The Letters Of Oscar Wilde

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Episodes

EpisodeRepeatedComments
0120050328 (BBC7)
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20101129 (BBC7)

From schooldays in Enniskillen via a First at Oxford and despair in London to triumph in the USA.

Read by Simon Callow.

From schooldays in Enniskillen via Oxford and despair in London to triumph in the USA.

Wilde, an idealist, heads to America when fame and fortune seem unlikely in England.

How will he be received there?

Simon Callow reads Wilde's letters, from schooldays in Enniskillen via despair in London to triumph in the USA.

0220050329 (BBC7)
20050330 (BBC7)
20060228 (BBC7)
20060301 (BBC7)
20101130 (BBC7)

Marriage, fatherhood, 'The Woman's World', vegetarianism and 'The Picture of Dorian Gray'.

Read by Simon Callow.

Oscar, the romantic doting husband and father and respectable breadwinner.

Can such a conformist role be sustained?

marriage, fatherhood, The Woman's World and The Picture of Dorian Gray.

0320050330 (BBC7)
20050331 (BBC7)
20060301 (BBC7)
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20101201 (BBC7)

The writer meets Lord Alfred Douglas, an encounter that will eventually lead to his downfall.

Read by Simon Callow.

The writer meets Lord Alfred Douglas, an encounter that will lead to his downfall.

The beginnings of Wilde's fascination with Lord Alfred Douglas.

A doomed love, it seems, that could end in disaster.

1891 was a very good year for Oscar Wilde - he wrote plays, essays and stories.

And he also met Lord Alfred Douglas.

0420050331 (BBC7)
20050401 (BBC7)
20060302 (BBC7)
20060303 (BBC7)
20101202 (BBC7)

From behind bars, the playwright reveals how his ardour for 'Bosie' has cooled somewhat.

Read by Simon Callow.

In his poignant letters from prison, we hear from a man broken by the loss of his love, his wife, and his children.

Wilde is jailed.

His letters reveal how his ardour for 'Bosie' cools, and his concern for his children.

Simon Callow reads.

05 LAST20050401 (BBC7)
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20101203 (BBC7)

The playwright approaches the end of his life: 'I live now on echoes as I have little music of own'.

Read by Simon Callow.

The playwright approaches the end of his life.

'I live now on echoes as I have little music of my own'.

Simon Callow reads from Wilde's late correspondence.

Exiled to France, Wilde's passion for Alfred Douglas remains.

As does the sparkling wit of his correspondence.