The Long View

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20030415
20030408

Jonathan Freedland and guests go in search of the past behind the present, exploring a moment in history which illuminates a contemporary debate.

20030401

Far from being a modern phenomenon cutting edge, garden makeovers were very much in vogue in the 18th century, nowhere more so than at Painshill in Surrey.

This is where presenter Jonathan Freedland meets, among others, Home Front's Diarmuid Gavin to find about an extraordinary garden designer called Charles Hamilton, whose vision included paying a hermit to live in the garden looking picturesque.

Unfortunately, Hamilton's living gnome had other ideas.

20081125

Jonathan Freedland explores the parallels between the financial crises of today and 1929.

Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present.

He explores the parallels and differences between the stock market crash of 1929 and the current credit crunch.

20081202

The parallels between today's airport expansions and the mid-19th century railway boom.

Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present.

He explores the parallels and differences between current attitudes to airport expansion and the controversy and debate that surrounded railway expansion in the mid-19th century.

20081209

Jonathan Freedland takes the Long View of retail at Christmas in a period of austerity.

Jonathan Freedland takes the Long View of retail at Christmas during a period of economic austerity.

He examines what shops today can learn from the bleak festive season of 1930.

Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present.

20081216

Comparing celebrity chefs with social agendas and Victorian chef Alexis Soyer.

Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present.

He examines the parallels between today's celebrity chefs with social agendas and the 19th century chef Alexis Soyer, who became a household name and captured the British public imagination with his revolutionary approach to cooking and eating.

20090217

Jonathan Freedland tells the story of the short-lived Victorian club New Brighton Tower.

Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present.

He examines the parallels between the relationship between football and business today and the story of a Victorian club with expensive imported players which folded when its profits fell.

The company that owned the New Brighton resort on The Wirral set up a football club, New Brighton Tower, to maintain profits during the winter months.

The founders set about buying up quality players from other top clubs but were initially denied entry to the Football League and tickets to their home games at their massive stadium proved too expensive for the local population, with attendances barely scraping 1,000.

With the club not making money as planned, and having failed to gain promotion to the first division of the League, the company disbanded it in 1901.

Jonathan takes local historian Tom Sault and footballing lecturer Rogan Taylor to the Wirral to tell the story of New Brighton Tower and to draw parallels with today's uneasy mix of the worlds of sport and business.

20090224

He examines the parallels between the murder of Liverpool youngster Rhys Jones in 2007 and another murder of a child by another child in Liverpool in 1883.

Michael Burns was an innocent bystander, set upon by a gang of youths and left for dead in one of the city's 'no-go areas' for police.

This 'shocking brutality among boys' created a new moral panic in 19th-Century England.

20100223

The long view of national debt, from Waterloo to today's financial crisis.

Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present.

As the nation's finances drown in red ink, Niall Ferguson, Will Hutton and Stephanie Flanders join Jonathan to take the long view of national debt.

Amid the splendour of Apsley House, home of the Duke of Wellington, they compare the causes and consequences of rising debt and deficit levels from the battlefield of Waterloo to today's financial crisis.

20100302

Taking the long view of football authorities' response to calls for camera technlogy.

Between 1880 and 1890, the game of football was transformed by a growing professionalism.

Suddenly disagreements which had previously been settled in a gentlemanly way between captains were becoming rancorous.

Professional teams who were now paying wages and getting crowds of several thousands wanted to win.

The goalposts needed changing and in came the cross tape.

But that wasn't good enough, so the cross bar was installed.

Then came referees to make the decisions previously agreed by captains.

But when, on 26 October 1889, a game between Everton and Accrington at the Anfield ground in Liverpool descended into a near riot over a disputed goal, an engineer in the crowd thought he had the answer.

John Alexander Brodie's Goal Net was patented a year later.

He met the Football Association and, after some initial trials, they decided that the net was a very good way of assisting referees and encouraged all clubs to use them.

So what holds back today's authorities from using the modern camera technology that might have changed Ireland's fate in the recent World Cup play-off? There was another disputed goal at the African Cup of Nations, Cameroon losing out on that occasion.

Rugby has adopted cameras and a fourth official with access to the pictures, cricket is moving that way and tennis has taken up the referred line call.

So should football take the Long View and use the available technology or is the reticence to do something more indicative of our culture and time? Are we as ready as the Victorians to accept the new?

20100309

Examining the changing culture and politics behind the commemoration of the fallen.

Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present.

As the small Wiltshire town of Wootton Bassett becomes the focus of the nation's commemoration of soldiers killed in Afghanistan, Jonathan journeys to Towton in Yorkshire, scene of the bloodiest battle on British soil, and of the 'repatriation' of the fallen to consecrated ground by Richard III 23 years later.

With Dr Carl Watkins, Andrew Boardman and Andrew Meek, Jonathan discovers the reasons behind this unprecedented act of commemoration, and traces the changing culture of such acts, through the wars of the 20th century to the present 'Highway for Heroes' in Wootton Bassett.

20100316

Jonathan Freedland takes the Long View of Kraft's takeover of Cadbury.

Jonathan Freedland takes the Long View of the recent purchase of Cadbury by Kraft, comparing the deal with the takeover of Boots the Chemist by an American company in 1920.

When the founder of the chain, Jesse Boot, put it up for sale it prompted a storm of controversy in the local and national press.

A rival chain responded by marketing itself as the 'biggest British chemist', playing on the idea that Boots had betrayed their national roots.

The takeover prompted a period of austerity in the company as the American owners embarked on an efficiency drive.

Jonathan draws on the lessons of the Boots takeover, asking how important it is for national brands to remain in British hands.

Guests include Lord Digby Jones and Stefan Stern of The Financial Times, and readings are provided by James Coombes, former Milk Tray Man.

20101012

Jonathan Freedland compares the present spending review with the 'Geddes Axe' of 1921-22.

Jonathan Freedland compares the present public spending review with the 'Geddes Axe' of 1921-22.

In the early 1920s, in the face of mounting economic and political pressure, Prime Minister David Lloyd George committed the government to massive public spending cuts.

Then as now it was a coalition government faced with the challenge of driving through savings.

Lloyd George appointed the Geddes Committee to decide where the axe should fall.

Jonathan and guests draw on the lessons of the early 20s to debate the difficulties of delivering economies in public spending and the potential political fallout.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

20101019

Jonathan Freedland compares cricket's recent betting scandals with 18th century boxing.

The world of sport is reeling from another blow to its fundamental philosophy - that what you see in a sporting encounter is the best competitors, trying their utmost and winning because, on the day, they were the best.

Now, it seems, gambling on the outcome of that contest is corrupting the contest itself.

The public, even those who enjoy betting, are faced with the possibility that those involved in sporting contests may not be giving their all.

Indeed it may be that their actions are just as likely to be for personal gain as they are for victory.

The result - the honourable sporting spirit is exposed as a sham and the sporting authorities are desperate to find a way of preserving and maintaining their good name and the good name of their sports.

That's the story today after the Spot Fixing allegations facing three Pakistani cricketers surfaced in the News of the World Newspaper.

But it was also a crisis that faced the hugely popular sport of bare knuckle prize fighting in 18th and 19th century Britain.

Jonathan Freedland takes The Long View of sports' uneasy relationship with the gambling business.

Back in the early days of fighting, and indeed cricket, gambling was the engine that drove sport.

Prize fighters could expect no fee other than money gathered from the various bets made prior to their fights.

While the spirit of noble combat prevailed all was well, but it wasn't long before fighters started responding directly to those making the bets or simply bending the rules to suit their own ends.

How the boxing promoters of the day dealt with the problem and how the Cricketing and sporting authorities in general are dealing with it today is the subject of this edition of the Long View.

Joining Jonathan are the historian and one time Olympic medallist Peter Radford, the former cricketer and now commentator and analyst Simon Huges, and the sports promoter, Barry Hearn.

Producer: Tom Alban.

20101026

Jonathan Freedland looks at the history of leaks from the military establishment.

Jonathan Freedland with the series which searches for the past behind the present, exploring a moment in history which illuminates a contemporary debate.

Recent leaks from inside the military questioned the way the war in Afghanistan is being run.

Jonathan Freedland looks at the case of a 19th Century officer who challenged British strategy in India.

What does the military establishment do when confronted by a leak from the inside? Jonathan Freedland looks at the story of a 19th century intelligence officer, Sir Charles MacGregor, who, although a serving soldier, published his concerns about British troop levels in India and on the North West Frontier.

Jonathan looks at the story of MacGregor, who feared that British intelligence was poor and that British troops would not be able to withstand an onslaught from the Russians.

The programme also looks at the challenge the military establishment faces now when information is much more easily released into the public domain, and as the war in that region continues.

Producer: Joanne Cayford.

20101102

Jonathan Freedland looks for events from the past being rehearsed again in the present.

Jonathan Freedland with the series which searches for the past behind the present, exploring a moment in history which illuminates a contemporary debate.

20110201

The programme which looks at the past behind the present.

Jonathan Freedland returns with the history series which finds the past behind the present and explores a moment in history which throws light on a contemporary debate.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

20110208

The programme that looks at the past behind the present.

Jonathan Freedland with the history series which finds the past behind the present and explores a moment in history which throws light on a contemporary debate.

At the Battle of Naseby in 1645, the King's enemies captured carriages containing his private papers.

Brought to London for decoding and publication, the documents laid bare the King's secret negotiations with foreign armies, revelations that were immensely damaging to the Royalist cause.

In the era of WikiLeaks, cyber attacks, phone-hacking and calls for ever-greater transparency, Jonathan and his guests compare seventeenth and twenty-first century attitudes towards state secrets and freedom of information.

Contributing to the programme are:

Jonathan Powell, former Chief of Staff to Tony Blair

John Kampfner, journalist and Chief Executive of Index on Censorship

Justin Champion, Professor of the History of Early Modern Ideas at Royal Holloway, University of London

Elizabeth Quintana, Head of Airpower and Technology Programme at the Royal United Services Institute

Tim McInnerny, actor

Producer: Julia Johnson.

20110215

Jonathan Freedland looks at the history of the debate on who should own England's forests.

Jonathan Freedland with the history series which finds the past behind the present and explores a moment in history which throws light on a contemporary debate.

In this edition he looks at the history of the debate over who should own England's forests.

Producer: Joanne Cayford.

20110222

Jonathan Freedland takes the long view of royal weddings.

Jonathan Freedland takes the long view of royal weddings, comparing the marriage between Prince William and Kate Middleton with the romance between King Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville who fell in love and married in the 15th century.

In 1464 Edward pursued and secretly married Elizabeth Woodville against the counsel of his royal advisors who were negotiating a dynastic union for the dashing young king.

When word of the wedding got out it was billed as a marriage for love - a dramatic break with royal tradition.

And eyebrows were also raised at Elizabeth's social status - her father was a member of the gentry rather than the aristocracy.

Jonathan is joined by veteran royal reporter James Whitaker, writer and commentator Peter York and columnist Polly Toynbee to discuss how so-called 'commoners' have won the hearts of royalty.

Producer: Paula McGinley.

20110621

Jonathan Freedland takes the Long View of super injunctions.

Jonathan Freedland returns with a new series of The Long View, the programme that sheds old light on new stories.

This week Jonathan looks at super-injunctions through the trial of William Hone, scurrilous gossip and high-minded political campaigner.

In the early 19th century, Hone used the communications technology of his day - pamphlets and cartoons - to keep one step ahead of the libel laws, whether over allegations of sexual impropriety among the royals or political corruption.

As with today, the message proliferated far ahead of the law's ability to keep up with it.

Pamphlets were printed and passed with such speed the authorities struggled to track the source or arrest the perpetrators.

Join Jonathan Freedland and guests for the Long View of public gossip, political freedom and the way communications technology challenges the law.

20110712

Jonathan Freedland takes the long view of the end of the space shuttle.

Jonathan Freedland compares the end of the US Space Shuttle programme with the decommissioning of the British oceanographic survey HMS Challenger in 1876.

As the final US Space Shuttle mission blasts off from Cape Canaveral, Jonathan Freedland compares the end of the shuttle programme with the decommissioning of the 1872 British oceanographic survey HMS Challenger.

The very boat after which the shuttle, Challenger, was named.

It's a story of high adventure at the farthest reaches of the known world but also a lesson in the way that super powers use state money, military prerogatives and scientific research to project power and influence.

Challenger was a British Oceanographic mission that sailed from 1872-76.

It was designed to chart the depths of the oceans and assess the currents more accurately.

This was a vital aid to the efficient global navigation of British warships and trade vessels.

Hugely successful on its own terms it was scrapped by the treasury on the grounds of cost.

But its work is the foundation stone of modern oceanography.

Producer: Mark Burman.

20110719

Comparing Greece and the Euro with Britain's departure from the gold standard in 1931.

Jonathan Freedland is joined by Norman Lamont and historian Patricia Clavin to discuss how Britain's departure from the Gold standard in 1931 sheds light on the predicament of Greece and the Euro today.

It's a shared story of economic collapse, austerity measures, mass protest and the international money markets.

All in the context of a currency network that arguably hindered instead of helped its crisis hit members.

Britain left the Gold standard in 1931, but would Greece benefit from leaving the Euro today?

20110726

Jonathan Freedland looks at the north south divide in terms of national media coverage.

In the late 1950's The Manchester Guardian demonstrated its national ambition by dropping Manchester from its title.

The Guardian wanted to establish itself as far more than a high-brow regional paper with a strong reputation for international coverage.

And so, in 1961 the paper started to print in London.

It wasn't a great success, furnishing parodists with acres of Gruaniad style material to parody while leaving ink all over the hands of the expanding Southern readership.

But in 1964 the editorial headquarters followed the printing presses to the capital.

Manchester and the north were in decline, yesterday's cities.

To be a national paper the feeling was that you had to be based in London.

Spool forward four decades and the BBC have taken an entirely different approach to being a national media organisation.

The move of substantial programme making operations including Five Live and BBC 1 breakfast to Salford is a statement of intent.

A new and exciting northern contribution to output, far greater than the old regional headquarters could ever manage, appears to be the way forward.

So do you achieve national coverage by going to London or by leaving London? The Long view examines whether the decisions are right and why they were made.

It tells a story of the changing balance of the North South divide examines the relationship between how you cover the UK and where you are within it.

20120110

Jonathan Freedland compares Elizabeth II's Diamond Jubilee with that of Queen Victoria.

20120117

Jonathan Freedland explores a moment in history which illuminates a current debate.

20120124

Jonathan Freedland explores a moment in history that illuminates a current debate.

20120131

Jonathan Freedland explores a moment in history that illuminates a current debate.

Jonathan Freedland explores a moment in history which illuminates a current debate.

20120709

Jonathan Freedland and his guests take the long view of liberal intervention.

The Great powers are at loggerheads over what to do about Syria. The opinion of the western powers lead by the United states and Britain is that, on the strength of the reports coming in of atrocities committed against innocent civilians, something has to be done. Opposing that is the Russian view that to encourage or even condone regime change is to destabilise the region without any real idea of what might happen in the aftermath.

Back in 1876 the debate was similarly uncomfortable when vivid news reports came in of the terrible violence meted out by the Ottoman authorities after an uprising in the land that now constitutes modern Bulgaria. Thousands of people were killed, women and children among them. And all this, recorded in detail, was available to readers of the London Evening News. Back then it was the Russians who demanded that 'something must be done' while the British Prime Minster Benjamin Disraeli first played down the atrocities and then tried to caution against intervention. His old opponent William Gladstone, inspired by a national reaction to the atrocities, added his voice to those who demanded action in the form of a famous pamphlet 'Bulgarian Horrors and the question of the East'.

When the Russians attacked the Turks Disraeli threatened to join on the Ottoman side. The result was the treaty of San Stefano and subsequently the congress of Berlin with Bulgaria gaining a degree of autonomy while the other great powers took the opportunity of dismantling part of the Ottoman empire for their own gains, Britain took control of Cyprus.

But did this re-shaping of the Balkans deliver long term 'peace with honour' as Disraeli had claimed, or was it yet another example of Liberal intervention assuaging national consciences but creating dangerous instability in the process.

Lord Ashdown, John Baron MP and Professor Robert Service are on hand to take the Long View of Liberal Intervention.

Jonathan Freedland presents the programme that looks at the past behind the present.

Jonathan Freedland presents the programme which looks at the past behind the present.

20120716

Jonathan Freedland takes the long view of Libor with a 13th-century financial scandal.

Jonathan Freedland takes the long view of LIBOR and rate fixing by comparing recent events at Barclays to the 13th century scandal of financier Richard Lyons. Like Bob Diamond, Lyons was hauled before parliament to explain the dubious financial practices he'd used to get around the prohibition of Usury. All against a back drop of economic crisis and rising suspicion of high finance and its influence on politics.

Jonathan is joined by Nick Leeson, the rogue trader who brought down Barings Bank; former Deputy Governor of the Bank of England, Sir John Gieve; financial historian Adrian Bell, John Coggan of the Economist and Performance poet, Attila the Stockbroker.

Producer: Laurence Grissell

20121106

Jonathan Freedland looks at graduate employment today and in the 16th century.

Jonathan Freedland looks at graduate employment today and in the 16th century. Among Jonathan's guests are David Blunkett and actor Nigel Planer - Neil in 'The Young Ones' - who provides the historical readings.

As graduates today grapple with the difficulties of finding suitable employment, they might reflect on the experiences of graduates in the 16th century. In response to the Reformation, university education had undergone significant expansion - but when the newly qualified youngsters went out into the world, they found very few jobs waiting for them. Among them was dramatist Christopher Marlowe. Some say that the alienation which followed was a contributing factor in the English Civil War.

Alongside David Blunkett, Jonathan is also joined by historian Professor Nandini Das, Phil Baty of Times Higher Education magazine, Conservative MP Kwasi Kwarteng and Shiv Malik, author of the book 'Jilted Generation', to debate the lessons for today.

Producer: Laurence Grissell

20121120

Jonathan Freedland presents the programme that looks at the past behind the present.

Jonathan Freedland presents the programme which looks at the past behind the present.

20121127

Jonathan Freedland explores tree disease by charting Dutch Elm Disease from the 1920s.

Jonathan Freedland presents the programme which looks at the past behind the present. This week he takes the Long View of tree disease in Britain by charting Dutch Elm Disease from its arrival in the 1920s until the 1970s. As Ash Dieback takes root in the countryside and is treated as a national emergency, Jonathan asks what lessons can be learned from the phenomenon and ensuing crisis of Dutch Elm Disease in the 20th century when 28 million trees were lost.

Produced by Neil McCarthy.

*20090210

Exploring the creation of the Bank of England and the first inflation rates, set in 1694.

Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present.

With interest rates at their lowest for 300 years, Jonathan explores the creation of the Bank of England and the economic turmoil which led to the setting of inflation rates for the first time in 1694.

Jonathan visits the Bank of England with an economic historian and a financial journalist, among others.

They look at the early justification for the existence of the Bank - to lend to the government at a reasonable rate and to keep interest rates in check - and why we are now going full circle.

*20090303

Jonathan is joined by Billy Bragg to consider House of Lords reform now and in the 1600s.

Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present.

He is joined by Billy Bragg to consider House of Lords reform now and in the 17th Century, examining the story of Lord Howard, a corrupt peer who was sent to the Tower.

In the light of recent cash-for-influence allegations, Jonathan and guests debate what can be learnt from the experience of the 1640s, when the Lords came under similarly intense scrutiny.

HsitoricAl Readings are provided by Tim Bentinck who plays David in The Archers and who is also the 12th Earl of Portland.

He was one of the hereditary peers who was disqualified from sitting in the Lords following the reforms of 1999.

Jonathan's other guests are the historian Dr Jason Peacey, Andrew Piece, assistant editor of the Daily Telegraph, Sir Christopher Kelly, chairman of the committee on Standards in Public Life and cross-bench peer Baroness Ilora Finlay of Llandaff.

*20090707

Jonathan and his guests ask how governments can best help the unemployed.

Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present.

Jonathan and his guests ask how governments can best help the unemployed and visit the site of a 1930s labour camp set up to 'recondition' unemployed men and prepare them for a return to work.

*20090714

Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present.

*20090728

Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present.

Jonathan examines the policing of demonstrations and asks what lessons can be learned in our own time from the 1855 Hyde Park disturbances.

The newly established police force was criticised in Parliament and the press for using excessive force to control the crowd, goading the public and coralling the protestors into a confined space.

Jonathan and guests compare that controversy with the criticisms being levelled at the police force today in light of the G20 protests.

Jonathan Freedland examines the policing of demonstrations.

*20090804

Jonathan Freedland examines the railways at a time of recession.

Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present.

Jonathan takes the Long View of the railways at a time of recession, asking what lessons can be learnt in our own time from the experience of the Great Western Railway in the 1860s.

A once-prestigious and highly-profitable enterprise, GWR had over-extended itself and the company faced bankruptcy.

As debates rage over the future of the East Coast Main Line, Jonathan and guests compare the action taken to rescue the railways in the 19th century with the challenges faced today.

Airport Expansion And 19th Century Ports20121113

Jonathan Freedland compares airport expansion now with the Victorian battle of the ports.

Jonathan Freedland compares the controversy over airport expansion now with the 19th century battle of the sea ports, examining how we should determine where Britain's gateway to the world should be.

Bristol had been a major port since the Middle Ages but, with the advent of travel by steam ship, Liverpool steals a march on its West Country competitor. Though engineered in Bristol, Brunel's ground-breaking SS Great Britain steam ship made its maiden voyage from Liverpool. But in the long term, it's Southampton that eventually reigns supreme.

As debates continue to rage over a third runway at Heathrow, the proposed 'Boris Island' airport and other options, Jonathan asks what we can learn from the Victorian approach.

Jonathan and guests visit the SS Great Britain - then travel on to the Cunard Building in Liverpool - to debate the issues. He's joined by Andrew Lambert, Professor of Naval History at King's College, Dr Lucy Budd, Lecturer in Transport Studies at Loughborough University, Paul Leblond, a former director of BAA and John Twigg, Planning Director of Manchester Airports Group. Readings are provided by Bristol Old Vic regular Christian Rodska and Liverpool based actor Neil Caple.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

British Brands, American Takeovers: Boots And Cadbury
King John And The Leveson Inquiry20120730

Jonathan Freedland presents the programme which looks at the past behind the present.

This week he centres on the Leveson Inquiry and the parallels it has with the 1215 King John Inquiry in which both the King and prime minister are forced to set up and inquiry against their wishes and both inquiries do not go according to plan. In the short term the 1215 inquiry ends in civil war but in the long term it was to establish the laws for local government for the next 800 years, it remains to be seen what will happen when the Leveson Inquiry finally makes its conclusions.

Jonathan Freedland on the Leveson Inquiry and parallels with the 1215 King John Inquiry.

The London Olympics In 1908 And 201220120723

Jonathan Freedland presents the programme which looks at the past behind the present. As London prepares for the opening ceremony of the 2012 Olympic Games he hears the story of the first time the capital hosted the Games, in 1908.

All kinds of parallels can be drawn between the two Olympics. Sports champions turned Conservative peers brought both Games to London and both men had a distinct vision for what the Olympics meant for Britain and the world. Whereas now the global focus is on the world's fastest man, in 1908 the public's imagination was captured by the athlete with the most endurance, the marathon winner. From corporate advertising to performance enhancing drugs to the destiny of the Olympic site after the Games: all important issues now, but also in 1908.

Jonathan Freedland compares the 2012 Olympics with the London games of 1908.

0120071127

Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present.

In the current climate of fear surrounding public health and obesity, he recalls the establishment of the first Pioneer Health Centre in 1935, which offered an educational and preventative approach to public health.

200A01Burke, Hare And Dr Knox20000314

Jonathan Freedland returns with the series which finds the past behind the present.

`Burke, Hare and Dr Knox'.

Gruesome serial killers in 1820s Edinburgh shed light on issues of organ donation and presumed consent in the 21st century.

With crime writer Ian Rankin, Ruth Richardson, Ken Mason, Owen Dudley Edwards and Kenny Ireland.

200A0220000321

Jonathan Freedland presents the series which finds the past behind the present.

2: The Burston School Strike.

He takes the long view of education and independent thinking in an exploration of the longest ever strike.

200A0320000328

The series which finds the past behind the present.

Jonathan Freedland and guests Billy Bragg, David Carpenter, Bernard Crick and Sian Thomas set off across the Worcestershire countryside to explore the legacy of Simon de Montfort - 13th-century English statesman and soldier - in the light of devolution today.

Jonathan Freedland and guests Billy Bragg, David Carpenter, Bernard Crick and Sian Thomas set off across the Worcestershire countryside to explore the legacy Simon de Montfort - 13th-century English statesman and soldier - in the light of devolution today.

200A0420000404

The series which finds the past behind the present.

Jonathan Freedland looks at the Gordon Riots, which took place in June 1780, resulting in the deaths of 200 people.

The anti-Catholic riots caused a breakdown of law and order in London for several days.

200A05The Gotham Tales20000411

The series which finds the past behind the present.

`The Gotham Tales'.

Jonathan Freedland explores the most popular jokes in British history and a best-selling collection of stories about a village fools on the fringes of Nottingham which dates back to the 13th century and earlier.

With Fiona Shaw and guests.

200A06Dick Whittington20000418

Whittington was the most famous Lord Mayor of London - until now.

Jonathan Freedland explores the man behind the myth and asks whether the current mayoral candidates have anything to learn from their illustrious predecessor.

200C0120000912

Jonathan Freedland returns with the series which finds the past behind the present.

1: In 1885 pioneering investigative journalist W T Stead exposed a child prostitution ring in London's West End.

Freedland tells his story and asks if children are any better protected in the 21st century.

200C02Trial By Jury20000919

Jonathan Freedland presents a series which finds the past behind the present.

In 1670, the landmark Bushell case had a profound effect on trial by jury - regarded by many today as a historic and fundamental right.

200C03Offa's Penny20000926

Jonathan Freedland presents a series which finds the past behind the present.

The first single European currency is not the Euro: it was Offa's penny, common coinage throughout Britain and Europe over 1,200 years ago.

200C04Bad Cows And Englishmen20001003

The series which finds the past behind the present.

Some 800,000 people caught and died from milk-borne tuberculosis between 1850 and 1960.

Jonathan Freedland explores the horrifying evidence and asks if we are any wiser a century on.

200C0520001010

The series which looks for the past behind the present.

Jonathan Freedland explores the fate of women in debt, through the extraordinary life of Laetitia Pilkington.

Guests include Dervla Kirwan and Fay Weldon

200C0620001017

The series which looks for the past behind the present.

Jonathan Freedland searches for the real Macbeth, the 11th-century Scottish king and source of our most potent myth of power and corruption.

201C01Atrocities20010828

The series which looks for the past behind the present.

Jonathan Freedland visits Lincoln, the site of a bloody massacre of civilians 800 years ago.

With contributions from Col.

Bob Stewart, David Carpenter, Joanna Bourke and actress Fiona Shaw

201C02The Tory Party Split20010904

`The Tory Party Split'.

In the series that looks for the past behind the present, Jonathan Freedland visits the scene of a split in the Conservative Party that left it out of power for three decades.

With contributions from Michael Ancram, John Fortune, Michael Gove, Boyd Hilton and Emma Nicholson.

201C03Mental Health20010911

Jonathan Freedland examines the lives of Charles and Mary Lamb.

Best known for their prose adaptations of Shakespeare's plays, they both suffered from depression, with disastrous consequences.

201C0420010918

The series that looks for the past behind the present.

Jonathan Freedland finds out how our recent extreme weather compares with the great storm of 1703.

201C0520010925

The series that looks for the past behind the present.

Jonathan Freedman looks at the rows and disaster that followed Benjamin Franklin's invention of the lightning rod.

201C0620011002

The series that looks for the past behind the present.

Jonathan Freedman investigates 1879's Tay Bridge disaster, in which 75 people died.

202A0120020226

Series that looks for the past behind the present.

Jonathan Freedland investigates the destruction of Santo Domingo and draws parallels with the horrific events of 11 September.

202A0120020305

Jonathan Freedland is joined by Juliet Stevenson in an investigation of drug abuse, past and present, through the brief life of Victorian artist Lizzie Siddal.

202A03Sentencing20020312

Series which finds the past behind the present.

3: `Sentencing'.

Jonathan Freedland is joined by Robert Hardy to explore the rights and wrongs of tough sentencing.

202A0420020319

Series which finds the past behind the present.

Germaine Greer, Fiona Shaw and Jonathan Freedland discuss the furore surrounding the introduction of the smallpox inoculation.

202A0520020326

Series which finds the past behind the present.

Jonathan Freedland discusses the first ever stock market crash - the spectacular rise and fall of the Mississippi Company in 1720.

202A06Irish Potato Famine 184520020402

Series that finds the past behind the present.

Jonathan Freedland recalls the failure of the Irish potato crop in 1845, which caused widespread famine and many deaths.

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Jonathan Freedland presents the series that finds the past behind the present, with guests including Prof Richard Dawkins.

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Jonathan Freedland presents the series that finds the past behind the present.

202C01Economic Migrants20020924

The series that looks for the past behind the present.

`Economic Migrants'.

The story of the Palatine refugees invited to England by Queen Anne.

202C02Church And State20021001

The series that looks for the past behind the present.

`Church and State'.

Jonathan Freedland explores the modern relevance of the story of Henry II and Thomas a Beckett.

202C03Celebrity20021008

The series that looks for the past behind the present.

`Celebrity'.

Jonathan Freedland investigates our fascination with the cult of celebrity.

202C04Trade Unions20021015

`Trade Unions'.

Jonathan Freedland recalls a bitter industrial dispute involving Bradford mill workers in 1890, which led to the creation of a party to fight the cause of Labour.

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The series that looks for the past behind the present.

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The series that looks for the past behind the present.

As war in Iraq looms, Jonathan Freedland and guests consider the Crusades and their influence on subsequent history.

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203A02Gangs20030325

Benjamin Zephaniah joins Jonathan Freedland to reveal a story of thuggery and intimidation in medieval Leicestershire which sheds light on today's gang crime.

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Jonathan Freedland returns with a new six-part series of programmes which looks for the past behind the present.

Each week he explores a moment in history which throws up close parallels with an issue today, recording on the location where the original story took place, in the company of experts, actors and commentators.

203C02The Silent Men20030930

Jonathan Freedland recalls 1963 when two reporters were jailed for refusing to name their sources.

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203C04Drugs In Sport20031014

In the light of the recent World Athletics championships, yet again blighted by drugs, Jonathan Freedland and guests look at cheating in sport and the pressures that persuade young athletes to risk their health in pursuit of success.

Even back in the 1890's a cycling coach who looked after two British world champions was accused of masterminding a drugs regime aimed at enhancing their performance.

And there were reports of one competitor close to death during a race and another falling off his bike, getting back on and cycling the wrong way round the track.

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203C06A Wall To Keep Out An Enemy20031028

Jonathan Freedland and guests go in search of the past behind the present, exploring a moment in history that illuminates a contemporary debate.

204C01Mothers And Miscarriages Of Justice20040907

A mother is accused of murdering her baby.

The Courts find her guilty.

The judge passes sentence.

And then - in an astonishing turn of events - an expert witness comes forward and Anne Green's case returns to court.

Jonathan Freedland is joined by Helena Kennedy, Fiona Shaw and Germaine Greer for a seventeenth century story which resonates strongly with recent trials in Britain.

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Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present.

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205A01Identity Cards20050222

London, 1950 and wartime Identity Cards are still in force.

When Clarence Willcock refuses to present his card to a police officer, it leads to a test case in the High Court.

The judges ponder whether ID cards are an unnecessary intrusion into private life or a useful weapon in combatting crime.

Jonathan Freedland is joined by Shami Chakrabarti of Liberty, Martin Linton MP - who developed the prototype of the new biometric cards - and Peter Byrne, alias PC Andy Crawford in Dixon of Dock Green, to debate ID Cards in 1950's Britain and today.

205A02South Africa - Pandemics20050301

Jonathan Freedland presents a special edition from Cape Town, where he and his guests consider today's HIV infection crisis and look back to the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918.

Why was South Africa hit so severely in both cases and what are the long term consequences of a nation dealing with disease on a massive scale?

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In a society that's having to re-think what constitutes blasphemy and moral outrage, a single, powerful voice takes aim at the dramatic arts and cries "enough is enough".

His name's Jeremy Collier and his colourful pamphlet A Short View of Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage, published in 1698, had a profound effect on the flavour and content of Restoration Drama.

Jonathan Freedland, with the help of historian Justin Champion, actor John Sessions and Don Horrocks of the Evangelical Alliance, takes the long view of the tensions between moral and religious outrage and freedom of expression.

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Jonathan Freedland presents a special edition from Portugal, where he and his guests consider the global response to the Asian tsunami of 2004 and the Lisbon earthquake of 1755.

205D0120051011

In this first edition, he focuses on the Conservative Party Leadership contest.

Political pundits have been concerned with predicting whether the Conservatives will avoid what some have perceived as the problems in the leadership contests of 1997, 2001 and 2003.

But Jonathan and guests look further back for parallels with today's situation.

What do the Tory leadership contests of old tell us about the fate of today's candidates?

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Jonathan Freedland presents the series that looks for the past behind the present by exploring a moment in history.

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Jonathan Freedland returns with the series that uses the past to illuminate the present.

The founders of Google have a lofty vision of how the internet search engine can transform society.

But this was an ambition shared by Whig politician Henry Brougham back in 1826.

Brougham created the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, and used the newly-invented steam press to make information available on an unprecedented scale.

Detractors attacked him for dominating the emerging knowledge economy.

Are Google and other internet search engines facing the same criticisms today?

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Today's computer games and on-line entertainment sites are rapidly increasing in sophistication.

They enthral millions of young users and disturb many parents, worried that their children are lost in a virtual world they don't understand.

Jonathan and guests investigate the controversial reaction to the arrival of an earlier and equally powerful form of escapist entertainment -the 18th century novel.

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Recent months have seen a slew of British military commanders voicing their concerns on everything from their overstretched forces to equipment shortages.

Commanders trying to hold the line in military coalition warfare whilst hampered by what they perceive as inadequate funding from Whitehall.

Can we find the concerns of General Sir Richard Dannatt and other British commanders today being matched by the difficulties encountered by Lord Wellington two centuries ago in the Peninsular Wars?

207D0120071009

As pressure mounts on Gordon Brown to allow a vote on the proposed new EU reform treaty, Jonathan and guests recall Harold Wilson's 1975 referendum on the UK's membership of Europe.

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