Live From The Lighthouse, Poole

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01Radio 3 Live In Concert20120509

(01/02)

Presented by Catherine Bott

Live from the Lighthouse, Poole

Nikolai Lugansky joins the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra in Rachmaninov's Second Piano Concerto. Also on the programme: Khachaturian's Gayaneh Suite and Walton's First Symphony.

Gayaneh, set in a Soviet Armenian cotton co-operative, is full of Khatchaturian's typically exuberant, exotic colours that slip from rich to garish, and towering climaxes that tumble into the brutal and bombastic.

With his Second Piano Concerto, Rachmaninov not only overcame his writer's block, but he found a new voice as a composer - one with a perfect knack for unforgettable tunes, dazzling pianistic effects, an effortless flow of ideas, and a very suave sense of style. It quickly became Rachmaninov's greatest hit and one of the most popular concertos of the twentieth century.

In musical terms, Walton's First Symphony is a landmark of English. Its turbulent emotions and high-voltage energy were the fruit of tempestuous events surrounding Walton at the time. It consists of an eloquent, dramatic first movement, a stinging, malicious Scherzo and a thoroughly melancholic slow movement. The finale, though, is totally different in outlook, an almost Elgarian ceremonial jubilation, as if a cloud has lifted.

Khachaturian : Gayaneh Suite

Rachmaninov : Piano Concerto No.2

Interval

Walton : Symphony No.1

Nikolai Lugansky, piano

Kirill Karabits, conductor.

01Radio 3 Live In Concert20121121

Live from The Lighthouse, Poole

Presented by Martin Handley

The young rising star Benjamin Grosvenor takes centre stage with the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra for Grieg's Piano concerto. Sibelius's 4th symphony opens the concert - a dark work with a sense of foreboding, but a fascinating piece. Tchaikovsky ends the programme, with his stormy take on Dante's story of the fallen lovers condemned to whirl through hell together for eternity.

Sibelius: Symphony No.4

Benjamin Grosvenor (piano)

Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra

conductor James Gaffigan

The fourth symphony was once considered to be the strangest of Sibelius's symphonies, but today it is regarded as one of the peaks of his output. Sibelius was proud of the work and later said "I am pleased that I did it, for even today I cannot find a single note in it that I could remove, nor can I find anything to add."

Grieg's highly lyrical and romantic piano concerto remains a favourite for both pianists and audiences alike. The final composer in tonight's programme, Tchaikovsky, was one of Grieg's admirers, and said of the work "there prevails that fascinating melancholy which seems to reflect in itself all the beauty of Norwegian scenery."

When Tchaikovsky read Dante's epic The Divine Comedy, an episode from the Inferno fired his imagination: the tale of Francesca, a young woman who has been condemned to eternal damnation because of an illicit love affair. Tchaikovsky vividly depicts the driving winds of hell before a solo clarinet launches Francesca's tale, and the music builds in a long crescendo of passion.

01Radio 3 Live In Concert20131002

Jac van Steen conducts the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra in Wagner extracts and in Rachmaninov's Third Concerto, with pianist Valentina Lisitsa.

Live from the Lighthouse, Poole

Presented by Martin Handley

Wagner: Die Meistersinger Overture

Wagner: Das Rheingold: Entrance of the Gods

Wagner: Tannhauser: Grand March

Wagner: Tristan and Isolde: Prelude and Liebestod

8.15: Interval

8.35

Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No.3

Valentina Lisitsa, piano

Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra

Jac van Steen, conductor

Marking 200 years since his birth, the concert begins with four of Wagner's most celebrated operatic moments, including the Mastersingers Overture, the March from Tannhäuser, the Entrance of the Gods from Das Rheingold, and the delicate yearning of Tristan and Isolde's doomed love affair. The astonishingly difficult pianistic gymnastics of Rachmaninov's Third Concerto are second nature to the virtuoso pianist Valentina Lisitsa.

Kirill Karabits conducts the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra in Wagner extracts and in Rachmaninov's Third Concerto, with pianist Valentina Lisitsa.

Kirill Karabits, conductor

02 LASTRadio 3 Live In Concert20120509

(02/02)

Presented by Catherine Bott

Live from the Lighthouse, Poole

Nikolai Lugansky joins the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra in Rachmaninov's Second Piano Concerto. Also on the programme: Khachaturian's Gayaneh Suite and Walton's First Symphony.

Gayaneh, set in a Soviet Armenian cotton co-operative, is full of Khatchaturian's typically exuberant, exotic colours that slip from rich to garish, and towering climaxes that tumble into the brutal and bombastic.

With his Second Piano Concerto, Rachmaninov not only overcame his writer's block, but he found a new voice as a composer - one with a perfect knack for unforgettable tunes, dazzling pianistic effects, an effortless flow of ideas, and a very suave sense of style. It quickly became Rachmaninov's greatest hit and one of the most popular concertos of the twentieth century.

In musical terms, Walton's First Symphony is a landmark of English. Its turbulent emotions and high-voltage energy were the fruit of tempestuous events surrounding Walton at the time. It consists of an eloquent, dramatic first movement, a stinging, malicious Scherzo and a thoroughly melancholic slow movement. The finale, though, is totally different in outlook, an almost Elgarian ceremonial jubilation, as if a cloud has lifted.

Walton : Symphony No.1

Nikolai Lugansky, piano

Kirill Karabits, conductor.

02 LASTRadio 3 Live In Concert20121121

Live from The Lighthouse, Poole

Presented by Martin Handley

The young rising star Benjamin Grosvenor takes centre stage with the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra for Grieg's Piano concerto. Sibelius's 4th symphony opens the concert - a dark work with a sense of foreboding, but a fascinating piece. Tchaikovsky ends the programme, with his stormy take on Dante's story of the fallen lovers condemned to whirl through hell together for eternity.

Grieg: Piano Concerto

Tchaikovsky : Francesca da Rimini

Benjamin Grosvenor (piano)

Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra

conductor James Gaffigan

The fourth symphony was once considered to be the strangest of Sibelius's symphonies, but today it is regarded as one of the peaks of his output. Sibelius was proud of the work and later said "I am pleased that I did it, for even today I cannot find a single note in it that I could remove, nor can I find anything to add."

Grieg's highly lyrical and romantic piano concerto remains a favourite for both pianists and audiences alike. The final composer in tonight's programme, Tchaikovsky, was one of Grieg's admirers, and said of the work "there prevails that fascinating melancholy which seems to reflect in itself all the beauty of Norwegian scenery."

When Tchaikovsky read Dante's epic The Divine Comedy, an episode from the Inferno fired his imagination: the tale of Francesca, a young woman who has been condemned to eternal damnation because of an illicit love affair. Tchaikovsky vividly depicts the driving winds of hell before a solo clarinet launches Francesca's tale, and the music builds in a long crescendo of passion.

02 LASTRadio 3 Live In Concert20131002