Letters To The Future

Four scientists are invited to write a short letter to a son or daughter, assessing the human consequences of their life's work on the next generation.

Are they satisfied with their achievements? Do they think they have fulfilled their parental and moral responsibilities?

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Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
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19980404

Steven Rose, professor of biology at the Open University, writes a personal letter to two young colleagues explaining why he became a scientist.

Would he advise them to follow a similar career?

19980328

Ian Stewart, professor of mathematics at Warwick University, writes a personal letter to his sons.

How would he like them to view his life's work?

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970712]

Four scientists are invited to write a letter to an offspring, assessing the consequences of their life's work on the next generation. Professor Igor Aleksander begins the series. Producer John Watkins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970712]

Unknown: Professor Igor Aleksander

Producer: John Watkins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970719]

Four scientists write a letter to a son or daughter, assessing their work. 2: Ian Stewart , professor of mathematics at Warwick University. Producer John Watkins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970719]

Unknown: Ian Stewart

Producer: John Watkins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970726]

Four scientists are invited to write to a son or daughter assessing their work. 3: Professor Susan Greenfield. Producer John Watkins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970726]

Unknown: Professor Susan Greenfield.

Producer: John Watkins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970802]

Four scientists write a short letter assessing their life's work.

4: Professor Steven Rose , biologist and director of the Brain and Behaviour Research Group at the Open University.

Producer John Watkins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970802]

Unknown: Professor Steven Rose

Producer: John Watkins

0119970712

Four scientists are invited to write a short letter to a son or daughter, assessing the human consequences of their life's work on the next generation.

Are they satisfied with their achievements? Do they think they have fulfilled their parental and moral responsibilities?Professor Igor Aleksander, who researches intelligent machinery at University College London, begins the series.

0219970719

Four scientists are invited to write a short letter to a son or daughter assessing the human consequences of their life's work.

Should their children be proud of their parents' achievements? 2: Ian Stewart, Professor of mathematics at Warwick University.

0319970726

Four scientists are invited to write a short letter to a son or daughter, assessing the human consequences of their life's work.

Should their children be proud of their parents' achievements? 3: Professor Susan Greenfield, biochemist at Oxford University, studies the workings of the brain and mind.

0419970802

Professor Steven Rose, biologist and director of the brain and behaviour research group at the Open University.