on the subject, like Channel 4's, "Finding Mum and Dad" and "15,000 kids and counting". Steve Hewlett talks to its series producer Claire Lewis about the challenges they faced. Also, Roger Graef, executive producer of the Panorama' documentary, 'The Truth About Adoption', and former chair of the British Association of Social Workers, David Niven, talk about how a shift in the relationship between the media and local authorities is enabling film makers to make more programmes about this subject.

The trial of ex-BBC correspondent Peter Greste and other Al-Jazeera staff continued in Cairo yesterday. It was the sixth court session underway at Tora Prison, and the trial has now been adjourned until May 3rd. The court is trying 20 people in the case, 12 in absentia including Al-Jazeera British journalist Sue Turton. Steve Hewlett talks to her about the latest developments in court.

As the Royal Tour of Australia draws to a close, Sarrah Le Marquand, associate editor of the Telegraph in Australia, on a row which has erupted over a video of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on their, 'day off'.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki

Editor: Andrew Smith.

Scotland culture minister Fiona Hyslop, Children's social media, Walter Presents20160106

Scotland culture minister Fiona Hyslop, Children's social media, Walter Presents20160106

Scotland's Culture Minister Fiona Hyslop says the BBC is not spending enough of the licence fee cash raised north of the border in Scotland.

Journalists are accused of unfairly harvesting information for stories from children's social media accounts. Is this legitimate use of information that has been put into the public arena? Or should anything posted online by a child always be off-limits to the media no matter what?

Channel Four launches a new foreign language drama on demand service called Walter Presents. We hear from Walter.

Scotland culture minister Fiona Hyslop, Children's social media, Walter Presents20160106

Scotland's Culture Minister Fiona Hyslop says the BBC is not spending enough of the licence fee cash raised north of the border in Scotland.

Journalists are accused of unfairly harvesting information for stories from children's social media accounts. Is this legitimate use of information that has been put into the public arena? Or should anything posted online by a child always be off-limits to the media no matter what?

Channel Four launches a new foreign language drama on demand service called Walter Presents. We hear from Walter.

The decline of TV news, Celebrity injunction, Local TV20160420

A new report by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism suggests that with steadily shrinking news audiences, TV news can expect to experience a disruptive period similar to that faced by the newspapers a decade ago. Joining Andrea to explore the declining viewership, the significance of the threat and how TV news might respond in the future is one of the report authors and former editor of BBC news Richard Sambrook, and Ben de Pear editor of Channel 4 news. Plus John McAndrew Executive Editor of Sky News shares his views and explains how new programme 'The Pledge' and its format could be the way to attract new audiences.

The Supreme Court will tomorrow hear the case of a celebrity who wants to keep his name out of a tabloid newspaper story about an alleged extra-marital relationship. Justices are to hear the argument following a decision by Court of Appeal judges on Monday that an injunction preventing his name being revealed should be lifted. This particular injunction has been in the headlines constantly over the last few weeks, leading some to conclude that this has given the story more attention than it otherwise would have had. Andrea Catherwood speaks to PR expert Mark Borkowski about the advice he'd give to celebrity clients when their stories hit the tabloids.

Five local TV channels; London, Manchester, Birmingham, Oxford and Southampton, have been given the go ahead by OFCOM to cut their local programming commitments. Joining Andrea Catherwood to discuss why the local TV channels requested the reduction and what the change in local programming might mean for the viability and relevance of local TV is Chris Johnson, chair of Local TV network & CEO of Bay TV.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

The decline of TV news, Celebrity injunction, Local TV20160420

Transgender20130116

Tv Presenter Chemistry20140101

It's an all-important catchword in TV circles - "chemistry". Get the mix right between presenters, and the audience will welcome them in. Get it wrong, and shows can easily flop. But how do TV executives decide whether a combination will work? Is it pure chance, or are there ways to determine whether sparks will fly for the camera? In this special programme, Steve Hewlett talks to agent Michael Foster, TV executive Lorraine Heggesey, TV critic Kevin O'Sullivan, and famous successful duo Richard and Judy about how to create that very special something between hosts.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki

Editor: Andrew Smith.

Tv Remakes20151230

Tv Remakes20151230
Tv Remakes20151230

The number of remakes seems to be increasing - Cold Feet and the X Files are both returning to our TV screens next year. So is this lazy commissioning, or is it actually more risky than commissioning new original work because of the weight of audience expectation? Writer Debbie Horsfield, talks about her approach to the new Poldark series, and why she avoided being influenced by the very successful 1970s series. Steve Hewlett also hears from Jane Tranter, who brought back Dr Who and Auf Wiedersehen Pet to the BBC, when she was controller of drama commissioning. Maurice Gran who co-wrote the BBC classic series Birds of a Feather, which was remade sixteen years later for ITV and Lucy Lumsden, the former BBC controller of comedy commissioning, and latterly Head of Comedy at Sky, and Julia Raeside, TV critic at the Guardian.

Presenter: Steve Hewlett

Producer: Dianne McGregor

Editor: Karen Dalziel.

Tv Soaps; Dab Radio; The Mail And Miliband20131002

The Mail has been caught up in a storm of criticism over its Ralph Miliband stories and how it responded to Ed Miliband's demand to reply, but is there anything the current press regulator could do with complaints over cases like this? Would the situation differ under any of the systems being considered following the Leveson report? Is there a clear enough distinction between fact and opinion? That's to be discussed by Brian Cathcart, director of Hacked Off and Peter Preston, former editor of The Guardian.

Following TV's digital switchover, an announcement's expected for the switchover of network radio from FM to digital. Culture minister Ed Vaizey's said we'll hear by the end of this year. Will a date be set? Ford Ennals, CEO of the Digital Radio UK, is in charge of making the change happen and is confident there'll be progress. Gillian Reynolds, the Telegraph's radio critic, is not convinced.

And how concerned should TV networks be about the viewing figures for soaps? There's been a marked decline over the last ten years but figures appear to be stabilising at a lower level - in the case of Eastenders, occasionally lower than Emmerdale. Stephen Price, broadcast consultant, looks at the competition that's grown up since the soaps' heyday. David Liddiment, former executive producer of Coronation Street and Lisa Holdsworth, who wrote for Emmerdale, look at what, if anything, is going wrong.

Presenter: Steve Hewlett

Producer: Simon Tillotson

Editor: Andy Smith.

Tv Writers; Bbc Governance20130911

In a week where the future of the BBC Trust has been called into question, we ask what alternative structures of governance might look like? BBC Trustee Richard Ayre joins Steve Hewlett to defend the Trust's performance, and a panel including former BBC and OFCOM executive Tim Suter, and former trustee and Newsnight editor Professor Richard Tait, discuss what a new governing body might look like and whether it would do a better job. And, a new report says earnings for top TV writers have risen by more than 30 per cent in the last 5 years. We ask what impact this has on commissioning budgets, and find out how a reliance on one or two star writers is making it harder to export programmes to the US.

Producer: Katy Takatsuki.

Twitter's Impact On Journalism, Mail On Sunday Editor Geordie Greig, Ashley Highfield Of Johnston Press20160323

Twitter is ten years old and has had an "utterly transformative" impact on journalism. That's according to Emily Bell, Director of the Tow Centre for Digital Journalism at the Columbia Journalism School. She says it has been the most important journalistic tool since the phone. We'll hear from her and from radio and TV presenter Richard Bacon, one of the UK's pioneers in using Twitter. He has 1.5 million followers and has experienced both the bright and very dark sides of Twitter.

We'll also ask if we - all of us - are too quick to share pictures and video on Twitter and other social media in the aftermath of terror attacks, like those in Brussels yesterday? We'll be hearing from Hend Amry who began #ISISMediaBlackout on Twitter to discourage users from sharing ISIS propaganda online. She feels that sharing footage of attacks inadvertently serves the purpose of terror groups who hope to spread panic.

Also - the editor of the Mail on Sunday, Geordie Greig, will reveal what he thinks helped his newspaper to win Newspaper of Year at last night's Society of Editors Press Awards.

And the Chief Executive Officer of Johnston Press, Ashley Highfield, will discuss his plans for the i newspaper, which the Johnston Press is in the process of buying. How will the i thrive without the content previously supplied by the Independent newspaper? And with so many local newspapers in the Johnston Press empire now labelled "non-core" or "sub-core", will their future be blighted by cuts, strikes and closures? All questions for Ashley Highfield.

Women On Radio And Tv20130123