Mapping The Town

Archaeologist Julian Richards uncovers the hidden histories of towns, exploring how modern streets hold clues to past times and lives.

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Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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0101Manchester19980810

The story of `Cottonopolis', and a centuries-old struggle between free trade and corporate control from the Town Hall.

0102Ripon19980817

The street map tells the story of one man and his church, but one small hill hints at the town's pagan origins.

0103Southampton19980824

Why the Roman, Saxon and medieval centres of this port were all in different places.

0104 LASTLondon19980831

Four programmes exploring how modern streets hold clues to past times and lives.

`LONDON'.

Archaeologist Julian Richards discovers why both Romans and Saxons built huge towns on the banks of the Thames.

0201Coventry19990412

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents a four-part series showing how to discover your town's past through the streets and buildings of today. 1: `Coventry'. This 20th-century capital of the motor industry was once a powerful medieval settlement and a centre for 19th-century ribbon weaving and watchmaking.

0202Basingstoke19990419

Julian Richards reveals how the dead have mapped the town and uncovers the story of why the pig market moved.

0203Malvern19990426

Julian Richards discovers how a hermit monk, two powerful families and the famous waters have all helped to put the Worcestershire spa town on the map.

0204 LASTGrimsby19990503

Last in a four-part series showing how to discover your town's past through the streets and buildings of today. `Grimsby'. Julian Richards discovers how mud and the tides have helped to map out this town. A brick on a wall reveals the story behind the early building societies.

0301Penzance19990816

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents the series which enables you to discover your town's past through the streets and buildings of today. 1: Penzance. He reveals how arable Cornish land and a natural harbour marked the beginnings of a market, how the town's remoteness fuelled a dark image of smugglers and wreckers, and how a tiny burial ground provides the clue to an aspiring middle classes the 19th century.

0302Nottingham19990823

Julian Richards presents a series which enables you to discover your town's past through the streets and buildings of today. 2: Nottingham. The story of how a Georgian town of gardens and cherry trees gave way to the demands of the hosiery and lace industries, and how a few powerful dynasts created both greath wealth and terrible poverty.

0303Stoke19990830

Rosemary Hill presents a series which investigates a town's past through the streets and buildings of today. 3: Stoke. In this programme, she uncovers the story of the two 18th-century clay barons who moulded the landscape of the town.

0304 LASTSalisbury19990906

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents the last in a series which investigates a town's past through the streets and buildings of today. 4: Salisbury. He discovers town planning at its best.

0401Bristol2000011020010604

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents the programme that shows you how to discover your town's past through the streets and buildings of today. 1: BRISTOL.

0402St Andrews2000011720010611

Richards discovers how the church laid out the street plan, and why war with the ENGLISH and the support of the wrong pope led to the founding of Scotland's first university.

0403Lincoln2000012420010521

This edition comes from Lincoln, where he explores the city's early origins as a retirement home for Roman soldiers and learns how the Romans managed to get a water supply flowing uphill.

0404Glastonbury2000013120010528

Archaeologist Julian Richards concludes his four-part series showing how to discover your town's past through the streets and buildings of today. `GLASTONBURY'. In Somerset he explores how Arthur, Guinevere and a young Jesus Christ all played a part in the ecclesiastical spin surrounding the success of medieval GLASTONBURY.

Archaeologist Julian Richards shows how to discover your town's past through the streets and buildings of today. The hidden history of St Albans, town ravaged by Queen Boudicca in the first century AD which grew into a medieval service station on the road north to Mercia. Its Norman abbey was built from Roman remains.

0404 LASTSt Albans2000013120010625
0501Ipswich2000071020010604

Archaeologist Julian Richards returns with a four-part series that shows you how to discover your town's past through the streets and buildings of today. He walks the original eighth-century street plan of Ipswich, discovers how an invasion of CHRISTIAN friars changed the medieval map, and uncovers links between the site of the modern town and the ancient royal burials at Sutton Hoo. / Archaeologist Julian Richards returns with a four-part series that shows you how to discover your town's past through the streets and buildings of today. 1: Ipswich. He walks the original eighth-century street plan, discovers how an invasion of CHRISTIAN friars changed the medieval map, and uncovers links between the site of the modern town and the ancient royal burials at Sutton Hoo.

0502Leicester2000071720010611

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents a four-part series that shows you how to discover your town's past through the streets and buildings of today. 2: Leicester. Roman settlers, Viking traders and medieval religious guilds have all left their mark on the modern map.

0503Newcastle2000072420010618

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents a four-part series showing how to discover your town's past through the streets and buildings of today. 3: Newcastle. He reveals why both the Romans and the Normans built bridges and castles on the same site by the River Tyne and how coal and the railways transformed medieval Newcastle into one of the world's greatest industrial cities.

0504Dublin2000073120010702

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents the series showing how to discover your town's past through the streets and buildings of today. `Dublin'. From ninth-century Vikings to 19th-century ENGLISHmen, Richard charts how waves of invasion and immigration have shaped the development of the town, for better or worse.

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents the series showing how to discover your town's past through the streets and buildings of today. From ninth-century Vikings to 19th-century ENGLISHmen, Richards charts how waves of invasion and immigration have shaped the development of the town, for better or worse.

0505Dublin2000073120010702
0505Dublin2000080720010702
0601Cardiff20010205

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents the series which uncovers the hidden histories of towns. 1: Cardiff. He reveals how Cardiff began as a Roman stronghold in hostile territory, remained a SLEEPy fishing village through the Middle Ages and was transformed by one family into the largest port in the world.

0602Silchester20010212

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents the series which uncovers the hidden histories of towns. 2: Silchester. He uncovers how a thriving Roman town came to fall into ruins and remain abandoned to the present day.

0603Aberdeen20010219

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents the series which uncovers the hidden histories of towns. 3: Aberdeen. Water has always played a vital part in the development and success of this unique city, built on a bend in the river which is said to be shaped like a bishop's crozier.

0604Exeter20010226

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents the series which uncovers the hidden histories of towns. 4: Exeter. He discovers how the Roman town was reused by the early church, why the port was never used to transport slaves, and how a powerful family put a stranglehold on trade coming up the River Exe.

0605Monmouth20010305

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents a series which uncovers the hidden histories of towns. 5: Monmouth. How did the town survive and thrive in its volatile location, where Roman met Celt and ENGLAND met Wales? Its streets and buildings reveal a history of guerilla warfare, Chartist rebellion and genteel tourism.

0606Guernsey20010312

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents the series which uncovers the hidden histories of towns. On Guernsey, he uncovers fresh evidence of Roman occupation and finds out how witch trials, legalised piracy and international banking have all shaped the island's capital.

0607St Peter Port20010319
0701Brighton20011126

Julian discovers how the Sussex sea view was initially scorned.

0702Colchester20011203

Julian Richards presents a series uncovering the hidden histories of towns. 2: `Colchester'. He explores ENGLAND's oldest recorded town, discovering why queen Boudicca sacked it.

0703Glasgow20011210

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents a series uncovering the hidden histories of towns. 3: `GLASGOW'.

0704Hereford20011217

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents a series uncovering the hidden histories of towns. 4: `Hereford'. He looks at Hereford's history as a border town.

0801Cambridge20020225

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents a series uncovering urban history.

This edition visits Cambridge, a city dating back to medieval times and a home of academia for centuries.

0802Dorchester20020304

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents a series uncovering the hidden histories of towns.

Today's programme visits Dorchester, a town with a history dating back to Roman times.

0803York20020311

Archaeologist Julian Richards uncovers the histories of towns.

3: `YORK'.

He asks whether YORK's architectural beauty is the result of deliberate preservation or of neglect.

0804Liverpool20020318

Julian Richards on towns' hidden histories.

4: `LIVERPOOL'.

He looks at how the bustling cosmopolitan history of the past 300 years shows itself in the architecture of LIVERPOOL.

0805Winchester20020325

Julian Richards on the histories of towns.

5: `Winchester'.

He explores how its map has been shaped by Roman engineering, old kings' bones and the Black Death.

0806Wharram Percy20020401

Archaeologist Julian Richards uncovers the hidden histories of towns.

6: `Wharram Percy'.

A deserted village in YORKshire offers evidence of how an entire way of life disappeared.

0807Valletta20020408

Archaeologist Julian Richards uncovers the hidden histories of towns.

7: `Valletta'.

The Maltese capital was designed by FRANCEsco Laparelli to serve as both a city and a fortress.

0901Bath20021104

In Bath, the Romans built an `alternative' working town away from the pilgrims and the waters.

0902Belfast20021111

Archaeologist Julian Richards uncovers the hidden histories of towns. This edition comes from Belfast, a city whose map has been shaped by religion, politics and industry.

0903Edinburgh20021118

Julian Richards uncovers the hidden history of Edinburgh. Scotland's capital was shaped by elitism, wind chill, an oddly shaped street plan, and the Edinburgh Festival.

0904Saltaire20021125

Julian Richards uncovers the hidden history of Saltaire, a community which came into existence over 150 years ago when Titus Salt established a textile mill outside Bradford.

0905Oxford20021202

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents a series uncovering the hidden histories of towns. This edition comes from OXFORD, a city dating back to medieval times.

0906Leeds20021209

Archaeologist Julian Richards uncovers the hidden history of Leeds, which became one of the boom towns of the cloth industry and the industrial revolution.

1001Swansea20030210

Julian Richards presents a series uncovering the hidden histories of towns.

This edition comes from Swansea, once a huge exporter of copper but always in Cardiff's shadow.

1002Canterbury20030217

Julian Richards presents a series uncovering the hidden histories of towns.

This edition comes from Canterbury, whose history is inextricably linked with that of the church.

1003Reading20030224

Archaeologist Julian Richards uncovers the hidden histories of towns.

This edition comes from Reading, a town which has been continually reinventing itself for over 1,000 years.

1004Sheffield20030303

Archaeologist Julian Richards uncovers the hidden histories of towns.

This edition comes from SHEFFIELD, the steel city whose industrial past has its origins in medieval times.

1005Dover20030310

Julian Richards uncovers the hidden histories of towns.

This edition comes from Dover, a town whose proximity to continental Europe has determined its heavily fortified past.

1006Copenhagen20030317

Archaeologist Julian Richards travels to Denmark's capital to uncover the story of pirates, bankruptcy and to discover more about the ever-changing map of this one-time fishing village.

1101Derry20030903

In the first of a new series, archaeologist Julian Richards uncovers the hidden histories of towns.

Today Julian Richards explores the many layers of Derry's development from pagan times.

With experts including Bishop Edward Daly, who played a crucial conciliatory role during Bloody Sunday and the troubles, we travel to the key historical landmarks of a city where even the name remains in dispute.

1102Blackpool20030910

This edition comes from Blackpool, a town whose growth has been fuelled by tourism.

1103Winchelsea20030917

Today, Winchelsea on the Sussex coast measures up to most people's idea of a quintessentially chocolate-box ENGLISH village, full of Olde Worlde charm.

Truly a world away from its status seven hundred years ago when it was an influential port, importing five million bottles of Bordeaux each year.

Presenter Julian Richards examines the historical evidence that reveals how Winchelsea was left high and dry by tide and time.

1104Norwich20030924

For many, East Anglia's provincial capital, Norwich, is today considered to be somewhat out on a limb.

Yet for centuries it was ENGLAND's second city, heart of a thriving textile trade.

Presenter Julian Richards examines the city's rich archaeological and architectural record that tells the story of its development.

He takes us from Stone Age times to the present via the rivalry between Church, state and the merchant Guilds, all of whom have left their mark on the city.

1105Portsmouth20031008

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents a series uncovering the hidden histories of towns.

During the great age of sail, the dockyards in Portsmouth represented the largest industrial site in the world.

This programme traces the technological breakthroughs in the drydocks and blockmills that made an empire possible, and had some peculiar effects on the town just outside the dockyard walls.

1106 LASTPortmerion20031015

6/6.

Portmerion In 1925, when Sir Clough Williams-Ellis acquired a North Wales peninsula, he described the location as a neglected wilderness which he would set straight.

The village of Portmeirion is the remarkable result.

Presenter Julian Richards, with the help of some of Sir Clough's descendants, traces the tale of how Portmeirion arose.

/ In 1925, when Sir Clough Williams-Ellis acquired a North Wales peninsula, he described the location as a neglected wilderness which he would set straight.

1201Jarrow20040225

This former shipbuilding town south of Newcastle is remembered by many for the Crusade for jobs in the 1930s when its industry collapsed almost overnight.

But Jarrow's history dates back to Anglo-Saxon times, when it was a leading centre for CHRISTIANity, and the home of ENGLAND's first historian, known as the Venerable Bede.

1202Spitalfields20040303

in the East End of LONDON is a story of immigration, from the Huguenots in the seventeenth century through to the Jews in the nineteenth and the twenty-first century wave of Somali and Bengali settlers.

From Spitalfields Market to a Huguenot house Julian Richards discovers more about this fascinating area including how Brick Lane has been so influential in our nation's food with the development of chocolate, curry and even fish and chips.

Archaeologist Julian Richards uncovers the hidden histories of towns.

1203Caernarfon20040310

is marked by the signs of invasion - the Roman fort of Segontium, and the castle and town walls built by Edward I.

Within those walls remains the very precise grid marking the land apportioned to the new ENGLISH landlords.

Despite these takeovers Caernarfon remains Welsh speaking heartland, secure in its boundaries between Snowdonia and the Menai Straits.

Archaeologist Julian Richards examines the legacy left by the conquerors, and wonders how the townsfolk managed to absorb it so well.

1204Berwick20040317

It sits on the north bank of the Tweed, its football team plays in the Scottish League, many of the town's banks are Scottish, and yet for five hundred years Berwick has been an ENGLISH outpost.

Before that, it changed hands between the two countries some fourteen times.

Archaeologist Julian Richards explores the town's strongly fortified walls to piece together its long contested history, and learns why some Berwickers - perhaps sensibly - consider their town to be a place apart.

1205Gloucester20040324

Archaeologist Julian Richards presents a series uncovering the hidden histories of towns.

This edition visits Gloucester, a town with a surprising past as a haven for immigrants.

12LASTLancaster20040331

Julian Richards travels to Lancaster, where he finds the main street layout little changed since 1610.

The puzzle for our experts is why a city, which had prospered from the slave trade, was far less marked by industrial change.

1301Hull20050216

Julian Richards uncovers the history of Hull through the geographical clues found in its streets.

Trade was the starting point of Hull's history but the shipping brought in ideas and people as well as goods.

Their legacy can still be found in the city.

Julian is joined by historians Arthur Credland, John Markham and Nicholas Evans.

1302Amagh20050223

Julian Richards uncovers the history of Armagh through the geographical clues in its streets.

A religious hotspot since earliest times, Armagh is the primatial see for the whole of IRELAND.

So why has this beautiful Georgian city always been such a focus of faith?

Julian is joined in his quest by archaeologist Chris Lynn, historian Roger Weatherup and guide Barbara Ferguson.

1303Gothenburg20050302

Julian Richards travels to Sweden, to the port of Gothenburg, to find out why the city is known as Little LONDON.

The British connection goes back to the earliest times and still continues today, according to historians John Markham, Håkan Strömberg, Marie Björk and Mari Wickerts.

1304Droitwich20050309

It's something as fundamental to life as salt that has shaped the entire history of Droitwich, a West Midlands market town.

Its salt-rich brine stream was exploited since before Roman times, until production finally stopped in the 1920s.

Julian Richards savours the town's past, finding evidence of old industrial processes, and visits the Droitwich Brine Spa Baths.

1305Carlisle20050316

Archaeologist Julian Richards decodes the geography of Carlisle in order to discover more about its history.

At the junction of three rivers, the town's low-lying position and friendly terrain is what attracted settlers to the area in the first place, although it also made it vulnerable to flooding.

Julian is joined by historians Dennis Perryman, Steven White and Ian Caruana.

1306 LASTHugh Town20050323

Julian Richards finds out about the development of Hugh Town on St Mary's, the only town on the Isles of Scilly.

He hears how much of its prehistory is submerged, a victim of rising sea levels, and that today's prosperity owes much to an energetic Victorian reformer, Augustus Smith.

1401Blaenavon20050810

in South Wales is a town built on iron.

Families had scratched a living mining iron ore in the hills around Blaenavon since Norman times but it was small scale and barely provided a living.

But the coming of the industrial revolution changed everything.

Thousands came seeking work in the new foundries of South Wales and soon Blaenavon had enough residents to support 48 pubs and 18 chapels and a town was born.

Julian travels to Wales to tell the story of the industrial revolution and map the building of Blaenavon.

1402Stratford-upon-avon20050817

What would Stratford be without Shakespeare? The modern town may have the Bard to thank for its prosperity, but what has the working market town lost in its conversion into a literary shrine? Archaeologist Julian Richards discovers a Medieval street plan behind the fake Elizabethan façades, and weighs up the benefits and the costs of 'Bard-olatry'.

1403Stirling20050824

It is said 'whoever controls Stirling controls Scotland'.

It lies at the strategic heart of the country and owes its history to the bridge that crosses the nearby River Forth.

The bridge was the only practical way to cross the river and it was fought over for centuries.

The Wallace monument casts its shadow over the city and a statue of Robert the Bruce stands proudly at the foot of the castle.

So was Stirling just a conduit to the castle? Or did it emerge into the light and build a life of its own? Julian Richards takes a trip through Stirling to investigate its royal past.

1404Bournemouth20050831

The archetype of a seaside town, Bournemouth, was purpose built.

It didn't exist until the early 1800s and was planned and controlled meticulously.

Once a restricted town of large villas and genteel folk, it has adapted and evolved through the ages to become the hot spot it is today.

Julian Richards traces the roots of the town from smuggling paradise to disco heaven and meets some of the characters who shaped it.

1405Chipping Camden20050907

Archaeologist Julian Richards examines how agricultural decline and the fashion for wildscape made this Cotswold village the perfect home for the Arts and Crafts movement at the beginning of the 20th century.

But what lasting effect did these artists have on the streetscape, and why does the 21st century visitor see a town centre that's apparently changed very little in 500 years?

1406 LASTWhitby20050914

It's the setting for Dracula and has great fish and chips but as archaeologist Julian Richards discovers, there is much more to this fishing town than fiction and food.

1501Brighton20060823

Once the nation's favourite resort, Julian discovers how a Sussex sea view was scorned until people started bathing for their health; why cocktails of salt water mixed with rum or milk went down well with Londoners; and how the town's two peers - stretching out beyond the confines of land, society and morality - became the vast sexual battleship of the seafront.

1502Tin Town20060830

One hundred years ago, a town was founded in the Derwent Valley, Derbyshire, to house workers building two massive dams.

Birchinlee housed almost a thousand people and boasted a schoolhouse, a police station, a hairdresser, shops, a community centre and canteen.

Today the dams remain, but the town of corrugated iron has gone.

So why did the Derwent Valley Water Board build such an impressive home for the navvies, and was this artificial town a success?

1503Liverpool20060906

In this Gateway to the Empire, human traffic through the port created a unique test bed for new ideas about charity, health provision and disease control.

But how does the bustling cosmopolitan history of the last 300 years show itself in the architecture of the city and the shape of the modern map?

1504Saltaire20060913

Over 150 years ago, Titus Salt set up a textile mill in a piece of countryside three miles from the centre of Bradford.

It became a model town, its visionary scale unsurpassed during the Industrial Revolution.

Salt didn't just provide well-built homes for his workers, but hospitals, shops and schools.

Julian Richards takes a look around this fascinating place, finding out more about it and its elusive founder.

1505Swansea20060920

Once the world's largest exporter of copper, Swansea earned the nickname Copperopolis, but had ambitions to become the Brighton of Wales to attract visitors.

So why, despite its vast economic power, was the town always coming in a poor second to Cardiff?

1506Canterbury20060927

Julian Richards seeks to unravel the influence the Church has had on the town's growth.

St Augustine began building here over 1,400 years ago, but it was the famous murder of his Medieval successor, Thomas à Becket, that put Canterbury on the pilgrims' map.

1507 LASTPortmeirion20061004

In 1925, when Sir Clough Williams-Ellis acquired a North Wales peninsula, he described the location as a neglected wilderness which he would set straight.

The village of Portmeirion is the remarkable result.

Presenter Julian Richards, with the help of some of Sir Clough's descendants, traces the tale of how Portmeirion arose.