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Broadcast
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2016010420160110 (R4)Catherine Guilyardi examines concerns about traditional French Republican values.
After the Charlie Hebdo killings and the extraordinary demonstration of unity in the country, France discovered that some of its young people did not want "to be Charlie". A number of children refused to respect a minute of silence in their schools, some even going so far as to say that they agreed with the killers.
They represented a tiny minority, but part of the French political elite claimed that traditional Republican values had been lost - including "la laïcité", the principle of the separation of state and religious affairs. It was decided that it was each school's role to make sure that these civic and moral values were taught again.
How are liberté, égalité, fraternité and la laïcité explained and transmitted to a generation and demographic that feels discriminated against and rejected by French society? Is enforcing 'la laicité' by law - for example, by banning religious symbols in school - a kind of discrimination against the poorest and most vulnerable sections of French society, those who feel least welcome in France, Muslim and migrant families?
Catherine Guilyardi meets school children, teachers, academics and a member of the government.
Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.
20160104
20160104Catherine Guilyardi examines concerns about traditional French Republican values.
After the Charlie Hebdo killings and the extraordinary demonstration of unity in the country, France discovered that some of its young people did not want "to be Charlie". A number of children refused to respect a minute of silence in their schools, some even going so far as to say that they agreed with the killers.
They represented a tiny minority, but part of the French political elite claimed that traditional Republican values had been lost - including "la laïcité", the principle of the separation of state and religious affairs. It was decided that it was each school's role to make sure that these civic and moral values were taught again.
How are liberté, égalité, fraternité and la laïcité explained and transmitted to a generation and demographic that feels discriminated against and rejected by French society? Is enforcing 'la laicité' by law - for example, by banning religious symbols in school - a kind of discrimination against the poorest and most vulnerable sections of French society, those who feel least welcome in France, Muslim and migrant families?
Catherine Guilyardi meets school children, teachers, academics and a member of the government.
Produced by Alan Hall
A Falling Tree production for BBC Radio 4.
20160104

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Duration

  • 28 Minutes

Genre

  • Genre: Documentaries, Factual

Programme Id

  • b06tr96c