Lost Causes

This Remembrance Sunday was a particularly proud and poignant day for one group of relatives of servicemen killed in wartime.

They are the families of more than 300 men who were shot at dawn for cowardice or desertion during the First World War.

The families have long argued that the men were the victims of an injustice, that they were not cowards but were deeply traumatised or shell-shocked.

Their appeals to have the men pardoned were repeatedly turned down but this year the government unexpectedly relented and 306 men have been pardoned.

This programme tells the story of the long campaign to resolve a dark episode in British history.

With Carolyn Quinn.

show more detailshow less detail

Episodes

EpisodeFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
012006111520061119

This Remembrance Sunday was a particularly proud and poignant day for one group of relatives of servicemen killed in wartime.

They are the families of more than 300 men who were shot at dawn for cowardice or desertion during the First World War.

The families have long argued that the men were the victims of an injustice, that they were not cowards but were deeply traumatised or shell-shocked.

Their appeals to have the men pardoned were repeatedly turned down but this year the government unexpectedly relented and 306 men have been pardoned.

This programme tells the story of the long campaign to resolve a dark episode in British history.

With Carolyn Quinn.

022006112220061126

3/3.

The struggle to win compensation for the victims of Thalidomide was one of the great campaigns of the 1960s and 70s.

There was a settlement in 1973 but as the years went by, its value was eroded by inflation, and the victims still had to pay tax.

Thalidomide disappeared from the headlines, but another campaign was going on to achieve a more generous deal.

Carolyn Quinn looks at the ongoing campaign to restore the link between the state pension and average earnings.

03 LAST2006112920061203

The struggle to win compensation for the victims of Thalidomide was one of the great campaigns of the 1960s and 70s.

There was a settlement in 1973 but as the years went by, its value was eroded by inflation, and the victims still had to pay tax.

Thalidomide disappeared from the headlines, but another campaign was going on to achieve a more generous deal.